Research

Your research can change the world

The IUPUI research community gives you the opportunity to make a difference, both locally and globally. Whether your idea engages a specific academic area or crosses disciplines, like STEM education, arts and humanities, integrated artificial intelligence, data science, and social, political, and life sciences, your idea could be the next big discovery that changes the world.

Recent research news

IU Health University Hospital building

URDC serves as resource for families struggling with rare diseases

Led by Erin Conboy, MD, the Undiagnosed and Rare Disease Clinic (URDC) researchers help families still on the hunt for answers when other doctors have not been able to determine a diagnosis.

Discover the clinic that never gives up
A man in a lab coat taking a sample from a man's arm

IUPUI, Indiana Department of Health enter 3rd phase of COVID-19 testing

Unlike the first two phases, among participants in the Phase 3 study will be randomly-selected children age 5 and older, establishing the first known prevalence rate of COVID-19 in school-age children. The fourth and final phase of the study is planned for April 2021.

Learn more about phase 3's approach
Portrait photo of  Noll Campbell smiling at the camera.

Regenstrief research scientist contributes to study on links between medications and dementia

Noll Campbell, PharmD, M.S., recently contributed to a study that concluded that anticholinergics are associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline regardless of the presence of genetic or biomarker risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease.

Explore Dr. Campbell’s research
Portrait photo of  Rachel Wheeler smiling at the camera.

CV app reflects pandemic’s impact, especially on women

IUPUI's Rachel Wheeler and colleagues Jane Williams, Aaron Ganci, and Rajeev Raje have developed an app called COVID CV, which better reflects the reality of the expanded roles of women in particular during the pandemic.

Read more about the app

Discover the latest research news

The Research Enterprise is a monthly newsletter published by the office of the Vice Chancellor to keep the community informed about the latest creative and research endeavors at IUPUI.

Subscribe to the Research Enterprise

Description of the video:

[Words appear: IUPUI]

[Words appear: Fulfilling the Promise]

[MUSIC]

[Words appear: Brian Dixon, PH.D., Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology]

[Video: Brian stands with his arms crossed next to a window.]

Brian speaks: When I went to school I was thinking that I would be sort of pre-professional, a dentist. Instead I got interested in computer science through some classes that I took and decided to major in that.

 

[Video: Brian sits in front of the camera and speaks.]

Following graduation, I answered a blind ad in the Indianapolis Star that said, “computer programmer wanted.”

[Video: Brian types at his computer.]

Little did I know that that organization that I’d be working for was doing health care information technology research and that really kind of lit the spark in me to pursue this kind of research as my pathway.

[Video: Brian sits in front of the camera and speaks.]

One of the problems that we face today in our health system is that we're trying to improve how we capture data and information electronically, how we manage that information, and then share it or move it electronically to the people and the organizations that need to be aware of what's happening to patients and populations.

[Video: Brian walks down a hallway while talking to a woman.]

So in our current work what we're looking at doing is trying to improve how we capture information about individuals who are diagnosed with an infectious disease.

[Video: Brian sits in front of the camera and speaks.]

And then move that data to public health agencies where the staff at those agencies can better assess the prevalence of the diseases.

[Video: Brian writes at a white board and speaks to a room full of people.]

And then design interventions that would improve the outcomes for the people diagnosed with those diseases. Current research has shown that not all the cases that actually occur in the population get reported to the public health agency. So we're working on a project now, a grant that we want to submit, where in that research we would use machine learning models so more advanced techniques in computer science to try to improve how we detect those cases from the data that flow around inside of our HIE network so that we can identify the positive cases and get that information reported to public health to prevent the spread of those diseases. The research Trailblazer award is a great honor to me, it the award I think is a mark a distinction that recognizes that what I'm doing in my lab or in my research center is not only important to our Center but it's also important to the mission of the University and that's what it means to me to be recognized in that way and it's an honor.

[Words appear: 2018 Trailblazer Award Recipient]

[MUSIC]

[Words appear: Brought to you by IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and BARNES & THORNBURG LLP, btlaw.com]

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Description of the video:

[Words appear: IUPUI]

[Words appear: Fulfilling the Promise]

[MUSIC]

[Words appear: EMPOWER: Enhanced Mentoring Program with Opportunities for Ways to Excel in Research]

[Words appear: What was the highlight of this EMPOWER experience?]

[Words appear: Claire Draucker, Mentor, School of Nursing]

[Video: Claire and Ukamaka sit next to each other in front of the camera.]

Claire speaks: I think what empower really did was help us be think through what we wanted the relationship to be like, how we wanted to structure it, what the outcomes were. So I think that really having that empower experience fairly early on in our relationship really helped enrich the whole mentoring experience.

[MUSIC]

[Words appear: Why did you choose to be mentored by someone in your discipline?]

[Words appear: Ukamaka Oruche, Mentor, School of Nursing]

[Video: Claire and Ukamaka sit next to each other in front of the camera.]

Ukamaka speaks: So I choose to be mentored by someone in my discipline, which is nursing, because not only is it important for the mentor-mentee relationship fit but it was also important that I have someone who could mentor me as a future you know as a nursing academic.

[MUSIC]

[Words appear: How has the EMPOWER mentoring experience helped to position you for success?]

Ukamaka speaks: I think one of the best things that happened that came out of our mentor-mentee relationship as I started to write put much together my dossier was having Claire you know after six, five years of relationship she had enough knowledge to near me enough to be able to look at my packet, especially the personal statement, and say this is you or no this is not you I think that was critical to really producing an impressive dossier for promotion and tenure.

[Words appear: What advice would you give others about making the most of this experience?]

Claire speaks: EMPOWER helped us with this I believe but to really have conversations early on about what both the mentor and the mentee want out of the relationship to be really transparent about that I would say because of this mentoring relationship I have developed a very rich, lifelong relationship with a colleague who I value, very highly.

[MUSIC]

[Words appear: Sponsored by IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and IUPUI Office for Women]

[End of transcript]

 

 

 

 

Description of the video:

[MUSIC]

[Video: a man wearing a blue surgical face mask siting in an office speaking to the camera; the camera transitions to yellow copper coated filters; the camera transitions back to the man who is now speaking to the camera and holding the yellow copper coated filter; the camera transitions to the filter and then transitions back to the man.]

A man speaks: Today I would like to talk about the 3D- printed, copper-coatedfilters for masks. The reason we're interested in this filter is that we're trying to develop a new system that can help fight against the coronavirus.

[Words appear: Jing Zhang, Associate Professor of Mechanical Energy Engineering]

Jing speaks: The whole process actually can be divided into several steps. First step is design. Using software, we can design those small filament structures into this filter.

[Video: A room sign shows Mechatronics and Intelligent Systems Laboratory; and Advanced Materials Laboratory; the camera transitions to Jing and then transitions to a machine that is making the filter by 3D printer; the camera transitions back to Jing and then transitions to the 3D printer which as Anycubic brand name on it.]

Jing speaks: It has the highest possible surface area that allows to exchange the air flowing through the filter. It mimics the fish gill which has very good efficiency for gas transportation. After that, with the CAD file, we can import into 3D printers here. Through 3D printing, actually there are several advantages. For example, we can define different shapes. Here I show two examples. One is a circular shape. The second one is a square shape. And with different shapes, we can actually feed them into some commercial filter cartridges.

[Video: Jing is speaking to the camera while holding a round shape and a square shape filter, and then Jing is demonstrating filter cartridge; the camera transitions to a electroplating coating machine. the camera transitions back to Jing.]

Jing speaks: The third step is the electroplating. We can coat the plastic part with a layer of copper. As we know, copper has the inherent property to inhibit either the bacteria or virus. Additionally, we have a collaborator from the chemistry department. They are developing a molecular dynamic model to simulate how the virus interacts with the environment.

[Video: Jing is speaking to the camera; the camera transitions to 3D printing machane which is printing the filter; the camera transitions to IU Hospital’s sign; the camera transitions to Jing speaking to the camera while holding the filter.]

Jing speaks: We are going to work with IU's School of Medicine. They will actually test the survivability of the virus in this structure so this will give us a much better understanding how these 3D-printed, copper-coated filters can be used to fight against coronavirus.

[Words appear: IU logo]

[Words appear: Indiana University]

[Words appear: research.impact.iu.edu/coronavirus]

[MUSIC]

[End of Transcript] 

Description of the video:

[MUSIC]

[Video: a man is speaking to the camera; the camera transitions to an image of a building; the camera transitions back to the man.]

A man speaks: At Integrated Nano systems Development Institute, me and my colleague Dr. Hamid Dalir are working on making reusable material that can capture and kill the virus.

[Video: while the man is speaking to the camera, words appear the man’s information]

[Words appear: Mangilal Agarwal, Director of the Integrated Nanosystems Development Institute]

[Video: while Mangilal still speaking in the background; the camera transitions to a researcher whom both hands are holding a mask; the camera transitions back to Mangilal; the camera transitions to a research whom both hands are holding a black mask; the camera transitions back to Mangilal.]

Mangilal speaks: Surgical masks can provide you protection with larger particles, but for a virus as small as 100 nanometer, they are not very effective to capture all the airborne virus particles. 

[Video: the camera focus on a microscope and then moving toward to a monitor which is displaying what is under the microscope; the camera transitions to a child who just sneeze with lots droplet; the camera transitions to the droplets turn to virus; the camera transitions to a machine that pulls paper layer; the camera transitions to a picture of Electrospun Nylon – 6.]

Mangilal speaks: To code this layer, we are using electrospinning technique that we have developed here at IUPUI. It is similar to like spray painting. 

[Video: The camera focus on Mangilal; the camera transitions to a machine in a lab.]

[Words appear: Vidya Wable, Graduate Student]

[Video: Vidya stands in front of a white board that has 7 images showing Electrosprayed. Vidya is pointing between images as she speaks; the camera transitions to a machine in the lab; the camera transitions to back to Vidya pointing between images.]

Vidya speaks: These are the nylon nanofibers, and these are the copper nanoparticles. When we electrospin and electrospray both simultaneously, it looks like this. So nylon traps the viruses, and copper kills the viruses.

[Words appear: Pias Kumar Biswas, INDI Research Assistant]

[Video: Pias and another male researcher are holding a mask while Pias speaks in front of camera.]

Pias speaks: Here you can see we have replaced the middle layer of the surgical mask, and we have modified them with our current technology, which is electrospun nylon fiber and electrosprayed copper oxide nanoparticle.

[Video: Camera focus on images on the white board; the camera transitions to the machine in the lab; the camera transitions to Mangilal.]

Mangilal speaks: You can apply this coating on any other substrate, HVAC filters at home or at commercial buildings, and also schools. We are also collaborating with local companies which are working on the Defense Protection Act to manufacture COVID-related PPE. 

[Video: Camera focus on Pias who is with the other male researcher working in the lab with few different machines; the camera transitions to Mangilal

Mangilal speaks IU Commercialization Office has been tremendous help. Since we disclosed this technology to their office, they have helped us to figure out how to start a company, filing the patent last year. 

[Video: a researcher is holding a black mask facing its inside to the camera; the camera transitions to a machine in the lab; the camera transitions to Mangilal.]

Mangilal speaks I think having a unit like ICO can make this happen, to work together, collaborate and succeed.  

[Words appear: IU logo]

[Words appear: Indiana University]

[Words appear: research.impact.iu.edu/coronavirus]

[MUSIC]

[End of Transcript]

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