Research

Your research can change the world

The IUPUI research community gives you the opportunity to make a difference, both locally and globally. Whether your idea engages a specific academic area or crosses disciplines, like STEM education, arts and humanities, integrated artificial intelligence, data science, and social, political, and life sciences, your idea could be the next big discovery that changes the world.

COVID guidance for IU researchers

Research at IUPUI continues in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. The following guidance has been provided for IU researchers:

If you have questions related to the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on research at IUPUI, please contact ovcr@iupui.edu.

Recent research news

Mentors and mentees from EMPOWER program in a meeting.

EMPOWER celebrates 10 years of mentoring success for minority and women faculty

IUPUI's Office for Women and Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research partnered in 2011 to launch the Enhanced Mentoring Program with Opportunities for Ways to Excel in Research (EMPOWER). This program pairs mentors and mentees and provides a structured path for minority and women faculty to achieve personal growth and professional success.

Learn more and apply for the EMPOWER program
An image of Dr. Michael Davis in a clinic with two people dressed in scrubs.

IUSM respiratory therapist answers call to help communities in West Africa

In Indianapolis at the IU School of Medicine, respiratory therapist and clinician scientist Michael D. Davis, RRT, PhD, plays a significant role in ongoing studies related to pulmonary medicine. Over 5,000 miles away from his Indianapolis lab, Davis has another critical role: he works a few months a year in West Africa where he assisted in opening the Liberia Respiratory Care Institute.

Explore Davis’s 10 years of work in Liberia
Portrait of Lata Balakrishnan smiling at the camera.

IUPUI researcher awarded $792,000 grant from American Cancer Society to study DNA repair

Lata Balakrishnan, PhD, an associate professor in the Department of Biology at the School of Science at IUPUI, will use the four-year grant to study the role of DNA replication errors in cancer. "Understanding basic mechanisms in isolation gives us a better understanding of how a mutation either in the DNA or the protein can lead to the progression of diseases,” she said.

Learn how the study will provide valuable insights
CRL award winners. Four awards for students and one award for mentors.

CRL invites nominations for undergraduate research and mentoring awards

The Center for Research and Learning (CRL) at IUPUI is now accepting nominations through February 1, 2022 for several undergraduate research awards – four awards for students and one award for mentors.

Submit a nomination

Discover the latest research news

The Research Enterprise is a monthly newsletter published by the office of the Vice Chancellor to keep the community informed about the latest creative and research endeavors at IUPUI.

Subscribe to the Research Enterprise

Description of the video:

[Beginning Transcript]
[Music]
[Words appear: 2021 Research Frontiers Trailblazer recipients]
[Words appear: IU logo]
[Words appear: IUPUI]
[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THEVICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]

[Words appear: KELLY NAUGLE, PHD, Associate Professor, Kinesiology]
[Video: Nicholas is standing and is smiling at the camera on a hallway.]

Kelly speaking: My name is Kelly Naugle and I am an Associate Professor in the department of kinesiology in the School of Health and Human Sciences.

[Video: the camera transitions to Kelly is speaking to the interviewer; Kelly is walking into the entry door of School of Health & Human Sciences, Kinesiology Research Laboratories, room 110; the camera transitions to Kelly is walking on a hallway; the camera zoom-in to Kelly is speaking to the interviewer.]

Kelly speaking: So my research is about trying to figure out factors that make people vulnerable for developing persistent pain. Those factors may be how we process pain in the central nervous system, but also includes behavioral factors such as our physical activity levels. Such as does being more sedentary, put us more at risk for developing persistent pain down the road.

[Video: the camera transitions to a room tag displaying room 112, Dr. Kelly Naugle; the camera transitions to Kelly is wearing her face mask and working on her workstation; the camera transitions to Kelly is holding a computer mouse; the camera zoom-in to Kelly’s face with face mask on; the camera transitions to Kelly is speaking to the interviewer; the camera zoom-in to Kelly is speaking to the interviewer.]

Kelly speaking: So for the process of research, particularly for one of our studies, we're trying to figure out people with mild traumatic brain injuries, what puts them at more risk, for developing persistent headaches, six months a year down the road.

[Video: the camera transitions to Kelly is interviewing a male; the camera transitions to Kelly is taking temperature of the male; the camera zoom-in to Kelly is speaking to the interviewer; the camera transitions to Kelly is speaking to the interviewer; the camera zoom-in to Kelly is speaking to the interviewer; the camera transitions to Kelly is working in her office on her workstation focusing on the data on the monitors; the camera transitions to Kelly is speaking to the interviewer; the camera zoom-in to Kelly is speaking to the interviewer.]

Kelly speaking: And so in that research process, we recruit research participants from the emergency department. We try to get them into our lab within a week or two of their injury. And we do lots of assessments such as blood draws, brain imaging, we assess behavioral factors, psychological factors. And then we try to get them back a month after their injury and four to six months after their injury. And then we collect all the data and then the next step is to analyze it and try to figure out what you know differentiates those people that go on to have persistent headaches six months after their injury, versus those that don't, they have them for a week and then they get better. So I think the, field of pain research is really important right now, we may have forgotten, but we are still under a opioid epidemic where the current pain medications that are often used are very addictive. And so a big area of research right now is trying to figure out other means to help people when they have pain.

[Video: the camera transitions to Kelly is walking outside of a building on sidewalk; the camera transitions to Kelly is speaking to the interviewer; the camera transitions to Kelly is walking on a sidewalk.]

Kelly speaking: And ours in particular, we're trying to figure out, how can we even prevent it from becoming chronic, so they don't need pain medicine for months or years To be recognized by peers, to me, I mean, that's what really means that you're doing a good job and they that they value your work and that you're doing something right.

[Music]
[Words appear: IU logo]
[Words appear: IUPUI]
[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]
[Words appear: Filmed at the IUPUI Innovation Hall]
[Music]
[End of Transcript]

Description of the video:

[Beginning Transcript]
[Music]
[Words appear: 2021 Research Frontiers Trailblazer recipients]
[Words appear: IU logo]
[Words appear: IUPUI]
[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THEVICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]

[Words appear: NICHOLAS MANICKE, PHD, Associate Professor, Chemistry & Forensic Sciences]
[Video: Nicholas is standing and is smiling at the camera on a hallway.]

Nicholas speaking: My name is Nick Manicke. I'm an associate professor in the department of Chemistry and in the Forensic and Investigative Sciences Program.

[Video: the camera transitions to Nicholas is speaking to the interviewer; the camera then zoom-in to Nicholas’s face.]

Nicholas speaking: My research focuses on analytical chemistry. Analytical chemistry is the science of chemical measurements and chemical measurements touch many different areas of our lives. Most medical diagnoses are based, in some form, on a chemical measurement. Other examples include in forensic science where if someone overdoses on a drug then we have to determine what that drug is and what the concentration is.

[Video: the camera transitions to zoom-out Nicholas who is speaking to the interviewer; the camera then zoom-in to Nicholas’s face.]

Nicholas speaking: Another example is in food safety, for example, where levels or agrichemicals like pesticides have to be tightly controlled to insure that they don't exceed some dangerous level, and another example is in homeland security where we need to detect and determine the presence of any harmful chemistries.]

[Video: the camera transitions to Nicholas is wearing face mask and working on computer data; the camera then transitions to Nicholas’s face; the camera then transitions to Nicholas’s lab environment.]

Nicholas speaking: So I work in all of these different areas where I try to improve chemical measurement science so that we can make better measurements in a faster and easier way. So that we can protect human health and people in general. The research in my group is truly a collaborative effort. Nothing's getting accomplished by me alone.

[Video: the camera transitions to Nicholas is working with a female researcher in the lab; the camera transitions to someone is adjusting focusing of a microscope.]

Nicholas speaking: The first level is with my students and I where we work together closely everyday to generate the results that we need for our research but even our research group, as talented as my students are they can't accomplish everything on their own.

[Video: the camera transitions to Nicholas is speaking to the interviewer; the camera then zoom-in to Nicholas’s face; the camera transitions to the side shot of Nicholas who is wearing a face mask and walking on a hallway; the camera transitions to the front shot of Nicholas who is wearing a face mask and walking on a hallway.]

Nicholas speaking: We've got a number of very important relationships including with the School of Medicine and including with Army research labs where my students work closely with experts in different fields in order to broaden the impact of our research. I hope that over the course of my career I will contribute to progress in use of chemical measurements to make important decisions that help people.

[Video: the camera transitions to Nicholas continue walking on the hallway and is taking his Indiana University ID card out from his front packet; the camera transitions to Nicholas is swiping the card to open the door of a lab label LD 367.]

Nicholas speaking: That we can improve healthcare. We can improve outcomes of people who are sick if we can have better and faster and less expensive measurements in clinical settings.

[Video: the camera transitions to zoom-in on Nicholas’s face; the camera transitions to Nicholas is speaking to the interviewer; the camera transitions to Nicholas is walking on IUPUI’s campus in front of the main library toward Science building.]

Nicholas speaking: We can improve forensic science. We can improve the justice system by making forensic chemistry more accurate and faster and more fair. We can improve the security of civilians abroad and also of our soldiers in the military by improving the chemical measurement of harmful chemistries. So this award, to me, was a very nice validation of the work that my students and I have been doing over the years that we've been here at IUPUI. The graduate students in my group which are both chemistry PHD's students and forensic science masters’ students, those folks have worked enormously hard in the time that I've been here to do some really nice work and so I think this is a great acknowledgement of all the nice work my students have been doing.
[Music]
[Words appear: IU logo]
[Words appear: IUPUI]
[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]
[Words appear: Filmed at the IUPUI Innovation Hall]
[Music]
[End of Transcript]

Description of the video:

[Beginning Transcript]
[Music]
[Words appear: 2021 Research Frontiers Trailblazer recipients]
[Words appear: IU logo]
[Words appear: IUPUI]
[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THEVICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]

[Words appear: BROXTON BIRD, PHD, Associate Professor, Earth Sciences]
[Video: Broxton is standing and is smiling at the camera on a hallway.]

Broxton speaking: My name is Broxton Bird, and I'm an associate professor of Earth Sciences in the department of Earth Sciences here at IUPUI.

[Video: the camera transitions to Broxton is speaking to the interviewer; the camera then zoom-in to Broxton’s face; the camera transitions to Broxton is working on his project in a lab.]

Broxton speaking: My research is focused on answering fundamental questions about how the Earth's climate system functions over time and what the impacts are on humans, as well as ecosystems and what impacts humans have had on the climate and environment. So our research on lakes involves the collection of lake sediments and the subsequent analysis of those here at my lab at IUPUI.

[Video: the camera transitions to Broxton is working on his project in a lab with two other males with face mask on their faces; the camera transitions to Broxton is speaking to the interviewer; the camera transitions to Broxton is working on his project in a lab with two other males with face mask on their faces; the camera then zoom-in to Broxton and one of the male working on the project; the camera transitions to a finger pointing to the project.]

Broxton speaking: So doing this work at IUPUI has been, especially valuable because IUPUI values undergraduate research as well as graduate research. And so, I've had the support of IUPUI to involve undergraduates in my research, which has been tremendous for me and a valuable experience for the undergraduates as well.

[Video: the camera transitions to Broxton is working with a male on his computer pointing to the data on the screen; the camera transitions to another angle of Broxton working on computer with the male; the camera transitions to Broxton is speaking to the interviewer; the camera then zoom-in to Broxton’s face; the camera transitions to Broxton is walking on a hallway wearing a face mask and then walking into a room.]

Broxton speaking: Plus being located here in the Midwest, I live in one of my study sites, and so it makes it extremely personal and also easy to do my research here. We are very interested in how the Midwest has responded to climate in the past and as one of the primary agricultural centers in the United States and the world, how this area is gonna respond to future climate change is important, not just for the people that live here, but really for the global community. So being able to do my work here has allowed me to investigate aspects of climate that I may not have otherwise investigated if I was located somewhere else.

[Video: the camera transitions to Broxton is speaking to the interviewer; the camera then zoom-in to Broxton’s face; the camera transitions to Broxton is walking with two male; the camera transitions to Broxton is speaking to the interviewer; the camera transitions to Broxton is walking with two male.]

Broxton speaking: Receiving the Trailblazer Award has been quite special. It is a valuable recognition of the value of climate change research, and the need to understand our climate system better so that we can hopefully adapt and mitigate future climatic changes. Personally, I've put a lot of effort into my research and so it feels good to be recognized for that, but really, this is part of a group effort. And so I think it's more of a recognition of this line of research and its value for society.

Music]
[Words appear: IU logo]
[Words appear: IUPUI]
[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]
[Words appear: Filmed at the IUPUI Innovation Hall]
[Music]
[End of Transcript]

Description of the video:

[Beginning Transcript]
[Music]
[Words appear: 2021 Research Frontiers Trailblazer recipients]
[Words appear: IU logo]
[Words appear: IUPUI]
[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THEVICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]

[Words appear: WILLIAM R. THOMPSON, PHD, Associate Professor, Physical Therapy]
[Video: William is standing and is smiling at the camera on a hallway.]

William speaking: My name is William Thompson. I'm an associate professor in the department of physical therapy within the School of Health and Human Sciences here at IUPUI.

[Video: the camera transitions to William is speaking to the interviewer; the camera then zoom-in to William’s face; the camera transitions to zoom-out William who is speaking to the interviewer; the camera then zoom-in to William’s face.]

William speaking: My research focuses on understanding how the skeleton responds to exercise. So we've known for a long time that exercise is beneficial for bone and so when you exercise, it makes your bones stronger and the opposite is true if we lead a sedentary lifestyle or we can't exercise because of disability or disease, our bones become weaker and more fragile.

[Video: the camera transitions to a room tag which display William R. Thompson, DPT, PhD Physical Therapy; the camera transitions William is working on computer and focusing on the data on the screens; the camera zoom-in to William’s face and the computer; the camera zoom-out William’s fac; the camera transitions to William is working on his workstation which has three monitors; the camera transitions to William is speaking to the interviewer. ]

William speaking: So my lab is looking specifically at the mechanisms to understand how bone knows that it's being exercised and knows when to respond. And so we use molecular biology techniques and genetically modified mice to target specific molecules that are in that pathway to understand how the bone responds to exercise.

[Video: the camera transitions William is working with a female who wearing glasses in a lab on her workstation; the camera transitions t two monitors. A hand holding a pen pointing data on the screen; the camera zoom-in to the female’s face; the camera transitions William is working with the female the lab.]

William speaking: The long term impact of my research, has really kind of two parts, is first understanding how bone responds to exercise but another piece of my research is looking at a specific drug called Gabapentin.

[video: the camera transitions to William is speaking to the interviewer; the camera then zoom-in to William’s face.]

William speaking: Gabapentin, it was originally designed as an anti-seizure medication, but it's more commonly used as a pain medication now and even though that's good to help with pain, it has negative effects on bone, but nobody really understands why, so we're trying to understand how that influences bone and how we can create strategies to offset those negative effects.

[Video: the camera transitions to William is speaking to the interviewer; the camera transitions to William is working in a lab; the camera transitions to William is wearing lab gloves working on tubing and liquid; the camera transitions to William is speaking to the interviewer;]

William speaking: My research is important, it's important that it's being done because it has a broad impact on society. There are a tremendous number of people who are afflicted with bone conditions and it's particularly difficult because problems with bones, such as osteoporosis, are really unseen. If you have weakness or other conditions, it's sometimes very obvious but bone problems are less obvious.

[Video: the camera transitions to William is working with a female in the lab on a microscope; the camera transitions to William is working on a microscope; the camera transitions to William is speaking to the interviewer; the camera transitions to William is walking on a hallway.]

William speaking: And it's also really important and impactful to society because we live in a world where we're less engaged in having to go out and exercise and do physical work so understanding or creating strategies that can help increase skeletal health, even in a society where we live more sedentary lifestyles is impactful.

[Video: the camera transitions to William is speaking to the interviewer; the camera transitions to William is walking outside of a building on a sidewalk.]

William speaking: Receiving the Trailblazer Award here at IUPUI is extremely meaningful. There's been a number of investigators over the years that I've known personally who've received this and who are mentors to me, and I respect greatly and so, it's a huge honor to be recognized among that group.

[Music]
[Words appear: IU logo]
[Words appear: IUPUI]
[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]
[Words appear: Filmed at the IUPUI Innovation Hall]
[Music]
[End of Transcript]

Centers and institutes

Resources for today’s hot topics

Explore more centers and institutes