Research

Your research can change the world

The IUPUI research community gives you the opportunity to make a difference, both locally and globally. Whether your idea engages a specific academic area or crosses disciplines, like STEM education, arts and humanities, integrated artificial intelligence, data science, and social, political, and life sciences, your idea could be the next big discovery that changes the world.

Recent research news

Xiaowen Liu is explaining proteoform on a white board.

Researcher receives NIH $1.26M grant to explore proteoform identification

For the second time, Xiaowen Liu, PhD, associate professor of bioinformatics at IUPUI, has received a prestigious R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), this time a 4-year, $1.26M award for his project entitled, "Computational tools for proteoform identification by top-down data independent acquisition mass spectrometry." This project is expected to yield the first open source software suite for high-throughput, top-down DIA-MS data analysis.

Read more about this exciting research award
Portrait of Matthew R. Allen(left) and Brownsyne Tucker Edmonds smiling at the camera.

Mentored researchers lead program to facilitate workforce development

Brownsyne Tucker Edmonds, MD, and Matt Allen, PhD, are the new co-directors of the Indiana CTSI Career Development, Education and Research Training (CERT) program. As they work together to lead the CERT program, they say they are looking forward to building on the success of the past, while also looking for new ways to grow.

Discover more about this important mentoring program
Portrait of Francesco Cafaro smiling at the camera.

IUPUI researchers find common errors made when sharing COVID-19 data visualizations on Twitter

"Experts have not yet begun to explore the world of casual visualizations on Twitter," said Francesco Cafaro, an assistant professor of human-computer interaction in the School of Informatics and Computing, who led the study. "Studying the new ways people are sharing information online to understand the pandemic and its effect on their lives is an important step in navigating these uncharted waters."

Explore this study and the five common errors
Portrait of Cierra Milton(left) and Sally Wasmuth smiling at the camera.

IUPUI team tackles diversity within occupational therapy

IUPUI's Sally Wasmuth is leading a team whose aim is to change the landscape of occupational therapy, and in doing so, diversify healthcare in the United States. "We use theater to reduce implicit biases people have toward marginalized groups, but we also incorporate important educational components, like how to provide affirming care or reduce behaviors rooted in stigma," Wasmuth said.

Delve further into this diversifying OT project

Discover the latest research news

The Research Enterprise is a monthly newsletter published by the office of the Vice Chancellor to keep the community informed about the latest creative and research endeavors at IUPUI.

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Description of the video:

[Music]

[Words appear: IU logo]

[Words appear: IUPUI]

[Words appear: 2020 Research Frontiers Trailblazer recipient]

[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THEVICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]

 

[Words appear: Christine Picard, PHD, Associate Professor, Biology]

[Video: Christine is standing is smiling at the camera.]

Christine speaking: So my research looks at investigating the correlation between insects and some of the behaviors they exhibit.

[Video: the camera transitions to Christine is sitting and speaking in the interview.]

Christine speaking: And so we do that by looking at the DNA level. And we're interested in applying that to a couple of different areas.

[Video: the camera transitions to Christine is talking to a black female student in a lab. Both are wearing their face masks.]

Christine speaking: One area in particular is trying to understand in a forensic context, how quickly or how slowly an insect develops.

[Video: the camera transitions to a container which has many live flies.]

Christine speaking: And that can be useful for estimating a post-mortem interval, for example.

[Video: the camera transitions to Christine is sitting and speaking in the interview.]

Christine speaking: So it has a big forensic application.

[Video: the camera transitions to Christine is speaking to a white female student working on her computer in the lab.]

Christine speaking: Another area that we're interested in is insects as feed and food.

[Video: the camera transitions to the computer screen that Christine and the white female student are working on with data displaying on the screen.]

Christine speaking: It's a sustainable agricultural product.

[Video: the camera transitions to Christine is speaking to the white female student with a closer picture shot; the camera transitions to Christine is sitting and speaking in the interview.]

Christine speaking: It is the future of food, likely, and so we are interested in trying to understand how these insects develop and how we can optimize that to make it even better of a system.

[Video: the camera transitions to Christine is speaking to the white female student working in the lab.]

Christine speaking: Every day when I speak with my students, and I hear about new things that they've discovered, it just gives me another boost to just keep going.

[Video: the camera transitions to the student is work on putting testing material into a test tube; the camera transitions to a box that contains many flies’ specimen; the camera transitions to Christine is looking into a microscope and the student is standing on the side.]

Christine speaking: And so I think that I'm trying to continue to discover new things and to learn something, which is what I've wanted to do all along. Is I just want to learn something new every day, and I'm lucky that I get to do that.

[Video: the camera transitions to Christine is sitting and speaking in the interview.]

Christine speaking: Having an impact on society as a whole would be the ultimate goal for any researcher.

[Video: the camera transitions to Christine is walking on a hallway. The camera is recording from the back; the camera transitions to Christine is walking on a hallway toward her lab with face mask. The camera is recording from the front.]

Christine speaking: And, whether it's the forensic science work that I do, which would have an impact on victims and other people associated with the criminal justice system, to the insects as feed and food, which will allow us to feed the growing population in this era of climate change. And so I think that's how you gauge success is how that impacts society as a whole.

 

[Words appear: IU logo]

[Words appear: IUPUI]

[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]

[Words appear: Filmed at the IUPUI Faculty Crossing]

[Music]

[End of Transcript]

Description of the video:

[Music]

[Words appear: IU logo]

[Words appear: IUPUI]

[Words appear: Fulfilling the Promise]

[Words appear: EMPOWER]

[Words appear: Enhanced Mentoring Program with Opportunities for Ways to Excel in Research]

 

[Music]

[Words appear: What has been your primary challenge as a mentee?]

[Words appear: IUPUI, Joseph Tucker Edmonds, Mentee, Africana & Religious Studies]

[Video: Joseph is sitting with other two males; the camera transitions from Joseph is sitting with other two males to only Joseph.]

Joseph speaking: As a minority researcher I think that the main challenge that I faced in terms of mentoring and in terms of developing a research portfolio we are actually finding mentors who were interested in willing to engage you on the topic and so finding mentors that had the expertise the time and the resources to really draw you into their orbit and to share their lessons with you so that you could be successful during your tenure track.

 

[Music]

[Words appear: How has this experience positioned you to overcome these challenges?]

[Video: The camera transitions back to Joseph and other two males. One of two males are sitting with Joseph is now speaking. The male’s name later identifies as Cullen Merritt.]

[Words appear: IUPUI, Cullen Merritt, Mentee, School of Public & Environmental Affairs]

Cullen speaking: Phil has made numerous connections between me and other individuals within the university that I have benefited from and so that mentorship really becomes a community of mentors and I think that is at the forefront of higher education.

[Video: The camera transitions from Cullen is sitting with Joseph and the other male to Cullen only.]

Cullen speaking: if you want to advance if you want to be successful you have to find a community of mentors and not just a single person.

 

[Music]

[Words appear: What was your biggest surprise about the EMPOWER program and how have you benefited from working with both mentees?]

[Video: the third male now is speaking and later identifies as Philip Goff; the camera transitions from Philip is sitting Cullen and Joseph to only Philip; the camera transitions from only Philip to Philip, Cullen and Joseph sitting together.]

[Words appear: IUPUI, Philip Goff, Mentor, American & Religious Studies]

Philip speaking: You know academics we tend to be introverted and when you get a letter from the vice-chancellor saying we'd like you to meet one-on-one for a year with someone you don't know that well or someone you've never met before you know your throat seizes up like oh my god what but then the first time you sit down it becomes very quickly not just a professional conversation but a personal sharing and friendship of ideas.

[Video: The camera transitions from Philip is sitting Cullen and Joseph to only Philip; The camera transitions from only Philip to Philip, Cullen and Joseph sitting together.]

Philip speaking: because basically I ripped off these guys ideas all the time - they came in with new ideas new ways of thinking about things and sometimes they'd walk out and I think why didn't I ever do that I'm gonna start doing that so it's as a mentor you need to be ready to grow as well because you will.

 

[Music]

[Words appear: IU logo]

[Words appear:Sponpored by]

[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]

[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE FOR WOMEN]

[Music]

[End of Transcript]

Description of the video:

[Music]

[Words appear: IU logo]

[Words appear: IUPUI]

[Words appear: 2020 Research Frontiers Trailblazer recipient]

[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THEVICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]

 

[Words appear: Jeremey Carter, PHD, Director of Criminal Justice and Public Safety]

[Video: Jeremey is standing in a lobby, and is smiling at the camera.]

Jeremey speaking: My research put simply involves creating evidence-based strategies for policing and criminal justice more broadly.

[Video: the camera transitions to Jeremey is sitting and speaking in the interview.]

Jeremey speaking: And most recently I've been involved with doing spatial temporal data modeling. 

[Video: the camera transitions to the camera is recording Jeremey from the side.]

Jeremey speaking: Especially how can we take data in  space and time and use it to help anticipate where problems and challenges are going to be in our community? 

[Video: the camera transitions to Jeremey is sitting in a cubic in a lobby and working on his computer.]

Jeremey speaking: So hopefully we can develop effective interventions. 

[Video: the camera transitions to the camera is recording Jeremey from the side.]

Jeremey speaking: So they're, evidence-based.  When you work with the police department, what you do can impact everyone that lives in that city. 

[Video: the camera transitions to Jeremey is focusing on working on his computer; the camera transitions to Jeremey is sitting and speaking in the interview.]

Jeremey speaking: But most importantly, what we're looking for are, are we making an impact in those communities that that most needed? And so when we talk about the intersections of service delivery of access to good quality of life outcomes. 

[Video: the camera transitions to Jeremey is working on his workstation with his laptop and two monitors.]

Jeremey speaking: When we talk about systematic racism. And we talk about social unrest around social issues, all those things coincide in different parts of the city.  

[Video: the camera transitions to Jeremey is sitting and speaking in the interview; the camera transitions to Jeremey is walking on a hallway.]

Jeremey speaking: And  so what we're trying to do is really figure out where in the city can we have the biggest  impact on people's lives and that's through using the data on those metrics to inform what we do and why we do.

 

[Words appear: IU logo]

[Words appear: IUPUI]

[Words appear: IUPUI, OFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH]

[Words appear: Filmed at the IUPUI Faculty Crossing]

[Music]

[End of Transcript]

Description of the video:

[MUSIC]

[Video: a man is speaking to the camera; the camera transitions to an image of a building; the camera transitions back to the man.]

A man speaks: At Integrated Nano systems Development Institute, me and my colleague Dr. Hamid Dalir are working on making reusable material that can capture and kill the virus.

[Video: while the man is speaking to the camera, words appear the man’s information]

[Words appear: Mangilal Agarwal, Director of the Integrated Nanosystems Development Institute]

[Video: while Mangilal still speaking in the background; the camera transitions to a researcher whom both hands are holding a mask; the camera transitions back to Mangilal; the camera transitions to a research whom both hands are holding a black mask; the camera transitions back to Mangilal.]

Mangilal speaks: Surgical masks can provide you protection with larger particles, but for a virus as small as 100 nanometer, they are not very effective to capture all the airborne virus particles. 

[Video: the camera focus on a microscope and then moving toward to a monitor which is displaying what is under the microscope; the camera transitions to a child who just sneeze with lots droplet; the camera transitions to the droplets turn to virus; the camera transitions to a machine that pulls paper layer; the camera transitions to a picture of Electrospun Nylon – 6.]

Mangilal speaks: To code this layer, we are using electrospinning technique that we have developed here at IUPUI. It is similar to like spray painting. 

[Video: The camera focus on Mangilal; the camera transitions to a machine in a lab.]

[Words appear: Vidya Wable, Graduate Student]

[Video: Vidya stands in front of a white board that has 7 images showing Electrosprayed. Vidya is pointing between images as she speaks; the camera transitions to a machine in the lab; the camera transitions to back to Vidya pointing between images.]

Vidya speaks: These are the nylon nanofibers, and these are the copper nanoparticles. When we electrospin and electrospray both simultaneously, it looks like this. So nylon traps the viruses, and copper kills the viruses.

[Words appear: Pias Kumar Biswas, INDI Research Assistant]

[Video: Pias and another male researcher are holding a mask while Pias speaks in front of camera.]

Pias speaks: Here you can see we have replaced the middle layer of the surgical mask, and we have modified them with our current technology, which is electrospun nylon fiber and electrosprayed copper oxide nanoparticle.

[Video: Camera focus on images on the white board; the camera transitions to the machine in the lab; the camera transitions to Mangilal.]

Mangilal speaks: You can apply this coating on any other substrate, HVAC filters at home or at commercial buildings, and also schools. We are also collaborating with local companies which are working on the Defense Protection Act to manufacture COVID-related PPE. 

[Video: Camera focus on Pias who is with the other male researcher working in the lab with few different machines; the camera transitions to Mangilal

Mangilal speaks IU Commercialization Office has been tremendous help. Since we disclosed this technology to their office, they have helped us to figure out how to start a company, filing the patent last year. 

[Video: a researcher is holding a black mask facing its inside to the camera; the camera transitions to a machine in the lab; the camera transitions to Mangilal.]

Mangilal speaks I think having a unit like ICO can make this happen, to work together, collaborate and succeed.  

[Words appear: IU logo]

[Words appear: Indiana University]

[Words appear: research.impact.iu.edu/coronavirus]

[MUSIC]

[End of Transcript]

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