Hilary Kahn to lead Office of International Affairs at IUPUI

INDIANAPOLIS — Hilary E. Kahn has been named IUPUI associate vice chancellor for international affairs as well as associate vice president for international affairs at Indiana University effective Sept. 1, subject to approval by the IU Board of Trustees. In addition, Kahn will serve on the faculty in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Kahn currently serves as assistant dean for international education and global initiatives and as the director of the Center for the Study of Global Change in the Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies at IU Bloomington.

Hilary E. Kahn

Leading the campus’s efforts to internationalize curricula and enacting an internationalization plan will be at the top of Kahn’s priority list when she arrives in the IUPUI Office of International Affairs. Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer Kathy E. Johnson said Kahn’s expertise, research and leadership in international education will be an asset to the future of international programs at IUPUI.

“Dr. Kahn has cultivated an impressive national reputation associated with her knowledge, leadership and advocacy for international education. At the same time, she has demonstrated her capacity for being an effective, transparent, collaborative and approachable colleague across roles held on the Bloomington and IUPUI campuses,” Johnson said. “I’m confident she will be well prepared to make rapid progress when she joins us this fall.”

In this new role, Kahn will serve as a member of the Council of Deans, the Academic Deans group and the Forum Council at IUPUI. She will also be a member of the leadership team in the IU Office of the Vice President for International Affairs.

“I am delighted to have been selected to serve IUPUI and take its global identity to even greater heights,” Kahn said. “Building on what is already a strong foundation for international education, I look forward to working across campus and with other stakeholders to advance opportunities for internationalized learning, research, partnerships, and student and scholar mobility.”

Kahn is the immediate past president and an executive board member of the Association of International Education Administrators, and she serves on the advisory board for the Diversity & Democracy publication and on the global learning advisory council for the Association of American Colleges and Universities. She is the author of multiple articles and chapters, as well as three books.

Kahn received her master’s and doctoral degrees in anthropology from the University of Buffalo and her bachelor’s degree in anthropology from IU Bloomington.

Read the original story from IUPUI News

Charles Goodlett, Elizabeth Kryder-Reid Appointed Chancellor’s Professors At IUPUI

From left: Chancellor's Professors Charles Goodlett and Elizabeth Kryder-Reid. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
From left: Chancellor’s Professors Charles Goodlett and Elizabeth Kryder-Reid. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar has appointed Charles Goodlett, a professor in the School of Science, and Elizabeth Kryder-Reid, a professor in the School of Liberal Arts, as prestigious Chancellor’s Professors.

The Chancellor’s Professorship is the most distinguished appointment a faculty member can attain at IUPUI, recognizing extensive records of accomplishment and leadership in teaching, research and service. These senior faculty members retain the title throughout their appointments at IUPUI and comprise a special group of mentors and advisors for colleagues.

“Professor Goodlett and professor Kryder-Reid have dedicated themselves to outstanding research and education at IUPUI, serving as mentors, teachers and scholars for more than 20 years,” Paydar said. “Their appointments as Chancellor’s Professors honor all that they have done to enhance students’ educational experiences, to contribute to the vibrant intellectual community on our campus, and to support the advancements of their disciplines more broadly.”

Chancellor’s Professors are faculty who have demonstrated excellence in their support of IUPUI as an academic community of exceptional quality and integrity and have distinguished themselves in their disciplines through the creation and application of knowledge. Through their leadership and service in their departments, in their schools and across campus, they have reinforced and advanced IUPUI’s mission and vision.

Charles Goodlett
Goodlett, who arrived at IUPUI in 1993, is a professor in the Addiction Neuroscience program in the Department of Psychology in the School of Science.

Much of his research over the last quarter-century has focused on the effects of alcohol on the developing brain using quantitative neuroanatomy and behavioral methods in animal models of human fetal exposure. His work has shown that prenatal alcohol-induced brain damage and subsequent impairments in learning are directly related to blood alcohol content, with binge-like patterns of consumption proving especially damaging to the developing brain. His work showed that during early development of one important region of the brain, the cerebellum, there are relatively well-defined periods of enhanced vulnerability to damage from binge alcohol exposure.

Goodlett is continuing to research neurodevelopment disorders in a collaborative project with Randall Roper studying a mouse model of Down syndrome, while also fueling his passions for mentoring and teaching.

“Service to the campus is what I really value right now; I have dedicated a lot of time in the last five years working on faculty issues through faculty governance,” said Goodlett, who has also served for many years on the IUPUI Research Affairs Committee, including being chairperson in 2008-10. “Mentoring junior faculty is a concern of mine — making sure they’re given the right support and that they are able to navigate the academic landscape to achieve the full potential of their career trajectory.

“We have a very strong neuroscience undergraduate program, and one of the things that we are working on — that I’m taking a bit of a lead on — is developing a capstone research laboratory course that will allow students to gain experience in independent, hypothesis-driven behavioral neuroscience research.

“Being appointed as a Chancellor’s Professor motivates me even more to be a good academic citizen. It encourages me to continue and expand my efforts.”

Elizabeth Kryder-Reid
When Kryder-Reid, a professor of anthropology and museum studies in the School of Liberal Arts, arrived on campus in 1998, museum studies was only an undergraduate certificate program, and when a computer with a student roster was inadvertently sent to university surplus, she had to track down the 11 certificate students individually.

Today, thanks in large part to Kryder-Reid’s leadership as director from 1998-2013, the IUPUI museum studies program is one of the largest in the country, with undergraduate and graduate offerings and a number of dedicated museum studies faculty that few other schools can match.

Kryder-Reid is currently director of the Cultural Heritage Research Center. Her research explores how people appropriate the tangible and intangible remnants of the past and mobilize them in social relationships.

“I’ve always been drawn to questions about the connections of past and present — how we remember the past and represent it in the material forms of public history sites and landscapes as well as museum collections and exhibits,” she said. “The compelling part is trying to understand not just the stories we tell, but why we tell them and how they relate to our contemporary relationships.”

Last month, her book “California Mission Landscapes: Race, Memory, and the Politics of Heritage” won the 2019 Elisabeth Blair MacDougall Book Award from the Society of Architectural Historians, which recognizes the most distinguished work of scholarship in the history of landscape architecture or garden design. The book, published in 2016 by University of Minnesota Press, has enjoyed widespread acclaim with awards from groups in landscape studies, history and landscape architecture history.

“I thanked my students in the foreword to that book. Conversations in class about the missions, about these broader questions of narratives, memory, race and politics, as well as about museums and anthropology sites, shaped my thinking about the mission landscapes,” Kryder-Reid said. “Teaching and scholarship are integrally related; each one informs the other.”

Kryder-Reid’s current work includes an environmental justice project, part of a broader international collaboration with the Humanities Action Lab that will include an exhibit coming to Indianapolis’ Central Library next January and public programs developed by IUPUI students.

“I know some of the people from the School of Liberal Arts who have served as Chancellor’s Professors and have admired the way they have crafted their careers to produce important scholarship and be amazing teachers while serving the campus,” Kryder-Reid said. “I’m honored to work in their company.”

Read the original story from IUPUI News’ John Schwarb 

Opening Eyes: Students Learn About Neighborhoods That Predated IUPUI

Anthropology professor Paul Mullins leads the new Digital History and Community Change in Indianapolis class in University Library. The course explores the history of neighborhoods that existed where IUPUI is today. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University
Anthropology professor Paul Mullins leads the new Digital History and Community Change in Indianapolis class in University Library. The course explores the history of neighborhoods that existed where IUPUI is today. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

Alysa Meyer’s sobering research project began with a 1978 article about an Indianapolis man found drowned in Fall Creek.

The tragedy and the life of Dr. George Watkins was part of the new Digital History and Community Change in Indianapolis class, which focuses on the histories of racial displacement and urban transformation along Indianapolis’ downtown canal in commemoration of the IUPUI 50th Anniversary and Indiana University Bicentennial. The class explores the rich history of the Indiana Avenue Cultural District and the nearby Ransom Place neighborhood as well as the contentious displacement and gentrification that occurred when IUPUI was established in 1969.

Meyer and research partner Kyle Turner dug up what they could with the random address they were assigned: 402 W. Vermont St. Watkins’ home also held his practice, once standing where parking lots are now paved near Inlow Hall.

As their research will soon be published online, Turner and Meyer were guest presenters at the April 12 Butler Undergraduate Research Conference. Their findings shocked their peers from other Indiana institutions. Though Meyer grew up in Indianapolis, she, too, was unfamiliar with the history of the area before the university, which included Watkins’ sad story.

This house that once stood at 402 California St. belonged to Dr. George Watkins. It was located where parking lots for Inlow Hall and the Science and Engineering Laboratory Building now exist. Photo courtesy of Indiana Landmarks Central Canal and IUPUI Image Collection

“He was very involved in the community and worked a lot with the YMCA,” said Meyer, a biology senior with an anthropology minor, of Watkins. “We found articles that said he would often give his chiropractic services for free in a way to give back to the community. In his later years, he would wander around the old neighborhood, searching for his house, according to another article. It was thought he had developed Alzheimer’s.”

The Digital History and Community Change in Indianapolis course is led by the team of Andrea Copeland, associate professor of library and information science; library and information science lecturer Kisha Tandy; and anthropology professor Paul Mullins, whose 2009 book, “The Price for Progress,” pays tribute to the neighborhoods that once bustled before IUPUI’s establishment. The final projects are being managed with the help of Herron Art Library digital services specialist Danita Davis and librarian Sonja Staum, who is also the director of the Herron Art Library.

The class of 17 undergraduate and graduate students majoring in science, museum studies, library science and public history utilized digitized newspapers, databases, old city directories, and Sanborn insurance maps from the late 1800s and early 1900s to monitor what kind of homes, businesses and landmarks once stood where IUPUI is today.

Museum studies graduate student Hannah Lundell had no idea of the history that was once literally beneath her feet as she prepared for her class, which takes place in University Library.

“It’s been a consensus with the class that a lot of people weren’t fully aware of the extent of the neighborhood that used to exist here,” said Lundell, a Florida native. “But we’ve been able to talk to former residents, which is rare when working in archives and piecing together stories.”

‘Study our city’

As the student projects are nearing completion, the research is being uploaded into a digital map from 1908. Users will be able to scroll along the map and click on the houses to learn more about the structures and the families who once inhabited them. Some of the content was acquired in collaboration with Indiana Landmarks.

A Civil War-era mansion once stood at 538 W. New York St., near where Inlow Hall is today. Photo courtesy of Indiana Landmarks Central Canal and IUPUI Image Collection
A Civil War-era mansion once stood at 538 W. New York St., near where Inlow Hall is today. Photo courtesy of Indiana Landmarks Central Canal and IUPUI Image Collection

Copeland said her students have learned about an early, hyper-local example of gentrification and displacement, which occurs in cities all over the country. These final projects give needed history, images and data to one of the most historically underrepresented parts of Indianapolis.

Copeland hopes the class will help pave the way for an Indianapolis history minor, specialization or certificate at IUPUI.

“There is a need to study our city,” she explained. “We don’t have a permanent course with the word ‘Indianapolis’ in it. Geography, history, social issues, current events, economics in our city — it’s all intertwined.”

Dr. Watkins’ story to live on

Meyer and Turner’s work filled in not only Watkins’ story, but that of his neighborhood.

“I think this is really eye-opening for a lot of people because I don’t think they realized this was happening,” Meyer said. “I think it’s a good way to teach people about displacement. You get to read about people’s lives and who it affected.”

Since publishing his book, co-authored with Glenn White, Mullins gets calls and messages from relatives of former area residents who are curious about their former homes. He hopes his class’s digital research project will answer questions for those relatives as well as for Hoosier historians.

“In general, we are interested in putting as much of this history as possible in an accessible, digital place,” Mullins said. “We’re building like genealogists would. We have so much digitized. Now, it’s about helping people understand how to use it and what they can do with it.”

Read the original story from IUPUI NewsTim Brouk 

Film Screening of Faat-Kiné

Come join us to watch the film, FAAT KINÉ (Senegal 2001)! Ousmane Sembene, the father of African cinema, calls his fellow Africans to a reckoning of the post-independence era at the beginning of a new century. FAAT KINÉ tells the story of the title character (Venus Seye), a gas-station manager in present-day Senegal, who has climbed the ladder of success in a male-dominated society after enduring numerous betrayals by men she trusted. A masterful portrait of the changing roles of women in Senegalese society, Sembene’s film is a poignant reminder that Africa will not be liberated from its colonial past without a concomitant liberation of African women.
This event is presented by the IUPUI Committee on African Studies (CAS)
Thursday April 25th, 6-8pm
Lilly Auditorium University Library 
We’ll see you there!

Run Toward Fear: Education & Art as Cultural Sites of Resistance

A Diversity Speaker Event Featuring Haki R. Madhubuti; a poet, professor, and publisher. A Leading poet and one of the architects in the Black Arts Movement, Haki R. Madhubuti has been a pivotal figure in the development of independent Black Institutions and a strong black literary and intellectual tradition. He is one of the world’s best-selling authors of poetry and nonfiction. In this public lecture, Prof. Madhubuti will address challenges and opportunities confronting us in our current historical moment, He will speak on the importance of developing critical stances in matters of culture, agency, social justice, equity and community.

Friday April 19th
2-3:30pm
Lilly Auditorium
UniversityLibrary
755W.MichiganAve

This event is free and open to the public! We’ll see you there!

Reading at the Table with Dr. Wendy Vogt

Dr. Wendy Vogt

Reading at the table will be presented by Wendy Vogt. Wendy Vogt, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of anthropology at IUPUI. In 2012, she received her doctorate from the School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Her research interests include politically engaged anthropology., migration, transit journeys, violence, political economy, human rights and transnational feminism. She teaches courses on Cultural Anthropology, Race & Ethnicity, Gender & Sexuality, Migration, Ethnographic Methods, Anthropological Theory, Applied Anthropology and International Studies.

Lives in Transit chronicles the dangerous journeys of Central American migrants in transit through Mexico. Drawing on fieldwork in humanitarian aid shelters and other key sites, the book examines the multiple forms of violence that migrants experience as their bodies, labor, and lives become implicated in global and local economies that profit from their mobility as racialized and gendered others. At the same time, it reveals new forms of intimacy, solidarity and activism that have emerged along transit routes over the past decade. Through the stories of migrants, shelter workers and local residents, Vogt encourages us to reimagine transit as both a site of violence and precarity as well as social struggle and resistance.

Please register in advance

Call in reservations are welcome at 317-274-7014

Buffet Lunch: $13
(Desert and soft drinks not included)

Tuesday April 9th, 2019
11:30am-1pm
UniversityClub Rm200
875W.NorthSt.
Indianapolis, IN 46202

IUPUI Liberal Arts Faculty, Students Assist in Repatriation of Massive Artifact Collection

U.S. Department of State’s Aleisha Woodward, center, and National Cultural Heritage Administration of China Deputy Administrator Hu Bing, to her left, inspect ancient Chinese artifacts after a repatriation ceremony in Indianapolis on Feb. 28. Photo by James Brosher, Indiana University

A most unusual ceremony played out Feb. 28 at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in downtown Indianapolis, as members of China’s national cultural heritage administration and U.S. embassy gathered alongside FBI agents and officials from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Department of State.

On the side of the meeting room sat a few of the 361 artifacts — some thousands of years old — that were once in an Indiana man’s residence but were soon to return home to China after this repatriation ceremony of unparalleled magnitude in the history of the FBI’s Art Crime Team, a rapid-deployment team of 16 special agents from around the country who have specialized training and expertise in fine arts, antiquities and cultural property.

The ceremony drew worldwide attention, with a number of Chinese news crews on hand to document the handoff.

Associate professor Holly Cusack-McVeigh, center, was joined by students Rebekah Ryan, Emily Hanawalt, Liz Ale, Rebecca Jacobs and Brianna Jackson, from left, at the repatriation ceremony. Photo by James Brosher, Indiana University

And sprinkled among the crowd were students and faculty from the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, seeing the fruits of their labor — with more work still to be done.

“It was such immediate gratification to see the look on the delegates’ faces as they opened those objects that we’ve been delicately preparing for years,” said Liz Ale, a second-year museum studies graduate student.

In the fall of 2013, when FBI agents had just begun to uncover the bizarre story of Donald Miller’s home artifact collection, one of their first calls was to IUPUI associate professor of anthropology and museum studies Holly Cusack-McVeigh.

Could she help shed light on the magnitude of the collection? And could she mobilize a group that could move these delicate pieces with dignity and safety?

“On April 1, 2014, we had over two dozen current or former students from anthropology and museum studies on-site helping FBI agents,” Cusack-McVeigh recalled. “It was absolutely astounding to see a collection of this global scale.”

In conjunction with the authorities, Cusack-McVeigh and her IUPUI contingent began the process of moving items and then cleaning and identifying them off-site. The collection was museum-like in its size (42,000 pieces) and scope, but questions about where the items came from and their legality — headlines in the United States centered around the human remains of over 500 individuals, mostly Native Americans — weren’t easily answered.

But with the help of IUPUI’s team, hundreds of pieces are returning to their rightful homes. Two years ago, some 70 items were repatriated to the Peruvian government at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. Now, Chinese officials are taking home priceless pieces.

“This repatriation ceremony is important because of our current political climate and because our Chinese counterparts care deeply about their cultural heritage,” Cusack-McVeigh said. “The members of both delegations are working together because we care about these issues and recognize the value to the country of origin.”

And the work isn’t even close to complete. The IUPUI students are helping to package the Chinese artifacts for shipping across the globe, and then they’ll continue examining, cleaning, identifying and packaging thousands more for delivery to other countries and to Native American tribes in the U.S. in what amounts to amazing on-the-job training in anthropology and museum studies.

“This has been a one-of-a-kind opportunity for my students to take what they’re learning in the classroom and apply it to the real world, but also to apply it to something that is very relevant, very current and incredibly meaningful,” Cusack-McVeigh said. “This is as much a human rights issue as anything, and that is what my students are learning both in the classroom and here, as they work countless hours to help get all of these objects back where they belong.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ John Schwarb

5 Tips for Landing an Internship

For those of you trying to plan ahead for internships, here are tips from our expert career advisors about how to land the job.

Start early and talk to your career advisor

The IUPUI campus has many resources to help with each step in landing an internship. Intern fairs are a great way to search for opportunities, establish connections and get your name out there. Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Don’t wait to look for an internship. It’s common for businesses to search for summer interns as early as the fall semester. Students who wait until spring to look for a summer internship might have trouble getting a position because many opportunities will be filled.

It’s also smart to begin the internship search by visiting your career advisor. They can help you consider what you want to do with your degree, guide you to templates for your resume and cover letters, review your resume and cover letters, help you with networking, do a mock interview with you, notify you about career fairs, and more.

Search for opportunities

First, check to see if your school has a database or another kind of internship listing for your major. For students in the School of Liberal Arts, there’s a database available to get help with many things involving your career. JagJobsIndiana INTERNnet and Ascend Indiana are a few sites that are specifically intended for students looking for internships. Google and LinkedIn are also options, and of course you can just go directly to a company’s website to see if it’s hiring.

Career and intern fairs are a great way to find opportunities and get your name out there. When attending career events, informational interviews or job-shadowing opportunities, make sure to dress professionally, come with questions and bring your resume. Also, make sure to follow up with the people you met.

Once you have a list of internships you’d like to apply for, prioritize them. Don’t apply for every position that sounds interesting — but don’t apply for just one or two either, in case those companies don’t get back to you.

Use your connections

Connections give you an advantage in the workforce. Not only can they suggest people you haven’t heard of, but they could also help you get in the door for that first interview. Those who are close to you know how you work and will likely enjoy helping where they can. Ask your advisors, professors or peers for potential connections. In addition, your parents — or your friends’ parents — might know people who could help you make connections.

Research professionals in your field and reach out to them to see if they’ll talk with you. Other ways to make connections are attending career fairs, joining LinkedIn, scheduling informational interviews and job-shadowing opportunities, attending company presentations, and talking with guest speakers in your classes.

Once again, don’t forget to follow up and send a thank-you email or note to people who took any time to help you.

Prepare your resume and cover letter

Every industry has different expectations.

Your resume needs to be descriptive and show measurable outcomes about your work experiences, accomplishments, scholarships and skill sets. It should not be more than one page. Also, unless your GPA is close to a 4.0, don’t put it on there.

Your cover letter must be tailored specifically to the internship you’re applying for — do not create a general one you send out to everyone. Briefly include what you know about the company, why you want to work there and how your skills match the needs listed in the job description. When you’re done, have professors, advisors, your career development office, parents and friends proofread the documents.

Finally, identify and ask three people you know to be references. Make sure you tell them in advance when they might be receiving a phone call or email from potential employers.

Prepare for the interview

Dress to impress for your interview, complete with professional clothing and a well-groomed appearance. Stay away from strong perfume/cologne and distracting jewelry. Also, find out beforehand exactly where the interview is, how long it takes to get there and where to park to avoid any chance of being late.

Nail down your elevator pitch and rehearse your answers to typical interview questions before the big day, and request a mock interview with your career advisor or a professor.

Lastly, never forget to follow up within 24 hours by sending a thank-you email or handwritten note. It should reiterate your interest, state something you learned or appreciated, and thank them for their time.

Read the original story from IUPUI News’ Ashlynnn Neumeyer

Liberal Arts Talks: Public Art, Monuments, and Civic Life by Modupe Labode

In 2011, a nonprofit agency responded to protest and cancelled artist Fred Wilson’s project to create a work of public art for the Indianapolis Cultural Trail. The proposed work, E Pluribus Unum, referenced the figure of an African American man on the Indiana Soldiers and Soldiers Monument. This case is a point of departure to consider the role of public art, monuments, race, and history in civic life.

Please RSVP here to attend.

FAQs
How much does this event cost and can I attend?
This event is free and open to the public.

What are my parking options for the event?
Please visit the following link for hourly rates, a visitor parking map, and garages on IUPUI’s campus: https://parking.iupui.edu/pages/park/visitors/visitors.asp
*Note: Closest visitor parking garage to the Campus Center is Vermont St Parking Garage (XB).