For the record: IUPUI Talks Favorite Albums In Time for Record Store Day

From connecting with family members to influencing their research at IUPUI, music has played an important part in the lives of IUPUI staff and faculty members.

With Record Store Day sweeping into Indianapolis record shops on Saturday, April 13, we wanted to know what some of your favorite records are and why.

Jordan Munson, Department of Music and Arts Technology
“OK Computer,” Radiohead

A senior lecturer in music and arts technology, Jordan Munson teaches synthesis and sound design classes while leading the student performing group Electronic Music Ensemble. He also oversees the performance studios’ use within his department.

Radiohead’s epic 1997 release, “OK Computer,” directly influenced his professional aspirations. The record was groundbreaking in terms of the possibilities of electronic music and recording studio experimentation. Munson has pursued electronic music since then, creating for IUPUI and his solo performance work.

“It was influential in recording and production and all of these things I think about all the time now here at IUPUI,” Munson explained. “It was an interesting turning point. This was a milestone in terms of albums, production and concept.”

Check out Munson’s new, original music live at 12:30 p.m. Saturday at Indy CD and Vinyl‘s Record Store Day celebration.

Carolyn Springer, Herron School of Art and Design
“Kind of Blue,” Miles Davis

For most of the 21st century, Carolyn Springer‘s academic work has focused on color and design. She has worked as an adjunct instructor since 2005, primarily teaching color theory in the elective arts program.

Color is her thing, so it’s fitting that Miles Davis’ legendary “Kind of Blue” would resonate so much with Springer, an Indiana University alumna. After all, the record’s compositions include “Blue in Green” and “All Blues.”

“It has this warmth, even though it’s ‘Kind of Blue,'” Springer said. “The rich tones … it just felt like it was inside my soul.”

Jasdeep Bagga, School of Science
“Chunga’s Revenge,” Frank Zappa

Jasdeep Bagga is the webmaster for the School of Science, developing and upkeeping sites for the program’s nine departments. Before he became adept at coding, he was putting the needle to the groove on an impressive record collection.

Bagga goes by the nickname “Jazz,” which is also an ingredient in the eclectic sounds of the late Frank Zappa. Bagga was a freshman at IU Bloomington when he first dove into the discography of the man who composed such works as “My Guitar Wants to Kill Your Mama,” “Dirty Love” and, of course, “Don’t Eat the Yellow Snow.” He took a music history class that focused on Zappa’s music, career and life.

“The music blew me away,” Bagga remembered. “I did this crazy deep dive of Zappa, fell in love — and there was no going back from there.”

John King, Department of Media Arts and Science
“Copper Blue,” Sugar

A lecturer in media arts and science, John King has collected music since his teens, but the 1992 album by noted alt rockers Sugar has stuck with him through the decades and format changes. It’s the only record he has several copies of; he first bought it on cassette, then CD, then LP — and then all of the reissues, international pressings and promotional copies. When he was a high school student, King said, “Copper Blue” was one of the first albums recommended to him that went beyond pop or classic rock radio.

“My buddy Ryan said I would like it because it was so loud and distorted,” King recalled. “After I bought it, I kept going back to it so many times. There were certain songs that spoke to me lyrically. To me, there isn’t a bad song on the album or one I skip every time.

“Today, when I see it in clearance bins at Half Price Books or something, I’ll get it and then give it to people: ‘I got this for $1. Here, take this.’ I feel like I am rescuing it from oblivion.”

King, who teaches video production, scriptwriting and digital storytelling classes, believes vinyl records still hold a place in modern music consumption. You can listen to Spotify, but holding an LP still strikes a chord.

“The tactile, the idea of holding it your hand — there are marks of character on it,” King said. “I like that there is a loud pop on this record between tracks. You get another copy, and it’s not going to play like that. There’s a significance to ‘This one is mine.'”

Mandy Porter, Division of Student Affairs
“Tapestry,” Carole King

The soothing sounds of “Natural Woman,” “I Feel the Earth Move” and “It’s Too Late” echoed through the Porter household near Portage, Michigan. Mandy Porter, the IUPUI coordinator for student success and outreach, said she grew up in the “CD era” and consumed music accordingly. But her parents’ massive collection of LPs always fascinated her. The old records have become an anchor to childhood memories of her home. She also had to listen to her dad explain — at length — the superior sound of vinyl over CD and digital.

Porter started buying current acts like Adele and Sam Smith on vinyl, but she always went back to those old tunes from “Tapestry,” which has sold 25 million copies and become an iconic title in 1970s soft rock.

“Just listening to an album my mom listened to when she was my age,” Porter explained, “brings me back to multiple times in my life and my mom’s life. Hearing music the way she heard music is relating to my family.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tim Brouk

5 Tips For Getting Into Grad School

For some of us, graduation means no more grades or homework. For those who can’t get enough of the college experience, it means the cycle is about to start all over again with graduate school.

If you’re going to graduate school and you know it, clap your hands — and give these tips a try.

Students who have questions about graduate school are encouraged to reach out to others for guidance. Indiana University

Research the program
Whether or not you know what you want to study in graduate school, it’s always a good idea to research any program you’re interested in. Find out what the program offers and what’s required to get in. You should also look up the faculty and their interests and strengths. This will help you create your personal statement and cater it specifically to the program you want to enter.

Take the GRE early
Similarly to taking the SAT when you were looking past high school, it’s a good idea to take the GRE your sophomore or junior year in college. That way, if your score is lower than you want, you have time to retake the test. Also, some of your general education classes, such as math and English, help prepare you for the GRE questions, so it’s good to take it when the information is still fresh in your mind. If you missed this mark and are taking the test later, it’s not the end of the world. It only means you have a little less time than people who started earlier.

Write, revise and tailor your personal statement
Your personal statement is not something you should write overnight. You might have several drafts throughout the process, and that’s OK. The more revisiting and revising you do, the more satisfied with the final product you’ll be. This is your chance to showcase your accomplishments and goals and explain why you’re a perfect fit for the program.

Ask for strong letters of recommendation
Making sure to ask the right people for “strong” letters of recommendation is key. Ask people who will promote you and your abilities in an effective way. It’s important to choose people who know how you work, what your accomplishments are and what your future goals are. Specifically requesting a “strong” recommendation letter shows that you’re serious about this program, and it encourages the recommender to put real thought and effort into what they write for you.

Ask for help and pay attention to deadlines
Getting all your materials turned in on time is extremely important. Make sure you know when the deadline is and have everything done a little early. That way, if you have questions about the application process, you’ll have time to ask people who know. Reach out to the admissions staff in your program, and they’ll help you create a successful application. The IUPUI Graduate Office offers workshops on getting into graduate school; see the website for details.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Ashlynn Neumeyer 

IUPUI professor lands NIH grant to research methods to strengthen bones, resist fractures

INDIANAPOLIS — There may be a new way to treat degenerative bone conditions in osteoporosis and diabetes sufferers, among others, thanks to a researcher in the School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI.

IUPUI associate professor of biomedical engineering Joseph Wallace. Photo courtesy of John Gentry

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a five-year grant of nearly $2 million to Joseph Wallace, an associate professor of biomedical engineering, in support of research that is expected to identify ways to build bone mass and improve bone quality.

Wallace’s research involves both mechanical properties of bone and bone mass, attempting to keep bones from fracturing by increasing the amount of bone through mechanical stimulation and improving the quality of the bone with pharmaceutical treatment. Collagen is targeted as an interventional approach to improving the bone material properties.

“We’re trying to use combination therapies, where we can both increase the amount of material that’s present but at the same time modify the quality of that tissue to enhance its ability to bear load without fracture,” Wallace said. “That’s the focus of this grant, to understand those quality-based effects that can enhance bone fracture resistance.”

The research project, “Targeting Collagen as an Interventional Approach to Improve Bone Material Properties,” is being funded through the NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

Wallace likens collagen to rebar, the metal reinforcement put in place before concrete is poured. Collagen helps support loads on the bones, such as the impact of one’s weight while walking. While most research today is focused on the mineral portion of bone, Wallace is looking at ways to modify the collagen component so that bones can better resist fractures. He is working with the FDA-approved drug raloxifene to determine if certain components of the drug can increase bone’s mechanical properties by improving tissue quality.

“With this grant, we will continue research to provide new ways of approaching the treatment of fragility-related diseases,” Wallace said. “From osteoporosis to diabetes’ effects on bone mass to genetic childhood diseases, this research could have a far-reaching positive impact for those suffering from many diseases with musculoskeletal complications.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News

Ph.D. music technology program to be offered at IUPUI

INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana University Board of Trustees has approved a Ph.D. program thin music technology at the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

One of the principal objectives of the program is to train graduates who will develop and research transformative new technologies in music and the arts, according to Debra S. Burns, associate professor of music therapy and chair of the school’s Department of Music and Arts Technology.

Graduates will also explore the practices of designing, making and managing music technology, developing research methodologies in music technology, and integrating music technology in society and industry.

“The Ph.D. program in music technology addresses the comprehensive nature of the field, whose needs include designing new technological tools and techniques, leadership, business entrepreneurship, interdisciplinary research, and creative activity utilizing new and evolving technologies,” Burns said.

Music technology degree programs have been proliferating throughout the country over the past few years. More recently, it has started to emerge as an academic discipline internationally, Burns said. The Ph.D. program builds on the continuing success of the department’s undergraduate and master’s programs.

In addition to academic positions, graduates will be qualified for employment at a number of performing arts organizations and educational centers, such as Auralex Corp. in Indianapolis; Black Entertainment Television in Washington, D.C.; D’Addario Music Products in Farmingdale, N.Y.; MakeMusic Inc. in Minneapolis; Music for All Inc. in Indianapolis; National Arts Center in Athens, Greece; National Arts Center in Beijing; Ruth Lilly Health Education Center in Indianapolis; Scripps Network Interactive in Nashville, Tenn.; Seoul Arts Center in Seoul, Korea; and Sirius Radio in New York.

“The rise of technologies such as file sharing, portable computing and interactive media have transformed the very nature of how music is both created and experienced,” Burns said. “It is expected that the Ph.D. program will produce academic and professional leaders capable of addressing a rapidly changing environment driven by continual development and integration of technology.”