Charles Goodlett, Elizabeth Kryder-Reid Appointed Chancellor’s Professors At IUPUI

From left: Chancellor's Professors Charles Goodlett and Elizabeth Kryder-Reid. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
From left: Chancellor’s Professors Charles Goodlett and Elizabeth Kryder-Reid. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar has appointed Charles Goodlett, a professor in the School of Science, and Elizabeth Kryder-Reid, a professor in the School of Liberal Arts, as prestigious Chancellor’s Professors.

The Chancellor’s Professorship is the most distinguished appointment a faculty member can attain at IUPUI, recognizing extensive records of accomplishment and leadership in teaching, research and service. These senior faculty members retain the title throughout their appointments at IUPUI and comprise a special group of mentors and advisors for colleagues.

“Professor Goodlett and professor Kryder-Reid have dedicated themselves to outstanding research and education at IUPUI, serving as mentors, teachers and scholars for more than 20 years,” Paydar said. “Their appointments as Chancellor’s Professors honor all that they have done to enhance students’ educational experiences, to contribute to the vibrant intellectual community on our campus, and to support the advancements of their disciplines more broadly.”

Chancellor’s Professors are faculty who have demonstrated excellence in their support of IUPUI as an academic community of exceptional quality and integrity and have distinguished themselves in their disciplines through the creation and application of knowledge. Through their leadership and service in their departments, in their schools and across campus, they have reinforced and advanced IUPUI’s mission and vision.

Charles Goodlett
Goodlett, who arrived at IUPUI in 1993, is a professor in the Addiction Neuroscience program in the Department of Psychology in the School of Science.

Much of his research over the last quarter-century has focused on the effects of alcohol on the developing brain using quantitative neuroanatomy and behavioral methods in animal models of human fetal exposure. His work has shown that prenatal alcohol-induced brain damage and subsequent impairments in learning are directly related to blood alcohol content, with binge-like patterns of consumption proving especially damaging to the developing brain. His work showed that during early development of one important region of the brain, the cerebellum, there are relatively well-defined periods of enhanced vulnerability to damage from binge alcohol exposure.

Goodlett is continuing to research neurodevelopment disorders in a collaborative project with Randall Roper studying a mouse model of Down syndrome, while also fueling his passions for mentoring and teaching.

“Service to the campus is what I really value right now; I have dedicated a lot of time in the last five years working on faculty issues through faculty governance,” said Goodlett, who has also served for many years on the IUPUI Research Affairs Committee, including being chairperson in 2008-10. “Mentoring junior faculty is a concern of mine — making sure they’re given the right support and that they are able to navigate the academic landscape to achieve the full potential of their career trajectory.

“We have a very strong neuroscience undergraduate program, and one of the things that we are working on — that I’m taking a bit of a lead on — is developing a capstone research laboratory course that will allow students to gain experience in independent, hypothesis-driven behavioral neuroscience research.

“Being appointed as a Chancellor’s Professor motivates me even more to be a good academic citizen. It encourages me to continue and expand my efforts.”

Elizabeth Kryder-Reid
When Kryder-Reid, a professor of anthropology and museum studies in the School of Liberal Arts, arrived on campus in 1998, museum studies was only an undergraduate certificate program, and when a computer with a student roster was inadvertently sent to university surplus, she had to track down the 11 certificate students individually.

Today, thanks in large part to Kryder-Reid’s leadership as director from 1998-2013, the IUPUI museum studies program is one of the largest in the country, with undergraduate and graduate offerings and a number of dedicated museum studies faculty that few other schools can match.

Kryder-Reid is currently director of the Cultural Heritage Research Center. Her research explores how people appropriate the tangible and intangible remnants of the past and mobilize them in social relationships.

“I’ve always been drawn to questions about the connections of past and present — how we remember the past and represent it in the material forms of public history sites and landscapes as well as museum collections and exhibits,” she said. “The compelling part is trying to understand not just the stories we tell, but why we tell them and how they relate to our contemporary relationships.”

Last month, her book “California Mission Landscapes: Race, Memory, and the Politics of Heritage” won the 2019 Elisabeth Blair MacDougall Book Award from the Society of Architectural Historians, which recognizes the most distinguished work of scholarship in the history of landscape architecture or garden design. The book, published in 2016 by University of Minnesota Press, has enjoyed widespread acclaim with awards from groups in landscape studies, history and landscape architecture history.

“I thanked my students in the foreword to that book. Conversations in class about the missions, about these broader questions of narratives, memory, race and politics, as well as about museums and anthropology sites, shaped my thinking about the mission landscapes,” Kryder-Reid said. “Teaching and scholarship are integrally related; each one informs the other.”

Kryder-Reid’s current work includes an environmental justice project, part of a broader international collaboration with the Humanities Action Lab that will include an exhibit coming to Indianapolis’ Central Library next January and public programs developed by IUPUI students.

“I know some of the people from the School of Liberal Arts who have served as Chancellor’s Professors and have admired the way they have crafted their careers to produce important scholarship and be amazing teachers while serving the campus,” Kryder-Reid said. “I’m honored to work in their company.”

Read the original story from IUPUI News’ John Schwarb 

IUPUI to party like it’s 1969

IUPUI will officially turn the big 5-0 on Jan. 24. It’s the campus’s birthday, but the presents are for you. Photo by Getty Images

On Jan. 24, 1969, the average cost of gas was 32 cents a gallon, “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” by Marvin Gaye was the No. 1 song on the radio, and “Sweet Caroline” crooner Neil Diamond turned 28 years old.

Also, and most importantly, IUPUI was officially established on that memorable day.

IUPUI’s golden anniversary will be celebrated in style throughout the day and well into the evening Jan. 24 in the Campus Center.

The day will feature a wide variety of activities designed to honor IUPUI’s past, celebrate our present and envision our future. Accomplishments by faculty, staff, students, alumni and community partners throughout the past 50 years will be recognized even as guests throughout the day will be looking ahead to the university’s next half-century.

Here’s a breakdown of what you can expect next week while celebrating IUPUI’s golden anniversary:

50th Anniversary Report to the Community

When and where: 10 to 11 30 a.m. on the fourth floor of the Campus Center.

Registrations are full for this invitation-only event that will feature remarks by IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar, IU President Michael A. McRobbie, Purdue Board of Trustees President Michael Berghoff and a panel of Indianapolis mayors — past and present — who will help celebrate the occasion of IUPUI’s official birthday in historic fashion. But the event will be live-streamed on broadcast.iu.edu.

Special sessions and party activities

When and where: Noon to 5 p.m. on various floors of the Campus Center.

Presentations from IUPUI faculty and staff, all 45 minutes or less, will enlighten throughout the afternoon. The talks are open to all. They include:

  • Professor of anthropology Paul Mullins will offer a featured session, “The Price of Progress: Race and Displacement in Indianapolis’ Near-Westside,” from noon to 12:45 p.m. and 2 to 2:45 p.m. in Room 309
  • Colleagues in the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research have organized an IUPUI Research Rock Stars session, highlighting 50 years of outstanding research at IUPUI.
  • University Library colleagues will share information about digital collections, including an opportunity to have a 3D scan made of your face — or your favorite IUPUI artifact — for the digital repository that will commemorate the day.

The party continues

When and where: Noon to 10 p.m. on various floors of the Campus Center.

Employees, students and visitors are invited to check out the activities on the Campus Center’s main floor and the theater level, which will include a 360-degree photo booth, an all-day dance party, a virtual-reality 3D tour of campus, a new interactive map of community engagement and 50th-birthday cakes made by local bakeries.

Get your golden jaguar

IUPUI is giving out 700 3D-printed “Golden Jaguars” to faculty, staff and students who print out a passport and collect stamps at various birthday locations around campus. The jaguars have been produced on campus by University Library’s digital scholarship group in the 3D Printing Studio.

Residence halls and organizations are competing for the most stamps to win golden jaguar figurines and a chance for pizza with Chancellor Paydar. Get started here.

Be sure to wear your JagSwag and post on social media about IUPUI’s birthday. The hashtag #MyIUPUI was created to celebrate this exciting day, so take advantage of this special occasion and show off your school spirit by spreading the word.

Read the original article from IUPUI News