From Humanities: Texting in Ancient Mayan Heiroglyphs

The Madrid Codex, World History Archive

If King Tut were around today, could he send a text in Egyptian hieroglyphics? Yes, with the right font and keyboard. That’s because the writing system of the pharaohs has already been included in the Unicode Standard, meaning that a character like the Eye of Horus has a code point, 13080, that will render the same way on a tablet in Cairo and a smartphone in Beijing. Because Mayan hieroglyphs have yet to be encoded, the ancient Mayan emperor K’inich Janaab’ Pakal would have to stick to emoji—but that’s about to change.

Unicode is the international encoding standard that makes it possible for users to read, write, and search in a wide range of written languages on all manner of devices without technical miscommunication. Made up of a mix of academics, stakeholders, and interested volunteers, the Unicode Consortium has encoded 139 of the writing systems, technically known as scripts, ever to have existed. Given that alphabets like Cyrillic, Arabic, and Devanagari serve more than 60 languages each and that 500 languages use the Latin alphabet, Unicode makes electronic communication possible in almost a thousand languages. But there are more than a hundred writing systems to go.

In June 2017, the Unicode Consortium rolled out its tenth version in 26 years, which included four scripts as well as the Bitcoin sign and 56 new emoji. The scripts introduced this year include Nüshu, a writing system that was developed by women in the Hunan Province of nineteenth-century China as a workaround when they were denied formal education. Also newly available is Zanabazar Square, created by a Mongolian monk in the seventeenth century to write spiritual texts in Mongolian, Tibetan, and Sanskrit. Crucial as these steps toward cultural empowerment may be, it is the textable faces, socks, mermen, and the like that have brought this global standard into the limelight.

[Read More]

NEH Humanities Access Grant internal deadline is March 29

The internal deadline for NEH Humanities Access Grant applications is March 29, 2017. More information on grant requirements or the application process can be found on the IU Research website.

Humanities Access grants help support capacity building for humanities programs that benefit one or more of the following groups: youth, communities of color, and economically disadvantaged populations. Humanities Access grants establish or augment term endowments (that is, endowments whose funds are entirely expended over the course of a set time period) to provide funding for existing programs at institutions such as public libraries, local and regional museums, historical societies, community colleges, HBCUs and tribal colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, archival repositories, and other cultural organizations. Humanities Access grants are intended to seed longer-term endowment-building efforts.

Programs supported by Humanities Access grants might include, for example, a summer project for teens at a local historical society; internships for Native American students at a tribal museum; or a Clemente course at a homeless shelter organized by a community college.

States of Incarceration Exhibit opens April 13

Indianapolis Central Public Library Atrium

States of Incarceration is a traveling exhibit and website created by over 500 students and others deeply affected by incarceration in 20 cities across the United States. These students grew up in a country that incarcerates more of its people, including immigrants, than any country in the world – and at any point in its history. Recently, they have witnessed a new bipartisan consensus that the criminal justice system is broken and yet there is intense conflict over how to fix it.

The exhibit will be open from April 13 to May 14 at the Indianapolis Central Library, 40 E. St. Claire Street.

States of Incarceration explores the roots of mass incarceration through stories rooted in our own communities, and its goal is to open national dialogue on what should happen next. More information and specific exhibition hours can be found on the exhibition website.

The exhibition will also include several public events, including the screening and panel discussion of the documentary “13th”, a conversation on the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program, the Pages to Prison book drive, an opening reception and panel, a spoken word performance, a mental health first aid certification class, and a public conversation. Some of these events require registration to attend; please click on the links provided to see event details.

Support for this exhibition has been provided by The New School Humanities Action Lab, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Indiana Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Netflix, Circle City (IN) Chapter of Links, Inc., Create Forward, LLC, Mental Health First Aid, Midwest Pages for Prisoners, the IUPUI Museum Studies Program, the Cultural Heritage Research Center, the IU School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI Social Justice Education, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Inside-Out Center, and the Indianapolis Public Library.

Voices from Central State Performance and Exhibition Series

Voices from Central State photo“Voices from Central State,” based on writings by patients at what was Indiana’s flagship psychiatric institution for nearly 150 years, begins with a one-woman show adapted from a patient’s memoir published in 1886 about her seven-year hospitalization.

The show, titled “Then There Is No Need to Speak,” will be performed at 7 p.m. on Aug. 26 and 27 at the Indiana Medical History Museum, 3045 W. Vermont St.

Each night, the 60-minute performance will be followed by a brief historical presentation by Kathleen Brian, a cultural and intellectual historian at Western Washington University who specializes in histories of science, medicine and public health.

The production is directed by Terri Bourus, a professor of English drama in the School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and founding artistic director of Hoosier Bard Productions. The script was adapted by Thomas Hummel from Anna Agnew’s memoir, “From Under a Cloud.” The patient, Anna Agnew, will be portrayed by Indianapolis actress Denise Jaeckel.

“What we’re looking to do with ‘Voices from Central State’ is tell an alternative kind of history through creative formats,” said Elizabeth Nelson, an associate faculty member in the Department of History at IUPUI and director of public programs at the Indiana Medical History Museum. “Most histories of medicine or mental health care are written from the point of view of doctors and administrators. It’s rare to have the patient perspective.”

“What we call mental illness — what our ancestors would have called ‘madness’ — has been part of the Western dramatic tradition for at least 25 centuries,” Bourus said.

“This interest in madness is part of drama’s fascination with extreme situations and extreme emotions,” Bourus continued. “At its best, theater makes it possible for spectators to imagine what it would be like to be another person, strikingly different from themselves. Theater provides us with a vicarious experience of the ‘other.’ That’s why memoirs, like Anna Agnew’s, are so invaluable. Agnew’s memoir tells a story of mental illness from the inside.”

The Indiana Medical History Museum is housed in the former department of pathology of the Indiana Hospital for the Insane, later known as Central State Hospital.

The second program in the “Voices from Central State” series, “I Remember Jones,” will take place at 6 p.m. on Sept. 26 and 27 at the museum. Nanette Vonnegut, daughter of acclaimed author Kurt Vonnegut, will read a short story by her maternal grandmother, Riah Cox, about her hospitalization in the 1940s.

Along with Jane Schultz, an IUPUI professor of English, Vonnegut will discuss a number of themes related to Cox’s story, including how mental illness affects families, the historical role of the nurse and the power of the arts to promote recovery.

The third program, titled “Leaving Home,” is an exhibit featuring newsletters produced by patients in the years leading up to the hospital’s closure in 1994. The exhibit opens Nov. 10 at the museum. That evening’s program begins with a 6 p.m. panel discussion about how the closing of the state hospital affected patients as well as Central Indiana residents who developed mental illness after the closing. Attendees may browse the exhibit beginning at 7 p.m.

All three programs require advance registration on the museum’s website. “Then There is No Need to Speak” is $5 for the public and free for students. “I Remember Jones” and the “Leaving Home” exhibit opening are free. “Leaving Home” will be on display at the Indiana Medical History Museum through March 2017.

“Voices from Central State” is supported by the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities program, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Arts Council of Indianapolis. It is presented by the Indiana Medical History Museum and the Medical Humanities and Health Studies program in the School of Liberal Arts with assistance from Discover Near West Indys.

View original post.

New Joint NEH and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship Opportunity Encourages Digital Research In the Humanities

WASHINGTON (February 29, 2016) — The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) NEH Logoand the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the two largest funders of humanities research in the United States, today announced a new joint fellowship opportunity to support high-quality “born digital” research in the humanities.

NEH-Mellon Fellowships for Digital Publication seek to encourage scholars engaged in humanities research that requires digital formats and digital publication. Eligible projects must be conceived as digital because the nature of the research and the topics addressed demand presentation beyond traditional print publication. For example, for scholarship in fields like art history, musicology, or media studies, an interactive digital publication may allow the author to use multimedia to make arguments or illustrate critical points that would be otherwise difficult or impossible in traditional print formats.

“Over the past five decades NEH and the Mellon Foundation have supported some of the most important books in the humanities through our respective fellowship programs,” said NEH Chairman William D. Adams. “Today we are pleased to join together to help foster new forms of scholarship that take advantage of the unique possibilities afforded by digital tools, formats, and methods. Our hope is to spur innovation and experimentation that will take humanities research beyond the printed page.”

“Research in the humanities is increasingly exploring the richness of human expression in digital form and in audio and visual materials, which can be represented digitally but not so easily in print,” said Earl Lewis, Mellon Foundation president. “Scholars are also recognizing the need to reach audiences using new digital media. These digital publication fellowships are designed to help scholars in the humanities both convey the results of their research on new media and reach new audiences.”

NEH-Mellon Fellowships for Digital Publication are designed for individual researchers and scholars and support continuous full-time work for a period of six to twelve months. Successful applicants receive a stipend of $4,200 per month, with a maximum stipend of $50,400 for a twelve-month period.

Application guidelines for NEH-Mellon Fellowships for Digital Publication are available at neh.gov. The application deadline for the initial cycle of NEH-Mellon Fellowships for Digital Publication is April 28.

The NEH-Mellon Fellowships for Digital Publication special opportunity is part of the National Endowment for the Humanities’ agency-wide initiative The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, which seeks to demonstrate and enhance the role of the humanities and humanities scholarship in public life.

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation: Founded in 1969, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation endeavors to strengthen, promote, and, where necessary, defend the contributions of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse and democratic societies by supporting exemplary institutions of higher education and culture as they renew and provide access to an invaluable heritage of ambitious, path-breaking work. Additional information is available at mellon.org

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: neh.gov.

Funding | NEH Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions

National Endowment For The Humanitites Logo

IUPUI Internal Deadline: 3/2/2016
NEH Application Deadline: 5/3/2016

Visit the website for complete guidelines.

Brief Description:
Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the NEH deadline. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

Preservation Assistance Grants help small and mid-sized institutions – such as libraries, museums, historical societies, archival repositories, cultural organizations, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities – improve their ability to preserve and care for their significant humanities collections. These may include special collections of books and journals, archives and manuscripts, prints and photographs, moving images, sound recordings, architectural and cartographic records, decorative and fine art objects, textiles, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, furniture, historical objects, and digital materials.

Preservation Assistance Grants may be used for purposes like these:

  • General preservation assessments
  • Consultations with professionals to address a specific preservation issue, need, or problem
  • Purchase of storage furniture and preservation supplies
  • Purchase of environmental monitoring equipment for humanities collections

Education and training

Award Amount:

  • Grants of up to $6,000 will be awarded.
  • All grants are awarded for a period of eighteen months, although a grantee may complete a project in a shorter period of time.

Cost sharing is not required in this program. If eligible expenses are more than $6,000, an applicant may cover the difference and show this as cost sharing in the project’s budget.

Eligibility:
Applicants must demonstrate that they:

  • care for and have custody of the humanities collections that are the focus of the application;
  • have at least one staff member or the full-time equivalent, whether paid or unpaid; and
  • make their collections open and available for the purpose of education, research, and/or public programming, as evidenced by the number of days on which the institution is open to the public, the capacity to support access and use, and the availability of staff for this purpose.

Individuals are not eligible to apply.

Limitation: One per campus
Only one application for a Preservation Assistance Grant may be submitted annually by an institution, although distinct collecting entities of a larger organization may apply in the same year, such as the library and museum of a university or two historic sites within a historical society.

To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by March 2, 2016 for internal competition.

1. Provide a one-paragraph abstract (up to one thousand characters) describing the nature of the collections that are the focus of the project, their significance to the humanities, and the specific goal(s) and activities that the grant would support.
2. 1-3 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references) that:
State the specific activity or activities that the grant would support and the goals of the proposed project.

  • Describe the collections that are the focus of the project, emphasizing their significance to the humanities.
  • Discuss how this project fits into the institution’s overall preservation needs or plans. Describe the current condition of collections and the environment in which they are stored. Explain how the proposed activities build on previous preservation efforts and how the project fits into future preservation plans. In addition, explain how the project would increase your institution’s ability to improve collection care beyond the period of the grant.
  • Outline the steps of the project, the sequence in which they will occur, and indicate who is responsible for which activities.

3.  A Letter from the Chair or Dean
4. 2-3 page abbreviated CV for the PI

Although not required, it is recommended that you contact Etta before the internal deadline indicating your interest in this program to help expedite the review process.

This message is sent on behalf of the Vice Chancellor for Research. These limited submission notices are distributed to deans, associate deans for research, certain members of upper administration, and all others who subscribe. Visit the IU Limited Submission website to view a list of other limited submission opportunities (http://research.iu.edu/limited_sub.shtml).

Funding | Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Office of Digital HumanitiesNational Endowment For The Humanities Logo
Receipt Deadline March 15, 2016 for Projects Beginning October 2016
Visit official website.

Brief Summary

These NEH grants support national or regional (multistate) training programs for scholars and advanced graduate students to broaden and extend their knowledge of digital humanities. Through these programs, NEH seeks to increase the number of humanities scholars using digital technology in their research and to broadly disseminate knowledge about advanced technology tools and methodologies relevant to the humanities.

The projects may be a single opportunity or offered multiple times to different audiences. Institutes may be as short as a few days and held at multiple locations or as long as six weeks at a single site. For example, training opportunities could be offered before or after regularly occurring scholarly meetings, during the summer months, or during appropriate times of the academic year. The duration of a program should allow for full and thorough treatment of the topic.

Today, complex data—its form, manipulation, and interpretation—are as important to humanities study as more traditional research materials. Datasets, for example, may represent digitized historical records, high-quality image data, or even multimedia collections, all of which are increasing in number due to the availability and affordability of mass data storage devices and international initiatives to create digital content. Moreover, extensive networking capabilities, sophisticated analytical tools, and new collaboration platforms are simultaneously providing and improving interactive access to and analysis of these data as well as a multitude of other resources. The Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities program seeks to enable humanities scholars in the United States to incorporate advances like these into their scholarship and teaching.

Important Information

The Grants.gov application package for this program is now available.

Program Statistics

In the last five competitions the Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities program received an average of seventeen applications per year. The program made an average of four awards per year, for a funding ratio of 24 percent.

The potential applicant pool for this program is limited, since applications require a high degree of institutional commitment to the project and often require the availability of facilities such as participant housing and computer laboratories. On the one hand, this results in a small number of applications each year. On the other hand, the quality of the applications tends to be high, so that many applicants have historically received funding.

The number of applications to an NEH grant program can vary widely year to year, as can the funding ratio. Information about the average number of applications and awards in recent competitions is meant only to provide historical context for the current competition. Information on the number of applications and awards in individual competitions is available from odh@neh.gov.

Questions?

Contact the NEH Office of Digital Humanities via e‑mail at odh@neh.gov. Applicants wishing to speak to a staff member by telephone should provide in an e-mail message a telephone number and a preferred time to call. Hearing-impaired applicants can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

Press Release | IUPUI to share in $250K NEH award to New School’s Humanities Action Lab mass-incarceration project

INDIANAPOLIS — The National Endowment for the Humanities has announced a $250,000 Elizabeth-Kryder-Reid-Imagegrant to The New School’s Humanities Action Lab, a coalition of 20 universities, including Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, collaborating to produce student- and community-curated public projects on pressing social issues.

The grant is the largest of the first 21 NEH “Humanities in the Public Square” grant awards. The funds will support public dialogues around HAL’s current project, “States of Incarceration,” a traveling exhibit, Web platform and curriculum focusing on mass Modupe Labode Imageincarceration.

Today, the United States incarcerates more of its citizens than any other country in the world and at any other moment in its history, with deep racial disparities in the system enforcing inequalities in American society.

To tackle this pressing issue, HAL invited students and people directly affected by incarceration in 20 cities to explore their own communities’ experiences with incarceration: how it evolved historically and what issues remain today. Each team created one local “chapter” of what will be compiled into a collective, multifaceted portrait of incarceration, past and present, framed by the key questions these histories raise. The exhibition, designed by the firm Matter Practice, will open at The New School’s Sheila C. Johnson Design Center in April and, over the next three years, travel to Indianapolis and the other 18 communities that created it.

“This grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, one of the nation’s largest funders of humanities programs, will enable us to explore how Americans have grappled with incarceration in the past and how it has profoundly shaped generations of people in each of our communities,” said Liz Sevcenko, Humanities Action Lab director. “We hope by coming together to exchange diverse local histories and collective memories, we can foster new national dialogue on how to move forward.”

The “States of Incarceration” exhibition opens at the Johnson Center galleries and will coincide with a national public forum at The New School April 14-16. The forum will provide a space for students — including those from IUPUI who worked on the exhibit — to come together with stakeholders, scholars and policy experts to engage in a national dialogue on incarceration. The forum will feature tactile interactives, digital polling and face-to-face dialogues. As the exhibit travels, local partners will host dialogues in their communities, in exchange with partners in other cities working on related issues.

A Web platform, designed by the studio Picture Projects, will expand on the traveling exhibition and provide a medium to connect communities across the country.

IUPUI will host “States of Incarceration” April and May 2017 at the Central Branch of the Indianapolis Public Library. The IUPUI segment of the exhibit focuses on the intersection of serious mental illnesses and incarceration. Programming for the Indianapolis exhibition, which will coincide with the National Council on Public History‘s national conference, will be developed by community partners and IUPUI students under the direction of Elizabeth Kryder-Reid, professor of anthropology and museum studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

“IUPUI’s focus on the intersections of mental health and incarceration bring attention to this important and often-ignored topic,” Kryder-Reid said. “Our partnerships with the Indiana Medical History Museum, the National Alliance on Mental Health Indiana, and National Alliance on Mental Health Indianapolis exemplify the power of public humanities to connect past and present in order to imagine a more just future.”

IUPUI’s participation in the Humanities Action Lab is led by Kryder-Reid and Modupe Labode, associate professor of history and museum studies at IUPUI.  The two professors previously led IUPUI to collaborate with more than a dozen other universities across the country to create the Guantánamo Public Memory Project, an internationally traveling exhibit, Web platform and series of dialogues reaching over 500,000 people in 18 cities that served as the pilot for HAL.

In addition to IUPUI, universities partnering in “States of Incarceration” are Arizona State University, Brown University, DePaul University, Duke University, Northeastern University, Parsons Paris, Rutgers University-Newark, Rutgers University-New Brunswick, Skidmore College, The New School, University of California, Riverside, University of Connecticut, University of Massachusetts Amherst, University of Miami, University of Minnesota, University of New Orleans, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, University of Texas at Austin and Vanderbilt University.

“The pressing challenges facing our nation call for dialogue and understanding,” said NEH Chairman William D. Adams. “There is ample evidence that communities across the nation are eager to come together to discuss the critical issues that face them as citizens and neighbors. Using the unique insights of the humanities, the Humanities Action Lab project will bring new audiences and organizations together in ways that address compelling public concerns.”

The Humanities in the Public Square grant program is part of Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, a new initiative to foster innovative ways to make scholarship relevant to contemporary issues.

Updates for Humanities Indicators

Over the past few months, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences has been active inAmerican_Academy_of_Arts_and_Sciences_logo-prv its support for the humanities, with new reports on the employment status and earnings of humanities majors, the financial health of not-for-profit humanities organizations, metrics on the qualifications of school teachers, international comparisons of levels of adult literacy, and trends in public reading rates.

Key findings:

  • In 2013, the median annual earnings for humanities majors were $50,000 for those who held only a bachelor’s degree and $71,000 for those with an advanced degree (in any field). Both amounts were $7,000 below the median for graduates from all fields with similar degree attainment (but still well above the median of $42,000 for all U.S. workers).
  • The salary differential between humanities majors and graduates from most other fields shrinks with time in the workforce.
  • Humanities majors had somewhat higher rates of unemployment than graduates from all fields. The gap in unemployment narrows with time in the workforce and an advanced degree.
  • A comparatively large share of humanities graduates go into education-related occupations—especially among those with terminal bachelor’s degrees, where humanities majors are second only to education graduates.
  •  Among the 42% of undergraduate humanities majors who had gone on to earn an advanced degree, workers were more evenly distributed across occupational categories than majors in most of the other fields.
  • Revenues of humanities not-for profits have largely recovered from recession, but not all organizations survived.
  •  Less than 70% of students in each of several types of high school humanities classes were taught by a teacher with both a college major in the subject and state certification to teach it.
  •  While a growing number of recent humanities PhDs report their research was “interdisciplinary,” most confined their work within the humanities.
  •  The median time to PhD for students who paid for their education with personal savings or employer support was two years longer than the median for those who relied on scholarships, grants, and assistantships.
  •  An international study finds that literacy and occupational skill levels are highly correlated.

New in the Academy Data Forum:                                                                       

  • Christine Henseler (Union College) argues for a more expansive view of the value of the humanities.John Dichtl (American Association for State and Local History) and
  • Carole Rosenstein (George Mason University) discuss gaps in what we know about humanities nonprofits.
  • Barbara Cambridge National Council for Teachers of English) and Nancy McTygue (California History-Social Science Project) fill in gaps between the numbers on teacher on teacher credentials and classroom experience.
  • Jamie Carroll and Chandra Muller (University of Texas at Austin) assess what recent changed in the intended majors of college-bound seniors might portend for the humanities.

Announcements:

  •  The Lincoln Project releases a new publication to examine state funding of higher education and describes challenges that state governments face. (And in case you missed it, the first Lincoln Project publication was Public Research Universities: Why They Matter.
  •  50 years of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)In response to a bipartisan Congressional request, the Academy is initiating the first national study on foreign language learning in more than 30 years.
  •  We are pleased to mark the 50th anniversary of the National Endowment for the Humanities—a vital sponsor for our work. The co-chair of the Academy’s Commission on the Humanities, Richard H. Brodhead (Duke Univ.), delivered the keynote address “On the Fate and Fortunes of Public Goods” at a symposium commemorating the event.

Three IU projects receive $690,000 in latest round of National Endowment for the Humanities funding

INDIANAPOLIS — The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded $690,000 to unnamedthree Indiana University research and learning projects.

The NEH grants will fund a summer training program for university and college faculty interested in exploring the cultures of African and African diaspora cities; a workshop series on applying digital methods to issues in Native American and Indigenous studies; and the Santayana Edition’s ongoing publication of writings of American philosopher George Santayana.

The three IU projects — two on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus and one at Indiana University Bloomington — are among 212 projects sharing $36.6 million in recent NEH funding.

“The grant projects represent the very best of humanities scholarship and programming,” NEH Chairman William Adams said. “NEH is proud to support programs that illuminate the great ideas and events of our past, broaden access to our nation’s many cultural resources, and open up for us new ways of understanding the world in which we live.”

The IUPUI projects, both housed in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, are:

“The Digital Native American and Indigenous Studies Project,” $249,817 for a series of three workshops on teaching new digital methods and exploring issues of digital cultural heritage in Native American studies, to be directed by IUPUI assistant professor of history Jennifer Guiliano. Yale University, Arizona State University and IUPUI will in turn host a three-day workshop for 35 participants.
“The Works of George Santayana,” directed by associate professor of philosophy Martin Coleman, which involves the preparation for print and digital publication of American philosopher George Santayana’s “Three Philosophical Poets” (Vol. 8), “Winds of Doctrine” (Vol. 9) and “Scepticism and Animal Faith” (Vol. 8) and the beginning of work on “Realm of Being,” (Vol. 16). A three-year grant of $225,000 and $23,623 in matching funds to the Santayana Edition will provide salaries for an editor and graduate student interns who will contribute to the production of the printed and electronic texts.

Indiana University Bloomington received $191,592 for “Arts of Survival: Recasting Lives in African Cities,” a three-week seminar for 25 college and university faculty who will study the arts and culture of Accra, Lagos, Nairobi, New Orleans and Port-au-Prince. The project is led by Eileen Julien, director of IU’s Institute for Advanced Study.

Organizers believe the IUPUI Native American studies project is the first workshop specifically focused on digital humanities that encourages participants in the development of a more systematic approach to integrating digital technologies within and throughout academic institutions, cultural organizations and tribal communities.

“While tremendous work has been done around the preservation and access of analog materials within Native American communities, there has been much less attention paid to the ways in which digital objects, practices and methods function within Native communities and through Native American studies scholarship,” Guiliano said.

The international reputation and broad appeal of Santayana justifies the Santayana Edition’s aim of preserving and disseminating Santayana’s thought in reliable and accurate texts. This will be published as “The Works of George Santayana” so readers can research, evaluate and appreciate Santayana’s role in shaping American letters, Coleman said.