American Creed Community Conversation Series

At a time when our country may feel divided, what are the hopes and beliefs that unite us as Americans? In partnership with the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, the Carmel Clay Public Library is hosting discussions designed to engage our community in thoughtful and respectful dialogue. The conversation series will explore themes from American Creed, a PBS documentary featuring former Secretary of State Condeleeza Rice, historian David Kennedy, and a diverse groups of Americans as they explore what ideals we share in common as a nation.

Thursday May 23, 6:30-8:00pm
American Creed Community Conversation: We the People
Who are “we the people” and who gets to define the American creed? Join us for discussion on immigration facilitated by IUPUI faculty members.
Suggested background reading and viewing:
Jose Antonio Vargas, “My Life as an Undocumented Immigrant”
Brent and Craif Renaud, New York Times Documentaries, “Between Borders: American Migrant Crisis”

Thursday May 30, 6:30-8:00pm
American Creed Community Conversation: Civic Engagement
Join IUPUI faculty to consider what civic engagement means and the interplay between engagement at the local level and with the sprawling community that is the United States.
Suggested background viewing:
Eric Liu for TED-Ed, “How to Understand Power”

All programs will be held in the Carmel Clay Public Library Program Room and are free and open to the public. For a closer look at topics and suggested background materials for each event in this conversation series, please visit carmel.lib.in.us/americancreed.

American Creed: Community Conversations is a project of Citizen Film in partnership with the American Library Association and the National Writing Project, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Carmel Clay Public Library was one of 50 US public libraries selected to take part in American Creed: Community Conversations.

Come check out these amazing events at the Carmel Clay Public Library! We’ll see you there!

Digital Scholarship Team Gives Blind Students Unique Senior Portraits

Dressed in their emerald green graduation gowns and mortarboards, the 19 graduating seniors from the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired lined up for their class pictures.

Two queues occupied the cafeteria space inside the historic school: one for the traditional still-portrait photographer and another for a team from the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship manning two 3D-scanning stations. Most of the students sat down for both.

The scanning took only about a minute for each student. The digital composites will be sent to the school’s records as well as to the students, who can then 3D-print the scan.

Emma Parker, a biomedical engineering sophomore and 3D digital assistant for the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, does a 3D scan of Kurt Stickradt, a senior at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. Photos by Tim Brouk, Indiana University
Emma Parker, a biomedical engineering sophomore and 3D digital assistant for the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, does a 3D scan of Kurt Stickradt, a senior at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. Photos by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

“We hope this becomes a new tradition for us,” said school superintendent Jim Durst. “A picture is worth a thousand words, and an object is worth a thousand pictures. Our kids can have access to information through 3D printing, but this really personalizes it at a level we hadn’t thought of or anticipated.”

The technicians used Creaform portable 3D scanners, which take about 1,000 digital photographs per second. The software stitches the images together to create a surface in staggering detail. The 3D scans can sharpen the details of a face — or any object — to a tenth of a millimeter.

The Center for Digital Scholarship has been busy for years with collaborations with the Benjamin Harrison Presidential SiteIndianapolis Motor Speedway MuseumIndianapolis Firefighters Museum, and several other institutions and programs. Typically, the team scans inanimate objects for virtual online museum experiences that users can access anywhere on the planet. At the 2018 Regatta, the team scanned 200 students’ faces, including one who 3D-printed a life-size version of his face to make into a Halloween mask. At the Jan. 24 50th Anniversary Birthday Bash, 400 students were scanned.

Steve Mannheimer, professor of media arts and science, had worked with the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired for years as part of assistive, accessible and inclusive technology research with the Department of Human-Centered Computing. He met with Durst to plan the April 16 scanning session.

Decades of two-dimensional class photos line the school’s halls, but many of the students can’t see them. The goal of the class of 2019’s 3D scans is for that to change.

“One research question is, ‘Will the students recognize themselves?'” Mannheimer said. “Thanks to digital technology, we can provide tactual, acoustic, gestural opportunities to say, ‘How will this help somebody who may be differently abled to better interact with the world?'”

Durst was excited about what the 3D scanning will lead his students to.

“In the future, when they come back years from now with their children and grandchildren,” he said, “they can say, ‘Here’s my picture. This is what I look like,’ without depending on somebody else to find their picture.”

Visually impaired students had the option of keeping their eyes closed, as the handheld scanners emit bright lights while scanning. No sound is emitted during the process as the technician holds the scanner about an arm’s length from the subject.

Derek Miller, 3D project coordinator for the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, scans a graduating senior at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. The student will be able to send the file to a 3D printer. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

“It’s like a projector that slides across a surface’s mountains and valleys,” said Derek Miller, 3D project coordinator. “We can also capture color and texture of materials.”

Inspired by a few other assistive technology initiatives, Miller hopes to offer scanning services to the school again — not only to the graduating class, but for every class. From kindergarten to senior year, blind students will be able to realize their physical growth from their 3D-scanned portraits.

“It’s going to allow them to feel themselves tactilely,” Miller said. “Someday, hopefully, we’ll be able to scan a blind student at the age of 5 and then scan them every year. In theory, we could build a timeline of them growing that they can actually feel.”

Senior Cassondra Ernstes was one of the first students to get scanned. She was thrilled to be among the first class to have such unique senior pictures.

“That was pretty interesting. I didn’t feel anything,” Ernstes said. “I’ll be 3D-printing this. We’ve never had anything like this before. It’s pretty different, but pretty cool.”

Read the original story from IUPUI New’s Tim Brouk 

These scanners were supported by a grant from the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Equity in Modern America with Jelani Cobb, Jeff Chang, and Negin Farsad

What do we mean when we use the word “equity”? How do we build an equitable society? Join us for a conversation with Jelani Cobb, Negin Farsad, and Jeff Chang about Equity in Modern America.

Jeff Chang is author of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation and We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation.

Jelani Cobb is author of The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of ProgressThe Devil and Dave Chappelle, and To the Break of Dawn: A Freestyle on the Hip Hop Aesthetic.

Negin Farsad is author of How to Make White People Laugh and director of The Muslims are Coming!

This event is part of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute’s Entanglements Series which puts scientists, social scientists, humanists, and artists in conversation with the audience to ask questions that transcend disciplinary boundaries.

Equity in Modern America is presented with the Kheprw Institute, the Central Indiana Community Foundation, Indiana Humanities, the Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library, and the IUPUI Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. Support for this event comes from the Indiana University New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities grant program.

RSVP NOW! 

Poetry, Music, & Mind

What are the effects of poetry and music on the mind and the body? Where do art and medicine meet? Join us for a conversation with Adrian Matejka, Nate Marshall, and Eileen Misluk about Poetry, Music & Mind.

Adrian Matejka is a National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize-nominated poet who teaches at Indiana University Bloomington and is Poet Laureate of Indiana. His most recent book is Map to the Stars (Penguin, 2017).

Nate Marshall is the author of Wild Hundreds (University of Pittsburgh, 2015) and co-editor of The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop (Haymarket, 2015). He was the star of the award winning full-length documentary Louder Than a Bomb and has been featured on the HBO original series Brave New Voices. He lives on the South Side of Chicago.

Eileen Misluk is Director of Art Therapy and Assistant Clinical Professor at Herron School of Art + Design, IUPUI. She is a registered and board certified art therapist, licensed professional counselor, and licensed mental health counselor.

This event is part of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute’s Entanglements Series which puts scientists, social scientists, humanists, and artists in conversation with the audience to ask questions that transcend disciplinary boundaries.

Poetry, Music, & Mind is co-presented with the Department of English at IUPUI and the Reiberg Reading Series at IUPUI. Support for this event comes from the Indiana University New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanitiesgrant program.

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Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Presents Eighth Annual Exhibition: Exploring the Story of Lot’s Wife

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, invited 12 Indiana artists to explore and expound upon the story of Lot’s Wife during the eighth annual Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Seminar and the accompanying art exhibition. Artists include Stan Blevins, Peggy Breidenbach, Alys Caviness-Gober, Marjie Giffin, A. Paul Johnson, Kasey May, Michael McAuley, William Peacock, Katherine
Simmons, Jennifer Strange, Teresa Vazquez, and Kevin Wilson.

In this exhibition, the artists consider questions that delve far beyond the story Lot’s Wife who, as told in Genesis 19, turns to see the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah and becomes a pillar of salt. Did she act in disobedience or out of compassion? What is our responsibility to bear witness? Is looking back redemptive or paralyzing? Might we see contemporary events (mass tragedies, refugees) in the light of this text? Exploring the story through
religion, art, poetry, and music, this exhibition will ask questions fundamental to the human experience

Directed by Rabbi Sandy Sasso, the RSA Seminar explores the varieties of religious experience and understanding. Through seminars led by an interdisciplinary faculty, artists gain the knowledge and inspiration to develop new artistic works. Artists share their creations through exhibitions and presentations to members of the Central Indiana community, including religious organizations, schools, libraries, and community groups.

On March 7, 2019, the first public exhibition of the 2018-19 RSA Seminar’s work will open featuring new works of painting, sculpture, music, and poetry developed by the cohort. A reception begins at 5:30 p.m. with performances beginning at 6:30 p.m. The exhibition will remain on display at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis through April 30.

This opening event and exhibition is free and open to the public at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260). Refreshments will also be served at the March 7 reception.

Thursday, March 7, 2019
Reception begins at 5:30 PM; performance begins at 6:30 PM
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community
Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available at
https://www.culturalecologies.org/rsa/.

REGISTER NOW!

Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Seminar Explores The Story of Lot’s Wife With 12 Indiana Artists

INDIANAPOLIS — Twelve Indiana artists have been selected to explore and expound upon the biblical story of Lot’s wife during the eighth annual Religion, Spirituality and the Arts seminar, a project of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

The artists invited to participate in the 2018-19 seminar and the accompanying art exhibition are Stan Blevins, Peggy Breidenbach, Alys Caviness-Gober, Marjie Giffin, A. Paul Johnson, Kasey May, Michael McAuley, William Peacock, Katherine Simmons, Jennifer Strange, Teresa Vazquez and Kevin Wilson.

The artists will consider questions that delve far beyond the story of Lot’s wife, who, as told in Genesis, turns to see the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah and becomes a pillar of salt. Did she act in disobedience or out of compassion? What is our responsibility to bear witness? Is looking back redemptive or paralyzing? Might we see contemporary events such as mass tragedies and refugees through this text? Exploring the story through religion, art, poetry and music, this seminar will ask questions fundamental to the human experience.

Directed by Rabbi Sandy Sasso, the seminar explores the varieties of religious experience and understanding. Through events led by an interdisciplinary faculty, artists gain the knowledge and inspiration to develop new artistic works. They share their creations through exhibitions and presentations to members of the Central Indiana community, including religious organizations, schools, libraries and community groups.

A public exhibition March 7 at the Jewish Community Center, 6701 Hoover Road, will feature new works of painting, sculpture, music and poetry developed by the cohort. A reception begins at 5:30 p.m., with performances beginning at 6:30 p.m. The exhibition will remain on display at the Jewish Community Center through April 30.

Also during the exhibition, the RSA seminar will feature a performance by critically acclaimed cellist Maya Beiser on April 3 at the Jewish Community Center. Beiser will perform excerpts from her cello opera, “Elsewhere,” an imaginative and psychological retelling of the biblical story of Lot’s wife. This event is offered in partnership with the Center for Interfaith Cooperation, Congregation Beth-El Zedeck, Indiana Humanities and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis.

Programming for the 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality and the Arts seminar is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available online.

About the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute

Established in 2012, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute supports research and creative activity across the IUPUI campus, serves as a campus liaison to the Central Indiana community, and fosters ongoing partnerships and ventures that advance arts and humanities endeavors at IUPUI and in Indianapolis.

Read the original article form IUPUI News

Digital Humanities Librarian Open Hours

Caitlin Pollock
Digital Humanities Librarian

Have questions about Digital Humanities? Come to IUPUI Arts and Humanities on Wednesdays from 12 to 1pm to meet with Caitlin Pollock, the Digital Humanities Librarian at the Center for Digital Scholarship at University Library! Caitlin can help you think through your project and develop next steps or workflows, and recommend methodologies, trainings, tools, and platforms. Caitlin can also advise on data visualization, Text Encoding Initiative Guidelines (TEI), textual analysis, data management, and project management. Your DH research can just have started or in the middle development. No appointments required, first come first serve.

IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute
University Library RM 4115T

Come Work With Us!

Want to work with us at the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute?

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute (IAHI) is excited to announce an opening for the position of part-time office manager. This individual will coordinate events, travel, scheduling, and basic budgeting for the institute. The office manager has the opportunity to engage with scholars from across the IUPUI campus, to participate in the central Indiana arts and culture community, and to work with a network of artists, writers, and scholars scattered across the globe. This is an ideal opportunity for a “people person” who is interested in learning about arts and culture programming and research while building relationships and solving problems as part of a dynamic team. We are particularly interested in finding a candidate who has strong time-management and multi-tasking skills, who pays close attention to detail, and who is lifelong learner interested in constantly expanding their knowledge of and understanding about arts and culture.

Interested? Of course you are! Apply here!

Poet, essayist, and critic Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib will speak at IUPUI

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the IUPUI English Department are pleased to present the Rufus and Louise Reiberg Reading Series featuring poet and essayist Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib. Willis-Abdurraqib will read from his collected works at the Basile Auditorium on November 16th at 7:30pm. Free tickets are available at willis-abdurraqib.eventbrite.com.

Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib is a poet, essayist, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His poetry has been published in Muzzle, Vinyl, PEN American, and various other journals. His essays and music criticism have been published in The FADER, Pitchfork, The New Yorker, and The New York Times. His first full length collection, The Crown Ain’t Worth Much, released in June 2016 from Button Poetry, was named a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book prize. His limited edition chapbook, Vintage Sadness, was released in summer 2017. His first collection of essays, They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us, will be released this winter. He is a Callaloo Creative Writing Fellow, an interviewer at Union Station Magazine, and a poetry editor at Muzzle Magazine. He is also a member of the poetry collective Echo Hotel with poet/essayist Eve Ewing.

Additionally, he is a columnist at MTV News, where he writes about music and fights to get Room Raiders back on the air. He thinks poems can change the world, but really wants to talk to you about music, sports, and sneakers.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series is provided by the Reiberg family, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and the IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.