Poet, essayist, and critic Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib will speak at IUPUI

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the IUPUI English Department are pleased to present the Rufus and Louise Reiberg Reading Series featuring poet and essayist Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib. Willis-Abdurraqib will read from his collected works at the Basile Auditorium on November 16th at 7:30pm. Free tickets are available at willis-abdurraqib.eventbrite.com.

Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib is a poet, essayist, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His poetry has been published in Muzzle, Vinyl, PEN American, and various other journals. His essays and music criticism have been published in The FADER, Pitchfork, The New Yorker, and The New York Times. His first full length collection, The Crown Ain’t Worth Much, released in June 2016 from Button Poetry, was named a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book prize. His limited edition chapbook, Vintage Sadness, was released in summer 2017. His first collection of essays, They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us, will be released this winter. He is a Callaloo Creative Writing Fellow, an interviewer at Union Station Magazine, and a poetry editor at Muzzle Magazine. He is also a member of the poetry collective Echo Hotel with poet/essayist Eve Ewing.

Additionally, he is a columnist at MTV News, where he writes about music and fights to get Room Raiders back on the air. He thinks poems can change the world, but really wants to talk to you about music, sports, and sneakers.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series is provided by the Reiberg family, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and the IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

Professor Barbara Mills will speak at the IAHI next month

As part of the 2017 Midwest Archaeological Conference, Barbara Mills invites you to her lecture, “Current Debates in the Archaeology of the Chaco World.” The talk will be held at the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute on October 19th at 7pm. Mills is the Professor of Anthropology and American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona and Curator of Archaeology at the Arizona State Museum.

Chaco Canyon’s dense concentration of monumental architecture, along with the millions of objects that have been excavated, pose challenges to traditional models of Southwestern societies. The ways in which archaeologists interpret regional systems of interaction like Chaco’s has led to a number of debates. Some of these are about Chaco’s origins, while others focus on its most extensive “Classic” period, and still others consider Chaco’s reorganization and fragmentation. The questions asked are as hotly debated as their answers. This presentation will outline several important debates about inequality, historical memory, economy, migration, and religious ritual that are guiding exciting new research on Chaco.

This event is sponsored by the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and The Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in collaboration with the 2017 Midwest Archaeological Conference.

Free tickets are available at barbara-mills.eventbrite.com.

About the Speaker
Professor Mills is an anthropological archaeologist with broad interests in archaeological method and theory, especially (but not exclusively) as applied to the North American Southwest. Her work has focused on ceramic analysis and, more broadly, material culture as a tool to understand social relations in the past. She is interested in the way depositional practice can be used to understand memory, materiality, and relational logics. Her research on ceramic technology, craft specialization, and accumulations research has led to a series of papers and edited volumes on social inequality, identity, feasting, and migration.

Mills’s interests were fostered by more than a decade of work in the Silver Creek area of east-central Arizona, including a multi-year collaborative project with the White Mountain Apache Tribe. She also has field and research experience in a number of other areas of the Southwest, including Zuni, Chaco, Mimbres, Grasshopper, and most recently the Greater Hohokam area. Outside the U.S. she has research experience in Guatemala (Postclassic Maya), Kazakhstan (Bronze Age), and Turkey (Neolithic). She is currently a lead researcher on the Southwest Social Networks Project, which brings together data and a talented group of scholars to apply social network analysis (SNA) to archaeological data from the Southwest.

The Reiberg Reading Series will feature poet Maggie Smith this October

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the IUPUI English Department are pleased to present the Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series featuring poet Maggie Smith. Smith will read from her selected works in the IUPUI Lilly Auditorium on October 11th at 7:30pm, with a Q&A session and book signing to follow.

Smith is the author of three books of poetry: Good Bones, which is making its debut on shelves on October first; The Well Speaks of Its Own Poison, winner of the Dorset Prize and the 2016 Independent Publisher Book Awards Gold Medal in Poetry; and Lamp of the Body, winner of the Benjamin Saltman Award. The poem “Good Bones,” after which her new book is titled, went viral internationally. It was called the “Official Poem of 2016” by the BBC/Public Radio International and has been translated into nearly a dozen languages. Advance praise for Good Bones (the book) says it is written “with such a clean, aching clarity of lyricism that I discover now frequently exhausted human touchstones freshly, with real surprise.”

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series is provided by the Reiberg family, the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and the IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

Tickets are available through Eventbrite.

IAHI to host grant-writing workshop for faculty

Dr. Jason Kelly, IAHI Director

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis faculty can learn about writing and submitting applications for the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute Grant Program from peers and Dr. Jason M. Kelly, the institute’s director, during a free workshop on August 31st.

The IAHI grant program supports campuswide attainment of excellence in research and creative activity in the arts and humanities. This activity can impact people’s lives not only on campus, but throughout Indianapolis and the state in the forms of new scholarship and cultural exhibits.

“The grant program is designed to enhance the research and creative-activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty,” he said. “The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.”

Grants range in size from $500 to support travel to $30,000 to support research projects and scholarly activities conducted by a team of two or more faculty.

The workshop is scheduled from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, University Library Room 4115P, 755 W. Michigan St.

Information will include guidelines on applying for the grant program, including how to apply, deadlines and scope of projects, best practices for grant writing that are relatable to other funding agencies’ grants, and a Q&A session with Dr. Kelly.

Workshop registration can be completed online. The original press release for this event can be found at the IU Newsroom.

 

Polio: A Look at America’s Most Successful Public Health Crusade

Join Pulitzer Prize winning author and New York University professor David Oshinsky for an in-depth look at the largest public health experiment in American history. Oshinsky will focus on the events leading up to the 1954 Salk polio vaccine trials and the ways in which the polio crusade revolutionized philanthropy and medical research. Oshinsky’s book Polio: An American Story won the Pulitzer Prize for History, among other awards, and influenced Bill Gates to make polio eradication the top priority of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

A part of the “History Talks! Engage the Past, in the Present, about the Future” presented by IUPUI Department of History, with support from IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, IU School of Medicine, Spirit and Place, and JBS Society. The talk will be held from 4-5:30pm on Thursday, October 19 at the Frank and Katrina Basile Theater of the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center, 450 W Ohio Street. Reserve your free tickets now before they run out!

Reiberg Reading Series to feature Lili Wright

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI English Department present the Rufus and Louise Reiberg Reading Series featuring Lili Wright. Lili Wright is the author of Dancing with the Tiger, a literary thriller set in Mexico, and the travel memoir Learning to Float. Her work has appeared in The New York Times and numerous other publications. On April 20 at 8pm in Campus Center Room 405, Wright will read from and discuss her new novel, which The New York Times called “electric with plot.”

Attendees are encouraged to register for free tickets, as seating will be limited. Books will be available for purchase, and the author will sign books after the reading.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series provided by: the Reiberg family, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and the IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

States of Incarceration Exhibit opens April 13

Indianapolis Central Public Library Atrium

States of Incarceration is a traveling exhibit and website created by over 500 students and others deeply affected by incarceration in 20 cities across the United States. These students grew up in a country that incarcerates more of its people, including immigrants, than any country in the world – and at any point in its history. Recently, they have witnessed a new bipartisan consensus that the criminal justice system is broken and yet there is intense conflict over how to fix it.

The exhibit will be open from April 13 to May 14 at the Indianapolis Central Library, 40 E. St. Claire Street.

States of Incarceration explores the roots of mass incarceration through stories rooted in our own communities, and its goal is to open national dialogue on what should happen next. More information and specific exhibition hours can be found on the exhibition website.

The exhibition will also include several public events, including the screening and panel discussion of the documentary “13th”, a conversation on the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program, the Pages to Prison book drive, an opening reception and panel, a spoken word performance, a mental health first aid certification class, and a public conversation. Some of these events require registration to attend; please click on the links provided to see event details.

Support for this exhibition has been provided by The New School Humanities Action Lab, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Indiana Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Netflix, Circle City (IN) Chapter of Links, Inc., Create Forward, LLC, Mental Health First Aid, Midwest Pages for Prisoners, the IUPUI Museum Studies Program, the Cultural Heritage Research Center, the IU School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI Social Justice Education, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Inside-Out Center, and the Indianapolis Public Library.

Voices from Central State Performance and Exhibition Series

Voices from Central State photo“Voices from Central State,” based on writings by patients at what was Indiana’s flagship psychiatric institution for nearly 150 years, begins with a one-woman show adapted from a patient’s memoir published in 1886 about her seven-year hospitalization.

The show, titled “Then There Is No Need to Speak,” will be performed at 7 p.m. on Aug. 26 and 27 at the Indiana Medical History Museum, 3045 W. Vermont St.

Each night, the 60-minute performance will be followed by a brief historical presentation by Kathleen Brian, a cultural and intellectual historian at Western Washington University who specializes in histories of science, medicine and public health.

The production is directed by Terri Bourus, a professor of English drama in the School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and founding artistic director of Hoosier Bard Productions. The script was adapted by Thomas Hummel from Anna Agnew’s memoir, “From Under a Cloud.” The patient, Anna Agnew, will be portrayed by Indianapolis actress Denise Jaeckel.

“What we’re looking to do with ‘Voices from Central State’ is tell an alternative kind of history through creative formats,” said Elizabeth Nelson, an associate faculty member in the Department of History at IUPUI and director of public programs at the Indiana Medical History Museum. “Most histories of medicine or mental health care are written from the point of view of doctors and administrators. It’s rare to have the patient perspective.”

“What we call mental illness — what our ancestors would have called ‘madness’ — has been part of the Western dramatic tradition for at least 25 centuries,” Bourus said.

“This interest in madness is part of drama’s fascination with extreme situations and extreme emotions,” Bourus continued. “At its best, theater makes it possible for spectators to imagine what it would be like to be another person, strikingly different from themselves. Theater provides us with a vicarious experience of the ‘other.’ That’s why memoirs, like Anna Agnew’s, are so invaluable. Agnew’s memoir tells a story of mental illness from the inside.”

The Indiana Medical History Museum is housed in the former department of pathology of the Indiana Hospital for the Insane, later known as Central State Hospital.

The second program in the “Voices from Central State” series, “I Remember Jones,” will take place at 6 p.m. on Sept. 26 and 27 at the museum. Nanette Vonnegut, daughter of acclaimed author Kurt Vonnegut, will read a short story by her maternal grandmother, Riah Cox, about her hospitalization in the 1940s.

Along with Jane Schultz, an IUPUI professor of English, Vonnegut will discuss a number of themes related to Cox’s story, including how mental illness affects families, the historical role of the nurse and the power of the arts to promote recovery.

The third program, titled “Leaving Home,” is an exhibit featuring newsletters produced by patients in the years leading up to the hospital’s closure in 1994. The exhibit opens Nov. 10 at the museum. That evening’s program begins with a 6 p.m. panel discussion about how the closing of the state hospital affected patients as well as Central Indiana residents who developed mental illness after the closing. Attendees may browse the exhibit beginning at 7 p.m.

All three programs require advance registration on the museum’s website. “Then There is No Need to Speak” is $5 for the public and free for students. “I Remember Jones” and the “Leaving Home” exhibit opening are free. “Leaving Home” will be on display at the Indiana Medical History Museum through March 2017.

“Voices from Central State” is supported by the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities program, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Arts Council of Indianapolis. It is presented by the Indiana Medical History Museum and the Medical Humanities and Health Studies program in the School of Liberal Arts with assistance from Discover Near West Indys.

View original post.

Roundtable Speaker Series | Anthropomorphic Techniques in the Worship of Mount Govardhan

Date: Thursday, March 24, 2016 Haberman Anthropomorphic Techniques in the Worship of Mount Govardhan Flyer
Time: 12:00 PM-1:30 PM
Location: IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute UL 4115P

This presentation examines the worship of stones from Mount Govardhan, a sacred hill in north-central India. Particular emphasis will be given to the anthropomorphic ritual process of dressing the revered stones and adding a face to them for the purpose of establishing and enhancing intimate relationships with them. Consideration will be given to the difference between such anthropomorphism and anthropocentrism. The ornamentation of stones will be illustrated with the use of powerpoint slides.

David L. Haberman is Professor of Religious Studies at Indiana University Bloomington and author of several scholarly articles and books, including Journey Through the Twelve Forests: An Encounter with Krishna (Oxford University Press, 1994), River of Love in an Age of Pollution: The Yamuna River of Northern India (University of California Press, 2006), and People Trees: Worship of Trees in Northern India (Oxford University Press, 2013). His interests, research, and teaching include human conceptions of and interactions with the nonhuman world as well as the manner in which religious worldviews shape human attitudes and behavior toward the environment and nonhuman world and deep ecology.

This talk is part of a roundtable speaker series sponsored by the Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society. The talk is co-sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.