IAHI Conference yields “An Anthropocene Primer”

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the Rivers of the Anthropocene project is proud to announce the official launch of An Anthropocene Primer, Version 1.0 on October 23, 2017. An Anthropocene Primer is an innovative open access, open peer review publication that guides learners through the complex concepts and debates related to the Anthropocene, including climate change, pollution, and environmental justice.

This born-digital publication (www.anthropoceneprimer.org) is a critical and timely resource for learners across multiple fields from academia, to industry, to philanthropy to learn about issues and topics relating to the Anthropocene, a framework for understanding environmental change that highlights human impact on earth systems.

An Anthropocene Primer was created to provide learners in museums, schools, non-profits, and formal research institutions with an entry point into some of the big concepts and debates that dominate discussions about the Anthropocene. The primer is not intended to be comprehensive (this is, after all, An Anthropocene Primer, not The Anthropocene Primer), nor is it intended to be didactic. The primer is a framework to guide individual and collaborative learning from the beginner to advanced levels.

Version 1.0 of An Anthropocene Primer is available for open peer review from October 23, 2017 through February 1, 2018. Open peer review allows users to contribute to and engage with fellow readers and the authors as the editors develop it for a final print and open access ebook version. A video tutorial on how to participate in open peer review is available at www.anthropoceneprimer.org/index.php/videotutorials/.

Edited by Jason M. Kelly and Fiona P. McDonald, An Anthropocene Primer emerged from the “Anthropology of the Anthropocene” workshop (http://www.anthropologyoftheanthropocene.org) hosted by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute in May 2017. The participants from this workshop make up list of authors: Jason M. Kelly (IUPUI, USA), Fiona P. McDonald (IUPUI, USA), Alejandro Camargo (University of Montreal, Canada), Amelia Moore (University of Rhode Island, USA), Mark Kesling (The daVinci Pursuit, USA), Ananya Ghoshal (Forum on Contemporary Theory, India), George Marcus (University of California, Irvine, USA), Paul Stoller (West Chester University, USA), Dominic Boyer (Rice University, USA), Serenella Iovino (University of Turin, Italy), Rebecca Ballestra (Artist, Monaco/Italy), Eduardo S. Brondizio (IU, Bloomington), Jim Enote (A:shiwiw A:wan Museum and Heritage Center, Zuni, USA), Ignatius Gutsa (University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe), Cymene Howe (Rice University, USA), Sue Jackson (Griffith University, Australia), Phil Scarpino (IUPUI, USA). This workshop was funded by the Wenner-Gren Foundation and the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities grant program.

Call for Proposals 2016-17 | Indiana University – Freie Universität Berlin Joint Research Workshops and Short-term Research Stays

With the goal of facilitating research cooperation, Freie Universität Berlin and Indiana University Seal of Freie Universitat of Berlinhave established a joint funding program to support annual joint research workshops and short-term research stays for the academic years 2016/17 and 2017/18. Each university will contribute € 30,000 / US$ 33,000 each year and commit to encouraging faculty and academic staff to seek support for joint projects from this fund.

FUB-IU joint research workshops and short-term research stays allow researchers to identify complementary research strengths and are intended to facilitate joint research collaborations. Proposals should have a clearly defined research focus and serve as a catalyst for the development of new research projects. The project format and duration is not pre-defined and workshops and research stays can take place in Berlin or in Indiana. Workshop participants should include both senior and junior researchers. Researchers can participate in more than one project provided that the projects are not submitted in the same cycle.

The scientific motivation for holding the workshop or planning a short-term research stay should be clearly explained, including how the involved FUB and IU institutes or departments can profit long term from this cooperation and what synergies will arise. Inclusion of German non-university research institutions such as Max Planck Institutes, Helmholtz Centers, and others, inSeal of Indiana University the projects is encouraged; however, any additional costs must be covered by those partners themselves. The call is not limited to a specific academic field; projects can be either focused on one discipline or be of interdisciplinary character.

Submission of proposals

Proposals can only be submitted by permanent/tenured professors of Freie Universität Berlin and tenured or tenure-track faculty members of Indiana University. It is required that workshops involve at least two tenure-stream faculty members, as well as at least two junior researchers (PhD students or post-docs), at each university. Total project costs shall not exceed € 10,000 for short-term research stays and € 15,000 for joint workshops (including travel), of which FUB and IU will each cover 50% under this call.

Selection criteria

Funding for joint research workshops and short-term research stays is provided on a competitive basis. Projects will be selected by a joint IU-FUB committee, giving particular attention to the following criteria:
• Clearly formulated goals of the project
• Information on envisaged synergies
• Level of concreteness of future joint research, including timeframe and information on plans for seeking extramural funding and steps for developing a joint proposal
• Compatibility with the FUB/IU research profiles (e.g. nature, excellence of project leaders, wide scope of the different fields/labs represented in the proposed project).

Submission and deadlines

Proposals for FUB-IU research workshops and short-term research stays should be submitted in English. They should not exceed 4 pages and have the following information attached:
• Timeframe/Date for the project (projects should be completed within 12 months of award)
• Budget calculation and budget justification
• Written statement of support from respective FUB/IU faculty/department.
• Information on project leaders on both sides and list of other FUB/IU participants

In 2016, joint proposals can be submitted at the following dates:
15 May, 2016
15 September, 2016

Researchers should submit their joint proposal simultaneously in Berlin and in Indiana. Proposals should be sent electronically to the following addresses:

Freie Universität Berlin:
Center for International Cooperation
Judith Winkler
Freie Universität Berlin
Tel: +49 30 838 73949
Email: judith.winkler@fu-berlin.de

Indiana University:
Shawn Reynolds
Office of the Vice President for International Affairs
Indiana University
Tel: +1 812 856 9024
Email: shreynol@iu.edu
For further information please contact the above listed staff.

Update: Division of Preservation and Access: Research and Development (formerly Preservation and Access Research and Development Grants)

Deadline
21 Jun 2016- for Projects Beginning January 2017National Endowment For The Humanitites Logo

A summary of this opportunity is listed below.

The Research and Development program supports projects that address major challenges in preserving or providing access to humanities collections and resources. These challenges include the need to find better ways to preserve materials of critical importance to the nation’s cultural heritage—from fragile artifacts and manuscripts to analog recordings and digital assets subject to technological obsolescence—and to develop advanced modes of organizing, searching, discovering, and using such materials.

This program recognizes that finding solutions to complex problems often requires forming interdisciplinary project teams, bringing together participants with expertise in the humanities; in preservation; and in information, computer, and natural science.

All projects must demonstrate how advances in preservation and access would benefit the cultural heritage community in supporting humanities research, teaching, or public programming

The deadline is confirmed now to give applicants the opportunity to start preparing their applications. Updated guidelines will be posted by NEH at least two months in advance of the deadline.

Sponsor
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)

African Studies Association panel discusses our response to ebola-related stigma and violence targeting Africans and first responders

indexThe African Studies Association will be holding its 57th Annual Meeting in Indianapolis next week. As part of our Annual Meeting, the Association will host a pre-conference workshop, “Responding to Ebola-Related Stigma and Violence Targeting Africans and First Responders” on Wednesday, Nov 19, 9:30 am-12:00 pm at the JW Marriott Indianapolis, Room 105. This workshop is being organized by a member of the African Studies Association Board of Directors, Dr. Sheryl McCurdy.

This workshop seeks to bring together interdisciplinary experts to discuss the Ebola crisis and possible ways forward, as well as the development of possible responses and resources for future teach-ins and forums. Current panelists include Dr. McCurdy, Dr. Pamela Scully, Emory University, Dr. Mary Beth Riner, Indiana University, and Dr. Ruth Stone, Indiana University.

The School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is a sponsor of this year’s meeting, and as part of your sponsorship benefits, we would like to open the workshop, free of charge, to interested students and faculty from the School.

Interested students and faculty can sign up to attend the workshop via this form.

Registration will be granted on a first come, first serve basis, and will remain open until the workshop hits capacity.

Collaborative Research Grants (IUCRG) Applications Available Now

imagesIndiana University is pleased to announce the 2014-2015 Collaborative Research Grants program (IUCRG). This opportunity is open to faculty on all Indiana University campuses. The goals of this competition are to facilitate and support outstanding research and cutting edge discoveries by teams of experts who have not worked together previously in the project’s subject matter. Teams should include experts from different campuses, schools, departments, or disciplines. The maximum funding per project will be $75,000.

The intent of this initiative is to support research which will significantly advance a research field and in doing so, impact the lives of Indiana residents, the U.S. and the world. The program as a whole is designed to help increase Indiana University’s competitiveness for external funding involving innovative and transformative research; proposals must therefore include explicit plans for securing external funding for projects extending from the findings of the IUCRG. IUCRG recipients are required to submit a proposal for external funding within 18 months from the date that IUCRG funds are available. Applicants should make explicit their plans for targeting external funding including but not limited to the funding agency, their RFAs, and institute/program.

IUCRG will fund projects in emerging fields of study, innovative or multidisciplinary research with the potential to significantly increase Indiana University’s research competitiveness, reputation and funding. Proposals should fit at least one of the following subject areas:

  1. Social and Behavioral sciences: innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to issues of local, state, national or international significance; educational research including but not limited to effective approaches to K‐12 STEM education (not curricular development);
  2. Biological and Health Sciences; innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to issues in neuroscience, -omics, biological, biomedical or chemical sciences;
  3. Physical, Applied, and Computer Sciences: innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to compelling issues in physical and applied sciences including material sciences, engineering research, or approaches to other areas of research that rely upon innovative uses of technology, engineering, or computer and applied sciences.

All proposals should indicate which category or mix of categories from this list of areas best describes the proposed research. Arts and Humanities proposals that do not fit into these categories should be submitted to Indiana University’s New Frontiers seed funding program.

Eligibility: All faculty and staff whose appointments allow them to submit external proposals are allowed to apply. A minimum of two faculty members from different campuses schools or departments, or different disciplines from the same campus must collaborate as co-principal investigators on the proposed project. Projects must be for NEW areas of research for the investigators, within their areas of expertise, but not a continuation of previous or current research activities. Faculty previously submitting together for external funding (NIH, NSF, DOD, etc.) are not eligible unless the IUCRG proposal represents a new area of research, or a new collaborator(s) is added to enhance the breadth of the proposed research.

Deadlines: December 3, 2014 (SLA Internal Deadline November 26), 5 pm

Terms of Awards: Applicants can request up to $75,000 for one year. Budgets must be justified and consistent with the scope of the proposed project. Applicants must commit to submitting an external funding proposal within 18 months from the start of the award; failure to do so will preclude eligibility for future internal funding programs. Recipients of funding in 2014-15 will participate in an open Workshop in the spring of 2016 where awardees will present project results and detailed plans to secure external funding. Final reports are required at study completion detailing the project’s progress including proposals submitted and funding received. IUCRG support should be acknowledged in all related publications and reports. Award notices are expected to go out no later than February 21 with funds available March 15, 2015.

Request for Proposals (PDF)

Guidelines

Collaborative Research Grants (IUCRG) Available Now

imagesIndiana University is pleased to announce the 2014-2015 Collaborative Research Grants program (IUCRG). This opportunity is open to faculty on all Indiana University campuses. The goals of this competition are to facilitate and support outstanding research and cutting edge discoveries by teams of experts who have not worked together previously in the project’s subject matter. Teams should include experts from different campuses, schools, departments, or disciplines. The maximum funding per project will be $75,000.

The intent of this initiative is to support research which will significantly advance a research field and in doing so, impact the lives of Indiana residents, the U.S. and the world. The program as a whole is designed to help increase Indiana University’s competitiveness for external funding involving innovative and transformative research; proposals must therefore include explicit plans for securing external funding for projects extending from the findings of the IUCRG. IUCRG recipients are required to submit a proposal for external funding within 18 months from the date that IUCRG funds are available. Applicants should make explicit their plans for targeting external funding including but not limited to the funding agency, their RFAs, and institute/program.

IUCRG will fund projects in emerging fields of study, innovative or multidisciplinary research with the potential to significantly increase Indiana University’s research competitiveness, reputation and funding. Proposals should fit at least one of the following subject areas:

Social and Behavioral sciences: innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to issues of local, state, national or international significance; educational research including but not limited to effective approaches to K‐12 STEM education (not curricular development)
Biological and Health Sciences; innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to issues in neuroscience, -omics, biological, biomedical or chemical sciences
Physical, Applied, and Computer Sciences: innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to compelling issues in physical and applied sciences including material sciences, engineering research, or approaches to other areas of research that rely upon innovative uses of technology, engineering, or computer and applied sciences

All proposals should indicate which category or mix of categories from this list of areas best describes the proposed research. Arts and Humanities proposals that do not fit into these categories should be submitted to Indiana University’s New Frontiers seed funding program.

Eligibility: All faculty and staff whose appointments allow them to submit external proposals are allowed to apply. A minimum of two faculty members from different campuses schools or departments, or different disciplines from the same campus must collaborate as co-principal investigators on the proposed project. Projects must be for NEW areas of research for the investigators, within their areas of expertise, but not a continuation of previous or current research activities. Faculty previously submitting together for external funding (NIH, NSF, DOD, etc.) are not eligible unless the IUCRG proposal represents a new area of research, or a new collaborator(s) is added to enhance the breadth of the proposed research.

Deadline: December 3rd, 2014 5 p.m. http://research.iu.edu/funding_collaborative.shtml.

Request for Proposals (PDF)

Philosophy and the (Non – Academic) Professions : A Panel Discussion

UntitledThursday, 25 Sept., 4:30pm
IUPUI Campus Center, Rm. 307

Bring Plenty of Questions!

Is there any connection between philosophy (or, more generally, the humanities) and the (non-academic) professions? Can one enrich the other? Is philosophy (or the humanities) of any value to professionals? Our panelists will talk about these and related questions!

Panelists:

Jan Frazier (Management Consultant)
Jack Hope (Operator, Hope Plumbing Co.)
Emily Krueger (Manager, Foundation Partnerships, Best Friends Animal Society)
Richard Ranucci (Attorney at Law)
Patrick F. Sullivan (Principal Consultant, JBW Group International)

For more information contact Prof. John Tilley, IUPUI Dept. of Philosophy, by email or by phone at 274-4690.

Gov. Pence recognizes 2014 class of Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellows

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Gov. Mike Pence (right, standing) and several 2014 Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching fellows

Ten aspiring teachers — including an oil industry engineer and a product development and quality control officer from the manufactured housing industry — will enroll at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis as members of the 2014 class of Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellows.

Now in its sixth year at IUPUI, the Woodrow Wilson program is designed to prepare recent college graduates or working professionals with strong backgrounds in the STEM fields  — science, technology, engineering, and math — to teach in high-need secondary schools.

The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation recently named a class of 45 2014 Indiana fellows. Indiana Gov. Mike Pence recognized the selected fellows June 9 during a Statehouse press conference attended by officials from the foundation, IUPUI and the other participating universities: Ball State University, Purdue University, University of Indianapolis and Valparaiso University.

“Attracting talent in science, technology, engineering and math to the teaching field will help our students better understand and be successful in these fields, which are so important to our state’s future success,” Pence said.

The Woodrow Wilson program at IUPUI is an interdisciplinary program between the IU School of Education, Purdue School of Science and Purdue School of Engineering and Technology. The IUPUI program offers a residency in which students are paired with a master teacher as a mentor for an full academic year.

“We feel this is the best way to prepare exemplary and experienced teachers for today’s diverse schools,” said Pat Rogan, executive associate dean of the IU School of Education at IUPUI. “Our program has been successful in preparing a total of 66 secondary STEM teachers over the course of five years, and these teachers have secured jobs in high-need schools — primarily in Marion County.

“We continue to attract incredibly talented candidates who want to teach in high-need schools.  Our program prepares them to be successful via in-depth content expertise and leading-edge teaching and learning practices, intensive clinical experiences, strong mentorship and support during their first three years of teaching — all in partnership with our middle and high school partners.”

The teaching fellowship, started in Indiana, is now established in Ohio, Michigan, New Jersey and Georgia. Each Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellow receives $30,000 to complete a specially designed, leading-edge master’s degree program based on a yearlong classroom experience. In return, fellows commit to teach for three years in the Indiana schools that most need strong STEM teachers. Throughout the three-year commitment, fellows receive intensive ongoing support and mentoring.

“At IUPUI, we have designed our Woodrow Wilson STEM teacher preparation program to reflect teaching as a practice-based profession, much like a medical residency,” said Kathy Marrs, director of the IUPUI Woodrow Wilson Program. “Woodrow Wilson fellows at IUPUI complete a master’s degree program that combines a solid academic base, a strong one-year clinical teaching residency in our local urban schools, a three-year new teacher induction experience, and ongoing opportunities such as Project Lead the Way or special education dual certification.”

The IUPUI program is the only Woodrow Wilson Fellowship program in the country that offers dual certification in both STEM and special education certification.

The 10 IUPUI 2014 Woodrow Wilson teaching fellows, listed with previous graduation dates and majors, are:

  • Jonathan Bernardi: Amherst College ’99, Russian
  • Justin Bush: IUPUI ’13, biology
  • William Johnson: Purdue University ’07, mechanical engineering technology
  • Danielle Lord: Albion College ’08, geological sciences; University of New Mexico ’13, M.S., earth and planetary sciences
  • Tamara Markey: Purdue University ’94, industrial engineering
  • Donovan McCubbins: Bellarmine University ’13, chemistry
  • Taylor Mobley: Indiana University Bloomington ’14, chemistry
  • Katherine Russo: Indiana University Bloomington ’12, human biology
  • Daryl Traylor: Eastern Kentucky University ’13, biology; IUPUI ’14, M.S., biology
  • Lauren Wyatt: IUPUI ’13, biology

New IU ethics consortium announces funding for research projects

The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society is offering funding for research proposals from IU faculty that explore the theme of wonder, especially as it intersects with nature and the environment.

The IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. The consortium was launched in January 2014 to leverage IU’s strengths in the interdisciplinary study of religion and advance research in key thematic areas.

This is the first call for research proposals from the new consortium. The research proposals are part of the first phase of a two-year thematic initiative — “Wonder and the Natural World” — sponsored by the consortium.

rachel carsonThe approaching 50th anniversary of Rachel Carson’s book “The Sense of Wonder” in 2015 makes the IU consortium’s theme especially timely, said Lisa Sideris, associate professor of religious studies in the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington, who is also the inaugural director of the consortium.

“Wonder has played a key role in the environmental movement since that movement’s inception,” Sideris said. “We’re seeking proposals that ‘push the envelope’ in exploring the intersecting themes of wonder and nature, such as war and nature (‘shock and awe’), children’s natural spirituality, cinematic or fictional representations of wonder, even areas such as genetic engineering and wonder in artificial environments, like theme parks.”

Funding of up to $5,000 for individuals and up to $10,000 for teams is available. Full-time, tenure-track IU faculty members from any IU campus are eligible to apply, with proposals that cut across disciplines, units or campuses especially welcome.

The deadline for proposals is Sept. 1, 2014. Funding awards will be announced at the end of October. Recipients will present their preliminary findings and works-in-progress at a daylong symposium at IU Bloomington in May 2015.

The full call for proposals may be found online on the Department of Religious Studies website. Proposals should be emailed to Abby Gitlitz. For additional information on the consortium or the funding awards, contact Lisa Sideris.

Conference at IUPUI explores transdisciplinary approach to problems with earth’s river systems

rivers image

Since the dawn of civilization, access to freshwater, especially in river environments, has helped determine where human populations have flourished on planet Earth.

Over the past two centuries — an age that many geologists are now calling the Anthropocene — humans have reshaped the planet’s biophysical systems, threatening the availability of freshwater and consequentially the stability of ecologies.

This situation has created one of the most important and complex problems that humans will face in the 21st century, according to an international group of researchers convening in Indianapolis this month to launch a seven-year study of how to mitigate the threat of water insecurity.

The researchers will hold the Rivers of the Anthropocene Conference on Jan. 23 and 24 in the Klipsch Theater, on the lower level of the Campus Center at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis in downtown Indianapolis.

The conference, which brings together 25 scientists, humanists, social scientists, artists, policy makers and community organizers from five countries, is open to the public and is the kickoff event for The Rivers of the Anthropocene Project, a long-range research effort. Leaders say the project will take a transdisciplinary approach to help us better understand the complex dynamics between humans and their river environments. Faculty from IUPUI are partnering with faculty from Newcastle University in the United Kingdom as project leaders. The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute is organizing the event.

“The majority of the world’s population is threatened by water insecurity and biodiversity loss,” said Jason M. Kelly, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute director and a Rivers of the Anthropocene Project director. “Even here in Indianapolis, we face potential water shortages in the next decades. We can solve these problems, but the solutions are not simply technological; they are cultural, social and political. They require experts from across the disciplines working hand-in-hand with communities and policy makers.”

By mapping the ecological, geographical, cultural, social, political and scientific histories of river systems, the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project will provide insight on issues of relevance to public policy, environmental conservation and heritage management.

For the January 2014 conference, presenters will offer case studies from around the globe, with particular emphasis on the Ohio and Tyne rivers. Topics for discussion and papers presented at the conference include human geography and river environments; the challenge of Anthropocene rivers; rivers on a human scale; earth systems; and the relationship between human systems and river systems.

Speakers include Bill Werkheiser, acting deputy director of the U.S. Geological Survey; and environmental artist Mary Miss.

Support for the conference comes from Keramida Inc., the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana Humanities, IUPUI School of Science, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the Center for Earth and Environmental Science at IUPUI, the Center for Urban Ecology at Butler University, the IUPUI Center for Urban Health, Newcastle University, the Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability, IU Office of the Vice President for Research, IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and IUPUI Office of the Chancellor.

Admission is $45. Registrants may purchase lunch. Discounted parking will be available on the ground level of the adjacent Vermont Street Garage.