Herron’s 2017 Undergraduate Student Exhibition

The Galleries at Herron School of Art and Design are pleased to present the 2017 Undergraduate Student Exhibition, located in Eskenazi Hall on the IUPUI campus.

The exhibition is an annual tradition featuring exceptional works produced by Herron students across a variety of artistic disciplines. Chris Reitz, gallery director of the Hite Art Institute, will serve as a guest juror and will award prizes for the top student entries.

Robert Horvath, Gold Room, 2017

Coinciding with the student exhibition is “Petit Mort,” a selection of oil paintings and digital compositions created by Associate Professor Robert Horvath during a recent sabbatical. Inspired by the complex nature of 18th-century figurative porcelain, Horvath’s newest body of work juxtaposes homoerotic imagery and Rococo style to raise questions of censorship in relation to present-day social issues for the LGBTQ community.

The exhibitions open with a public reception at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St., on November 29 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. The Undergraduate Student Exhibition will take place in the Berkshire, Reese, Paul, and Marsh Galleries, with “Petit Mort” showing in the Basile Gallery. During the reception, visitors can shop locally from a selection of affordable prints and ceramic wares made by Herron artists while supporting student clubs. The student sale will take place in the grand hallway of Eskenazi Hall from 4 to 8:30 p.m.

The Galleries at Herron are free and open to the public Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesdays until 8 p.m. For more information, visit HerronGalleries.org.

Parking is available courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor’s section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or on the upper floors of the Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6 p.m. Park on any floor after 6 p.m. and bring your parking ticket to the Herron galleries for validation.

Video installation by Ragnar Kjartansson and The National headlines summer exhibitions at the Herron Galleries

This summer, the Herron School of Art and Design will feature the first Indiana exhibition of “A Lot of Sorrow,” a video installation by Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson and indie-rock band The National.

“A Lot of Sorrow,” one of Kjartansson’s most well-known and acclaimed works, is a six-hour, single-channel video of a performance recorded at MoMA PS1 in 2013. For this piece, Kjartansson, best known for his durational performance and video work, invited The National to play their hit song “Sorrow” live on stage repeatedly and continuously for six hours, nine minutes, and 35 seconds. As hours pass and fatigue sets in, the band members experiment and improvise, yielding unexpected outcomes while Kjartansson periodically steps on stage to offer food and drink.

Kjartansson explores the creative potential of repetition by stretching a single pop song into a six-hour concert. Filmed with multiple cameras, Kjartansson’s large-screen video projection becomes an immersive experience that ARTnewscalled “astonishingly riveting,” and The New YorkTimes critic Roberta Smith described as “unimaginably expansive.”

The video will start from the beginning each day, allowing interested visitors to watch the entire 6-hour performance during gallery hours.

“A Lot of Sorrow” debuted at Luhring Augustine Bushwick in New York City in 2014 with more recent screenings at The Art Institute of Chicago, the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C.

An opening reception will take place from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m. on Friday, July 7 in conjunction with the Indianapolis Downtown Artists & Dealer’s Association’s (IDADA) monthly First Friday art tour. The exhibition runs June 14 to September 2, 2017 in Herron’s Berkshire, Reese, and Paul Galleries. All Herron exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Also on view this summer in the Herron Galleries:

  • “Mirror Mirror,” featuring new paintings and a site-specific installation by New York-based artist Jaqueline Cedar (June 14 to September 2) in the Marsh Gallery;
  • “Fold, Staple, Riot: The Art and Subculture of Zine Making” highlighting local and national self-publishing communities (June 14 to July 15) in the Basile Gallery;
  • New work by Herron alumnus Samuel Levi Jones (B.F.A. Photography ’09) from July 26 to September 2 in the Basile Gallery.

Parking is available courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or on the upper floors of the Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6 p.m. Park on any floor after 6 p.m. Bring your parking ticket to the Herron galleries for validation.

To view the original press release for this event, visit the Herron School of Art and Design website.

Reading at the Table Series to feature Anila Agha

nbaker_ruag_agha_150929_3074copyIntersections

Feb. 15, 2017, 11:30am-1:00pm

University Place Conference Center, Room 200

Anila Quayyum Agha, MFA, Herron School of Art and Design

Imagine a single lightbulb inside a cube made of six 6.5 ft.-square panels of wood with intricate laser cutouts and hung from a ceiling. When the light is on, the sculpture floods the room with lace-like shadows resembling architectural motifs found in mosques. That is “Intersections.”

At the 2014 ArtPrize competition held in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Intersections wowed audiences and judges alike. It swept both the public and jury awards at ArtPrize and resulted in prize winnings of $300,000.  Professor Anila Agha’s work has garnered many honors, competitive grants, and was selected for display nationally at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, and internationally at the National Museum of Sculpture in Spain.

Join Dr. Agha to learn more about her vision that resulted in this magnificent piece of art.

The annual Reading at the Table series provides an opportunity for members of the IUPUI community to celebrate published books written by IUPUI faculty or staff. During each luncheon, the featured author/editor will read from his or her work and open the floor to discussion. Seating is limited; registration is encouraged and can be completed on the campus Events Page. Walk-ins will be handled on a first-come, first-served basis—if space is available. Purchase of a buffet-style lunch for $13.00 (dessert and soft drinks not included) is required to attend this event.

Artist Faith Ringgold to speak at Herron Undergraduate Student Exhibition opening

tar-beachArtist Faith Ringgold will present the 2016 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture at the Herron School of Art and Design.

The event will take place at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 30 in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. The lecture, with a book signing and reception immediately following, coincides with the opening of the Undergraduate Student Exhibition and is free and open to the public.

Ringgold creates art in many mediums, including quilting, which she has described as a way to make her subject matter more approachable. Her art and activism of the 1960s and ’70s called out museums for not being inclusive of works by women and people of color. “Tar Beach,” one of the most famous of her narrative quilts, now resides at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

Ringgold created “Tar Beach” as part of theWoman on a Bridge” series, begun in the late 1980s. The story of a young girl’s resilient flights of fancy from the “tar beach” rooftop of her family home also became the first of 20 children’s books written and/or illustrated by Ringgold. “Tar Beach” has won numerous awards, including a Caldecott Honor and the Coretta Scott King illustrator award.

Ringgold is the recipient of more than 75 awards, including 23 honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degrees and fellowships. Her work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art and the Boston Museum of Fine Art. She lives and works in Englewood, New Jersey. She is a professor emerita of the University of California, San Diego, where she taught art from 1984 until 2002. 

About the Undergraduate Exhibition
This year’s Undergraduate Exhibition jurist is Liz Garvey of Garvey Simon Art Access in New York City. Garvey will choose works from student submissions across a wide variety of media. The exhibition will take place in the Berkshire, Reese, Paul, and Marsh galleries. The Basile Gallery will feature a sampling of broadsides and artists’ books from the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here CoalitionThe collection represents the solidarity with the people of Iraq that poured forth from around the globe in response to the 2007 car bombing of the intellectual center of Baghdad.

About the Jane Fortune Lecture
“I want to make an impact on the community that surrounds me and help make the arts accessible to our residents,” said Jane Fortune, author, cultural editor, art historian, art collector, and philanthropist, when she established the Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture. This series brings prominent female artists to the Herron School of Art and Design and has included Polly Apfelbaum, Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons, Deborah Butterfield, Judy Chicago, and Eleanor Antin. For gallery hours and parking information, visit the Herron Galleries online.

View original press release from the IUPUI Newsroom.

Award winning alumnus Rogelio Gutierrez returns to speak at Made in Mexico opening September 30

The photography and installation-based art of Herron School of Art and Design alumni who herron_posterwork and live in the United States but share cultural and familial roots in Mexico will be featured in Made in Mexico, opening on Wednesday, September 30 with an artist’s talk, live performance and reception beginning at 6:00 p.m.

The exhibition, in the Berkshire, Reese and Paul galleries, will feature works by Leticia Alvarez, Susana Cortez (M.F.A. in Sculpture, 2013), Rogelio Gutierrez (M.F.A. in Printmaking, 2011) and Tommey Reyes (B.F.A. in Photography, 2005), curated by Linda Adele Goodine.

A companion video installation by Goodine, Made in Mexico, her place, almost her place, not her place, will open in the Marsh Gallery.

New works by Meredith Knapp Brickell, associate professor of art and art history at DePauw University, will open in the Basile Gallery. Brickell is one of the recipients of the 2015-16 Creative Renewal Arts Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

Gutierrez will present the visiting artist’s talk in the Basile Auditorium, to be immediately followed by Cortez’s live performance.

Gutierrez went on from Herron to a tenure track as an award-winning professor of printmaking at the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University-School of Art, Tempe. “I was extremely honored and grateful to be selected for the Herberger Institute School of Arts’ Endowed Professor of Art Award, which provides funding for research and travel,” he said. It allowed him to create the solo exhibition FARMAS, which debuted at Arts Visalia Visual Art Center in California and traveled to Casa Siglo XIX Museo-Sebastian in Chihuahua, Mexico. Its next stop is scheduled for the Slocomb Galleries at Middle Tennessee State University in spring 2016.

The California native studied at Herron because he “wanted to get out of my comfort zone in the West and see what the Midwest was all about; Indianapolis was the perfect place for that. Herron has a strong reputation in the academic print world and I was interested in the public aspect of the curriculum.”

His focus is on printmaking because “It is a democratic art form that is meant for the masses. Printmaking has a rich history of important Mexican printmakers like Leopoldo Mendez and Jose Guadalupe Posada who were a big part of the Mexican Revolution Movement. Printmakers and artists associated with that movement truly had an important message; they are some of my favorite artists and inspire me to make work that connects to a wide audience including your non-traditional art goer,” he said.

There is likely to be some lively political discussion during his talk, given the season: “Politics always make an impact in my work,” Gutierrez said. “As you know, I am in the ring of fire here in Arizona when it comes to immigration and Latino issues. I have a project that I am working on that is related to these issues; I will share it during my lecture.”

Yasmine K. Kasem wins Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award

The International Sculpture Center has announced that Yasmine K. Kasem (B.F.A. in sculptureSculpture, ’15) is a recipient of the Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award for 2015 for her work El Qamesha El Wahida (The Lonely Cloth)

In a letter notifying associate professors of sculpture Eric Nordgulen and Greg Hull, who were Kasem’s faculty nominators, a center representative said there were “an exceptional number of nominees this year; 423 students … .” The nominees came from more than 158 college and university sculpture programs in North America and abroad.

The judges, all from New York, included sculptor Chakaia Booker, Dia Art Foundation Assistant Curator Kelly Kivland, and CUNY Professor of Fine Arts Maki Hajikano. They selected Kasem’s sculpture after deliberating over 952 images of sculptural works, the letter said.

The award includes an exhibition with catalog at Grounds for Sculpture—a sculpture garden on the former New Jersey State Fairgrounds in Trenton. The exhibition will take place October 2015 through March 2016 with an opening reception for honorees and their faculty sponsors on October 24. Sculpture magazine will also feature the awards in its October issue. Kasem’s work will be added to an archive of winners on the International Sculpture Center’s website.

“It’s very good for an undergraduate student to get this award,” said Nordgulen.

Although Kasem joins recipients from Herron including alumni Emily Stergar (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ‘04) and James Darr (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ‘03), they had already graduated from Herron and were nominated by the graduate schools they were attending at the universities of Arizona and Delaware, respectively.

Kasem said her experiences at Herron have been among the best of her life. “The faculty and facilities gave me the guidance and resources I needed to explore and develop. But not only that, I saw that Herron genuinely cares about its students and their ability to succeed. I owe so much of my success to Herron, my professors and peers. I’ve gotten the wonderful opportunity to work alongside so many talented artists and grow with them in the studio as well.”

“I’m truly grateful for being selected for this award,” she said. “If you would have told me four years ago that I would’ve accomplished what I have, I wouldn’t have believed you. I was so insecure about what I was making and how it held up in comparison to my peers. But all of the positive support, honest critiques and conversations I’ve had with friends, faculty and staff at Herron is what motivated me to keep working hard through any obstacle I encountered.”

As she got closer to applying for college, Kasem said, “I realized that I felt much stronger about visual art and that it would be a better fit for me than studying jazz,” as had been her initial intent.

Once she decided on Herron, there was no question she wanted to study sculpture. “Growing up, I always looked for ways to keep myself occupied,” she said, “which usually led me to building something in the back yard, or playing with the leftover clay my mom had from making beads for her jewelry. Kasem loved making something beautiful out of nothing, but “wanted to work with even more materials, so sculpture was the logical choice.”

Kasem has applied for residencies in Egypt and Switzerland and sees her future at an as yet undetermined graduate school. She’s making new work for a group show in the fall.

“Now that I’ve graduated, I haven’t slowed down at all,” she said. “After that, just continuing my process and hoping I can get my message across to as many people as I can” is the plan.

“Career wise, I’d love to teach, and that’s something I’ve discovered more recently. On the other hand, working at the Herron Galleries has really instilled a deep interest in what goes into running a gallery. But beyond all of that, I want to be a successful artist. That’s what I’m working towards and that’s what gets me up in the morning.”

Nontraditional Herron juniors help IMS embody ‘Back Home Again in Indiana’

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway featured work by Herron juniors Sarah Chumbley and alicia-for-blog_resizedAlicia Stephens in the official event program for the 2015 Indianapolis 500.

Chumbley, a visual communication design major, was a spring intern in creative services at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, reporting to Dawn DeBellis. Working on the publication design, Chumbley asked Debellis to consider a painting for page 23, to illustrate a favorite Hoosier song, Back Home Again in Indiana. Debellis agreed.

Stephens, a painting major, had created Cross That Bridge, an oil on canvas, to fulfill a school assignment. She painted from a photo she’d taken in 2012 at Shades State Park. “My daughter, who was seven at the time, was afraid to cross a log over a creek. Her dad is on the far side of the log,” Stephens said.

Stephens entered IUPUI later in life than most students. “I’ve been painting for 20 years,” she said. “I had success in selling my work, but I was stuck in landscapes. I didn’t know how to get out of it. My husband suggested that I come to Herron.”

Chumbley came to Herron after three and a half years as a chemistry major. “It was senior year and I just wasn’t happy,” she recalled. “I finally just decided to do something about it. I had a meeting with my advisor and told her that my dream job would be to work somewhere like Hallmark, where I’d have a creative outlet in a business setting, and she referred me to [Herron academic advisor] Abbey Chambers. An hour later I was registered as a visual communication design major. It was terrifying at the time, but I honestly believe it was the best decision I’ve ever made.”

Stephens and Chumbley first met in a drawing class two years ago. “I think we clicked instantly in that we were both older than your average college student,” Chumbley said. “When Alicia showed me Cross That Bridge I felt like it was her strongest piece yet.”

Chumbley got the Speedway placement through Associate Professor Paula Differding. “She asked if I had an internship yet and told me I should apply for the one at the IMS because it sounded perfect for me. She knew I was familiar with the racing scene; my mom owns Hinchman Racing Uniforms.”

“I hadn’t put together a resume or portfolio,” Chumbley continued. “I was hesitant and intimidated, but she insisted and so I applied anyway. Looking back, it was just incredible luck. I can’t imagine loving an internship more than I love this one, and it basically fell in my lap. There’s a reason why we all call Professor Differding ‘Mama Paula’. She knows what she’s doing!”

The official event program was one of dozens of assignments Chumbley completed during her internship, which began in mid-March. “The event program is 100 pages plus,” she said, “so it’s pretty much all hands on deck. I had a lot of freedom to design, as long as it fit with the aesthetic of the rest of the pages.”

“I was looking through old Indy 500 programs for inspiration I could use for the Back Home Again page,” she said. “I saw one that had a landscape painting and I thought of Alicia immediately. I asked her to send me some pictures of her work. In the back of my mind, I already knew I’d choose Cross that Bridge. It went with the song lyrics. When I shared a draft of the page with my coworkers, they agreed that it was perfect.”

Stephens credits excellent instructors for her success as a student, but her work ethic plays a big part. She has earned multiple scholarships. “I could not tell my son and daughter to go to college if I did not have a degree. I’ve shown them that if they work hard, they can treat every project as job they were hired to do. They can receive recognition,” she said.

“I was a high school drop out in ninth grade,” continued Stephens. “I did not have a supportive environment. I didn’t think I was smart enough to go to college, so I never tried. My sister had encouraged me to get my GED in 1995. To come to IUPUI, I had to take extra math classes to resolve what I missed not finishing high school. My husband helped me get through those classes and I finally made it here.

“I have learned so much. I can’t wait for senior year. Color theory was so important from my first semester here. I learned how to create the illusion of depth. I look back at my paintings from before Herron and think wow, I really was an amateur.”

Editor’s note: In June, Alicia learned that she has multiple myeloma. She is facing multiple rounds of chemotherapy and a likely stem cell transplant. She has started a GoFundMe campaign to help her family offset the costs of her illness that are not covered by their insurance. To find out more and to donate, visit Myeloma Cancer chemo fund.

Summer Youth Program Fund feeds thinking and making at Herron Creativity Camps

At Herron School of Art and Design, if you can think it, you can make it. That holds true for herron_posterthe 147 youths who attended this year’s Summer Creativity Camps.

Camp Cartoon, Camp Tomorrow, Camp Noise and Camp Kinetics each ran for a week in Eskenazi Hall. Students explored, discovered and made things—often with digital technology in the school’s newly established Think It Make It Lab.

“These new camps are what the students are looking for,” said instructor Lauren Saunders (B.A.E., 2015). “Bringing together traditional studio art practices and digital technologies opens up a whole new set of skills for the students. It also takes them out of their comfort zone and results in great brainstorming and exploration.”

Hannah, a 13-year-old camper, tried all of the creativity camps. “I came to camp to learn how to do animation and broaden my experiences,” she said. She described the unfamiliar hand-to-computer processes in Camp Cartoon as really tough at first, but “the more I did it, the easier it got. I feel like I really pushed myself.”

A scholarship made it possible for Hannah to attend. “Scholarships are good,” she said, “because there are a lot of kids who want to come to camp but can’t. That’s too bad because they may not be able to become what they want to be. I feel lucky.”

Thanks to donors including the Summer Youth Program Fund—a collaborative coordinated by the Central Indiana Community Foundation and Lilly Endowment, Inc.—many Marion County youths had something fun to do this summer.

Sisters Nyela, 12, and Mesgana, 13, said their mother was looking for educational camps online when she found Herron. The pair said she was happy to learn that scholarships were available. The girls attended camp for two weeks. They both wanted to thank whoever made the scholarships possible. “It’s neat that two people from the same family got to come to camp,” Nyela said.

This year’s Summer Youth Program Fund partners included Lilly Endowment, Inc., Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation and the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation.

The Lacy Foundation also supported Herron Creativity Camps through its support to Herron’s Community Learning Programs.

Herron’s Community Learning Programs have undoubtedly made a positive mark on the lives of aspiring artists. To learn more about these programs, visit www.HerronCommunity.org

Goodine and Richardson say farewell to Herron after 59 combined years of teaching

There are a lot of meet-cute stories at Herron School of Art and Design. One belongs to goodine_richardson_mainthe departing duo of Linda Adele Goodine, former Chancellor’s Professor of Photography and Intermedia and Mark Richardson, former associate professor of Ceramics. A school secretary introduced them to each other a quarter of a century ago. “She said to Mark, ‘Look at that skinny photo instructor. She looks like she needs to be fed,’” recalled Goodine. They went to Some Guys, a popular place for pizza.

Their apartments were within walking distance of the school. Later, said Richardson, “We could have bought a small house, but we bought this crazy, empty church,” just a few degrees north on the same street in the historic neighborhood. The vast space, fronted by a lush garden today, became a hub for creative activity and socializing.

Richardson earned his M.F.A. degree from IU Bloomington in 1980. He started at Herron the same year as a visiting lecturer and stayed for 34 years. He retired in December 2014.

Goodine, who holds master’s degrees from Ithaca College (1981) and Florida State University (1983), was recruited in 1989 as a visiting artist. “I came with an established career and had 20 museum shows under my belt,” she said. Her 26-year career at Herron ended on May 31.

Both Richardson and Goodine have family on the east coast. His family is in Massachusetts. Although she was born in New York, Goodine said, “I came of age in the South as an artist and I go back down to the Gulf or the Everglades to do my work.” With their daughter, Ella Richardson Goodine, out of the nest and studying French theory and gendered sound art at Smith College, it was natural for the couple to look beyond the Midwest.

“I am well into my 50s, and I wanted to start spending more time in my studio,” said Goodine. “I probably would have stayed at Herron just a year or so longer.” However, a position in Greenville, North Carolina, caught her eye.

“It was as if the job description had been written for her,” Richardson said. So she has accepted the appointment as Carol Grotnes Belk Distinguished Professor in the School of Art and Design at Eastern Carolina University, beginning this August.

Goodine said she will be teaching three classes per year and have more time for research, including several book projects she has had in mind. “There’s a real connection fit-wise between there and Herron,” she said. “It has a very familiar feel.”

Richardson and Goodine said what they loved most about their time at Herron was their students.

“When you have a big group of curious people—for example, last semester’s junior class—I was so lucky to have them. They were ready to think differently at any moment,” said Goodine.

“You look at the art you make and the kids you teach as your children,” Richardson said.

Both professors empathize with parents’ varied reactions when students announce their plans to go to art school.

Richardson said his own parents were a little nervous but supportive.

“My dad wanted me to go to law school with my sister and start a family business,” said Goodine. “‘Why would you take a vow of poverty?’ he said. That worry for parents never changes—that connectedness to security and what that means for livelihood.”

“I try to teach my students to be full-brained, to reign in their intuition through technique and go past their craft,” she said. “If they never make another piece of art after they leave here is doesn’t matter. They have adaptability tenacity, and the ability to think critically.”

Richardson and Goodine still remember their early artistic influencers reverently. For Richardson, they were the international ceramicist Gregor Giesmann and folk potter Shoji Hamada. For Goodine, they were her grandfather, Arthur H. Richards, a photojournalist for Reuters and Gannett, and Roger Mertin, “a photographer’s photographer,” she said.

From Adele, I learned that good art starts from a place of questioning rather than knowing. Her great gift as an educator was to create a space where I could challenge what I thought I knew, about the world and myself, and use that inquiry as a basis for making better images.

She inspired this quest to really examine where the images come from inside yourself, and also to think more about how your art lives outside the classroom. A regular part of Adele’s curriculum was a public-service component; I loved finding out that art-making can go out of the studio and be a part of the community. It’s a wonderful way to keep your practice alive and fresh. In Adele’s classroom, we got this sense that what we do as artists is powerful and important. I’ve kept that feeling throughout my career.

“We will miss our colleagues. We’ve said goodbye to many people and been happy because they are going on to more adventures,” said Richardson.

A title from one of the airport commissions sums it up best for Richardson and Goodine: Bon Voyage, Fly, Perfect.

Herron book arts exhibit on IU Bloomington campus has been extended through Aug. 14

INDIANAPOLIS — Art lovers still have time to catch the 15th annual exhibit of artist’s books photo courtesy of herron.iupui.edumade by students in the book arts program at Herron School of Art and Design, part of the Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis campus.

The free exhibit has been extended through Aug. 14 in the foyer of the Fine Arts Library at IU-Bloomington, 1133 East Seventh St., Bloomington. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.

Herron offers a minor in book arts within its printmaking department. Herron’s book arts curriculum emphasizes combining solid craftsmanship skills such as drawing, printmaking, letterpress and sculpture with an understanding of the expressive potential of the book as a medium. Students are encouraged to push the definition of the book and engage with the melding of narrative and structure, or narrative and functionality. The end result is that many of the works on display are “unbooks” bearing little resemblance to books as we know them.

The Fine Arts Library exhibit includes a bracelet-like structure that opens into two halves out of which comes an accordion-style tiny book that can be read only when the accordion is pulled out. The display also includes books created by sculptor Shana Reis, who uses the books to explore her combat experiences as a gunner on the front lines in Iraq and Afghanistan. The books include paper pages created by running military uniforms through a paper pulp beater.

In an interview with WFIU Public Radio, Herron book arts adjunct instructor Karen Baldner talks about the excitement of being on the leading edge of the “re-appropriation” of the physical book as a “medium of enormous potential” in our digital age. “Students who are engaging in this know that they are re-inventing the wheel,” Baldner said.

Listen to Baldner’s interview here.