Digital Scholarship Team Gives Blind Students Unique Senior Portraits

Dressed in their emerald green graduation gowns and mortarboards, the 19 graduating seniors from the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired lined up for their class pictures.

Two queues occupied the cafeteria space inside the historic school: one for the traditional still-portrait photographer and another for a team from the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship manning two 3D-scanning stations. Most of the students sat down for both.

The scanning took only about a minute for each student. The digital composites will be sent to the school’s records as well as to the students, who can then 3D-print the scan.

Emma Parker, a biomedical engineering sophomore and 3D digital assistant for the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, does a 3D scan of Kurt Stickradt, a senior at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. Photos by Tim Brouk, Indiana University
Emma Parker, a biomedical engineering sophomore and 3D digital assistant for the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, does a 3D scan of Kurt Stickradt, a senior at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. Photos by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

“We hope this becomes a new tradition for us,” said school superintendent Jim Durst. “A picture is worth a thousand words, and an object is worth a thousand pictures. Our kids can have access to information through 3D printing, but this really personalizes it at a level we hadn’t thought of or anticipated.”

The technicians used Creaform portable 3D scanners, which take about 1,000 digital photographs per second. The software stitches the images together to create a surface in staggering detail. The 3D scans can sharpen the details of a face — or any object — to a tenth of a millimeter.

The Center for Digital Scholarship has been busy for years with collaborations with the Benjamin Harrison Presidential SiteIndianapolis Motor Speedway MuseumIndianapolis Firefighters Museum, and several other institutions and programs. Typically, the team scans inanimate objects for virtual online museum experiences that users can access anywhere on the planet. At the 2018 Regatta, the team scanned 200 students’ faces, including one who 3D-printed a life-size version of his face to make into a Halloween mask. At the Jan. 24 50th Anniversary Birthday Bash, 400 students were scanned.

Steve Mannheimer, professor of media arts and science, had worked with the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired for years as part of assistive, accessible and inclusive technology research with the Department of Human-Centered Computing. He met with Durst to plan the April 16 scanning session.

Decades of two-dimensional class photos line the school’s halls, but many of the students can’t see them. The goal of the class of 2019’s 3D scans is for that to change.

“One research question is, ‘Will the students recognize themselves?'” Mannheimer said. “Thanks to digital technology, we can provide tactual, acoustic, gestural opportunities to say, ‘How will this help somebody who may be differently abled to better interact with the world?'”

Durst was excited about what the 3D scanning will lead his students to.

“In the future, when they come back years from now with their children and grandchildren,” he said, “they can say, ‘Here’s my picture. This is what I look like,’ without depending on somebody else to find their picture.”

Visually impaired students had the option of keeping their eyes closed, as the handheld scanners emit bright lights while scanning. No sound is emitted during the process as the technician holds the scanner about an arm’s length from the subject.

Derek Miller, 3D project coordinator for the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, scans a graduating senior at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. The student will be able to send the file to a 3D printer. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

“It’s like a projector that slides across a surface’s mountains and valleys,” said Derek Miller, 3D project coordinator. “We can also capture color and texture of materials.”

Inspired by a few other assistive technology initiatives, Miller hopes to offer scanning services to the school again — not only to the graduating class, but for every class. From kindergarten to senior year, blind students will be able to realize their physical growth from their 3D-scanned portraits.

“It’s going to allow them to feel themselves tactilely,” Miller said. “Someday, hopefully, we’ll be able to scan a blind student at the age of 5 and then scan them every year. In theory, we could build a timeline of them growing that they can actually feel.”

Senior Cassondra Ernstes was one of the first students to get scanned. She was thrilled to be among the first class to have such unique senior pictures.

“That was pretty interesting. I didn’t feel anything,” Ernstes said. “I’ll be 3D-printing this. We’ve never had anything like this before. It’s pretty different, but pretty cool.”

Read the original story from IUPUI New’s Tim Brouk 

These scanners were supported by a grant from the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Funding Available through Indiana Campus Compact

Guest Contributor: Lauren French, Master’s Student Non-Profit Mgmt., Graduate Assistant, CSL

Effective service learning and community engagement [SLCE] demands additional support to move from vision to impact and sustainability. Indiana Campus Compact [ICC ] is one important source of funding for administrators, faculty, staff, and students, who wish to partner with the community to deepen and expand programs. ICC is a partnership among 44 Indiana colleges and universities, representing 70 campuses, dedicated to preparing college students to advance the public good in their communities. IUPUI is proud to be a member campus and has found previous success in seeking funding through ICC.

Indiana Campus Compact has thousands of dollars in the form of grants and fellowships for faculty, staff, students, and the community organizations they work with. These include:

  • Service Engagement Grants: Support students, professional staff, faculty, or department level projects that integrate one or more forms of educationally meaningful service learning and community engagement.
    • Funding categories include:
    • Scholarship of Engagement [includes SL course development, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning on SL, Community Engaged Research and Professional Service Projects]
    • Student Community Service
    • Listening to Communities [support for campus community dialogues]
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $2,250 are available; upcoming proposal deadlines are February 11th, 2019 & May 13th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • Conference Scholarships: These scholarships support faculty, staff, or students at ICC campuses to present on their engaged work at regional and national conferences.
    • The presentation must relate to ICC’s mission.
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $500 are available and proposals are accepted on a rolling basis. The deadline for proposals is at least 6 weeks prior to the conference; conferences must take place before April 30th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • The Faculty Fellows Program: This is a year-long learning community experience for full-time faculty that supports the integration of service learning and community engagement into all aspects of faculty work: teaching, research, and service. Participants will work together to develop a research or creative project to enhance and advance the field of service learning and community engagement.
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $3,750 are available; deadline for letter of intent to apply is Tuesday, March 19th, 2019 and deadline for full proposal is Tuesday, May 14th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • Social Innovation Microlending Program: This program is available to students and alum of ICC campuses who are social entrepreneurs and would like to obtain a loan to start a social venture.
    • Loans are provided through a partnership with Bankable on behalf of the Indiana Small Business Administration.
    • ICC provides consultation and professional development for funded social entrepreneurs through events and partnerships with other organizations.
    • Funding Levels: Loan amounts vary from $500 to $50,000  [a typical loan amount will range from $5,000 to $10,000]. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

A Message from Rafael Macia from the Institute for European Studies

Just as a reminder before the November 5th deadline, please see below the announcement for EURO’s research and travel awards for Fall 2018 – Spring 2019. You can find more information, along with the application forms for graduate students, and for faculty.

Research and Travel Awards for Faculty
The Institute for European Studies is happy to announce two grant competitions for the Fall of 2018 and the Spring of 2019. Eligible applicants are allowed to apply for both, but with the understanding that only one award may be accepted per person.

The Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence Grant offers one $1,500 award in the Fall and one in the Spring to an IU faculty member (TT or NTT) to support research and / or travel related to any aspect of European politics, society, or culture, whether current or historical in scope.

EURO’s Title VI Grant offers 2 awards of $1,500 each in the Fall and 2 in the Spring to IU faculty to support international research and / or travel, as well as 2 awards of $750 each (also Fall and Spring) to support domestic research and / or travel related to any aspect of European politics, society, or culture, whether current or historical in scope.

Research and Travel Awards for Graduate Students

The Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence Grant: One $1,500 award in the Fall and one in the Spring to an IU graduate student to support research and/or travel related to any aspect of European politics, society, or culture, whether current or historical in scope.

Research funds may be used to conduct preliminary thesis or dissertation feasibility studies or to compile evidence for their Master’s thesis or dissertation. While priority is given to students pursuing an MA or doctoral minor in European Studies, all IU graduate students are welcome to apply.

Grant recipients are expected to send a report detailing how the grant was used and on invitation, to present their results at a lecture hosted by the Institute for European Studies.

The Fall application deadline for all competitions is November 5, 2018, at 5 pm.

The Spring application deadline for all competitions is March 25, 2019, at 5 pm.

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens Research Fellowships 2019-2020

The Huntington Library awards over 150 research fellowships annually. The application deadline for fellowships in the 2019-2020 academic year is November 15, 2019. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make contributions to its intellectual life.

Traditional Japanese gardens and red moon-shaped bridge Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens San Marino California

The Huntington is an independent research library with significant holdings in British and American history; British and American literature; art history; the history of science and medicine; and the history of the book. The Library collections range chronologically from the eleventh century to the present. 

Long-Term fellowships are for nine to twelve months in residence with a stipend of $50,000. Three long-term fellowships are funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities ($4,200/ month from the NEH; the balance of the stipend from the Huntington funds).

Short term fellowships are for one to five months in residence and carry stipends of $3,500.

The Dibner Program in the History of Science offers historians of science and technology the opportunity to study in the Burndy Library, a remarkable collection in the history of science and technology. Both long and short term fellowships are available.

Travel grants and exchange fellowships for study in the United Kingdom and Ireland are for study in any of the fields in which The Huntington’s own collections are strong and where the research will be carried out in the libraries or archives in the United Kingdom and Ireland. We also offer exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, Lincoln, and New Colleges, Oxford; Trinity Hall, Cambridge; Durham University; and Trinity College Dublin.

To learn more about these opportunities and applications, click here  to visit the Huntington Library website!

IUPUI Arts & Humanities Grant Deadline is February 15!

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Grant deadline will be here sooner than you think. Be sure to give yourself plenty of time to get your application together. Here’s what you need to know to get started . . .

The IAHI Grant Program supports campus-wide attainment of excellence in research and creative activity in arts and humanities. It is designed to enhance the research and creative activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty. The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.

ELIGIBILITY

All full-time tenured and tenure-eligible faculty from all schools and units at IUPUI are eligible to apply. Under certain circumstances, non-tenure-track faculty members whose evaluation criteria include research or creative activity may also be eligible with an explanation in the letter of support from their chair or dean.

Visiting and associate faculty members and post-doctoral fellows are not eligible.

An associate member (or non-eligible member) of the IUPUI faculty can be a participant in a grant in collaboration with a PI who is an eligible member of the IUPUI faculty.

FUNDING AND PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS

All grants are intended for support of research and scholarly activity, and not for support of teaching and/or service activities. Scholarship of teaching may be supported under this grant program, if it has strong and clearly articulated research outcomes.

Projects will be limited to one (1) year in duration.

Funds will not be granted for a project currently supported by another internal funding mechanism, unless a case is made in justifying the complementary funding.

An investigator may not serve as PI on more than one IAHI grant proposal in a given round.

Applications will be judged on the merit of the proposed research or creative activity, qualifications of the applicant, significance of the research to the field, the potential for additional external funding, and the project’s importance to the individual’s future research plans. Applications for new projects are encouraged.

CATEGORIES

A. Small Travel Grants for Conferences and Exhibitions: up to $500 to support travel to a conference or exhibition related to a research or creative project.

B. Event Support Grants: up to $1,000 to support a public event at IUPUI related to a research or creative project.

C. Research/Creative Activity Grant: up to $5,000 for travel, equipment, materials, space, hourly assistance, etc. This grant does not require a match. A grant recipient may apply and receive this grant on a yearly basis.

D. Matching Grant for Research/Creative Activity: up to $15,000 which might be used for such things as release time, summer salary, research assistant support, or a research workshop or conference, as well as incidental expenses. This grant requires a 1 to 2 match from the school, department, and/or center sponsoring the faculty (i.e. two thirds or 66.67% of funds come from IAHI, and one third or 33.33% from the faculty’s unit). Salary requests are allowed and cannot exceed one month of salary per person. A Matching Grant recipient is eligible to apply for a new Matching Grant no sooner than two years from the previous grant proposal submission.

E. Collaborative Grant for Research/Creative Activity: up to $30,000 to support research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by a team of two or more arts and humanities faculty from different units on campus. Funds might be used for such things as release time, summer salary, research assistant support, or a research workshop or conference, as well as incidental expenses. This grant does not require a match from the school, department, and/or center of applying faculty. Funding preference in this category will be given to projects that correspond to one of the following themes: a) Social Justice and the Urban Environment, b) Communication and Exchange in the Digital Age

Click here to learn more or apply for a grant.

 

IAHI Grant Deadline

Blue Square

The IAHI Grant Program supports campus-wide attainment of excellence in research and creative activity in arts and humanities. It is designed to enhance the research and creative activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty. The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.

The next deadline is February 15, 2017.

To learn more about the grant program and how to apply, click here.

Getty Library Research Grants

The Getty Foundation logoThe deadline to apply for this grant is October 15, 2015

Getty Library Research Grants provide partial, short-term support for costs relating to travel and living expenses for scholars whose research requires use of specific collections housed in the Getty Research Institute. A Library Research Grant is not a prerequisite for obtaining access to the Research Library.

Eligibility:
Library Research Grants are intended for scholars of all nationalities and at any level who demonstrate a compelling need to use materials housed in the Research Library, and whose place of residence is more than eighty miles from the Getty Center. Projects must relate to specific items in the library collection. (To search the collections, please consult the Research Library’s Search Tools and Databases.)

Terms:
Library Research Grants are intended to provide partial support for costs relating to travel and living expenses. Grants range from $500 to $2,500, depending on the distance traveled. The research period may range from several days to a maximum of three months. These terms apply as of August 2015 and are subject to future changes. Additional information about the terms of these grants is available here.

Application Availability and Deadline:
Complete application materials are now accepted through an online application process only. The next deadline for these grants is October 15, 2015.

Notification:
Applicants are notified of the Research Institute’s decision approximately six weeks to two months following the deadline.

Special Information on the Photo Archive:
The grant selection committee welcomes applications for researchers wishing to consult the Getty Research Institute’s unique resources, including the Photo Archive. Two million photographs of works of art and architecture in the Photo Archive provide opportunities for original pictorial research in the fine arts, including the history of photography. For more information, visit the Photo Archive Web page.

How To Apply:
Applicants are required to complete and submit the online Library Research Grant application form (which includes uploading a Project Proposal; Curriculum Vitae; Selected Bibliography of Research Library Collections you wish to consult; and Proposed Estimated Travel Costs) by 5:00 p.m. PDT, October 15, 2015. Two letters of recommendation are also required for this application.

For the best user experience, The Getty Foundation strongly recommends the use of the Google Chrome browser. You may also use Firefox or Safari. The Internet Explorer 11 (IE) browser is not fully compatible with the portal.

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Offers Fellowships to Assist Research and Artistic Creation

Application Deadline: September 19, 2015

TJohn Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Logo courtesy of GF.orghe foundation offers fellowships to further the development of scholars and artists by assisting them to engage in research in any field of knowledge and creation in any of the arts, under the freest possible conditions and irrespective of race, color, or creed. The foundation provides fellowships for advanced professionals in all fields (natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, creative arts) except the performing arts. The foundation selects its fellows on the basis of two separate competitions, one for the United States and Canada, the other for Latin America and the Caribbean.

The foundation understands advanced professionals to be those who as writers, scholars, or scientists have a significant record of publication, or as artists, playwrights, filmmakers, photographers, composers, or the like, have a significant record of exhibition or performance of their work.

The foundation only supports individuals. It does not make grants to institutions or organizations.

The amounts of the grants will be adjusted to the needs of the fellows, considering their other resources and the purpose and scope of their plans. Appointments are ordinarily made for one year, and in no instance for a period shorter than six consecutive months.

Applicants should be: New Faculty/New Investigator/PhD/M.D./Other Professional

The Application deadline is September 19, 2015

Application information can be found here.

NEH Summer Stipends

NEH Logo provided by neh.govNEH Summer Stipends
Limited Submission URL: here.
IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
NEH Online Application Deadline: 10/1/2015

Brief Description:
Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Common Good:  The Humanities in the Public Square
NEH invites projects related to its new initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square. This initiative seeks to connect the study of the humanities to the current conditions of national life. Many of today’s challenges require more than ever the forms of understanding and knowledge represented by the humanities. They require the broadest possible engagement of scholars and the public with the resources of the humanities, including but not limited to the study of language, literature, history, philosophy, comparative religion, and ethics. The study of the humanities can help illuminate the complexity of many contemporary challenges while enriching our understanding of the common good.

Summer Stipends may not be used for:
• projects that seek to promote a particular political, religious, or ideological point of view;
• projects that advocate a particular program of social action;
• specific policy studies;
• research for doctoral dissertations or theses by students enrolled in a degree program;
• the preparation or revision of textbooks;
• curriculum development;
• the development of pedagogical tools (including teaching methods or theories);
• educational or technical impact assessments;
• empirical social science research, unless part of a larger humanities project;
• inventories of collections;
• the writing of guide books, how-to books, or self-help books;
• the writing of autobiographies, memoirs, or works of creative nonfiction; or
• works in the creative or performing arts (for example, painting, fiction or poetry, or dance performance).

Award Amount:
Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends are awarded to individuals, not to institutions. They do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

Eligibility:
• Faculty members teaching full-time at colleges or universities must be nominated by their institutions.
• All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.
• Individuals who have been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. (Applicants who have held such fellowships or research grants are eligible only if their award period ended at least three years before the deadline for Summer Stipends applications.) . A “major fellowship or research grant”; is a postdoctoral research award that provides a stipend of at least $15,000. Sabbaticals and grants from an individual’s own institution and stipends and grants from other sources supporting study and research during the summer are not considered major fellowships. See Program details.
• Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.
• See Program details for more specific information.
INTERNAL COMPETITION NECESSARY: TWO FACUTLY MEMBERS PER CAMPUS
Each college and university in the United States and its jurisdictions (campus) may nominate two faculty members. Any faculty member teaching full-time is eligible for nomination.

APPLICANTS EXEMPT FROM NOMINATION / NO INTERNAL COMPETITION NEEDED
The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:
• independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;
• college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure
• emeritus faculty; and
• adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

IUPUI Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward,emward@iupui.edu by July 1, 2015 for internal competition.
Format pages with one-inch margins and with a font size no smaller than eleven point.
The narrative should not assume specialized knowledge and should be free of technical terms and jargon. The narrative limitation does not include references.

1. Provide a 1-3 page narrative that includes the following:
• Project Title
• Project Director Name and Credentials
• Research and contribution: Describe the intellectual significance of the proposed project, including its value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Provide an overview of the project, explaining the basic ideas, problems, or questions examined by the study. Explain how the project will complement, challenge, or expand relevant studies in the field.
• Methods and work plan: Describe your method(s) and clarify the part or stage of the project that will be supported by the Summer Stipend. Provide a work plan, describing what you will accomplish during the award period. Your work plan must be based on a full-time commitment to the project; part-time work is not allowed. If you do not anticipate finishing the entire project during the award period, discuss your plan for doing so. For book projects, explain how the final project will be organized. If possible, provide a brief chapter outline. For digital projects, describe the technologies that will be used and developed, and how the scholarship will be presented to benefit audiences in the humanities.
• Competencies, skills, and access: Explain your competence in the area of your project. If the area of inquiry is new to you, explain your reasons for working in it and your qualifications to do so. Specify your level of competence in any language or digital technology needed for the study. Describe where the study will be conducted and what research materials will be used.
• Final product and dissemination: Describe the intended audience and the intended results of the project. If relevant, explain how the results will be disseminated and why these means are appropriate to the subject matter and audience.

2. A Letter from the Chair or Dean

3. 1-2 page abbreviated CV which includes:
• Current and Past Positions
• Education: List degrees, dates awarded, and titles of theses or dissertations
• Awards and Honors: Include dates. If you have received support from NEH, indicate the dates of these grants and any resulting publications.
• Publications: Include full citations for publications and presentations
• Other Relevant Professional Activities & Accomplishments

WONDER AND THE NATURAL WORLD: A Call for Grant Proposals

Logo for CSRES courtesy of News.iupui.eduCALL FOR GRANT PROPOSALS: Symposia, workshops, performances, and seminar series for departments, institutes, and research centers at all IU campuses
Deadline for submission: June 15, 2015
Awards announced by mid-July 2015

The IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society (CSRES) announces a grant competition on the theme of Wonder and the Natural World. Departments, research centers, and institutes across all IU campuses may apply for funds to support or supplement symposia, workshops, seminar series, performances, or small conferences during the 2015-2016 academic year that align with the Consortium’s two-year theme of Wonder and the Natural World. This call for proposals is part of a two-year thematic initiative sponsored by CSRES.

Wonder has been framed as a key moral disposition, as well as an aesthetic, emotional, or cognitive response; depending on its objects and orientation, it may display both salutary and sinister dimensions. Wonder at nature is prompted by the odd and uncanny, the strange and novel, the transcendent and sublime, as well as encounters with the monstrous and horrific. It has variously been associated with, or dissociated from, curiosity, awe, intimations of divinity, infinity, the sublime, the miraculous or supernatural, feelings of astonishment and puzzlement. We welcome projects that explore wonder or its cognate terms in relation to nature or the natural, broadly construed. Proposals should clearly relate the project to the announced theme.

Grants will be awarded in amounts up to $2500, $5000, and $7500 depending on the scope of the proposed project. Funds can be used for travel and honoraria for external speakers, as well as hospitality expenses in keeping with university regulations. IU faculty may not receive honoraria. Applications for funding should include:

• summary of the project (750 words max.)
• a list of invited presenters
• a detailed budget
• letter of support from department chair or school/unit dean (included with the application or emailed separately)
• evidence of other funding obtained or requested (for requests over $2000)

Questions about the grant competition, and complete grant proposals may be emailed to CSRES Director Lisa Sideris at lsideris@indiana.edu.

The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs, and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. Their mandate is to aid in the development of research and scholarship to better understand religion, ethics, values, and spirituality in society. An initiative of the IU Vice President for Research Office, CSRES is also supported by the Office of the President, The Office of the Executive Vice President and Chancellor, IUPUI, and the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington.