The Couple That Stays Together, Graduates Together

Ralph Durrett Jr., left, and Ronae Williams hold a photograph from their wedding. The couple married and raised a family before earning degrees from IUPUI. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University
Ralph Durrett Jr., left, and Ronae Williams hold a photograph from their wedding. The couple married and raised a family before earning degrees from IUPUI. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

They agreed ’til death do they part, but they will have to be apart during IUPUI’s commencement ceremony, set for 10 a.m. Saturday, May 11, at Lucas Oil Stadium.

Ronae Williams and Ralph Durrett Jr. were married and started a family before enrolling and earning degrees at IUPUI. The couple will be donning caps and gowns this weekend, but they will be separated during graduation as Williams accepts her psychology degree from the School of Science and Durrett receives his sociology degree from the School of Liberal Arts.

“This is huge for both of us,” Williams said, “but everybody is going to be spread out and divided. Maybe we will Facetime each other during it.”

The couple were the ultimate team during their IUPUI careers: They took turns carting son Cameron, 12, and daughter Rayne, 10, to various school functions while the other studied. The kids sometimes sat in with them during lectures. Evening classes were in the mix, so one parent made sure son and daughter were doing their homework while the other parent was getting their own homework assignments.

Ralph Durrett Jr., left, adjusts the mortarboard of his wife, Ronae Williams. The couple met at a Kings Island roller coaster, and that thrill ride will continue through commencement. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University
Ralph Durrett Jr., left, adjusts the mortarboard of his wife, Ronae Williams. The couple met at a Kings Island roller coaster, and that thrill ride will continue through commencement. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

Then there was work. Williams balanced her studies with full-time employment in an Indiana University School of Medicine cytogenetics, biochemical genetics and pharmacogenomics laboratory. After a day of processing, accessioning samples and communicating with doctors’ offices, Williams would walk the few blocks east to her psychology classes.

The hard work culminated in degrees for the Indianapolis couple.

“We worked together like a machine — an operation — to get here,” Williams reflected. “We walked together at our wedding, and we’re walking again together. The journey never stopped. Even though we took our own academic paths, we got through it together.”

High school sweethearts after high school

Durrett and Williams attended Warren Central High School but were in different classes and crowds.

“I used to see her every once in a while because she was a popular girl in school,” said Durrett, a 2004 Warren grad. Williams finished at Warren in 2005. “She was on this morning news show called ‘Wake Up, Warren.’ I was the new guy in school. I didn’t really know anybody.”

It wasn’t until Durrett’s after-prom trip to Kings Island — which Williams, who would graduate from Warren in 2005, attended with some friends — did they even meet. Warren Central’s enrollment of almost 4,000 students meant the meeting at the dizzying Invertigo roller coaster was fate.

“My friend and I were walking around harassing people,” Williams recalled, laughing. “I saw him and his nephew, and as a joke I said, ‘We should ask them to ride rides with us.’ And he said yes. I was like ‘Oh my God, now we have to commit.'”

“And the rest is history,” Durrett added. “We’ve been together ever since.”

Realizing potential at IUPUI

Durrett had said that college wasn’t for him, but as their family grew, he realized a degree was necessary. After gaining class credits at Ivy Tech, he entered the biology program at IUPUI but then switched to sociology. It didn’t take long for him to find a career path.

“I learned a lot about myself in these classes,” Durrett said. “They helped me figure out who I am as a person.”

Durrett said his experiences in classes like Race and Ethics, with assistant professor of sociology Carly Schall, inspired him to fight for justice. Pursuing that inspiration, he will start in the McKinney School of Law in the fall.

“Law is the catalyst to change in this society as a whole,” said Durrett on why he is pursuing a law degree. “Law has to be the foundation of that change.”

Schall said Durrett’s passion and academic prowess made him a star in the program.

“I’m so proud of him, and the Department of Sociology is proud of him,” she continued. “He’s been doing so much good as a student; I can’t imagine the good he’s going to do once he gets into and through law school.

“What really gets you through and makes you into somebody who makes a difference is perseverance, and he’s persevered. He’s a great success.”

Williams plans on taking a year away from school, but she will continue working at the lab. Then she will pursue a graduate degree in the field of marriage and family therapy.

But before that, Williams plans on enjoying Saturday’s commencement ceremony. She said her perspective will be different than most of her fellow grads. Starting a family first was an atypical path to a degree, but thanks to the bonds of love, dedication and hard work, the couple achieved success.

“I want to savor the moment,” said Williams with a sigh. “I like our journey not being traditional because I feel like we appreciated it more. I was immersed in the whole culture of what college was — even though I was an adult learner, a parent, a wife. I feel I was more involved.”

Read the original story from IUPUI NewsTim Brouk 

Pinpointing Activities: Office of Community Engagement Launches Engagement Map

The community engagement map features more than 350 activities, heavily concentrated in metro Indianapolis but also spreading across the country and internationally.
The community engagement map features more than 350 activities, heavily concentrated in metro Indianapolis but also spreading across the country and internationally.

IUPUI faculty and students participate every year in activities that enhance lives in the Indianapolis community and beyond.

That’s not just a tagline or a talking point; it’s documentable work that anyone can explore, thanks to a new map launched by the IUPUI Office of Community Engagement.

On the map — dive in yourself here — are points representing more than 360 activities, heavily concentrated in Indianapolis and within the I-465 loop but stretching across the country and as far away as Africa. Each one represents an activity or where an activity’s community partners are located, with details about faculty, schools/centers involved and the scope of the work. Among all the activities, more than 5,000 IUPUI students have participated.

“The map further demonstrates IUPUI’s commitment to Central Indiana,” said Amy Conrad Warner, vice chancellor for the Office of Community Engagement. “It provides essential information about initiatives underway, assets in the community and partners who contribute to a common goal.”

The map, funded by an IUPUI Welcoming Campus Initiative grant, was developed in partnership with The Polis Center and includes social and demographic data from SAVI, one of the nation’s first and largest community information systems.

For example, selecting a point just southwest of downtown brings up a window about SEAL Indiana, a statewide dental program that provides preventive oral health services for children who do not have adequate access to dental care. The Indiana State Department of Health and IUPUI provided startup funding for the program, which began in 2003. The School of Dentistry, naturally, is the school listed as the participant, with areas of focus including education, government and public safety, health and wellness, and social issues.

School of Dentistry assistant professor Armando Soto is one of two faculty members listed, and clicking on Soto’s name brings up lines on the map connecting to other sites where he is involved in community activities — a web of engagement, if you will.

A toolbar on the map allows further pinpointing; activities can be filtered by information such as start date, number of students involved or community organizations involved. Adding layers allows for demographic, education, income and health data by neighborhood in Marion County that provides further context to the community’s opportunities and challenges.

The map will be updated periodically as more information is added to the Collaboratory, a platform that captures IUPUI’s community engagement efforts.

IUPUI’s Center For Service And Learning Cultivates A Culture Of Student Engagement

An IUPUI student shovels mulch as part of the 2017 César Chávez Day of Service. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

The IUPUI Center for Service and Learning and its opportunities to enrich the Indianapolis community have grown steadily through the decades, with programs earning national and international recognition. Today, community engagement is ingrained in the student culture. Four major days of service are highlights on the IUPUI academic calendar, including the upcoming César Chávez Day.

Ian Burke, a senior studying biochemistry, got involved with his community quickly. A student mentor for the scholarship students working to plan the day of service, Burke believes the experience is essential not only to making his community a better place but also to improving his professional skills.

“I plan on applying to medical school,” Burke said. “Professional skills, time management and leadership are all things I’ve learned in community service, and all are needed in medicine.”

Burke will serve as a student leader during the March 30 César Chávez Day of Service. Hundreds of students will engage with nonprofit organizations throughout the day. There is still time to register to be part of the event.

César Chávez is considered a hero for farm laborers and is hailed as one of the greatest American civil rights leaders. The campus also celebrates his legacy with a student-organized dinner.

While the 2018 César Chávez Day saw an unexpected 10 inches of snow dumped onto the city, the 2019 edition will still focus on outdoor projects. Students will be planting trees and weeding for organizations like Indy Urban AcresFletcher Place Community Centerand the Willard Park Community Garden. Burke will lead his fellow students in setting up summer camp tents for the Girl Scouts at Camp Dellwood.

A culture of service

As a member of a fraternity and the Honors College, Burke had to satisfy requirements for community service hours, but students wanting to further their service with communities have found a special outlet in the Center for Service and Learning.

“I just connected with being able to do something positive for the community,” Burke explained. “The impact is a big thing for me.”

The Sam H. Jones Community Service Scholarship Program was established in 1999. Students like Burke interact with community organizations, lead projects, write about their experiences, and lead reflective and educational dialogue with their peers on-site. Burke said most of his fellow Jaguars are drawn to deeper community-engagement experiences after their first service day experience.

“At the end of the day,” Burke added, “I try to drive home the message: ‘Yeah, you got your service hours, but did you get anything else?'”

Taking service to work

Burke believes his community-based experiences will apply to his post-IUPUI career. He’s learned project management and programming skills to go along with his biochemistry degree.

“I plan on getting involved with nonprofits during my professional life,” he said. “A lot of the concepts I’ve learned from here, I’ll take with me to whatever I do. I think it would be my responsibility to continue to help my community.”

And Burke believes that culture of service will continue at IUPUI for another 25 years or more: “I see a lot of students engaging with the community and realizing they can be a part of it.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tim Brouk 

Around IUPUI

Be sure to attend a pair of one-hour faculty Liberal Arts Talks next week in the Campus Center:

  • “The Green Challenge Deepens: Environmentalism in the Age of Climate Change” with John McCormick, professor of political science, 4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 27, Room 305. John McCormick revisits his 1995 book, “The Global Environmental Movement,” to examine the ways in which environmentalism has evolved in the era of climate change, globalization, the internet, nationalism and the rise of China. He asks how these five developments have altered the definition of environmental problems; how they have shaped the international response to those problems; and how the relationship between science, economics, trade and technology has exacerbated or addressed environmental change.
  • “Public Art, Monuments, and Civic Life” with Modupe Labode, associate professor of history, 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 28, Room 307. In 2011, a nonprofit agency responded to protest and canceled artist Fred Wilson’s project to create a work of public art for the Indianapolis Cultural Trail. The proposed work, “E Pluribus Unum,” referenced the figure of an African-American man on the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in downtown Indianapolis. This case is a point of departure to consider the role of public art, monuments, race and history in civic life.

Music and arts technology faculty member scores soundtrack

Jordan Munson lent his composition talents to the Phoenix Theatre. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Jordan Munson, a senior lecturer of music and arts technology, created the original soundtrack to the Phoenix Theatre‘s staging of John Kuntz’s play “The Hotel Nepenthe,” which opens Feb. 28 and runs through March 24.

Munson created original soundscapes with the show’s sound designer, Brian Hartz. The music adds to the dark comedy’s schizophrenic nature.

The play is described as such: “A gruesome murder, a fatal accident and a missing infant — anything can happen at Hotel Nepenthe, a locale straight out of the film noir of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Four actors portray 19 characters in this poignant work that oscillates between absurdity and deeply emotional honesty.”

Furniture design meets the human body

North Carolina designer Annie Evelyn will talk about the relationship between furniture and the human body as the keynote for the annual Phillip Tennant Furniture Design Lecture, slated for 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 27, at the Basile Auditorium in Eskenazi Hall.

Evelyn’s mission is to reshape our experiences with everyday furniture, from seating to lighting. Her creations can be seen at the Museum of Modern Art and Design in New York.

Read the original article from IUPUI News

IUPUI to party like it’s 1969

IUPUI will officially turn the big 5-0 on Jan. 24. It’s the campus’s birthday, but the presents are for you. Photo by Getty Images

On Jan. 24, 1969, the average cost of gas was 32 cents a gallon, “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” by Marvin Gaye was the No. 1 song on the radio, and “Sweet Caroline” crooner Neil Diamond turned 28 years old.

Also, and most importantly, IUPUI was officially established on that memorable day.

IUPUI’s golden anniversary will be celebrated in style throughout the day and well into the evening Jan. 24 in the Campus Center.

The day will feature a wide variety of activities designed to honor IUPUI’s past, celebrate our present and envision our future. Accomplishments by faculty, staff, students, alumni and community partners throughout the past 50 years will be recognized even as guests throughout the day will be looking ahead to the university’s next half-century.

Here’s a breakdown of what you can expect next week while celebrating IUPUI’s golden anniversary:

50th Anniversary Report to the Community

When and where: 10 to 11 30 a.m. on the fourth floor of the Campus Center.

Registrations are full for this invitation-only event that will feature remarks by IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar, IU President Michael A. McRobbie, Purdue Board of Trustees President Michael Berghoff and a panel of Indianapolis mayors — past and present — who will help celebrate the occasion of IUPUI’s official birthday in historic fashion. But the event will be live-streamed on broadcast.iu.edu.

Special sessions and party activities

When and where: Noon to 5 p.m. on various floors of the Campus Center.

Presentations from IUPUI faculty and staff, all 45 minutes or less, will enlighten throughout the afternoon. The talks are open to all. They include:

  • Professor of anthropology Paul Mullins will offer a featured session, “The Price of Progress: Race and Displacement in Indianapolis’ Near-Westside,” from noon to 12:45 p.m. and 2 to 2:45 p.m. in Room 309
  • Colleagues in the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research have organized an IUPUI Research Rock Stars session, highlighting 50 years of outstanding research at IUPUI.
  • University Library colleagues will share information about digital collections, including an opportunity to have a 3D scan made of your face — or your favorite IUPUI artifact — for the digital repository that will commemorate the day.

The party continues

When and where: Noon to 10 p.m. on various floors of the Campus Center.

Employees, students and visitors are invited to check out the activities on the Campus Center’s main floor and the theater level, which will include a 360-degree photo booth, an all-day dance party, a virtual-reality 3D tour of campus, a new interactive map of community engagement and 50th-birthday cakes made by local bakeries.

Get your golden jaguar

IUPUI is giving out 700 3D-printed “Golden Jaguars” to faculty, staff and students who print out a passport and collect stamps at various birthday locations around campus. The jaguars have been produced on campus by University Library’s digital scholarship group in the 3D Printing Studio.

Residence halls and organizations are competing for the most stamps to win golden jaguar figurines and a chance for pizza with Chancellor Paydar. Get started here.

Be sure to wear your JagSwag and post on social media about IUPUI’s birthday. The hashtag #MyIUPUI was created to celebrate this exciting day, so take advantage of this special occasion and show off your school spirit by spreading the word.

Read the original article from IUPUI News

Fall 2018 Herron Highlights

Kenneth Tyler in Herron’s printmaking lab on Sept. 17, 2018. Iman Pirzadeh

As spring semester begins, we’re looking back at all that happened with the Herron community last fall. Needless to say, our students, alumni, and faculty have made great creative strides – from commissioned projects to local and national exhibitions.

Following is a recap of highlights that you may have missed over the past four months.

  • Associate Professor Anila Agha exhibited laser-cut encaustic works at Sundaram Tagore Chelsea Nov. 15–Dec. 15, 2018, in “The Art of Paper,” a group show featuring nine international artists.
  • The Arts Council of Indianapolis named five recipients of the 2018 DeHaan Artist of Distinction Award, including associate professors Anila AghaStefan Petranek, and Cory Robinson. Each recipient was awarded a $10,000 grant to fund new and dynamic creative projects.
  • TIME Magazine featured CODO Design’s packaging in the special issue “Beer: The Story of the World’s Most Celebrated Drink.” CODO Design is the brainchild of Isaac Arthur (B.F.A. Visual Communication ’09) and Cody Fague (B.F.A. Visual Communication ’09), who began business planning for the Indianapolis-based branding firm during their senior year and cofounded it the Monday after graduating.
  • Audrey Barcio (B.A.E. Art Education ’07) exhibited Aug. 27–Sept. 14, 2018, alongside American sculptor Lynda Benglis and 10 other contemporary artists in “ART IN CONTEXT” at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art.
  • Emily Bennett (M.F.A. Visual Art ’17) exhibited Nov. 17–Dec. 15, 2018, in “Multiplied Motions,” a solo show at Gaslight Art Colony in Marshall, Ill.
  • As part of a commissioned project through Herron’s Basile Center, students McKayla BensheimerAaron DoddElizabeth JorgensonApril Knauber, and Elizabeth Jorgenson, along with alumnus Jared Cru Smith (B.F.A. Furniture Design ’11), created and installed sculptures, mosaics, and benches in the Elmira Annis Civic Plaza at the new Irvington branch of Indianapolis Public Library.
  • Amelia Briggs (B.F.A. Painting ’09) was featured in the Oct. 2018 issue of Maake Magazine, an artist-run online gallery and limited-edition print publication showcasing the work of emerging contemporary artists.
  • Internationally renowned artist and Herron alumna Vija Celmins (B.F.A. ’62) exhibited nearly 150 drawings, sculptures, paintings, and prints at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in her first North American retrospective in 25 years. “Vija Celmins: To Fix the Image in Memory” opened Dec. 15, 2018 and is on view through March 31.
  • Paula Differding, a beloved visual communication design professor, retired in December after 33 years of teaching. Differding will stay connected with the Herron community as a distinguished professor emerita.
  • Lorrie Fredette (B.F.A. Sculpture ’90) exhibited in “Tender Exchanges,” a solo show at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art. The exhibition opened Nov. 18, 2018, and is on view through Feb. 10.
  • Evan Hauser (B.F.A. Ceramics ’14) exhibited in “Canary Syndrome,” a group show featuring the ceramics and glass works of nine contemporary artists, at Ferrin Contemporary in North Adams, Mass., Sept. 27–Nov. 4, 2018.
  • In October, Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas, honoredAssociate Professor Robert Horvath as a 2018 Outstanding Alumnus from the university’s Lamar D. Fain College of Fine Arts.
  • Assistant Professor Katie Hudnall, Associate Professor Meredith Setser, and Adjunct Instructor Liz Wierzbicki (M.F.A. Visual Art ’14) each receivedgrants as part of the Indiana Arts Commission’s 2019 Individual Artist Program for creative research, travel, or new studio equipment.
  • Under the direction of Professor Craig McDaniel and photography technician Benjamin Martinkus, Herron M.F.A. students Kennedy ConnerFrank MullenHailey PottsAdam RathbunSarah Strong, and Denise Troyer collaborated with IUPUI music technology students on an interdisciplinary project exploring the elements of sound and movement in both visual art and music. “HEARING THINGS” involved an exhibition of sonic and kinetic artworks on Nov. 15 in Eskenazi Fine Arts Center and a live multimedia performance on Nov. 30 at the IUPUI Informatics and Communications Technology Complex building.
  • On Nov. 30, 2018, IDEA Fellow Maria Meschi and her visual communication design graduate peers hosted IUPUI’s first Open Innovation Sprint at Herron. The four-hour event involved 54 IUPUI students brainstorming solutions for the various problems surrounding scooters in Indianapolis and resulted in 861 ideas. The problem will be further explored in one of Associate Professor Youngbok Hong’s graduate classes this spring.
  • Professor David Morrison exhibited Nov. 15–Dec. 22, 2018, in a solo show, “Nature’s Ephemera,” at Garvey|Simon in New York, N.Y. Craig McDaniel wrote a short piece about Morrison’s artistic practice to accompany the exhibition. Additionally, a selection of Morrison’s works were featured in the Nov. 2018 issue of American Art Collector.
  • Michael Nannery (B.F.A. Printmaking ’11) exhibited Dec. 1-15, 2018, in a five-person group exhibition, “Permutations,” at Torrance Art Museum, Calif.
  • Asli Narin exhibited solo in “Carpe Noctum” at Millî Reasürans Art Gallery in Istanbul, Turkey, Nov. 28–Dec. 29, 2018. Click here to view installation images of the exhibition.
  • Michael Osheroff (M.F.A. Visual Art ’18) spoke as a panelist for Design Arts Society’s “LOVE/HATE” discussion on Nov. 10, 2018, in the newly reinstalled Design Gallery of the IMA Galleries at Newfields.
  • Yasha Persson (B.F.A. Photography ’92) exhibited mixed media works Nov. 2-30, 2018, in a solo show at the Indianapolis Artsgarden.
  • Brian Presnell (B.F.A. Furniture Design ’96) of Indy Urban Hardwood created tables using milled wood from over 40 on-site trees for the new Michigan Road branch of Indianapolis Public Library, in partnership with krM Architecture.
  • Jason Ramey (B.F.A. Furniture Design ’08) exhibited large-scale sculptures in a two-person show at Hutchinson Center for the Arts in Hutchinson, Minn. The show opened Dec. 10, 2018, and continues through Jan. 11.
  • In September, Associate Professor Danielle Riede was one of two recipientsto receive the 2018 Advocate for Equity in Accessibility Award. She joins a small yet dedicated cadre of IUPUI staff and faculty who advocate on behalf of students with disabilities.
  • Herron alumnus Casey Roberts (B.F.A. Photography) exhibited new cyanotype works at the Indianapolis-based Edington Gallery in the solo show “A Bird I Knew, Dreamt a Dream, of Valley View,” Dec. 7-22, 2018.
  • Cat Head Press received a $4.3 million grant from the Lilly Endowment Arts and Culture Initiative in partnership with the John Boner Neighborhood Centers, as well as other Near Eastside neighborhood collaborators, to bring to life the 10 East Art + Design District. The Indianapolis-based printshop and artist cooperative was established in 2016 by Dominic Senibaldi (M.F.A. Visual Art ’13), Michael Hoefle (M.F.A. Visual Art ’13), and Liz Wierzbicki(M.F.A. Visual Art ’14). On Jan. 4, Senibaldi left Herron to fulfill his executive director role in a full-time capacity.
  • Marna Shopoff (M.F.A. Visual Art ’14) exhibited new paintings Oct. 3-26, 2018, in “Première Couche,” a solo show at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery in New Orleans, La.
  • On Dec. 7, 2018, Johnson Simon (M.F.A. Visual Art ’18) participated in the Stutz Artist Association’s annual holiday open house as one of two recipients of the association’s 2018 Artist Residency program.
  • Visiting Lecturer Jake Sneath (M.F.A. Visual Art ’17) presented his work during the Society for Photography Education’s Midwest Chapter Conference on Nov. 1-4, 2018, at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.
  • Stuart Snoddy (B.F.A. Painting ’09) was featured in ArtMaze Magazine’s Anniversary Edition 10, curated by founder and Editor-in-Chief Maria Zemtsova and released on Nov. 27, 2018.
  • Emily Stergar (B.F.A. Sculpture ’14) exhibited Nov. 29–Dec. 15, 2018, in Arizona State University’s Faculty Mentor/Alumni Exhibition. Stergar’s work was also included in “Onyx,” a group exhibition featuring 46 contemporary artists, presented online by Alfa Gallery.
  • In November, the Indianapolis International Airport (IND) installed small-scale sculptures created by Phillip Tennant, professor emeritus of furniture design. Tennant’s work remains on display through March 10 in the ticketing hall.
  • Colin Tury (M.F.A. Visual Art ’14) was featured in Architectural Digest’s article “The Highlights from Detroit’s First Month of Design.” Detroit Month of Design occurred Sept. 1-30, 2018, during which Tury’s Fairfax Lounge Chair was included in the exhibition “Shape: Defining Furniture in Michigan’s Design Legacy” at Shinola’s flagship store.
  • The Herron galleries presented “Kenneth Tyler: The Art of Collaboration,” a survey of collaborations between master printer Kenneth Tyler (M.A.E. Art Education ’63) and some of the 20th century’s most iconic artists. Tyler visited the school during opening week of the exhibition to work with printmaking students and discuss his life’s work via an unforgettable artist talk. The exhibition closed on Nov. 10, 2018.
  • During IUPUI’s 2018 Spirit & Place Festival, Beatriz Vasquez (B.F.A. General Fine Arts ’06) participated in a collaborative public project showcasing the stories of historically marginalized communities in America.

Read the original article from Stories at Herron School of Art and Design 

Herron to Present Lecture by Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley, Undergraduate Student Exhibition

INDIANAPOLIS — Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI is presenting the 2018 Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture with Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley on Nov. 28, followed by an opening reception for the annual Undergraduate Student Exhibition and a holiday art sale supporting Herron student artists and designers.

MacArthur Award “genius” grant recipient Mary Reid Kelley combines painting, performance and her distinctive wordplay in graphically stylized films made in collaboration with her partner, Patrick Kelley. During the talk, the collaborative duo will discuss the visual language of “The Minotaur Trilogy” (2013–15), a series of short narrative films exploring the Greek Minotaur myth and, through it, the present-day roles of women, sexuality, language and art historical tropes.

Kassie Woodworth, “Circulate,” 2018. Paper and wood, 40 inches by 40 inches by 29 inches. Photo courtesy of Herron School of Art and Design

Opening in conjunction with the Kelleys’ talk is the Undergraduate Student Exhibition, an annual tradition featuring exceptional works produced by Herron students across a variety of artistic disciplines. This year’s guest juror is Betsy Stirratt, director of the Grunwald Gallery of Art at Indiana University Bloomington, who will award prizes to the top entries. Additionally, the ceramics, furniture design and printmaking clubs will sell student-made artwork and wares, and students in studio art and technology will present live puppet performances featuring laser-engraved sets and characters fabricated in the school’s Think It Make It Lab.

The talk and opening reception will take place from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Nov. 28 at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.

The opening reception is made possible by Prizm: The Artist’s Supply Store, with in-kind support provided by Sun King Brewing. Parking will be free in the Sports Complex Garage adjacent to Eskenazi Hall or on levels 5 and 6 of the Riverwalk Garage, courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis, with validation from the Herron galleries. Visit HerronGalleries.org for more information.

Located in Eskenazi Hall on the IUPUI campus, the Galleries at Herron are free and open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays.

Also on view in the Galleries at Herron through Dec. 12:

  • In the Marsh Gallery: Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley’s corresponding exhibition, “The Minotaur Trilogy,” comprising three films — “Priapus Agonistes” (2014), “Swinburne’s Pasiphae” (2014), and “The Thong of Dionysus” (2015) — that use punning wordplay, handmade costumes and sets, and bawdy humor to riff on classical mythology and pop culture.
  • In the Basile Gallery: “Stuff(ed),” an exhibition featuring the work of five contemporary artists who explore the playful, subversive power of sculpted fabric to transform and reimagine mass-market commodities and bric-a-brac from everyday life. Participating artists are Jessica Dance, Gil Yefman, Andrea Pritschow, David Gabbard and Natalie Baxter.

About Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley

Mary Reid Kelley earned a B.A. from St. Olaf College and an MFA from Yale University. She is the recipient of a 2016 MacArthur fellowship and has received awards from the American Academy in Rome, the Rema Hort Mann Foundation, and the College Art Association. Major exhibitions include Salt Lake Art Center, Utah; SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico; the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, Massachusetts; and ZKM Museum of Contemporary Art in Karlsruhe, Germany.

Patrick Kelley earned a BFA from St. Olaf College and an MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art. He has taught photography, video and new media courses at the University of Minnesota, St. Olaf College, St. Mary’s College of Maryland and Skidmore College in New York. His works have shown at the Bibliothèque Publique d’Information-Centre Pompidou, Paris, France; the Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Germany; and the Minnesota Museum of American Art.

About the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture

The Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture brings prominent contemporary artists to Herron to present their work and ideas.

About Betsy Stirratt

Betsy Stirratt is the founding director of the Grunwald Gallery of Art at Indiana University Bloomington. As director, Stirratt has curated exhibitions for over 30 years, including the exhibits “Personal: Selections from the Robert J. Shiffler Collection,” “Human Nature” and “The Miniature.”

About the Herron School of Art and Design

Founded in 1902, Herron School of Art and Design is the premier accredited professional school of art and design in the state of Indiana and is part of the thriving urban campus of IUPUI. Herron has more than 50 full-time faculty serving 11 undergraduate and three graduate programs and a curriculum that prepares graduates to be leaders in a world that requires a unique combination of creativity, conceptual skills and technical abilities. Herron is an engaged community and regional partner including five public galleries; community learning programs; and the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life.

Read the original article from IUPUI News

Themester 2018 explores the relationship between humans and nonhuman animals

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — The Indiana University Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences’ 10th annual Themester explores the interconnectedness of animals and humans with a fall lineup of public talks, workshops, films, exhibits and visiting speakers.

Peter Singer. Photo by Alletta Vaandering

“Darwin provoked human beings to reconsider the human place among living beings,” said Steven Wagshal, professor of Spanish and co-chair of the 2018 Themester Committee. “Perhaps we are nothing more or less than one species of animals who evolved on this planet. Yet human beings are also an extremely peculiar sort of animal; we have complex social and political systems, and we have radically changed the environment.

“The purpose of this Themester is to challenge us all to think about our connections to and differences from other animals. It is to explore how authors and artists have depicted animals, to work through our strange sort of animality and to inquire about what sorts of obligations flow from it for how we ought to treat each other, other animals and our environment.”

Philosopher Peter Singer, author of the groundbreaking book “Animal Liberation” and most recently known for his effective altruism model, will speak about ethics and animals on Sept. 12 at Presidents Hall inside Franklin Hall. A groundbreaking work first published in 1975, “Animal Liberation” popularized the term “speciesism” and changed the conversation about treatment of animals. The talk is co-sponsored by Union Board, IU’s largest student programming board.

Russ Mittermeier

Other scholars giving free public talks include Russ Mittermeier, the world’s pre-eminent primate conservationist and the 2018 winner of the prestigious Indianapolis Prize. On Oct. 2, Mittermeier will discuss the importance of conservation with a particular focus on nonhuman primates.

Jill Pruetz, professor of anthropology at Texas State University, will also focus on primates for her Oct. 26 public keynote talk, “Life on the Savanna,” for the Midwest Primate Conference. Pruetz will discuss her work with chimpanzees in the hostile savanna environment of Senegal.

The Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior will present a speaker series called “Man’s Best Friend: The Science of Dog Cognition.” The first lecture, scheduled for Sept. 20, will feature anthropologist Pat Shipman of Pennsylvania State University speaking on the domestication of dogs in Ice Age Europe. Themester will partner with IU Cinema and the IU Moving Image Archive Screening Room at Herman B Wells Library to present a series of free films, beginning Sept. 12 with Charles Burnett’s critically acclaimed but rarely shown “Killer of Sheep” at Wells Library. A counter to the “blaxpoitation” films of the early 1970s, the film focuses on everyday life in a black community. It was added to the National Film Registry and named one of the 100 Essential Films by the National Society of Film Critics.

Jill Pruetz

Other films include the documentary “Jane,” which draws on hours of previously lost National Geographic footage of primatologist Jane Goodall; and “Au Hasard Balthazar,” Robert Bresson’s classic look at cruelty and compassion. “Angry Inuk” presents Arctic seal hunting from an indigenous perspective.

Exhibitions include “Shapes of the Ancestors: Bodies, Animals, Art and Ghanaian Fantasy Coffins” at the Mathers Museum of World Cultures. The exhibit will explore the historical development and contemporary use of figurative coffins, which are often in the shape of animals and communicate familial and personal attributes, values or identity. Mathers will hold a number of supporting events, including a curator’s talk, artist visit and family craft day at the museum. The exhibit runs through the fall semester.

In October, the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology will present a curated exhibit that explores the animal/human connection from historic, archaeological and Native perspectives.

Daniel Anum Jasper hand-paints details on the face of a lion palanquin used by a Ghanaian chief. Jasper is also well-known in Ghana for painting movie posters. Photo by Kristin Otto, Indiana University

IU Theatre presents Edward Albee’s “The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia? (Notes toward a definition of tragedy).” A provocative play about loss, love and the limits of tolerance, “The Goat” is for mature audiences only. The show runs Nov. 29 to Dec. 8 and is a ticketed event.

For a complete list of Themester 2018: Animal/Human events and details, visit the Themester News and Events page. Most events are free and open to the public, though some require registration or tickets. Consult the Themester online calendar for more information.

Select events are limited to IU undergraduates, but most Themester events are open to the public and free.

College of Arts and Sciences Themester courses complement Themester 2018. Course include animal folklore and the behavior and evolution of animals.

Themester is an initiative of the Indiana University Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences.

Guest filmmakers and directors including Michael Schultz are highlights of IU Cinema’s fall season

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Thirty years after his last visit to Indiana University Bloomington, filmmaker Michael Schultz returns to celebrate 50 years in stage and screen. Schultz will be present for screenings of several of his films as part of Indiana University Cinema’s Jorgensen Guest Filmmaker Series.

Michael Schultz Photo courtesy of IU Cinema

 

The filmmaker series is supported through the Ove W Jorgensen Foundation and brings internationally known filmmakers to IU Bloomington during the fall and spring semesters.

Writer and curator Sergio Mims will lead an extended onstage interview with Schultz about his films and career at 7 p.m. Nov. 9. In addition, Schultz and his wife, creative partner and co-producer Lauren Jones will be present for screenings of “Cooley High,” “Krush Groove,” “Car Wash” and “To Be Young, Gifted and Black.”

The screening of “To Be Young, Gifted and Black” will take place at the IU Moving Image Archive Screening Room in the Herman B Wells Library on Nov. 7. All other films will be screened at IU Cinema. Schultz’s visit is made possible through a partnership with the Black Film Center/Archive.

The fall 2018 Jorgensen Guest Filmmaker Series also features:

  • Tamer El Said, filmmaker and director, who will visit Bloomington on Sept. 21 to present a lecture at 4 p.m. followed by a 7 p.m. screening of “In the Last Days of the City,” his first feature film as director. El Said founded Zero Production, is an advocate for the power of cinema and established Cimatheque-Alternative Film Centre in Egypt, a multipurpose teaching and programming space for independent filmmaking.

    “78/52: Hitchcock’s Shower Scene” is a documentary about “78 shots and 52 cuts that changed cinema forever.” Image courtesy of IU Cinema
  • Director Sara Driver, whose work is a combination of fantasy, surrealism, science fiction, comics, horror, sword-and-sorcery and the supernatural. Driver will be in Bloomington for screenings of her films “Boom for Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michael Basquiat” at 7 p.m. Nov. 29 and “Sleepwalk” at 10 p.m. Nov. 30. She’ll present her lecture at 7 p.m. Nov. 30 before the screening of “Sleepwalk.”
  • Alexandre O. Philippe, a Swiss-American filmmaker who has directed a number of award-winning films and documentaries. His most recent work, “78/52: Hitchcock’s Shower Scene,” documents the iconic scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho,” which used 78 camera set-ups and 52 edits over the course of three minutes. Philippe will attend the screening of this film at 7 p.m. Dec. 6, as well as screenings of “The Exorcist” at 7 p.m. Dec. 4 and “Doc of the Dead” at 10 p.m. Dec. 7. He will present a Hitchcock Master Class at 7 p.m. Dec. 7.

“The range of talented guests visiting IU Cinema across all programs this fall should engage and entertain a broad and diverse audience for us,” said Jon Vickers, IU Cinema founding director. “There are over a dozen guests presenting their work, and the majority of them will work with students and faculty in the classroom or special master classes.”

Tickets are not necessary for the lectures in the Jorgensen series, but they are needed for the film screenings. Ticket information and additional details on all of the guest filmmakers can be found on IU Cinema’s website.

IU Cinema also hosts a full season of movies, screenings and events, often collaborating with other units on the Bloomington campus.

Rising Tide: The Crossroads Project Photo courtesy of IU CInema

“We are thrilled to partner each semester with a wealth of IU units and community organizations through our Creative Collaborations program,” said Brittany Friesner, associate director of IU Cinema. “Our fall schedule includes another strong line-up of engaging and collaborative programming, including series curated by the Mathers Museum for World Cultures, the Irish-American Community at IU, the Russian and East European Institute, and the Black Film Center/Archive.

“Our collaborative programming model allows us to reach deeply into campus and community, calling upon scholars and other subject-matter experts to present unique cinematic experiences accessible for all IU students, staff, faculty and the community at large.”

Highlights of the fall 2018 season include:

  • The 5X Ida Lupino: Fearless, Extraordinary Trailblazer film series, which commemorates the 100th anniversary of the birth of early Hollywood filmmaker Ida Lupino. Her films often addressed social issues and taboo topics. Five films directed by Lupino will be shown throughout the fall semester, kicking off Sept. 7. Dates and ticket information are available on the 5X Series page.
  • “On Your Marc,” a documentary following television icon Marc Summers as he develops a live theater show about his life. A sneak preview of this new film will be shown at 7 p.m. Sept. 14; Summers is scheduled to be present. The screening is presented in partnership with Bloomington Playwrights Project.
  • Rising Tide: The Crossroads Project, part of IU’s Integrated Program in the Environment and Environmental Resilience Institute’s celebration of how the arts and humanities catalyze science in support of environmental sustainability. The performance combines film, chamber music and spoken word to motivate sustainable action in the face of climate change. A Q&A with the performers and IU experts will follow the film. The screening begins at 7 p.m. Oct. 4. There will also be a daylong symposium with lectures, a workshop and a panel discussion hosted by the Integrated Program in the Environment.
  • The Creatures of Yes Interactive Workshop, which is part of the CINEkids International Children’s Film Series. Director and puppeteer Jacob Graham will lead a workshop filled with screenings of many of his short films at 4 p.m. Nov. 17. The workshop is suggested for kids 5 and older.

Read the original article from IU News

New Exhibit from IAHI Scholar-in-Residence Samuel E. Vázquez

IMMERSED is a group exhibition featuring works by contemporary visual artists whose creative processes reveal deeply rooted meanings through symbolism and narrative. The exhibition is organized and curated by Samuel E. Vázquez in collaboration with InCultur. Participating artists include Samuel E. Vázquez, Danicia Monét, Atsu Kpotufe, Elizabeth Bilbrey, Gary Gee, Shamira Wilson, Hector Del Campo, Maria Zepeda, Stephen Heathcock, and Heather Ward Miles.

According to Vázquez, “The main idea of IMMERSED is to share diverse expressions by featuring the works of artists whose focused studio practices are unique to each artist.” The title of the exhibition, which includes paintings, photographs, illustrations, and sculptures, “alludes to the immersive and continuous process of developing one’s voice.”

“This exhibition can speak to anyone interested in exploring, engaging, and interacting with the art and artists. It can also speak via the diverse global backgrounds of the featured artists. Through direct dialogue with the artists or the works, we can meaningfully engage in conversation while learning from one another. That’s the beauty of art – it speaks of and about life, making our collective human experience richer,” Vázquez said.

The exhibition, held at Butler University’s Clowes Memorial Hall, will open with a reception from 6:00-9:00 pm on Tuesday, March 20, and will close on April 23. This exhibition is presented by Butler’s Jordan College of the Arts Signature Series, which features internationally acclaimed guest artists brought to Butler University’s campus. For more details, including gallery hours and parking information, click here.

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1970, Samuel E Vázquez is a visual artist working primarily in mixed media. His inspiration is rooted in the New York City subway style writings of the 1970s and 80s, along with the works of Ed Clark, Jackson Pollock, and Jean-Michel Basquiat. Vázquez’s work has been exhibited in numerous galleries and cultural institutions. He has lectured on the history of style writing in venues such as the Arts Council of Indianapolis, New York City College of Technology-CUNY, Indianapolis Public Library Central Branch, Clowes Memorial Hall at Butler Arts Center, and Indianapolis Museum of Art. Vázquez is a 2017 Scholar In Residence at the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and a 2017-18 Creative Renewal Arts Fellow of the Arts Council of Indianapolis.