Herron to Present Lecture by Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley, Undergraduate Student Exhibition

INDIANAPOLIS — Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI is presenting the 2018 Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture with Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley on Nov. 28, followed by an opening reception for the annual Undergraduate Student Exhibition and a holiday art sale supporting Herron student artists and designers.

MacArthur Award “genius” grant recipient Mary Reid Kelley combines painting, performance and her distinctive wordplay in graphically stylized films made in collaboration with her partner, Patrick Kelley. During the talk, the collaborative duo will discuss the visual language of “The Minotaur Trilogy” (2013–15), a series of short narrative films exploring the Greek Minotaur myth and, through it, the present-day roles of women, sexuality, language and art historical tropes.

Kassie Woodworth, “Circulate,” 2018. Paper and wood, 40 inches by 40 inches by 29 inches. Photo courtesy of Herron School of Art and Design

Opening in conjunction with the Kelleys’ talk is the Undergraduate Student Exhibition, an annual tradition featuring exceptional works produced by Herron students across a variety of artistic disciplines. This year’s guest juror is Betsy Stirratt, director of the Grunwald Gallery of Art at Indiana University Bloomington, who will award prizes to the top entries. Additionally, the ceramics, furniture design and printmaking clubs will sell student-made artwork and wares, and students in studio art and technology will present live puppet performances featuring laser-engraved sets and characters fabricated in the school’s Think It Make It Lab.

The talk and opening reception will take place from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Nov. 28 at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.

The opening reception is made possible by Prizm: The Artist’s Supply Store, with in-kind support provided by Sun King Brewing. Parking will be free in the Sports Complex Garage adjacent to Eskenazi Hall or on levels 5 and 6 of the Riverwalk Garage, courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis, with validation from the Herron galleries. Visit HerronGalleries.org for more information.

Located in Eskenazi Hall on the IUPUI campus, the Galleries at Herron are free and open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays.

Also on view in the Galleries at Herron through Dec. 12:

  • In the Marsh Gallery: Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley’s corresponding exhibition, “The Minotaur Trilogy,” comprising three films — “Priapus Agonistes” (2014), “Swinburne’s Pasiphae” (2014), and “The Thong of Dionysus” (2015) — that use punning wordplay, handmade costumes and sets, and bawdy humor to riff on classical mythology and pop culture.
  • In the Basile Gallery: “Stuff(ed),” an exhibition featuring the work of five contemporary artists who explore the playful, subversive power of sculpted fabric to transform and reimagine mass-market commodities and bric-a-brac from everyday life. Participating artists are Jessica Dance, Gil Yefman, Andrea Pritschow, David Gabbard and Natalie Baxter.

About Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley

Mary Reid Kelley earned a B.A. from St. Olaf College and an MFA from Yale University. She is the recipient of a 2016 MacArthur fellowship and has received awards from the American Academy in Rome, the Rema Hort Mann Foundation, and the College Art Association. Major exhibitions include Salt Lake Art Center, Utah; SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico; the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, Massachusetts; and ZKM Museum of Contemporary Art in Karlsruhe, Germany.

Patrick Kelley earned a BFA from St. Olaf College and an MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art. He has taught photography, video and new media courses at the University of Minnesota, St. Olaf College, St. Mary’s College of Maryland and Skidmore College in New York. His works have shown at the Bibliothèque Publique d’Information-Centre Pompidou, Paris, France; the Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Germany; and the Minnesota Museum of American Art.

About the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture

The Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture brings prominent contemporary artists to Herron to present their work and ideas.

About Betsy Stirratt

Betsy Stirratt is the founding director of the Grunwald Gallery of Art at Indiana University Bloomington. As director, Stirratt has curated exhibitions for over 30 years, including the exhibits “Personal: Selections from the Robert J. Shiffler Collection,” “Human Nature” and “The Miniature.”

About the Herron School of Art and Design

Founded in 1902, Herron School of Art and Design is the premier accredited professional school of art and design in the state of Indiana and is part of the thriving urban campus of IUPUI. Herron has more than 50 full-time faculty serving 11 undergraduate and three graduate programs and a curriculum that prepares graduates to be leaders in a world that requires a unique combination of creativity, conceptual skills and technical abilities. Herron is an engaged community and regional partner including five public galleries; community learning programs; and the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life.

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Themester 2018 explores the relationship between humans and nonhuman animals

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — The Indiana University Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences’ 10th annual Themester explores the interconnectedness of animals and humans with a fall lineup of public talks, workshops, films, exhibits and visiting speakers.

Peter Singer. Photo by Alletta Vaandering

“Darwin provoked human beings to reconsider the human place among living beings,” said Steven Wagshal, professor of Spanish and co-chair of the 2018 Themester Committee. “Perhaps we are nothing more or less than one species of animals who evolved on this planet. Yet human beings are also an extremely peculiar sort of animal; we have complex social and political systems, and we have radically changed the environment.

“The purpose of this Themester is to challenge us all to think about our connections to and differences from other animals. It is to explore how authors and artists have depicted animals, to work through our strange sort of animality and to inquire about what sorts of obligations flow from it for how we ought to treat each other, other animals and our environment.”

Philosopher Peter Singer, author of the groundbreaking book “Animal Liberation” and most recently known for his effective altruism model, will speak about ethics and animals on Sept. 12 at Presidents Hall inside Franklin Hall. A groundbreaking work first published in 1975, “Animal Liberation” popularized the term “speciesism” and changed the conversation about treatment of animals. The talk is co-sponsored by Union Board, IU’s largest student programming board.

Russ Mittermeier

Other scholars giving free public talks include Russ Mittermeier, the world’s pre-eminent primate conservationist and the 2018 winner of the prestigious Indianapolis Prize. On Oct. 2, Mittermeier will discuss the importance of conservation with a particular focus on nonhuman primates.

Jill Pruetz, professor of anthropology at Texas State University, will also focus on primates for her Oct. 26 public keynote talk, “Life on the Savanna,” for the Midwest Primate Conference. Pruetz will discuss her work with chimpanzees in the hostile savanna environment of Senegal.

The Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior will present a speaker series called “Man’s Best Friend: The Science of Dog Cognition.” The first lecture, scheduled for Sept. 20, will feature anthropologist Pat Shipman of Pennsylvania State University speaking on the domestication of dogs in Ice Age Europe. Themester will partner with IU Cinema and the IU Moving Image Archive Screening Room at Herman B Wells Library to present a series of free films, beginning Sept. 12 with Charles Burnett’s critically acclaimed but rarely shown “Killer of Sheep” at Wells Library. A counter to the “blaxpoitation” films of the early 1970s, the film focuses on everyday life in a black community. It was added to the National Film Registry and named one of the 100 Essential Films by the National Society of Film Critics.

Jill Pruetz

Other films include the documentary “Jane,” which draws on hours of previously lost National Geographic footage of primatologist Jane Goodall; and “Au Hasard Balthazar,” Robert Bresson’s classic look at cruelty and compassion. “Angry Inuk” presents Arctic seal hunting from an indigenous perspective.

Exhibitions include “Shapes of the Ancestors: Bodies, Animals, Art and Ghanaian Fantasy Coffins” at the Mathers Museum of World Cultures. The exhibit will explore the historical development and contemporary use of figurative coffins, which are often in the shape of animals and communicate familial and personal attributes, values or identity. Mathers will hold a number of supporting events, including a curator’s talk, artist visit and family craft day at the museum. The exhibit runs through the fall semester.

In October, the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology will present a curated exhibit that explores the animal/human connection from historic, archaeological and Native perspectives.

Daniel Anum Jasper hand-paints details on the face of a lion palanquin used by a Ghanaian chief. Jasper is also well-known in Ghana for painting movie posters. Photo by Kristin Otto, Indiana University

IU Theatre presents Edward Albee’s “The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia? (Notes toward a definition of tragedy).” A provocative play about loss, love and the limits of tolerance, “The Goat” is for mature audiences only. The show runs Nov. 29 to Dec. 8 and is a ticketed event.

For a complete list of Themester 2018: Animal/Human events and details, visit the Themester News and Events page. Most events are free and open to the public, though some require registration or tickets. Consult the Themester online calendar for more information.

Select events are limited to IU undergraduates, but most Themester events are open to the public and free.

College of Arts and Sciences Themester courses complement Themester 2018. Course include animal folklore and the behavior and evolution of animals.

Themester is an initiative of the Indiana University Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences.

Guest filmmakers and directors including Michael Schultz are highlights of IU Cinema’s fall season

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Thirty years after his last visit to Indiana University Bloomington, filmmaker Michael Schultz returns to celebrate 50 years in stage and screen. Schultz will be present for screenings of several of his films as part of Indiana University Cinema’s Jorgensen Guest Filmmaker Series.

Michael Schultz Photo courtesy of IU Cinema

 

The filmmaker series is supported through the Ove W Jorgensen Foundation and brings internationally known filmmakers to IU Bloomington during the fall and spring semesters.

Writer and curator Sergio Mims will lead an extended onstage interview with Schultz about his films and career at 7 p.m. Nov. 9. In addition, Schultz and his wife, creative partner and co-producer Lauren Jones will be present for screenings of “Cooley High,” “Krush Groove,” “Car Wash” and “To Be Young, Gifted and Black.”

The screening of “To Be Young, Gifted and Black” will take place at the IU Moving Image Archive Screening Room in the Herman B Wells Library on Nov. 7. All other films will be screened at IU Cinema. Schultz’s visit is made possible through a partnership with the Black Film Center/Archive.

The fall 2018 Jorgensen Guest Filmmaker Series also features:

  • Tamer El Said, filmmaker and director, who will visit Bloomington on Sept. 21 to present a lecture at 4 p.m. followed by a 7 p.m. screening of “In the Last Days of the City,” his first feature film as director. El Said founded Zero Production, is an advocate for the power of cinema and established Cimatheque-Alternative Film Centre in Egypt, a multipurpose teaching and programming space for independent filmmaking.

    “78/52: Hitchcock’s Shower Scene” is a documentary about “78 shots and 52 cuts that changed cinema forever.” Image courtesy of IU Cinema
  • Director Sara Driver, whose work is a combination of fantasy, surrealism, science fiction, comics, horror, sword-and-sorcery and the supernatural. Driver will be in Bloomington for screenings of her films “Boom for Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michael Basquiat” at 7 p.m. Nov. 29 and “Sleepwalk” at 10 p.m. Nov. 30. She’ll present her lecture at 7 p.m. Nov. 30 before the screening of “Sleepwalk.”
  • Alexandre O. Philippe, a Swiss-American filmmaker who has directed a number of award-winning films and documentaries. His most recent work, “78/52: Hitchcock’s Shower Scene,” documents the iconic scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho,” which used 78 camera set-ups and 52 edits over the course of three minutes. Philippe will attend the screening of this film at 7 p.m. Dec. 6, as well as screenings of “The Exorcist” at 7 p.m. Dec. 4 and “Doc of the Dead” at 10 p.m. Dec. 7. He will present a Hitchcock Master Class at 7 p.m. Dec. 7.

“The range of talented guests visiting IU Cinema across all programs this fall should engage and entertain a broad and diverse audience for us,” said Jon Vickers, IU Cinema founding director. “There are over a dozen guests presenting their work, and the majority of them will work with students and faculty in the classroom or special master classes.”

Tickets are not necessary for the lectures in the Jorgensen series, but they are needed for the film screenings. Ticket information and additional details on all of the guest filmmakers can be found on IU Cinema’s website.

IU Cinema also hosts a full season of movies, screenings and events, often collaborating with other units on the Bloomington campus.

Rising Tide: The Crossroads Project Photo courtesy of IU CInema

“We are thrilled to partner each semester with a wealth of IU units and community organizations through our Creative Collaborations program,” said Brittany Friesner, associate director of IU Cinema. “Our fall schedule includes another strong line-up of engaging and collaborative programming, including series curated by the Mathers Museum for World Cultures, the Irish-American Community at IU, the Russian and East European Institute, and the Black Film Center/Archive.

“Our collaborative programming model allows us to reach deeply into campus and community, calling upon scholars and other subject-matter experts to present unique cinematic experiences accessible for all IU students, staff, faculty and the community at large.”

Highlights of the fall 2018 season include:

  • The 5X Ida Lupino: Fearless, Extraordinary Trailblazer film series, which commemorates the 100th anniversary of the birth of early Hollywood filmmaker Ida Lupino. Her films often addressed social issues and taboo topics. Five films directed by Lupino will be shown throughout the fall semester, kicking off Sept. 7. Dates and ticket information are available on the 5X Series page.
  • “On Your Marc,” a documentary following television icon Marc Summers as he develops a live theater show about his life. A sneak preview of this new film will be shown at 7 p.m. Sept. 14; Summers is scheduled to be present. The screening is presented in partnership with Bloomington Playwrights Project.
  • Rising Tide: The Crossroads Project, part of IU’s Integrated Program in the Environment and Environmental Resilience Institute’s celebration of how the arts and humanities catalyze science in support of environmental sustainability. The performance combines film, chamber music and spoken word to motivate sustainable action in the face of climate change. A Q&A with the performers and IU experts will follow the film. The screening begins at 7 p.m. Oct. 4. There will also be a daylong symposium with lectures, a workshop and a panel discussion hosted by the Integrated Program in the Environment.
  • The Creatures of Yes Interactive Workshop, which is part of the CINEkids International Children’s Film Series. Director and puppeteer Jacob Graham will lead a workshop filled with screenings of many of his short films at 4 p.m. Nov. 17. The workshop is suggested for kids 5 and older.

Read the original article from IU News

New Exhibit from IAHI Scholar-in-Residence Samuel E. Vázquez

IMMERSED is a group exhibition featuring works by contemporary visual artists whose creative processes reveal deeply rooted meanings through symbolism and narrative. The exhibition is organized and curated by Samuel E. Vázquez in collaboration with InCultur. Participating artists include Samuel E. Vázquez, Danicia Monét, Atsu Kpotufe, Elizabeth Bilbrey, Gary Gee, Shamira Wilson, Hector Del Campo, Maria Zepeda, Stephen Heathcock, and Heather Ward Miles.

According to Vázquez, “The main idea of IMMERSED is to share diverse expressions by featuring the works of artists whose focused studio practices are unique to each artist.” The title of the exhibition, which includes paintings, photographs, illustrations, and sculptures, “alludes to the immersive and continuous process of developing one’s voice.”

“This exhibition can speak to anyone interested in exploring, engaging, and interacting with the art and artists. It can also speak via the diverse global backgrounds of the featured artists. Through direct dialogue with the artists or the works, we can meaningfully engage in conversation while learning from one another. That’s the beauty of art – it speaks of and about life, making our collective human experience richer,” Vázquez said.

The exhibition, held at Butler University’s Clowes Memorial Hall, will open with a reception from 6:00-9:00 pm on Tuesday, March 20, and will close on April 23. This exhibition is presented by Butler’s Jordan College of the Arts Signature Series, which features internationally acclaimed guest artists brought to Butler University’s campus. For more details, including gallery hours and parking information, click here.

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1970, Samuel E Vázquez is a visual artist working primarily in mixed media. His inspiration is rooted in the New York City subway style writings of the 1970s and 80s, along with the works of Ed Clark, Jackson Pollock, and Jean-Michel Basquiat. Vázquez’s work has been exhibited in numerous galleries and cultural institutions. He has lectured on the history of style writing in venues such as the Arts Council of Indianapolis, New York City College of Technology-CUNY, Indianapolis Public Library Central Branch, Clowes Memorial Hall at Butler Arts Center, and Indianapolis Museum of Art. Vázquez is a 2017 Scholar In Residence at the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and a 2017-18 Creative Renewal Arts Fellow of the Arts Council of Indianapolis.