A Stronger Body for a Healthier Mind: German Lebensreform, Midwestern Vegetarians, and the Politics of Resistance

Vegetarianism, nudism, alternative medicine, ecology, and organic farming: In the late 19th– and early 20th-century, diverse groups promoting “back-to-nature” lifestyles captured the popular imagination throughout Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Emphasizing a holistic approach to both physical and mental health, this so-called Lebensreform (“life reform”) movement sought to liberate body and mind from the ardor and exigencies of modern life. The roundtable discussion will focus on the intersection of everyday practice and political potential by addressing the origins of the Lebensreform movement during the socially restrictive German Kaiserreich, their appropriation in the United States (from the Chicago Vegetarian Society to utopian settlements), and their later role in the context of Nazi Germany.

Speakers include Thorsten Carstensen (Associate Professor of German, IUPUI), Mark Roseman (Distinguished Professor, Pat M Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies, IU Bloomington), and Marcel Schmid (Assistant Professor of German, Universityof Virginia).

Parking vouchers will be provided. The event, which is free and open to the public, will be followed by a light reception. For all questions, please contact Thorsten Carstensen at tcarsten@iupui.edu.

Monday, November 5, 6:30-8:00 p.m.
Campus Center, Room 305

Registration is encouraged!

The Entanglements Series: Sound, Art, and Ecology

What do we mean when we say that we’re listening? What is it that we hear? How do sounds help us articulate our emotions and shape our understanding?

In a world of rapid environmental transformation, how have our soundscapes changed? What is it that we’re not hearing? What does this mean for our futures?

Join us for lunch (it’s free!), a performance by Mary Lattimore, and a discussion with a panel of experts who focus on the intersections of sound, art, ecology, and culture.

Panelists

Alisha Lola Jones
Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology
Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology
Indiana University Bloomington

Dr. Jones teaches ethnomusicology in IU Bloomington’s Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology within the College of Arts and Sciences. Jones specializes in the study of music and religion in the African diaspora, and teaches courses such as “Music & Mysticism” and “Popular Music in African American Music Performance.”

Gustavo Valdivia
PhD Candidate
Johns Hopkins University

Gustavo Valdivia specializes in ethnographic research in Andean indigenous communities in Peru. His work blends environmental anthropology and social theory with the tools of modern environmental science. He seeks to produce a horizontal and democratic dialogue that articulates the voices of indigenous peasants whose lives and lands are marked by the recent trends of global change.

Moderator:
Enrique Ramirez
Curatorial Advisor to Exhibit Columbus

Dr. Ramirez is a scholar of modern and contemporary architectural history and is Curatorial Advisor to Exhibit Columbus. He has lectured widely and his work has appeared in diverse publications like Harvard Design Magazine, Metropolis, The Journal of Architecture, and Perspecta: The Yale Architectural Journal. His work has been recognized and supported by various organizations, including the Canadian Centre for Architecture, the Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation, and the Graham Foundation for Advanced Study in the Fine Arts.

Performance

Mary Lattimore is an American classically trained harpist based in Los Angeles, California. In addition to her solo work and collaborations with fellow Philadelphia musician Jeff Zeigler, she has also performed with multiple prominent indie musicians, including Thurston Moore, Kurt Vile, and Steve Gunn. Her newest album is “Hundreds of Days.” You can hear a sample and read a review at Pitchfork: https://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/mary-lattimore-hundreds-of-days/

About the Entanglements Series

The “Entanglements Series” is a program designed by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute. Events brings together scientists or social scientists with humanists and artists to discuss a “big question” that transcends disciplines. These big questions are often topics that philosophers have debated for thousands of years — for example, “what makes us human?” — but they might be questions that are of immediate pressing concern such as “how do we stop the next plague?”
Funding for the Entanglements Series is generously provided by an IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant. This program is offered in collaboration with the “Metaphonics: A Sonic Journey through Stuart Hyatt’s Field Works,” which will take place in the evening. You can get tickets for Metaphonics at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/metaphonics-a-sonic-journey-through-stuart-hyatts-field-works-tickets-48700574730

Eventbrite - The Entanglements Series: Sound, Art, and Ecology (free lunch included)

IAHI Announces the Publication of the Open Access Book Rivers of the Anthropocene

Rivers of the Anthropocene Book CoverThe IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the Rivers of the Anthropocene project is proud to announce the publication of Rivers of the Anthropocene. Published by University of California Press, Rivers of the Anthropocene is available in print and as an open access publication through Luminos at https://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520295025.

This exciting volume presents the work and research of the Rivers of the Anthropocene Network, an international collaborative group of scientists, social scientists, humanists, artists, policy makers, and community organizers working to produce innovative transdisciplinary research on global freshwater systems. In an attempt to bridge disciplinary divides, the essays in this volume address the challenge in studying the intersection of biophysical and human sociocultural systems in the age of the Anthropocene.

Featuring contributions from authors in a rich diversity of disciplines—from toxicology to archaeology to philosophy—this book is an excellent resource for students and scholars studying both freshwater systems and the Anthropocene.

Edited by Jason M. Kelly, Philip Scarpino, Helen Berry, James Syvitski, and Michel Meybeck, this volume emerged from a conference held at the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute. Contributors include Jeff Benjamin (PhD student, Columbia University); Helen Berry (Professor of History, Newcastle University); Tim Carter (President, Second Nature); Celia Deane-Drummond (Professor and Director of the Center for Theology, Science and Human Flourishing, Department of Theology, University of Notre Dame); Matt Edgeworth (Senior Project Officer for the Cambridge University Archaeology Unit; Honorary Research Fellow, University of Leicester); David Gilvear (Professor of River Science, Sustainable Earth Institute, Plymouth University); Stephanie C. Kane (Professor, Department of International Studies, Indiana University Bloomington); Jason M. Kelly (Director of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute; Associate Professor of History, IUPUI); Andy Large (Reader in River Science, School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, Newcastle University); Laurence Lestel (Researcher at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Ken Lubinski (Former Chief, River Ecology, U. S. Geological Survey, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center); Sina Marx (German Committee for Disaster Reduction, Bonn, Germany); Michel Meybeck (Emeritus Scientist at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Mary Miss (Founder, City as Living Laboratory); Dinah Smith (Honorary Visiting Fellow, Department of Geology, University of Leicester); Philip Scarpino (Director, Public History Program at IUPUI;  Professor of History, IUPUI); Eleanor R. Starkey (Researcher, School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University); Jai Syvitski (Executive Director of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System and Professor at University of Colorado, Boulder); Martin Thoms (Professor of River Science, Director of the Institute for Rural Futures, University of New England); Mark Williams (Professor of Palaeobiology, Department of Geology, University of Leicester); Jan Zalasiewicz (Professor of Palaeobiology, Department of Geology, University of Leicester).

Consecrating Science Wonder, Ethics, and the New Cosmology: a Roundtable with Dr. Lisa Sideris

Lisa Sideris
Lisa Sideris

What is the role of wonder in contemporary environmental discourse? Come join Dr. Lisa Sideris on Friday, December 5 at 1:30 p.m. in the IUPUI University Library, Room 4115P, as she examines a constellation of movements referred to as the New Story/Universe Story/Epic of Evolution/Big History—forms of science-based ecospirituality that have emerged in recent decades. One of her central claims is that these narratives encourage awe and wonder at scientific information and expert knowledge as that which is most “real,” over and above lived encounters with the natural world. She questions whether these new myths are likely to engender the environmental values and ethics they seek to cultivate. This privileging of abstract information is pronounced in iterations of the new cosmology that take inspiration from the work of E. O. Wilson and Richard Dawkins—who promote a mythopoeic rendering of science as a superior rival to religion—but many of the same criticisms can be made of the new cosmology as it has come to dominate the broad discipline of “religion and ecology.” Dr. Sideris’s talk will draw comparisons between the forms (and objects) of wonder celebrated in these movements and accounts of wonder as an enduring orientation, such as Rachel Carson defends in The Sense of Wonder and other writings.

LISA SIDERIS is Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Director of the IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society (CSRES) at Indiana University Bloomington. Her research interests include environmental ethics, religion and nature, and the science-religion interface. She is author of Environmental Ethics, Ecological Theology, and Natural Selection (Columbia, 2003) and editor of Rachel Carson: Legacy and Challenge (SUNY, 2008). Her current research focuses on the role played by wonder in discourse at the intersection of science, religion, and nature, and the turn to science for a common sacred narrative.

This is a public program open to all. An RSVP to Abby Gitlitz agitlitz@indiana.edu is appreciated but not required. Religion and Ethics Roundtables highlight the work of scholars at IUB, IUPUI, and beyond, with the goal of engaging the IU community and the public in dialogue about important issues at the intersection of religion, ethics, and society.