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We’re gathering up for the next quarterly Herron Highlights roundup, where we share news from our students, alumni, and faculty. If you’re showing work, starting a new job, or have another kind of update you’d like to share, submit your story online by June 26 for editorial consideration.

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OUR TOWN: Grant Program Description

Our Town is the National Endowment for the Arts’ creative placemaking grants program. Through project-based funding, we support projects that integrate arts, culture, and design activities into efforts that strengthen communities by advancing local economic, physical, and/or social outcomes. Successful Our Town projects ultimately lay the groundwork for systemic changes that sustain the integration of arts, culture, and design into local strategies for strengthening communities. These projects require a partnership between a local government entity and nonprofit organization, one of which must be a cultural organization; and should engage in partnership with other sectors (such as agriculture and food, economic development, education and youth, environment and energy, health, housing, public safety, transportation, and workforce development). Matching grants range from $25,000 to $200,000, with a minimum cost share/match equal to the grant amount.

FY 2020 marks the 10 year anniversary of the Our Town program. We are looking for projects that reflect a new and catalytic way of working, and demonstrate the potential for sustained support and recognition for arts, design, and cultural strategies as integral to every phase of community development.

Projects

We encourage applications for artistically excellent projects that:

  • Bring new attention to or elevate key community assets and issues, voices of residents, local history, or cultural infrastructure.
  • Inject new or additional energy, resources, activity, people, or enthusiasm into a place, community issue, or local economy.
  • Envision new possibilities for a community or place – a new future, a new way of overcoming a challenge, or approaching problem-solving.
  • Connect communities, people, places, and economic opportunity via physical spaces or new relationships.

The National Endowment for the Arts plans to support a variety of projects across the country in urban, rural, and tribal communities of all sizes.

Project Types

Our Town projects must integrate arts, culture, and design activities into efforts that strengthen communities by advancing local economic, physical, and/or social outcomes. Projects may include activities such as:

Arts Engagement:

  • Artist residency: A program designed to strategically connect artists with the opportunity to bring their creative skill sets to non-arts institutions, including residencies in government offices, businesses, or other institutions.
  • Arts festivals: Public events that gather people, often in public space or otherwise unexpected places, to showcase talent and exchange culture.
  • Community co-creation of art: The process of engaging stakeholders to participate or collaborate alongside artists/designers in conceiving, designing, or fabricating a work or works of art.
  • Performances: Presentations of a live art work (e.g., music, theater, dance, media).
  • Public art: A work of art that is conceived for a particular place or community, with the intention of being broadly accessible, and often involving community members in the process of developing, selecting, or executing the work.
  • Temporary public art: A work of art that is conceived for a particular place or community and meant for display over a finite period of time, with the intention of being broadly accessible and often involving community members in developing, selecting, or executing the work.

Cultural Planning: 

  • Cultural planning: The process of identifying and leveraging a community’s cultural resources and decision-making (e.g., creating a cultural plan, or integrating plans and policies around arts and culture as part of a city master planning process).
  • Cultural district planning: The process of convening stakeholders to identify a specific geography with unique potential for community and/or economic development based on cultural assets (e.g., through designation, branding, policy, plans, or other means).
  • Creative asset mapping: The process of identifying the people, places, physical infrastructure, institutions, and customs that hold meaningful aesthetics, historical, and/or economic value that make a place unique.
  • Public art planning: The process of developing community-wide strategies and/or policies that guide and support commissioning, installing, and maintaining works of public art and/or temporary public art.

Design: 

  • Artist/designer-facilitated community planning: Artists/designers leading or partnering in the creative processes of visioning, and for solutions to community issues.
  • Design of artist space: Design processes to support the creation of dedicated spaces for artists to live and/or to produce, exhibit, or sell their work.
  • Design of cultural facilities: Design processes to support the creation of a dedicated building or space for creating and/or showcasing arts and culture.
  • Public space design: The process of designing elements of public infrastructure, or spaces where people congregate (e.g., parks, plazas, landscapes, neighborhoods, districts, infrastructure, and artist-produced elements of streetscapes).

Artist and Creative Industry Support:

  • Creative business development: Programs or services that support entrepreneurs and businesses in the creative industries, or help cultivate strong infrastructure for establishing and developing creative businesses.
  • Professional artist development: Programs or services that support artists professionally, such as through skill development or accessing markets and capital.

Please view our Tips for a Successful Our Town Application webinar, and review the list of grants on our website to see the types of projects that have been funded recently through Our Town. The online storybook ‘Exploring Our Town‘ has illustrative examples of Our Town grant projects and insights into doing creative placemaking for practitioners. You also may download our free publication How to Do Creative Placemaking, and look at additional creative placemaking resources on our website. Applications on projects resulting from Mayors Institute on City Design and Citizens Institute on Rural Design are encouraged.

National Environmental Policy Act and/or the National Historic Preservation Act Review

If you are recommended for a grant and your project may be subject to the National Environmental Policy Act  (NEPA) and/or the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the National Endowment for the Arts will conduct a review of your project to ensure that it is in compliance with NEPA/NHPA.

Some of the common project types that garner a NHPA review are:

  • A project involving or occurring near a district, site, building, landscape, structure or object that is at least 50 years old or older and therefore included in or eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places (please note that in some instances, buildings or structures may be included in or eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places that are less than 50 years old).
  • The commissioning and installation of temporary or permanent outdoor furnishings such as benches or market structures or art such as a sculpture or mural.
  • An arts festival in a park.
  • Design planning and services for projects that may involve a historic site, structure, or district.

This review and approval process may take up to several months to complete and may delay your project’s start date. The results of the review may impact our ability to make a grant award/our ability to release grant funds. If you are recommended for an award which may have historic preservation or environmental concerns (NHPA/NEPA), you will be notified and asked to provide additional information. Your thorough and complete information for all project activities and locations will expedite the review. The NEA cannot release an award and/or grant funds until the historic preservation and environmental review is complete.

To learn more about what questions you will need to answer for the review of a project impacted by the National Environmental Policy Act and/or the National Historic Preservation Act, see here.

Required Partnerships 

A key to the success of creative placemaking is involving the arts in partnership with committed governmental, nonprofit, and private sector leadership. All applications must demonstrate a partnership that will provide leadership for the project. These partnerships must involve two primary partners, as defined by these guidelines:

  1. Nonprofit organization
  2. Local government entity

One of these two primary partners must be a cultural (arts or design) organization. The highest ranking official of the local government is required to submit a formal statement of support designating the project as the one of the up to two applications being submitted for the local government. See “How to Prepare and Submit an Application” for more information.

Additional partners are encouraged and may include an appropriate variety of entities such as arts organizations and artists, design professionals and design centers, state level government agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, real estate developers, business leaders, community organizations, councils of government, rural or regional planning organizations, transportation agencies, special districts, educational organizations, as well as public and governmental entities; and should engage in partnership with other sectors (such as agriculture and food, economic development, education and youth, environment and energy, health, housing, public safety, transportation, and workforce development).

You may find it helpful to contact your local or regional arts agency as you begin the process of identifying partners within your community. 

Strengthening Communities

Through Our Town projects, the National Endowment for the Arts Endowment intends to achieve the following objective: Strengthening Communities: Provide opportunities for the arts to be integrated into the fabric of community life.

Our Town project outcomes may include:

  • Economic Change: Economic improvements of individuals, institutions, or the community including local business growth, job creation/labor force participation, professional development/training, prevention of displacement, in-migration, and tourism.
  • Physical Change: Physical improvements that occur to the built and natural environment including beautification and/or enhancement of physical environment, new construction, and redevelopment (including arts, culture, and public space).
  • Social Change: Improvements to social relationships, civic engagement and community empowerment, and/or amplifying community identity including civic engagement, collective efficacy, social capital, social cohesion, and community attachment.
  • Systems Change: Improvements to community capacity to sustain the integration of arts, culture, and design into strategies for advancing local economic, physical, and/or social outcomes including partnerships with other sectors, civic and institutional leadership, replication or scaling of innovative projects, long term funding, training programs, and permanent staff positions.

For more information, visit the National Endowment For The Arts website 

Portraits Of Our Campus: 50 Faces of IUPUI

This exhibition celebrates some of the students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community members whose hard work, dedication, and resourcefulness have helped distinguish IUPUI as an innovative, inclusive, and service-minded campus leading up to our 50th Anniversary.

This exhibit will be open  on June 4th and will run through the 30th.

Visiting hours will be Monday through Saturday 10am-7pm and Sunday 11am-7pm!

So come check it out at the Cultural Arts Gallery in the Campus Center Room 148! It’s all free!

We’ll see you there!

Herron Alumna Alice Guerin on Finding Her Artistic Niche

Alice Guerin. Rachel Enneking

Alice Guerin, after receiving her Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2013, quickly found a sector where she could continue her artistic practice: tattooing. Due to her incredible attention to detail and ability to do delicate, precise designs, Guerin’s business gained traction very quickly.

Today, Guerin only takes appointments, and for good reason: her parlor, Knot Eye Studio, has a incredibly high level of demand, and her appointment books currently closed until fall 2019. She has been featured in Indianapolis Monthly and The Good Trade, along with numerous other publications. Here, Guerin discusses her artistic process, inspirations, and more.

Virtual Reality Game Built By IUPUI Students Challenges Players To Escape Breakout High

Video by Samantha Thompson, Indiana University

Gamers in Indianapolis have a new virtual world to play in, one built by a team of IUPUI media arts and science students where players must use their puzzle-solving wits to escape the clutches of a villain who has locked them inside a school.

The game, “Breakout High,” is available for play at BlueWall VR, a virtual reality arcade at 5967 E. 82nd St. in Castleton.

After donning a VR headset, players find they have been locked inside a classroom in Breakout High by the villainous Mr. Jack. Players escape from a series of locked rooms, and eventually the school, by solving puzzles.

The students developed the game as part of a team-driven project-based learning course, N420 Multimedia Project Development. The student team was paired with BlueWall VR as a client, said Joshua Kottka, who led the student team as product manager.

“They wanted a VR game, so we met with them for a couple of weeks to brainstorm ideas about what type of game we should develop,” Kottka said. “We eventually narrowed it down to a puzzle-solving game, like an escape room.”

“I think we were all pretty excited to work on a virtual reality game,” Kottka said. “Virtual reality and augmented reality games are still not quite as popular as other types of video game genres, but they are new and emerging. The really interesting thing about virtual reality is that it is still super-new.”

Jonathan Renninger, who served as lead programmer, said learning the ins and outs of virtual reality programming was the most interesting part of the project. “I had to do a lot of research and learn how to program that kind of stuff,” he said.

That included designing puzzles that lead a player from one step to the next, such as a bookcase on which books have to be placed in a certain order, Renninger said.

“Breakout High” may be the first game Kottka and Renninger developed for a client, but it won’t be their last.

After he graduates from IUPUI May 11, Kottka said, he will be applying for internships at gaming studios around the country: “That’s really my goal after graduation, making more games and stuff.”

He believes his work on “Breakout High” will give him a leg up on that quest. “This will definitely help. For a year, I was project manager for ‘Breakout High.’ So I have that to put on my resume.”

Renninger, who is also graduating, hopes his experience developing “Breakout High” will burnish his portfolio. “It also helped me learn a bit more about how to work with a client. So I hope further on down the line this will help me deal with clients and with programming for other games in the future.”

Read the original story from IUPUI News’ Rich Schneider

 

Herron Sculpture Graduate Took Country Roads To Commencement

Shelby Lahne, a Herron School of Art and Design sculpture graduate, watches her pet goats Crackerjack, left, and Peanut play on her property in rural Shelby County. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
Shelby Lahne, a Herron School of Art and Design sculpture graduate, watches her pet goats Crackerjack, left, and Peanut play on her property in rural Shelby County. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

The roads to graduation for 7,122 students at the May 11 IUPUI commencement differ tremendously. Some left home half-a-planet away to study here; many others earned their degrees without having to leave beautiful and bustling Indianapolis.

A senior about to graduate, Shelby Lahne was born and raised in Pleasant View, Indiana, and went to high school in Fairland, population 315. She commuted 30 to 40 minutes to classes daily. While home is only a county away, her experience is another world from the downtown Indianapolis campus, which is where she earned a degree in sculpture from the Herron School of Art and Design. Pleasant View consists of an offramp from I-74 east, a gas station and a handful of roads with quaint houses on large plots of land.

While most of her classmates weren’t raised in small-town Indiana, it has fueled her art in terms of direction and materials.

Shelby Lahne poses with part of her installation piece, "Nests," which currently hangs in University Library. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
Shelby Lahne poses with part of her installation piece, “Nests,” which currently hangs in University Library. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

“I think being from a small town but going to school in the big city gives me a different perspective on things,” said Lahne, whose high school graduating class was about 100 students.

Thousands of IUPUI students, staff and faculty have seen — and walked under — a recent commission of Lahne’s: “Nests” has hung in the second-floor lobby of University Library since the fall, and it will continue to show for another year. The four large constructions sway quietly by thick rope. That rope is also wrapped around each nest made of burlap over a steel, egg-shaped understructure.

“Over the steel rods, there is a layer of chicken wire, and over that is a layer of carpet padding,” Lahne revealed. “I got the idea from looking at weaver bird nests. Instead of cup-shaped nests, they create dome-shaped nests with just one little hole in them. They make them in large groups for protection purposes.

“I thought that was very interesting because it’s like the library itself — everyone comes here. We may all be doing our own thing, but we’re still in here together.”

Following “Nests,” Lahne continued with the suspension theme in her work. Ropes, pulleys and the defiance of gravity were utilized in most pieces.

Photos courtesy of Shelby Lahne
Photos courtesy of Shelby Lahne

“I’ve used a lot of concrete and cinder blocks,” Lahne said. “They all have to do with weight, tension and balance.

“A lot of my ideas come from different building materials, like metal, concrete and rope. Out in the country, you just find these things in someone’s yard or their barn. They are typically thought of as junk or scrap, but the materials seem to have a story to them.”

Before her years at IUPUI, Lahne earned an associate degree in art therapy from Vincennes University. She expected to pursue the field at IUPUI, but she found a better fit in Herron’s sculpture program, which is headquartered in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Lahne’s recent pieces have shown well in Herron galleries and classrooms, and the young artist will pursue a graduate degree in sculpture.

As she looks for her next stop along her academic journey, Lahne must decide what to do with her two beloved pets. An option would be finding a farm for Peanut and Crackerjack while she continues her studies.

Peanut and Crackerjack love to eat and roam around Shelby Lahne's property in Shelby County. Photos by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
Peanut and Crackerjack love to eat and roam around Shelby Lahne’s property in Shelby County. Photos by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Like it has for countless young Hoosiers, 4-H Club became a big part of Lahne’s high school years when a friend roped her into showing goats for the Shelby County Fair. Not getting attached to your show animals is a rite of passage for many 4-H kids. Lahne was, however, able to rescue a pair of goats from slaughter. First was Peanut. He was kept at her grandfather’s house just outside of the town limits. Since a solitary goat is an unhappy one, Crackerjack, a pygmy mix, was welcomed into the herd. The smaller, younger goat was another 4-H animal that is now enjoying a retirement full of fresh alfalfa hay, more than an acre of lawn with delicious grass and jelly beans for treats.

Lahne constructed a pen and a small barn for her pets. It’s true that the goats are eating machines, but they don’t eat cans or other items meant for the recycling bins. But they will decimate any kind of yard waste with haste.

“They’re similar to a dog,” Lahne said of her goats. “They always follow me around. If I have them out, they’re always where I am, and whatever I’m trying to do, they’re always in the way. Peanut wants to be petted all the time.”

Lahne has shown numerous pictures and videos of Peanut, a Boer breed now weighing in at 200 pounds, and Crackerjack, who is now almost 100 pounds, to her classmates.

“Everyone at the sculpture building wants me to bring them in,” said Lahne, with a laugh. “That would be impossible to do. If you try to pet Crackerjack, he’ll think you’re playing and try to headbutt you.”

Small-town living inspired Herron sculpture graduate Shelby Lahne to achieve commissions, goats and commencement. Video by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

Read the original story from IUPUI NewsTim Brouk 

Mother Nature Inspired IUPUI Students’ Design For A Safer Football Helmet

The thick peel of a pomelo was one of nature's bio-inspired designs the students examined.
The thick peel of a pomelo was one of nature’s bio-inspired designs the students examined.

Two IUPUI students drew upon the wisdom of Mother Nature to create biologically inspired designs that could be used to create a safer football helmet.

Their research has been published in the Society of Automotive Engineering International Journal of Transportation Safety.

The student authors of the paper, “Cellular Helmet Liner Design through Bio-Inspired Structures and Topology Optimization of Compliant Mechanism Lattices,” are Jacob DeHart, a media arts and science student in the School of Informatics and Computing, and Joel Najmon, an engineering student in the School of Engineering and Technology.

Zebulun Wood, a lecturer in media arts and science, and Andres Tovar, an associate professor of mechanical and energy engineering and an assistant professor of biomedical engineering, are co-authors and co-directors of this research project.

“Our research and design algorithms show innovative, energy-absorbing cellular helmet liners,” Najmon said. “Cellular helmet liners are ideal for impact energy absorption, as their structures can mimic the excellent absorbing capabilities of foam and energy protective biological structures while maintaining the ability to be engineered for specific impact, dynamic responses.”

The two students were given the reins to experiment and explore different ways of making something that could be useful to people, DeHart said. “I took a more interpretative look at nature, mimicking functions and forms from nature, while Joel took a more scientific one, putting numbers into a program to get results.”

This work shows lessons learned from bio-inspired designs using protective structures such as pomelo peel, nautilus shell and woodpecker skull, Tovar said. “Our work explores a design approach to tailor the response of a cellular material subject to impact, an approach that offers the potential to mitigate head injury by decreasing acceleration, decreasing penetration and increasing specific energy absorption.”

“What this study really gets to is that nature, through millions of years of innovation and evolution, knows best,” Wood said. “We took some of nature’s hardest surfaces — surfaces that could be translated to helmet design — and re-created them in a way that can be simulated in engineering software.”

Nature may have provided inspiration for the cellular designs, but it took the students months to figure out how the bio-inspired shapes developed by DeHart could be re-created in a way that they could be used by Najmon in engineering simulation software that showed whether their helmet liner would reduce risk of injury.

The challenge the two students faced, Wood said, was to learn how to create geometric shapes that were inspired by nature but could also be simulated in engineering software. “Until our experiment, that was very difficult to do. It’s still difficult to do. Now IUPUI knows how to get those shapes to work together.”

The kind of collaboration that enabled the students to bridge the gap between the domains of media arts and science and engineering could only happen at a campus like IUPUI that encourages people in different fields to work together, Wood said.

The helmet liner study was supported by a grant from the Sports Innovation Institute at IUPUI.

Read the original article from IUPUI NewsJohn Schwarb and Rich Schneider

Herron’s Top 100 Honorees of 2019

Devin Johannis (middle) with Leslie Kidwell (left), president of the IUPUI Alumni Association, and Nasser H. Paydar (right), IUPUI chancellor and executive vice president of Indiana University. Courtesy of Shannon McCullough.
Devin Johannis (middle) with Leslie Kidwell (left), president of the IUPUI Alumni Association, and Nasser H. Paydar (right), IUPUI chancellor and executive vice president of Indiana University. Courtesy of Shannon McCullough.

Every year, IUPUI honors the achievements of their student body by recognizing exceptional students through the IUPUI Top 100 list. Changemakers, innovators, achievers, and leaders are included.

Several students at Herron are being honored this year: newcomers Devin Johannis and Jazmine Hooper, in addition to returning honorees Haley Francis-Halstead and Sydney Patberg.

Devin Johannis
Succeeding on his own terms is something Devin Johannis specializes in. He had an untraditional start at Herron: he was admitted through the newly founded artistic support program. When he received a notification that a portfolio of his work would be due in a week, he had to make do with what he could. “I remember grabbing some colored pencils and pens that were lying around and just looking things up online, trying to make art,” he said. This hard work paid off, and Johannis was soon directly admitted. After an experience while studying abroad in Italy where he saw the same pattern his father uses as trim moulding on architectural columns and church designs, he began to think more about tradition in his work. This eventually led him to furniture design as his major.

“Tradition is such an important part of being a designer now. So many people have made so many things before you, it can only benefit you to know more about it…I would’ve felt blind without it,” he said.

The experience of being a artistic support student serves as a source of inspiration for Johannis, and drives him to help students in similar situations. He is a mentor through IUPUI’s O-Team program. He’s also contributed to the National Mentoring Symposium, IUPUI’s Sophomore Experience program, and IUPUI’s Bridge first year seminar, among others. “My mentor played a huge role in getting me admitted, and through her, I realized how beneficial it can be to have a mentorship. I wanted to know what it means to be a mentor, so that’s why I pursued it,” Johannis said.

Herron School of Art and Design's Top 100 honorees of 2019, pictured with members of the Student Services team during the recognition dinner on April 12th, 2019.   Courtesy of Shannon McCullough
Herron School of Art and Design’s Top 100 honorees of 2019, pictured with members of the Student Services team during the recognition dinner on April 12th, 2019. Courtesy of Shannon McCullough

Having been listed as one of IUPUI’s top 100, Johannis has proven he is well on his way to becoming a successful creator. With that being said, he stresses the importance of maintaining momentum. “I still try to ground myself, and pretend in my head that at any moment I could get kicked out. The more success, the more things I’m able to achieve — the more praise that comes with it. That’s great, but it’s really easy to get lost in that, to be like ‘cool, I’m in the Top 100! I made it!’ and stop trying,” Johannis said. “I don’t want to ever be like that. I’ve always got another goal, and I’ve always got to keep going.

Johannis is graduating this year with a B.F.A. in furniture design, a minor in art history, and an architectural and interior design graphics certificate. True to his word, he plans on applying for jobs that could push him towards his goal after graduation: getting in-field experience and then pursuing a master’s degree to become a fine arts professor. “There’s something about being out in the actual career field that allows professors to specialize their classes and make it feel like it really is their coursework. That’s something I don’t want to miss out on,” he said. “When people take a class with me, I want them to be able to say ‘oh, that’s his work. There’s a lot that he can provide that’s unique to the course and I couldn’t get elsewhere.'”

Jazmine Hooper
Jazmine Hooper is a leader, first and foremost. She is a member of the Herron Ambassador program, the president of Herron’s Student Council, and the student representative for the Herron Alumni Association, among other leadership appointments. All of these enable Hooper to maximize outreach and help incoming students. “Being able to have these interactions with students and being able to give them advice and clarity is extremely valuable,” she said.

Hooper believes in the importance of the student connection due to the significance of her own time at Herron. She originally intended to major in visual communication design, but ended up in drawing and illustration. Now, she’s currently experimenting with printmaking. She attributes this to Herron’s “beautiful way of making you take classes outside your comfort zone.” “You’re going to be taking electives out of your major,” she said. “I discovered book arts, printmaking — things that I’ve absolutely fallen in love with.” She cites Herron’s inherent experimentation as the reason why she didn’t have to “settle” for a medium that might’ve not worked for her.

Malala, Magician 2 1/2″ x 3″. Courtesy of Jazmine Hooper.

When giving advice to incoming freshmen, Hooper believes one of the most important things to remember is that “everything has a purpose,” especially foundation studies. “I throw back to things I learned freshman year all the time,” she said. “I might be setting up a composition for a print and use gestalt theory without even recognizing it. You have to have patience.”

Being a part of the IUPUI Top 100 is extremely important to Hooper. It was a goal for her since her sophomore year, and she can graduate knowing she’s achieved it. “To get that recognition is a really big deal to me,” she said. After graduating with her B.F.A. in drawing and illustration (along with her minors in book arts and art history), she plans to further her body of work by contributing to the Indianapolis artistic sphere. “Whether I end up as a gallery attendant or creative director or anything else, I just want to be able to express myself creatively and maintain my personal practice,” Hooper says. She plans on eventually going to graduate school to become a professor of the arts.

Haley Francis-Halstead
Haley Francis-Halstead is receiving a B.F.A. in visual communication design(VCD). She has a wide spectrum of experience, ranging from restaurant industry social media marketing to being the executive director of Herron’s VCD capstone exhibition in 2019. She has worked tirelessly to support IUPUI over the course of her education, having been an employee in the Office of Community Engagement, Housing and Residence Life, and IUPUI’s chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha. In her spare time, she creates YouTube vlogs about her experiences as an art student. Francis-Halstead has made the Top 100 two consecutive years.

Sydney Patberg
Sydney Patberg is receiving a B.A.E. in art education. She has already worked in-field, having been employed as an art teacher for both U Craft Me Up and Columbus Canvas. She contributes to IUPUI’s Greek life scene as the chapter president for Phi Mu Fraternity since November 2017, helping to raise over $25,000 annually on behalf of the organization. She also participates in Jagathon yearly, helping to raise money for Riley Hospital for Children. Patberg has also made the Top 100 two consecutive years.

Read the original story from Herron School of Art + Design 

Herron’s Ninth Annual ‘Look/See’ Event Celebrates Indianapolis’s Emerging Artists, Art Therapists And Design Strategists

Design, Culture, and Everyday Life in Denmark

Aaron Ganci and Haley Francis-Halstead in Copenhagen. @hollabackhaley

This spring break, twenty-two students from Herron’sfurniture designvisual art, and visual communication design programs traveled to Copenhagen, Denmark, with associate professors Aaron Ganci and Helen Sanematsu to experience one of Europe’s modernist design epicenters. They traveled via bicycle to design studios, museums, and cultural attractions and sampled a plethora of Danish cuisines.

“It was inspiring to see my students experience Denmark. We visited several design agencies to learn about their people-centered approach to design, went to a few museums, had a bike tour of the city with a local designer, and made a dinner together to experience hygge. Our trip to the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art was especially inspiring because we had a personal tour from their director of education who taught us about the history of land, the collection, and the architecture. I can’t wait to get back with more students!”

Aaron Ganci, associate professor of visual communication design

“The museums we visited during our study abroad were amazing and made me fall in love with the arts all over again. But above all, the talks with the designers were what stood out to me.

We went to EGGS Design and spoke to Katja [Egmose] and Nikolaj [Bebe], who are the creative directors for EGGS in Copenhagen. Katja had us do an exercise where a few groups had arthritis and the other groups were mute. The groups with arthritis (I was in that group) had to tape their knuckles and wrists, which would mimic the lack of movement with arthritis.

This was an important exercise because we had to go to the grocery store and pick up ingredients to make lunch while our hands and wrists were taped. This seemed weird at first, and we got some interesting looks from the people in the store, but as we were shopping – trying to hold on to the basket, use our phones to look up translations, and take out our credit cards – it all made sense.

Design isn’t about making something pretty; design is about creating a solution to a problem. Our problem was the fact that everyday tasks were made more difficult because of our mobility issues. Katja said we should always try and put ourselves in the shoes of the people for whom we are creating a solution.”

Romarie Quinones-Perez, visual communication design student

“Being exposed to well-designed solutions that address a particular problem has had the biggest influence on me. I am now confident that I can provide techniques and ideas similar to the ones used in Denmark for problem solving in the United States. For example, at the airport, instead of scanning your ticket when they start boarding, you scan your ticket to get into a seating area when you first arrive at the gate, therefore, making the boarding process quicker and less stressful.”

Caila Lutz, visual communication design student

“Denmark always ranks in the top 3 of the world’s happiest countries, and it was awesome to get some idea of why by being there and hanging out with Danish folks. We used our previous experience in design to share our own networks with our students, and we all learned a lot about how design can make life better.”

Helen Sanematsu, associate professor of visual communication design

“Everyone there was so kind! Me and the other grad student took a day trip to Møns Klint, a beach with giant white sand cliffs. We had a four-mile hike to get to there, after a train and two bus rides. During our hike back, it started to rain and the wind was really strong. We stopped to use the restroom in what turned out to be a nursing home and the manager offered us a ride to the train station. It was a 40-minute drive and she told us a lot about Denmark and even stopped at a couple churches to show us the architecture and art inside.

I think part of why everything felt so intentionally placed and beautiful in Denmark is because the people there really value what they have – not just as possessions but also in terms of quality and design as well as togetherness. So many things there are designed to maximum potential and to be aesthetically pleasing, which compliments their emphasis on togetherness and coziness. It is definitely something I have taken home with me and makes me look at things differently.”

Tiffany Pierce, visual art student

“The people there were amazing, and the architecture was breathtaking. It was an incredible experience I would want to have again and again!”

Deven Grose, visual communication design student

Read the original article from Herron School of Art + Design