2015 Spring Colloquium Series Presentation

Nate William, Ph.D. Candidate IU School of Education, IUPUI
Nate William

Please join us for the 2015 Spring Colloquium Series Presentation, hosted by the Center for Urban and Multicultural Education (CUME), and the School of Education. You will have the opportunity to experience a series of innovative research presentations by Ph.D. students, colleagues and community members. Join us for creative yet critical conversations on research that’s relevant to today’s society.  We thank all of those who attended our last sessions and look forward to seeing you at this one. Please mark this time on your calendar in support of our students and colleagues.

Invited Presenter: Mr. Nate William, Ph.D. Candidate, IU School of Education, IUPUI

Racial disparities in school discipline: A function of Systemic Racism?

The primary focus of my research centers on the overrepresentation of Black students in discipline, in particular, the exploration of how, if at all, the “school-to-prison pipeline” acts a function of systemic racism. Specifically, my research draws from critical scholarship to examine how teachers’ and administrators’ dispositions, their biases and beliefs, and philosophies of education and discipline, intersect with macro level social systems to contribute or interrupt the school-to-prison pipeline and/or act as means of protecting whiteness. Using an embedded multi-case study (Yin, 2013) of four middle schools differing on dimensions of disproportionality and school locale, I analyze isolated and intersections of subunits of inquiry using a conceptual framework comprised of color-blind racism, post-colonialism, and critical race theory . Subunits of this inquiry include classroom dynamics, the disposition of teachers, their philosophies of education and discipline, discipline techniques, the referral process, and the overall discipline policy. Working in combination with my conceptual framework I will examine the subunits of this inquiry from three data points 1) ethnographic observations, 2) interviews, and 3) school level referral rates.