Charles Goodlett, Elizabeth Kryder-Reid Appointed Chancellor’s Professors At IUPUI

From left: Chancellor's Professors Charles Goodlett and Elizabeth Kryder-Reid. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
From left: Chancellor’s Professors Charles Goodlett and Elizabeth Kryder-Reid. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar has appointed Charles Goodlett, a professor in the School of Science, and Elizabeth Kryder-Reid, a professor in the School of Liberal Arts, as prestigious Chancellor’s Professors.

The Chancellor’s Professorship is the most distinguished appointment a faculty member can attain at IUPUI, recognizing extensive records of accomplishment and leadership in teaching, research and service. These senior faculty members retain the title throughout their appointments at IUPUI and comprise a special group of mentors and advisors for colleagues.

“Professor Goodlett and professor Kryder-Reid have dedicated themselves to outstanding research and education at IUPUI, serving as mentors, teachers and scholars for more than 20 years,” Paydar said. “Their appointments as Chancellor’s Professors honor all that they have done to enhance students’ educational experiences, to contribute to the vibrant intellectual community on our campus, and to support the advancements of their disciplines more broadly.”

Chancellor’s Professors are faculty who have demonstrated excellence in their support of IUPUI as an academic community of exceptional quality and integrity and have distinguished themselves in their disciplines through the creation and application of knowledge. Through their leadership and service in their departments, in their schools and across campus, they have reinforced and advanced IUPUI’s mission and vision.

Charles Goodlett
Goodlett, who arrived at IUPUI in 1993, is a professor in the Addiction Neuroscience program in the Department of Psychology in the School of Science.

Much of his research over the last quarter-century has focused on the effects of alcohol on the developing brain using quantitative neuroanatomy and behavioral methods in animal models of human fetal exposure. His work has shown that prenatal alcohol-induced brain damage and subsequent impairments in learning are directly related to blood alcohol content, with binge-like patterns of consumption proving especially damaging to the developing brain. His work showed that during early development of one important region of the brain, the cerebellum, there are relatively well-defined periods of enhanced vulnerability to damage from binge alcohol exposure.

Goodlett is continuing to research neurodevelopment disorders in a collaborative project with Randall Roper studying a mouse model of Down syndrome, while also fueling his passions for mentoring and teaching.

“Service to the campus is what I really value right now; I have dedicated a lot of time in the last five years working on faculty issues through faculty governance,” said Goodlett, who has also served for many years on the IUPUI Research Affairs Committee, including being chairperson in 2008-10. “Mentoring junior faculty is a concern of mine — making sure they’re given the right support and that they are able to navigate the academic landscape to achieve the full potential of their career trajectory.

“We have a very strong neuroscience undergraduate program, and one of the things that we are working on — that I’m taking a bit of a lead on — is developing a capstone research laboratory course that will allow students to gain experience in independent, hypothesis-driven behavioral neuroscience research.

“Being appointed as a Chancellor’s Professor motivates me even more to be a good academic citizen. It encourages me to continue and expand my efforts.”

Elizabeth Kryder-Reid
When Kryder-Reid, a professor of anthropology and museum studies in the School of Liberal Arts, arrived on campus in 1998, museum studies was only an undergraduate certificate program, and when a computer with a student roster was inadvertently sent to university surplus, she had to track down the 11 certificate students individually.

Today, thanks in large part to Kryder-Reid’s leadership as director from 1998-2013, the IUPUI museum studies program is one of the largest in the country, with undergraduate and graduate offerings and a number of dedicated museum studies faculty that few other schools can match.

Kryder-Reid is currently director of the Cultural Heritage Research Center. Her research explores how people appropriate the tangible and intangible remnants of the past and mobilize them in social relationships.

“I’ve always been drawn to questions about the connections of past and present — how we remember the past and represent it in the material forms of public history sites and landscapes as well as museum collections and exhibits,” she said. “The compelling part is trying to understand not just the stories we tell, but why we tell them and how they relate to our contemporary relationships.”

Last month, her book “California Mission Landscapes: Race, Memory, and the Politics of Heritage” won the 2019 Elisabeth Blair MacDougall Book Award from the Society of Architectural Historians, which recognizes the most distinguished work of scholarship in the history of landscape architecture or garden design. The book, published in 2016 by University of Minnesota Press, has enjoyed widespread acclaim with awards from groups in landscape studies, history and landscape architecture history.

“I thanked my students in the foreword to that book. Conversations in class about the missions, about these broader questions of narratives, memory, race and politics, as well as about museums and anthropology sites, shaped my thinking about the mission landscapes,” Kryder-Reid said. “Teaching and scholarship are integrally related; each one informs the other.”

Kryder-Reid’s current work includes an environmental justice project, part of a broader international collaboration with the Humanities Action Lab that will include an exhibit coming to Indianapolis’ Central Library next January and public programs developed by IUPUI students.

“I know some of the people from the School of Liberal Arts who have served as Chancellor’s Professors and have admired the way they have crafted their careers to produce important scholarship and be amazing teachers while serving the campus,” Kryder-Reid said. “I’m honored to work in their company.”

Read the original story from IUPUI News’ John Schwarb 

Two IUPUI Researchers Receive 2018 Research Frontiers Trailblazer Award

IUPUI faculty from the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health and the School of Liberal Arts have been named recipients of the 2018 Research Frontiers Trailblazer Award.

Established in 2010, the award recognizes outstanding IUPUI researchers who show promise in becoming nationally and internationally known for their research and creative activity. It is given to associate professors within the first three years of being appointed or promoted to that title.

This year’s Research Frontiers Trailblazer Award recipients are Brian E. Dixon, associate professor, Department of Epidemiology, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, and Andrea R. Jain, associate professor, Department of Religious Studies, School of Liberal Arts.

Dixon and Jain spoke about their research in videos produced by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research at IUPUI.

Brian E. Dixon

Brian E. Dixon

“The tools and platforms Brian Dixon designs, builds and evaluates are routinely deployed and used by health systems and public health agencies in Indiana. The systems therefore impact real-world practice and support future research as new data are collected by the operational systems,” said Gerardo Maupomé, associate dean of research and professor of social and behavior sciences, in a letter of recommendation. “These systems have the capacity to be replicated across the U.S. and internationally through other research programs at IUPUI.”

Watch this video about Brian E. Dixon’s research!

Andrea R. Jain

Internal Grants for Faculty From Office of the Vice President for International Affairs (OVPIA)

OVPIA supports a variety of competitive funding opportunities that help IU faculty members advance their research and teaching through international engagement. These include a number of exchange programs as well as internal grant programs!

  •   Short-Term Exchange Program for the 2019-2020 academic year (deadline: October 12, 2018); exchange positions will be offered in Brazil, China, Germany, Ghana, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, and Thailand.
  • Freie Universität Berlin- IU Joint Research Workshops and Short-Term Research Grants (deadline September 28th)
  • Global Gateway Seed Grants for China, Europe, India, Mexico, and ASEAN (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to event)
  • International Short-Term Visitors Grans (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to event)
  • Language Learning Grants (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to start of program)
  • Overseas Conference Grant (deadlines: October 1, 2018; January 15, April 1, and July 1, 2019)
  • Overseas Study Program Development Grants (deadlines: November 1, 2018; February 2, 2019)
  • President’s International Research Awards (PIRA) (deadline TBD)
  • Renmin University of China- IU joint research grants (deadline: November 1, 2018; April 1, 2019)

As you plan international activities, check out these opportunities! Follow this link for guidelines and on-line application forms! If you have any questions, email ovpia@iu.edu!

American Academy of Nursing Selects Four Current and Former IU Nursing Faculty for Prestigious Award

INDIANAPOLIS — Three current and one former faculty member at the Indiana University School of Nursing have been named 2018 American Academy of Nursing fellows.

Lisa Carter-Harris

Lisa Carter-Harris, Wendy Miller, Joyce Pittman and former faculty member Kimberly Harper will be inducted as fellows during the organization’s annual policy conference Nov. 1-3 in Washington, D.C.

“Our new IU School of Nursing fellows join an esteemed group of leaders past and present who have made a significant impact on nursing practice, patient care and health,” said Robin Newhouse, dean and Distinguished Professor at the nursing school. “On behalf of the school, I congratulate my colleagues on receiving national recognition by the academy for their outstanding contributions.”

Academy fellows include renowned researchers and academic, clinical and government leaders who have transformed health care, nursing practice or education. The academy is currently composed of more than 2,500 nurse leaders representing all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 29 countries.

Lisa Carter-Harris is an assistant professor who focuses on improving patient-provider communication and the shared decision-making process in lung cancer screening. Her research has been used widely by clinicians, patients and policymakers to help more people get early screening and treatment for lung cancer. Carter-Harris is a board-certified adult nurse practitioner, teacher and mentor. She is an invited member of the American Cancer Society’s National Lung Cancer Roundtable as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s expert panel on shared decision-making in lung cancer screening.

Wendy Miller

Wendy Miller is an associate professor and director of the Social Network Health Research Lab, where she oversees interdisciplinary projects that focus on capturing the patient’s voice. Her independent program of research focuses on generating knowledge that will advance the state of science in the area of chronic disease self-management with an emphasis on improving the quality of life of adults with epilepsy via patient-centered interventions. She was awarded the New Investigator Career Development Award from the National Institutes of Health via the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

Joyce Pittman

Joyce Pittman is an adjunct assistant professor and coordinator of the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Program at IU Health Academic Health Center, leading a team of 10 nurses. Her research is focused on improving the quality of life of those individuals with wound, ostomy and continence issues, specifically prevention of pressure injuries and ostomy-related complications. She has 38 years’ experience in clinical practice, including 18 as a certified WOC nurse and 15 as a nurse practitioner. She is the deputy editor for the Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing; a board member for the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel; and a member of the Governing Guidance Group for the International Pressure Ulcer Prevention and Treatment Guideline. Pittman has published numerous articles, authored chapters, and given presentations both nationally and internationally.

Kimberly Harper

Kimberly Harper is chief executive officer of the Indiana Center for Nursing and serves as the nursing co-lead for the Indiana Action Coalition. Previous positions held include Nursing 2000 executive director; vice president for public affairs and the foundation at Wishard Health Services, now Eskenazi Health; and a 30-year stint serving Indiana University in a variety of nursing, marketing and human resources senior leadership roles. She is active in numerous professional organizations and has held various leadership roles within them; currently she is the chair of the board of directors of the national Nurses on Boards Coalition, where her leadership has contributed to improved health of our communities and nation through the voices of nurses on boards, commissions and governmental appointments all across the nation. Harper has served as a guest lecturer and a national and international speaker and has earned many awards, including the Nursing Professionalism and Practice Award for her “outstanding professional contributions and excellence in the practice, science and art of nursing” from the Indiana State Nurses Association.

About the Indiana University School of Nursing

Established in 1914, the IU School of Nursing has been empowering leaders in practice, research, education and service for over 100 years. Ranked 12th among public schools and colleges of nursing for National Institutes of Health funding, the school boasts a robust program of research focused on quality of life in chronic illness, nursing education and behavioral oncology. Programs offered include three undergraduate and nine graduate options in the master’s program. At the doctoral level, the school offers a Ph.D. in nursing science, the only Ph.D. program in the state of Indiana, and a leadership-focused DNP. There are also multiple graduate certificate and continuing education opportunities.

Read the original article from IUPUI News

‘Woman President’ earns two national awards for IUPUI co-author

unnamed
Stock Photo

INDIANAPOLIS — Two national professional organizations have named an IUPUI professor and her Colorado State University co-author recipients of top awards in recognition of their book about women and the quest for the U.S. presidency.

Kristina Horn Sheeler, chair and associate professor of communication studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and Karrin Vasby Anderson will receive the National Communication Association’s top book award, the James A. Winans and Herbert A. Wichelns Memorial Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Rhetoric and Public Address.

Sheeler and Anderson, professor of communication studies at Colorado State University, are also recipients of the Organization for the Study of Communication, Language and Gender’s 2014 Outstanding Book Award.

Both awards honor the women for their authorship of “Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture,” published last year by Texas A&M University Press.

“We are honored to receive these significant awards,” said Sheeler, who teaches in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. “Recognition of this important scholarship on gender and the presidency is one step toward imagining a woman as president. It is not as simple as advising women to run differently; as a culture, we must shift the conversation to include the cultural barriers competent women face when running for executive level office.”

In “Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture,” Sheeler and Anderson discuss the U.S. presidentiality as a unique rhetorical role, reviewing women’s historical and contemporary presidential bids with special emphasis on the 2008 campaign. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media and political parody, all to answer the question “What will it take for a woman to be elected as U.S. president?”

The co-authors argue that “one of the most intransigent barriers to the election of a woman president is the persistence of a broad cultural backlash against female presidentiality” that can be seen in political and popular culture.

Sheeler and Anderson received funding for their research as co-recipients of the Carrie Chapman Catt Prize for Research on Women in Politics.

The women will be honored during an award ceremony Nov. 22 at the National Communication Association’s 100th annual convention in Chicago.

The National Communication Association promotes the appreciation of the importance of communication in public and private life, the application of competent communication to improve the quality of human life and relationships, and the use of knowledge about communication to solve human problems.

As National Communication Association award recipients, Sheeler and Anderson “join a venerable group of scholars and educators who have been honored for achieving excellence in research, teaching and service,” association president Kathleen Turner said in the award letter to the co-authors.

Sheeler and Anderson have also been invited to attend an award celebration during the Organization for the Study of Communication, Language and Gender convention Oct. 16 to 19 in the San Francisco area.

The organization seeks to provide a forum for professional discussion, presentation of research and demonstration of creative projects in the areas of communication, language and gender, and to promote recognition of those doing work in this area.

“The committee had glowing things to say about your book and the decision to award you winner was unanimous,” Rachel E. Silverman, organization Book Award Committee chair, said in an award letter to the co-authors.

2014 M.F.A Exhibition

Herron MFA pic
L to R: detail, Lauren Davis (Photography and Intermedia), Musgave; Steve Baker (Furniture Design), Unity; Michael Helsley (Sculpture) untitled; Stephanie Kristen Erin Wichmann (Ceramics), Business As Usual.

The Annual Honors and Awards Ceremony for undergraduate students and their families kicks off the day’s celebration at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd., beginning at 4:00 p.m on May 1. All are welcome. The exhibits will be available for viewing until May 22.

Herron School of Art and Design is recognizing the achievements of Herron’s graduating master’s degree candidates with the M.F.A. Exhibition. Graduates work will be displayed in all the galleries in Eskenazi Hall and the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. The candidates represent Ceramics, Furniture Design, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture.

Exhibiting at the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center will be Steven Baker, Michael Helsley, Christopher Martin, John Collins McCormick, Colin Tury and Stephanie Kristen Erin Wichmann.

In the Basile Gallery in Eskenazi Hall will be Samuel R. Ladwig.

In the Marsh Gallery in Eskenai Hall will be Melissa Michelle Hopson and Southard Freeland.

In the Berkshire, Paul and Reese galleries in Eskenazi Hall will be Denise Conrady, Lauren Davis, Margaret Elizabeth Ingram, Sarah Kasch, Hillary Russell, Marna Lee Shopoff, Bridgit Stoffer, Elizabeth Wierzbicki and David Woolf.

When: May 1-22, 2014
Where:
Indianapolis, IN

For more information visit the event site.