American Creed Community Conversation Series

At a time when our country may feel divided, what are the hopes and beliefs that unite us as Americans? In partnership with the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, the Carmel Clay Public Library is hosting discussions designed to engage our community in thoughtful and respectful dialogue. The conversation series will explore themes from American Creed, a PBS documentary featuring former Secretary of State Condeleeza Rice, historian David Kennedy, and a diverse groups of Americans as they explore what ideals we share in common as a nation.

Thursday May 23, 6:30-8:00pm
American Creed Community Conversation: We the People
Who are “we the people” and who gets to define the American creed? Join us for discussion on immigration facilitated by IUPUI faculty members.
Suggested background reading and viewing:
Jose Antonio Vargas, “My Life as an Undocumented Immigrant”
Brent and Craif Renaud, New York Times Documentaries, “Between Borders: American Migrant Crisis”

Thursday May 30, 6:30-8:00pm
American Creed Community Conversation: Civic Engagement
Join IUPUI faculty to consider what civic engagement means and the interplay between engagement at the local level and with the sprawling community that is the United States.
Suggested background viewing:
Eric Liu for TED-Ed, “How to Understand Power”

All programs will be held in the Carmel Clay Public Library Program Room and are free and open to the public. For a closer look at topics and suggested background materials for each event in this conversation series, please visit carmel.lib.in.us/americancreed.

American Creed: Community Conversations is a project of Citizen Film in partnership with the American Library Association and the National Writing Project, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Carmel Clay Public Library was one of 50 US public libraries selected to take part in American Creed: Community Conversations.

Come check out these amazing events at the Carmel Clay Public Library! We’ll see you there!

Herron Alumna Alice Guerin on Finding Her Artistic Niche

Alice Guerin. Rachel Enneking

Alice Guerin, after receiving her Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2013, quickly found a sector where she could continue her artistic practice: tattooing. Due to her incredible attention to detail and ability to do delicate, precise designs, Guerin’s business gained traction very quickly.

Today, Guerin only takes appointments, and for good reason: her parlor, Knot Eye Studio, has a incredibly high level of demand, and her appointment books currently closed until fall 2019. She has been featured in Indianapolis Monthly and The Good Trade, along with numerous other publications. Here, Guerin discusses her artistic process, inspirations, and more.

Contested Image by Laura Holzman

Join us May 22nd from 5:30-6:30 at Indy Reads Books to hear Laura M. Holzman discuss her new book, Contested Image!

About Contested Image
Thomas Eakins’s 1875 painting The Gross Clinic, the Rocky statue, and the art collection under the stewardship of the Barnes Foundation are all iconic in Philadelphia for different reasons. But around the year 2000, they emerged as subjects of extended – and heated – controversies about their “appropriate” location. By revisiting these debates, Contested Image demonstrates how public reception transformed prominent elements of Philadelphia’s visual culture. The book’s insights into the public envisioning of place will resonate with readers regardless of where they call home.

About Laura Holzman
Laura M. Holzman is an associate professor of art history and museum studies at Indiana University, IUPUI, where she is also appointed Public Scholar of Curatorial Practices and Visual Art. She holds a PhD and MA in visual studies from the University of California, Irvine, and a BA with highest honors from Swarthmore College. Her work is dedicated to activating art history, its methods, and its related institutions as tools for strengthening communities, expanding democratic discourse, and creating a more reflective society.

May 22 | 5:30-6:30 PM
Indy Reads Books
911 Massachusetts Ave.; Indianapolis, IN

We’ll see you there!

Virtual Reality Game Built By IUPUI Students Challenges Players To Escape Breakout High

Video by Samantha Thompson, Indiana University

Gamers in Indianapolis have a new virtual world to play in, one built by a team of IUPUI media arts and science students where players must use their puzzle-solving wits to escape the clutches of a villain who has locked them inside a school.

The game, “Breakout High,” is available for play at BlueWall VR, a virtual reality arcade at 5967 E. 82nd St. in Castleton.

After donning a VR headset, players find they have been locked inside a classroom in Breakout High by the villainous Mr. Jack. Players escape from a series of locked rooms, and eventually the school, by solving puzzles.

The students developed the game as part of a team-driven project-based learning course, N420 Multimedia Project Development. The student team was paired with BlueWall VR as a client, said Joshua Kottka, who led the student team as product manager.

“They wanted a VR game, so we met with them for a couple of weeks to brainstorm ideas about what type of game we should develop,” Kottka said. “We eventually narrowed it down to a puzzle-solving game, like an escape room.”

“I think we were all pretty excited to work on a virtual reality game,” Kottka said. “Virtual reality and augmented reality games are still not quite as popular as other types of video game genres, but they are new and emerging. The really interesting thing about virtual reality is that it is still super-new.”

Jonathan Renninger, who served as lead programmer, said learning the ins and outs of virtual reality programming was the most interesting part of the project. “I had to do a lot of research and learn how to program that kind of stuff,” he said.

That included designing puzzles that lead a player from one step to the next, such as a bookcase on which books have to be placed in a certain order, Renninger said.

“Breakout High” may be the first game Kottka and Renninger developed for a client, but it won’t be their last.

After he graduates from IUPUI May 11, Kottka said, he will be applying for internships at gaming studios around the country: “That’s really my goal after graduation, making more games and stuff.”

He believes his work on “Breakout High” will give him a leg up on that quest. “This will definitely help. For a year, I was project manager for ‘Breakout High.’ So I have that to put on my resume.”

Renninger, who is also graduating, hopes his experience developing “Breakout High” will burnish his portfolio. “It also helped me learn a bit more about how to work with a client. So I hope further on down the line this will help me deal with clients and with programming for other games in the future.”

Read the original story from IUPUI News’ Rich Schneider

 

Associate Professor Laura Holzman On How Public Art Can Redefine The Urban Identities Of Our Cities

 

Laura Holzman in her office at Herron School of Art and Design. Herron School of Art and Design

Laura Holzman, associate professor of art history and museum studies and public scholar of curatorial practices and visual art, has just authored her first book, which was eleven years in the making.

Published in April by Temple University Press, “Contested Image: Defining Philadelphia for the Twenty-First Century” investigates how Thomas Eakin’s 1875 painting “The Gross Clinic,” the Rocky statue, and the Barnes Foundation each helped create a new identity for the city of Philadelphia.

We sat down with Holzman to discuss her book, the origins of her research, and what it feels like to finally see it in print. The interview has been condensed and lightly edited for clarity.

HERRON: Tell us about your art historical approach for writing the book.

LAURA HOLZMAN: “Contested Image” is about contemporary visual culture, but it’s also about how historical objects from different points in time are contemporary to one another when we look at the roles that they’ve played more recently in regard to Philadelphia’s changing identity. I focus on big debates about where art belongs in the city from approximately 1990 to 2010. But some of the episodes start brewing in the 1980s and others trail into 2012.

I couldn’t have articulated this when I started working on the project, but the mode of art history scholarship that I am really interested in is public scholarship. What that means is doing scholarship that’s meaningful and shareable outside of academia and written in a way that is accessible. It can also mean scholarship that’s generated in collaboration with people outside of a university – that’s the work I do now.

My book looks like very traditional scholarship because it’s a book published by a university press and written by only one person. But my research questions didn’t come from conversations that were happening inside academia; they came directly from conversations that were happening outside in the world. I’d first heard about these issues on the radio and while sitting on the train in Philadelphia, listening to the people around me. People were having really passionate conversations about where art belongs.

Some of these conversations were divisive. They made me wonder, what’s really going on? How can I use my resources as a scholar to interpret this discourse constructively? My professional experience in Philadelphia’s arts and culture sector allowed me to develop a sensitivity to the issues at stake as well as understanding of who the major players are and how these stories unfolded. As I offer my own interpretation of each episode, I also try to honor the voices of the people who participated in these public exchanges about issues they cared very deeply about. I see this book as my way of contributing to those conversations.

HERRON: What’s your connection to Philadelphia?

HOLZMAN: I’ve spent a lot of my life in and around Philadelphia – visiting family, going to college, working with arts and culture organizations. My experiences there shaped how I approached the material in the book.

When I worked at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and so I walked up the Rocky steps almost every day on my way to work. It was hard not to think about the relationship between the Rocky statue and the site of the museum.

I was also working at the museum when Thomas Jefferson University sold “The Gross Clinic.” The university had made a deal with philanthropist and arts patron Alice Walton, who was collecting art for the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. The university said, ‘Ok, you guys can buy the painting for $68 million, unless a local institution can match the price.’ Oh, and they told local institutions, ‘You have 45 days to match that enormous price.’ There was a massive fundraising effort and a huge public relations campaign to generate the interest and the dollars to purchase the painting. With support from that campaign, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts jointly purchased the artwork.

I wasn’t thinking about it in an academic way at the time, but I was steeped in the environment of what was going on because of my job as a press relations coordinator. One of my responsibilities was to keep track of all the press clips that were generated about the institution. I’m a curious person, so I read them all. And then I didn’t really think much of it. When I went to graduate school, I revisited the newspaper articles and blogs about the painting. I thought, ‘There’s something going on here that people aren’t talking about’ and that was the hook for me and this research project.

HERRON: Is that what you went to graduate school to study?

HOLZMAN: Not at all. There’s a good story about that, actually. During my first quarter in the interdisciplinary PhD program in visual studies at UC Irvine [University of California, Irvine], I was waiting in the department office and one of the professors walked into the room. I casually mentioned that I’d noticed she would be teaching a seminar on museums, cultural memory, and history. She responded by saying, ‘I’m so glad you’ll be taking it!’ So, I enrolled in the class because I felt I’d made some kind of unintentional verbal commitment to take the course.

For the research project, we could write about anything we wanted that related to the subject of the seminar. I just kept thinking about “The Gross Clinic” and I had to get it out of my system. I wrote the paper and, I’m not kidding, it was the easiest first draft I’ve ever written. It was like the story was writing itself.

HERRON: What kinds of memories did you study during your research?

HOLZMAN: One of the things I noticed from reading all of those press clips and blog posts was that people were making it really personal when they were talking about “The Gross Clinic” and how it belongs in Philadelphia. For example, somebody said that it would be almost like losing a friend if the painting were to leave Philadelphia. There was this very personal language of memory and trauma that resonated with themes we’d examined in the class, so it came together as a really interesting example of memory practices related to museum collection practices.

HERRON: So, how did your short seminar paper turn into a 200-page book?

HOLZMAN: I ended up revising and expanding it fairly substantially for my master’s thesis. I revised and expanded it again for a chapter in my dissertation. Then, I revised and expanded it again for the book. Along the way, I added chapters about other prominent public conversations about where art belongs in Philadelphia, and I learned that the stories of “The Gross Clinic,” the Barnes Collection, and the Rocky statue are deeply intertwined with one another and with Philadelphia’s identity.

When I was trying to figure out what I wanted to write about, my dissertation advisor said, ‘Make sure it’s something you’re really okay with thinking about for ten years.’ I thought, ‘Pshh, ten years.’ The first words that I typed for this research were in 2008. It’s really been eleven years!

HERRON: How does it feel to finally see the book in front of you?

HOLZMAN: When I first held it in my hands I was like, ‘Oh my gosh, this is really a thing.’ There were definitely times when I thought this was not going to be a thing. Writing is really hard and the process of writing a book is very complicated. Enough of the steps are beyond the author’s control that it can feel like it might never manifest into anything. It is really cool to have this physical evidence that I completed the project.

I’m excited to have the book out in the world. I’ve published segments of the book previously, but now people can know the other parts of the story. It’s also a little bit scary, in part because of the way I’ve been doing scholarship for the past few years, which involves a lot of collaboration with stakeholders along the way. But with this, I’ve put it out in the world and, sure, it’s gone through academic peer review, but somebody might read this book and see their name in it because they gave a quote to a journalist and now it’s in the book. I wonder, is that person going to appreciate the way that I used their language? I hope that they will. I feel the weight of the responsibility of writing about people’s lives.

HERRON: What impact do you hope to make with “Contested Image?” What do you hope readers will take away from the book?

HOLZMAN: I think that people across the country and internationally can learn a lot from looking at my research in the book. We can learn about how people are using visual culture to define the places where they spend time. I also want to contribute to a shift in ways of thinking about which places are valuable for people to study from a distance. For example, you asked me earlier about my connection to Philadelphia. Would you have asked a similar question if this book were about New York?

Since I moved to Indianapolis, I’ve seen a lot of things that remind me of what I know about Philadelphia from the 1990s and the 2000s as the city started to change the way it was talking about itself and as the city started to invest in different areas. Philadelphia has major issues that it’s still working out, so I don’t want to imply that Philadelphia is perfect. But I think there’s a valuable lesson in the ways Philadelphia embraced the arts and culture sector as a major element of its new identity.

Indianapolis would really benefit from following a similar lead and recognizing that the arts and culture are central to making a place a vibrant and rewarding place to live, work, and visit. Arts and culture can look like different things for different people. We benefit from having a variety of those things, but we also benefit from truly embracing the possibilities that they offer.

Read the original story from Herron School of Art + Design

Herron Sculpture Graduate Took Country Roads To Commencement

Shelby Lahne, a Herron School of Art and Design sculpture graduate, watches her pet goats Crackerjack, left, and Peanut play on her property in rural Shelby County. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
Shelby Lahne, a Herron School of Art and Design sculpture graduate, watches her pet goats Crackerjack, left, and Peanut play on her property in rural Shelby County. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

The roads to graduation for 7,122 students at the May 11 IUPUI commencement differ tremendously. Some left home half-a-planet away to study here; many others earned their degrees without having to leave beautiful and bustling Indianapolis.

A senior about to graduate, Shelby Lahne was born and raised in Pleasant View, Indiana, and went to high school in Fairland, population 315. She commuted 30 to 40 minutes to classes daily. While home is only a county away, her experience is another world from the downtown Indianapolis campus, which is where she earned a degree in sculpture from the Herron School of Art and Design. Pleasant View consists of an offramp from I-74 east, a gas station and a handful of roads with quaint houses on large plots of land.

While most of her classmates weren’t raised in small-town Indiana, it has fueled her art in terms of direction and materials.

Shelby Lahne poses with part of her installation piece, "Nests," which currently hangs in University Library. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
Shelby Lahne poses with part of her installation piece, “Nests,” which currently hangs in University Library. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

“I think being from a small town but going to school in the big city gives me a different perspective on things,” said Lahne, whose high school graduating class was about 100 students.

Thousands of IUPUI students, staff and faculty have seen — and walked under — a recent commission of Lahne’s: “Nests” has hung in the second-floor lobby of University Library since the fall, and it will continue to show for another year. The four large constructions sway quietly by thick rope. That rope is also wrapped around each nest made of burlap over a steel, egg-shaped understructure.

“Over the steel rods, there is a layer of chicken wire, and over that is a layer of carpet padding,” Lahne revealed. “I got the idea from looking at weaver bird nests. Instead of cup-shaped nests, they create dome-shaped nests with just one little hole in them. They make them in large groups for protection purposes.

“I thought that was very interesting because it’s like the library itself — everyone comes here. We may all be doing our own thing, but we’re still in here together.”

Following “Nests,” Lahne continued with the suspension theme in her work. Ropes, pulleys and the defiance of gravity were utilized in most pieces.

Photos courtesy of Shelby Lahne
Photos courtesy of Shelby Lahne

“I’ve used a lot of concrete and cinder blocks,” Lahne said. “They all have to do with weight, tension and balance.

“A lot of my ideas come from different building materials, like metal, concrete and rope. Out in the country, you just find these things in someone’s yard or their barn. They are typically thought of as junk or scrap, but the materials seem to have a story to them.”

Before her years at IUPUI, Lahne earned an associate degree in art therapy from Vincennes University. She expected to pursue the field at IUPUI, but she found a better fit in Herron’s sculpture program, which is headquartered in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Lahne’s recent pieces have shown well in Herron galleries and classrooms, and the young artist will pursue a graduate degree in sculpture.

As she looks for her next stop along her academic journey, Lahne must decide what to do with her two beloved pets. An option would be finding a farm for Peanut and Crackerjack while she continues her studies.

Peanut and Crackerjack love to eat and roam around Shelby Lahne's property in Shelby County. Photos by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
Peanut and Crackerjack love to eat and roam around Shelby Lahne’s property in Shelby County. Photos by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Like it has for countless young Hoosiers, 4-H Club became a big part of Lahne’s high school years when a friend roped her into showing goats for the Shelby County Fair. Not getting attached to your show animals is a rite of passage for many 4-H kids. Lahne was, however, able to rescue a pair of goats from slaughter. First was Peanut. He was kept at her grandfather’s house just outside of the town limits. Since a solitary goat is an unhappy one, Crackerjack, a pygmy mix, was welcomed into the herd. The smaller, younger goat was another 4-H animal that is now enjoying a retirement full of fresh alfalfa hay, more than an acre of lawn with delicious grass and jelly beans for treats.

Lahne constructed a pen and a small barn for her pets. It’s true that the goats are eating machines, but they don’t eat cans or other items meant for the recycling bins. But they will decimate any kind of yard waste with haste.

“They’re similar to a dog,” Lahne said of her goats. “They always follow me around. If I have them out, they’re always where I am, and whatever I’m trying to do, they’re always in the way. Peanut wants to be petted all the time.”

Lahne has shown numerous pictures and videos of Peanut, a Boer breed now weighing in at 200 pounds, and Crackerjack, who is now almost 100 pounds, to her classmates.

“Everyone at the sculpture building wants me to bring them in,” said Lahne, with a laugh. “That would be impossible to do. If you try to pet Crackerjack, he’ll think you’re playing and try to headbutt you.”

Small-town living inspired Herron sculpture graduate Shelby Lahne to achieve commissions, goats and commencement. Video by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

Read the original story from IUPUI NewsTim Brouk 

Commencement Speakers Hope To Inspire IUPUI’s Newest Graduates

Communications studies major Connor LaGrange will address more than 7,000 of his fellow graduates during IUPUI's May 11 commencement ceremony at Lucas Oil Stadium. Photo courtesy of the Division of Undergraduate Education
Communications studies major Connor LaGrange will address more than 7,000 of his fellow graduates during IUPUI’s May 11 commencement ceremony at Lucas Oil Stadium. Photo courtesy of the Division of Undergraduate Education

The pressure’s on for Connor LaGrange, not only to wrap up his final finals as an IUPUI undergraduate but also to deliver a five-minute speech during commencement.

While most Americans would rather stand on the edge of the Salesforce Tower than give a speech in front of thousands of people, LaGrange embraces it. He has been delivering speeches and presentations in an academic setting since his senior year in high school, when he was dually enrolled as a first-year communication studies student at IUPUI. As a senior supervisor in the IUPUI Speaker’s Lab, he worked with a wide array of students to improve their presentation skills — from shaky-kneed freshmen to international graduate students.

On May 11, all eyes will be on the Indianapolis native as he represents his class of 7,122 graduates. The ceremony starts at 10 a.m. at Lucas Oil Stadium.

“I’m approaching it as if I were sitting in the audience: What would I want to hear from the speaker?” said LaGrange, who will begin his pursuit of an applied communications graduate degree from IUPUI in the fall. “I’ll be talking about four points that I think we can use to be successful — not just academically or professionally, but life-related things that the parents and family members in the audience can use, too.”

While having the gift of gab will get you on podiums and behind lecterns, LaGrange said, fine-tuned communication skills improve businesses, health networks and other fields.

“I can walk into a room of engineers and not know engineering and be just fine,” he explained. “From clients to higher-ups, there isn’t a single place in our world where people aren’t communicating with one another in one fashion or another.”

LaGrange’s years at IUPUI were packed. But he wasn’t too busy to notice the university’s growth, which coincided with that of Indianapolis.

“It’s an incredible city, and I’m blessed to go to an incredible university in the heart of that city,” LaGrange said. “I think both institutions have hit their stride during my time at IUPUI.

“I think Indianapolis for sure made a name for itself attracting bigger companies and conferences. I see our economy only getting stronger. Hoosier hospitality is a thing, and IUPUI is one of the few Division I urban campuses that is a short walk to the heart of the city. Graduates no longer have to go to New York City or other bigger cities. Students will continue to get opportunities in their own backyard.”

Sarah Evans Barker, senior judge of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, will also speak at the commencement ceremony. Deemed a Living Legend by the Indiana Historical Society, she has been instrumental in numerous behind-the-scenes roles that have helped the university grow and thrive. Barker helped create the Bepko Scholars and Fellows Program, and she has worked with the Indiana University McKinney School of Law while participating as a member of the chancellor’s advisory board and several dean and chancellor searches.

Judge Sarah Evans Barker. Photo courtesy of the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana
Judge Sarah Evans Barker. Photo courtesy of the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana

“I’ve been able to see IUPUI grow and put down significant roots in the community,” said Barker, who earned a social service degree from IU Bloomington. “I’ve known many people who have been a creative force in determining IUPUI’s mission. It is an honor for me to give this talk to these graduates. In terms of my career, I’ve had a lifelong affiliation with the university.”

While Barker has addressed hundreds of rooms full of people throughout her impressive career, IUPUI’s commencement ceremony will be the judge’s largest audience by far. In the home of the Indianapolis Colts, she said, she may not have a touchdown dance for IUPUI’s newest graduates, but she hopes her remarks will inspire and ring true.

“I’m hoping that there will be enough cohesiveness that the purpose of the gathering will be realized,” Barker revealed. “I hope they can connect with some ideas that I want to leave with them.”

Read the original story from IUPUI NewsTim Brouk 

Apply to Participate in the 2019-20 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar

The Religion, Spirituality, and the Arts Program (RSA) is a program of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute that brings together artists, religious leaders, religious communities, humanities experts, and a broad range of publics from diverse backgrounds and disciplinary perspectives for sustained study, analysis, and discussion of religious texts in a classroom environment. Directed by Rabbi Sandy Sasso, these textual discussions, which explore the varieties of religious experience and understanding, provide the inspiration for creating new artistic works (e.g. music, poetry, fiction, drama, visual art, dance). Artists share their creations through exhibitions and presentations to members of the Central Indiana community, including religious organizations, congregations, schools, libraries, and community groups.

2019-20 Theme

We will explore the story of Jonah in the Bible and the Quran and consider a variety of themes including the arbitrariness of unwarranted compassion and the desire to escape calls to human responsibility. When others cry out, Jonah runs away or sleeps. Might we see contemporary responses to crises through Jonah’s actions? What about the human desire to flee distasteful obligations? Through visual arts, poetry, and music we will explore the symbolism of the big fish as “reassuring womb” or “terrifying tomb” and the strange prophet who hates change but nevertheless brings it about in the end.

Faculty

The faculty list for the 2018-19 seminar is still growing. So far, the faculty include

  • Anila Quayyum Agha, Associate Professor of Drawing and Illustration in the Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI

  • Julia Muney Moore, Director of Public Art for the Arts Council of Indianapolis

  • Sandy Sasso, Rabbi Emerita of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck

  • Steven Stolen Host of WFYI’s Stolen Moments

  • Shari Wagner, Author and Indiana Poet Laureate (2016-2017)

  • Joseph Tucker Edmonds, Assistant Professor of Africana Studies and Religious Studies at IUPUI

Meetings

Sessions will be held for 2 1/2 hours weekly for a total of eight weeks and will meet evenings from 6:00–8:30 p.m. on 9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 11/7, 12/12, 1/9 or 1/16, 2/6

How to Apply

Applications for this seminar will be accepted from April 29 to May 28, 2019.

Applicants may be anyone in the community who is active (as a professional or amateur) in the artistic disciplines. Selected applicants must be able to make a commitment to attend all seminar sessions and engage in open and respectful dialogue. Seminar participants will produce creative work to be performed and/or exhibited in a public forum. Seminar participants will receive a $150 stipend at the conclusion of the group exhibition.

Application Form

To apply to be an artist-participant in the current seminar, please submit your application using the online form.

In addition to basic demographic information, the form asks you to answer the following questions:

      • How do you see your art form interacting with a religious text?

      • How do you imagine this experience will impact your creative work?

You will also need to upload

      • An artist resume

      • Three examples of your work

For more information, please visit our website! 

Herron Professor’s New Book Explores Public Art’s Impact

Laura Holzman stands in the 2017 House Life Project on Sept. 20, 2017. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University
Laura Holzman stands in the 2017 House Life Project on Sept. 20, 2017. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

You’ve seen the “Rocky” movies. You hum the theme song every time you run up a flight of stairs. You might even have posed in front of the statue when visiting Philadelphia. But have you thought about the impact the statue has made on the city and public art in general?

A new book by Laura Holzman, IUPUI associate professor of art history and museum studies, explores the history and public discourse concerning public art in early-21st-century Philadelphia. “Contested Image: Defining Philadelphia for the Twenty-First Century” focuses on the “Rocky” statue as well as “The Gross Clinic” by Thomas Eakins and the Barnes Foundation art collection.

The book is available through Temple University Press and many other online outlets.