Equity in Modern America with Jelani Cobb, Jeff Chang, and Negin Farsad

What do we mean when we use the word “equity”? How do we build an equitable society? Join us for a conversation with Jelani Cobb, Negin Farsad, and Jeff Chang about Equity in Modern America.

Jeff Chang is author of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation and We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation.

Jelani Cobb is author of The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of ProgressThe Devil and Dave Chappelle, and To the Break of Dawn: A Freestyle on the Hip Hop Aesthetic.

Negin Farsad is author of How to Make White People Laugh and director of The Muslims are Coming!

This event is part of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute’s Entanglements Series which puts scientists, social scientists, humanists, and artists in conversation with the audience to ask questions that transcend disciplinary boundaries.

Equity in Modern America is presented with the Kheprw Institute, the Central Indiana Community Foundation, Indiana Humanities, the Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library, and the IUPUI Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. Support for this event comes from the Indiana University New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities grant program.

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Liberal Arts Talks- Digging Deeper into the 19th Century Central Indiana: A Bioarchaeological Analysis of the Bethel Cemetery

Jeremy Wilson presents: “Digging Deeper into 19th Century Central Indiana: A Bioarchaeological Analysis of the Bethel Cemetery”

In 2018, the IUPUI Department of Anthropology partnered with industry leaders to undertake one of the largest applied anthropological research projects ever in Indiana. This work, involving the detection, exhumation and analysis of over 500 individuals from the Bethel Cemetery, provided a unique opportunity to identify and reconstruct the lives and lifeways of early Hoosier pioneers, as well as later inhabitants that experienced industrialization, urbanization, and key moments in the state and nation’s history.

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FAQs

How much does this event cost and can I attend?

This event is free and open to the public.

What are my parking options for the event?

Please click here for hourly rates, a visitor parking map, and garages on IUPUI’s campus: 
*Note: Closest visitor parking garage to the Campus Center is Vermont St Parking Garage (XB).

Herron Invites Artists to Participate in Lori Waxman’s Acclaimed ’60 wrd/min Art Critic’ Performance

Lori Waxman at work during her "60 wrd/min art critic" performance in St. Louis, Mississippi, in 2015. Courtesy of Lori Waxman
Lori Waxman at work during her “60 wrd/min art critic” performance in St. Louis, Mississippi, in 2015. Courtesy of Lori Waxman

This spring, the Galleries at Herron School of Art and Design will present “60 wrd/min art critic,” an ongoing performance art project by Chicago Tribune columnist Lori Waxman, providing Indiana artists the opportunity to submit their artwork for critical review and published recognition. Waxman’s performance will occur April 30–May 2, 2019, on the IUPUI campus in Herron’s Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life, located in Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.

Since 2005, Waxman’s internationally acclaimed performance has resulted in more than 700 written reviews for underserved and underrepresented visual artists across the United States and Europe. In her words, the project aims to “get the community thinking about where the responsibility for art criticism resides” by raising awareness about the lack of venues to cover the arts in certain regional arts communities, especially at a time when art columns are disappearing from newspapers and magazines. “60 wrd/min art critic” also reveals the art critique process in real-time as artist, artwork, critic, and review all exist in the same space.

During the three-day presentation at Herron, Waxman will review artwork by 30 artists of all ages, skill levels and artistic disciplines. Reviews are free of charge and will be scheduled and written in twenty-five-minute increments in Waxman’s pop-up office from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 30, and Wednesday, May 1, and from 1:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 2.

Artists may request an appointment at any time by emailing critic@60wordmin.org, stating date and time preferences.

Indianapolis is among sixteen U.S. cities to host “60 wrd/min art critic,” including Detroit; Durham, North Carolina; Lexington, Kentucky; and Portland, Maine. In 2012, a 100-day version of the performance was included in dOCUMENTA, a major survey of international contemporary art held every five years in Kassel, Germany. A book collecting 241 reviews written during dOCUMENTA (13) was later published by Onestar Press, Paris.

“60 wrd/min art critic” is a project of the Creative Capital/Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. This performance is made possible by the Indiana Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. To learn more about Waxman’s project, visit 60wrdmin.org.

Waxman’s performance is free and open to the public. Parking is free in the Sports Complex Garage adjacent to Eskenazi Hall or on levels 5 and 6 of the Riverwalk Garage, courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis, with validation from the Herron galleries. Visit HerronGalleries.org for more information.

Read the original article from Herron School of Art and Design 

Herron announces 2019 Spring/Summer Youth Programs

A student in one of Herron’s Teen Intensive, working on a linocut print. Mary McClung

This spring, Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI will offer four weeklong programs for art-curious children and youth in grades 1 through 8. Herron’s summer programs during the month of June will include Youth Art Camps, Teen Intensives, and Pre-College Prep for students in grades 1 through 10, as well as a Herron Pre-College course for high school juniors and seniors and college-bound graduates.

Herron’s Youth Programs provide the opportunity for aspiring artists ages 6 through 18 to gain authentic art-making experiences in a welcoming and supportive environment that fosters creativity and self-expression. In that spirit, the school will offer Pride Studio, a new Teen Intensive for LGBTQ and allied youth celebrating activism and inclusivity in the arts. Pride Studio will be offered in conjunction with an upcoming exhibition commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising during Pride Month.

Youth Art Camps are offered as full-day sessions; Teen Intensives are offered as both half-day and full-day sessions. Spring programs run March 25-29 and April 1-5 in Herron’s spacious and light-filled Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Youth Art Camps, Teen Intensives, Pre-College Prep, and Herron Pre-College run June 10-14, June 17-24, and June 24-28 in Eskenazi Hall. Session times and tuition fees vary as outlined below. All materials are provided.

Online registration is currently open for all spring and summer Youth Programs. IUPUI employees, siblings, and repeat enrollees receive a $20 tuition discount. Qualifying families may receive financial assistance. For more information, contact Colton Pedro at 317-278-9404 or clpedro@iupui.edu.

Spring Programs

  • Spring into Art (Grades 1-5): Explore drawing, painting, ceramics, and more in and outside Herron during a dynamic week of creativity and art-making activities. Full-day sessions run March 25-29 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $300.
  • Drawing Intensive (Grades 6-8): Develop observational drawing skills while working with graphite, charcoal, and ink. Half-day sessions run April 1-5 from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. each day. Tuition is $160.
  • Illustration Intensive (Grades 6-8): Learn multidisciplinary image-making skills using traditional and digital drawing techniques. Half-day sessions run April 1-5 from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $160.
  • Drawing and Illustration Intensive (Grades 6-8): Enroll in both the drawing and illustration intensives to hone foundational art-making skills during a full weeklong exploration. All-day sessions run April 1-5 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $300.

Youth Art Camps

  • Art in Motion (Grades 1-3 and 4-6): Explore movement through kinetic sculpture, performance art, and photography as well as other artistic mediums. All-day sessions run June 10-14 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $300.
  • Drawing on Discovery (Grades 1-3 and 4-6): Cultivate essential skills in observation, perception, and construction through a variety of drawing, painting, and sculpting projects. All-day sessions run June 10-14 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $300.
  • Art, Space, and the In-between (Grades 1-3 and 4-6): Channel the mindsets of both artist and designer to explore the many definitions of space through performance art, drawing, painting, and sculpture. All-day sessions run June 24-28 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $300.

Teen Intensives and Herron Pre-College

  • Pride Studio (Grades 7-8 and 9-10): Learn about past and present LGBTQ+ artists while exploring various contemporary art concepts, artistic disciplines, and the power of voice. All-day sessions run June 10-14 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $300.
  • Screenprinting (Grades 7-10): Experiment with screenprinting to create handmade prints on paper and fabric. Half-day sessions run June 10-14 from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. each day. Tuition is $160.
  • Drawing on Design (Grades 7-10): Apply design mindsets and aesthetics to drawing, painting, photography, and digital media. Half-day sessions run June 10-14 from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $160.
  • Screenprinting and Drawing on Design (Grades 7-10): Enroll in both the screenprinting and drawing intensives to for a full weeklong exploration. All-day session runs June 10-14 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $300.
  • Illustration Studio (Grades 7-10): Learn multidisciplinary image-making skills using traditional and digital drawing techniques. Half-day sessions run June 17-21 from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. each day. Tuition is $160.
  • Painting Intensive (Grades 7-10): Explore painting techniques, color theory, and composition. Half-day sessions run June 17-21 from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $160.
  • Illustration Studio and Painting Intensive (Grades 7-10): Enroll in both the illustration and painting intensives to for a full weeklong exploration. All-day session runs June 17-21 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $300.
  • Art + 3D (Grades 7-10): Explore the three-dimensional side of art-making and create artworks using clay, foam, plaster, and more. Half-day and all-day sessions run June 24-28 from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. or 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $160 for half-day sessions and $300 for full-day sessions.
  • Pre-College Prep (Grades 7-10): Explore a variety of studio art disciplines while gaining an understanding of the vocabulary and concepts discussed in college-level art and design courses. All-day sessions run June 24-28 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $300.
  • Herron Pre-College (Grades 11-12): Advance your college portfolio while developing critical thinking skills and exploring creative freedom through a two-week simulation of Herron’s first-year foundations studies coursework. All-day sessions run June 10-14 and June 17-21 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Tuition is $850, plus a $25 application fee.

Read the original story from Herron School of Art and Design

Herron Alumnus Eric Sutton On The Power of Teaching Artistic Expression

#MyIUPUI memories with Michael Barclay

Chris Sickels aka Red Nose Studio

Chris Sickels, Hero of Five Points (detail), 2014. Courtesy of the artist

In the Basile Gallery is an exhibition featuring the characters and imagery of Greenfield-based illustrator and stop-motion animator Chris Sickels aka Red Nose Studio. The exhibition explores Sickel’s process of creating, photographing and animating intricate dioramas and offers an in-depth look at the artist’s creative approaches to illustration.

BASILE GALLERY, ESKENAZI HALL MARCH 6, 2019 – MAY 18, 2019

Christine Sciulli

Christine Sciulli, “Roil,” 2018. EIght-channel video projection into fabric, 35 by 55 by 28 feet. Photo by Etienne Frossard

INDIANAPOLIS — Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI will present the 2019 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture with Ann Hamilton on Wednesday, March 6, kicking off a spring exhibition season headlined by New York-based artist Christine Sciulli.

A recipient of the National Medal of Arts and the MacArthur Foundation “genius grant,” Hamilton has created large-scale multimedia installations, public projects and performances in numerous spaces around the world for more than 30 years. Most recently, New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority commissioned her to create a marble mosaic for the World Trade Center Cortlandt Street subway station, which reopened Sept. 8, 2018 — 17 years after it was destroyed on 9/11. The project, “CHORUS,” fills the station’s walls with woven phrases of text from nationally and internationally authored declarations of human rights and independence.

During the lecture at Herron, Hamilton will discuss her wide-ranging processes and use of materials along with the themes she has drawn upon throughout her artistic career.

The headlining exhibition opening in the Galleries at Herron this spring features a site-specific installation by Sciulli. Known for her use of projected light to activate and shape space, Sciulli takes over Herron’s 3,000-square-foot Berkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries to create an immersive experience. Her exhibition opens March 6 and runs through April 20.

The lecture and the opening reception for the exhibition are free and open to the public and will take place from 5:30 to 8 p.m. in Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.

In-kind support for the opening reception is provided by Sun King Brewing. Parking is free in the Sports Complex Garage adjacent to Eskenazi Hall or on levels 5 and 6 of the Riverwalk Garage, courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis, with validation from the Herron galleries.

Visit HerronGalleries.org for more information on current and upcoming exhibitions, talks and more.

The Galleries at Herron, located in Eskenazi Hall on the IUPUI campus, are free and open to the public 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays.

Read the original article from IUPUI News

BERKSHIRE, REESE AND PAUL GALLERIES, ESKENAZI HALL MARCH 6, 2019 – APRIL 20, 2019

Ann Hamilton + Opening Reception

Ann Hamilton, habitus, 2016. Installation at Municipal Pier 9, made in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop & Museum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Thibault Jeanson

Herron School of Art and Design will present the 2019 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture with Ann Hamilton, a recipient of the National Medal of Arts and MacArthur Foundation “genius grant.”

Hamilton has created large-scale multimedia installations, public projects, and performances in numerous spaces around the world for more than 30 years. During the lecture, Hamilton will discuss her wide-ranging processes and use of materials along with the themes she has drawn upon throughout her artistic career. Following the lecture is an opening reception for three exhibitions, presenting new and recent works by Christine Sciulli, Gillian Wearing and Chris Sickels aka Red Nose Studios.

The Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture brings internationally acclaimed female artists to Indianapolis. The lecture series is made possible by a gift from Indiana philanthropist Jane Fortune – author, art historian, and founder of Advancing Women Artists.

THE JANE FORTUNE OUTSTANDING WOMEN VISITING ARTIST LECTURE BASILE AUDITORIUM, ESKENAZI HALL
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6 | 5:30 – 8 P.M.

5 Tips for Landing an Internship

For those of you trying to plan ahead for internships, here are tips from our expert career advisors about how to land the job.

Start early and talk to your career advisor

The IUPUI campus has many resources to help with each step in landing an internship. Intern fairs are a great way to search for opportunities, establish connections and get your name out there. Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Don’t wait to look for an internship. It’s common for businesses to search for summer interns as early as the fall semester. Students who wait until spring to look for a summer internship might have trouble getting a position because many opportunities will be filled.

It’s also smart to begin the internship search by visiting your career advisor. They can help you consider what you want to do with your degree, guide you to templates for your resume and cover letters, review your resume and cover letters, help you with networking, do a mock interview with you, notify you about career fairs, and more.

Search for opportunities

First, check to see if your school has a database or another kind of internship listing for your major. For students in the School of Liberal Arts, there’s a database available to get help with many things involving your career. JagJobsIndiana INTERNnet and Ascend Indiana are a few sites that are specifically intended for students looking for internships. Google and LinkedIn are also options, and of course you can just go directly to a company’s website to see if it’s hiring.

Career and intern fairs are a great way to find opportunities and get your name out there. When attending career events, informational interviews or job-shadowing opportunities, make sure to dress professionally, come with questions and bring your resume. Also, make sure to follow up with the people you met.

Once you have a list of internships you’d like to apply for, prioritize them. Don’t apply for every position that sounds interesting — but don’t apply for just one or two either, in case those companies don’t get back to you.

Use your connections

Connections give you an advantage in the workforce. Not only can they suggest people you haven’t heard of, but they could also help you get in the door for that first interview. Those who are close to you know how you work and will likely enjoy helping where they can. Ask your advisors, professors or peers for potential connections. In addition, your parents — or your friends’ parents — might know people who could help you make connections.

Research professionals in your field and reach out to them to see if they’ll talk with you. Other ways to make connections are attending career fairs, joining LinkedIn, scheduling informational interviews and job-shadowing opportunities, attending company presentations, and talking with guest speakers in your classes.

Once again, don’t forget to follow up and send a thank-you email or note to people who took any time to help you.

Prepare your resume and cover letter

Every industry has different expectations.

Your resume needs to be descriptive and show measurable outcomes about your work experiences, accomplishments, scholarships and skill sets. It should not be more than one page. Also, unless your GPA is close to a 4.0, don’t put it on there.

Your cover letter must be tailored specifically to the internship you’re applying for — do not create a general one you send out to everyone. Briefly include what you know about the company, why you want to work there and how your skills match the needs listed in the job description. When you’re done, have professors, advisors, your career development office, parents and friends proofread the documents.

Finally, identify and ask three people you know to be references. Make sure you tell them in advance when they might be receiving a phone call or email from potential employers.

Prepare for the interview

Dress to impress for your interview, complete with professional clothing and a well-groomed appearance. Stay away from strong perfume/cologne and distracting jewelry. Also, find out beforehand exactly where the interview is, how long it takes to get there and where to park to avoid any chance of being late.

Nail down your elevator pitch and rehearse your answers to typical interview questions before the big day, and request a mock interview with your career advisor or a professor.

Lastly, never forget to follow up within 24 hours by sending a thank-you email or handwritten note. It should reiterate your interest, state something you learned or appreciated, and thank them for their time.

Read the original story from IUPUI News’ Ashlynnn Neumeyer