Funding Available through Indiana Campus Compact

Guest Contributor: Lauren French, Master’s Student Non-Profit Mgmt., Graduate Assistant, CSL

Effective service learning and community engagement [SLCE] demands additional support to move from vision to impact and sustainability. Indiana Campus Compact [ICC ] is one important source of funding for administrators, faculty, staff, and students, who wish to partner with the community to deepen and expand programs. ICC is a partnership among 44 Indiana colleges and universities, representing 70 campuses, dedicated to preparing college students to advance the public good in their communities. IUPUI is proud to be a member campus and has found previous success in seeking funding through ICC.

Indiana Campus Compact has thousands of dollars in the form of grants and fellowships for faculty, staff, students, and the community organizations they work with. These include:

  • Service Engagement Grants: Support students, professional staff, faculty, or department level projects that integrate one or more forms of educationally meaningful service learning and community engagement.
    • Funding categories include:
    • Scholarship of Engagement [includes SL course development, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning on SL, Community Engaged Research and Professional Service Projects]
    • Student Community Service
    • Listening to Communities [support for campus community dialogues]
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $2,250 are available; upcoming proposal deadlines are February 11th, 2019 & May 13th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • Conference Scholarships: These scholarships support faculty, staff, or students at ICC campuses to present on their engaged work at regional and national conferences.
    • The presentation must relate to ICC’s mission.
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $500 are available and proposals are accepted on a rolling basis. The deadline for proposals is at least 6 weeks prior to the conference; conferences must take place before April 30th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • The Faculty Fellows Program: This is a year-long learning community experience for full-time faculty that supports the integration of service learning and community engagement into all aspects of faculty work: teaching, research, and service. Participants will work together to develop a research or creative project to enhance and advance the field of service learning and community engagement.
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $3,750 are available; deadline for letter of intent to apply is Tuesday, March 19th, 2019 and deadline for full proposal is Tuesday, May 14th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • Social Innovation Microlending Program: This program is available to students and alum of ICC campuses who are social entrepreneurs and would like to obtain a loan to start a social venture.
    • Loans are provided through a partnership with Bankable on behalf of the Indiana Small Business Administration.
    • ICC provides consultation and professional development for funded social entrepreneurs through events and partnerships with other organizations.
    • Funding Levels: Loan amounts vary from $500 to $50,000  [a typical loan amount will range from $5,000 to $10,000]. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

AI for Conservation: AI and Humans Combatting Extinction Together

Dr. Tanya Berger-Wolf 

The School of Informatics and Computing’s Data to Action (D2A) lab cordially invites you to attend the first event in its speaker series. We especially welcome students to attend, and we can arrange attendance-taking and reporting for class credit at an instructor’s request.

Dr. Tanya Berger-Wolf of University of Illinois Chicago will be presenting in the Data to Action Lecture Series on Friday February 22nd at 11am in the Lilly auditorium in the University Library. (lower level).

About the Lecture 

Photographs, taken by field scientists, tourists, automated cameras, and incidental photographers, are the most abundant source of data on wildlife today. Dr. Berger-Wolf will show how computational methods can be used to turn massive collections of images into high resolution information database, enabling scientific inquiry, conservation, and citizen science. Dr. Berger-Wolf will demonstrate how computational data science methods are used to collect images from online social media, detect various species of animals and even identify individuals. I will present data science methods to infer and counter biases in the ad-hoc data to provide accurate estimates of population sizes from those image data.

Dr. Berger-Wolf will show how it all can come together to a deployed system, Wildbook, a project of tech for conservation non-profit Wild Me. Dr. Berger-Wolf’s research team has built Wildbooks for over 20 species of animals, including whales (flukebook.org), sharks (whaleshark.org), giraffes (giraffespotter.org), and working on elephants. In January 2016, Wildbook enabled the first ever full species (the endangered Grevy’s zebra) census using photographs taken by ordinary citizens in Kenya. The resulting numbers are now the official species census used by IUCN Red List and the research team repeated the effort in 2018, becoming the first certified census from an outside organization accepted by the Kenyan government. Wildbook is becoming the data foundation for wildlife science, conservation, and policy.

About the Speaker 

Dr. Tanya Berger-Wolf is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she heads the Computational Population Biology Lab. Berger-Wolf is also a director and co-founder of the conservation software non-profit Wild Me, home of the Wildbook project. She has received numerous awards for her research and mentoring, including the US National Science Foundation CAREER Award, Association for Women in Science Chicago Innovator Award, and the UIC Mentor of the Year Award.

About Data to Action

The Data to Action (DATA) Lab is an interdisciplinary team of SoIC faculty and student researchers who study the impact of data practices and labor in a variety of contexts. Data are empowering artifacts that, when properly collected, aggregated, managed, and analyzed, have immense value. Data can bring tangible reward to individuals, communities, organizations, and businesses. Our work characterizes data not only as a statistical input or technological byproduct, but as a socio-technical construction with inherent contradictions, problems, and ethical implications.

Informal Gathering: There is another opportunity to informally interact with Dr. Tanya Berger-Wolf, from 9:30 am to 10:30 am on Friday 22nd at IT 266. Students and faculty from other department across the campus are welcome to attend. Right refreshment and coffee will be served.

WE’LL SEE YOU THERE!

All The Moving Parts: A Workshop on Large-Scale Project Coordination

How to launch, coordinate, and finish inter-disciplinary projects with multiple scholars and sites, an example from O Say Can You See: The Early Washington, D.C. Law and Family Project. This workshop will focus on how to integrate social science and humanities scholarship in the process of generating a large-scale project.

All the Moving Parts is part of the seminar series Those Who Know the Trouble I’ve Seen: Citizenship and Resistance in the African-American Christian Communities, directed by Joseph Tucker Edmonds and Amanda Friesen and sponsored by the IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society.

RSVP now by email nwynne@iupui.edu

Did we mention that lunch will be provided?!
Friday February 8th in CA 508
12:30 to 2pm

See you there!