Digital Humanities Librarian Open Hours

Caitlin Pollock
Digital Humanities Librarian

Have questions about Digital Humanities? Come to IUPUI Arts and Humanities on Wednesdays from 12 to 1pm to meet with Caitlin Pollock, the Digital Humanities Librarian at the Center for Digital Scholarship at University Library! Caitlin can help you think through your project and develop next steps or workflows, and recommend methodologies, trainings, tools, and platforms. Caitlin can also advise on data visualization, Text Encoding Initiative Guidelines (TEI), textual analysis, data management, and project management. Your DH research can just have started or in the middle development. No appointments required, first come first serve.

IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute
University Library RM 4115T

JagStart

It only takes three minutes…

JagStart is an annual elevator pitch competition sponsored by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research that pits contestants against the clock to pitch their original ideas to a panel of judges. Students are invited to submit their ideas for innovative new products, new business ventures, or compelling solutions to social challenges.

Register now to attend one of the offered JagStart Launch Sessions–learn how you can engage with local business mentors to help you refine your idea, and learn how to prepare a great entry!

JagStart Launch Sessions
University Library, UL 1126

Thursday, November 15, 2018
Session 1: 11:30-1pm
Session 2: 1:30-3pm
Session 3: 3:30-5pm

Wednesday, November 28, 2018
Session 4: 9-10am
Session 5: 10:30-11:30am
Session 6: 12-1pm
Session 6:1:30-1:30pm

DROP-INS WELCOME!
But registration is encouraged, to ensure space is available.

Identifying and Working With Community Partners

Community partners are essential to the development of meaningful community-engaged curricular learning experiences.  A well-designed experience includes identifying appropriate community partner(s) and including community partner voice in project planning. In this session, we will discuss some of the important principles of working with community partners as well as key ways in which to find, identify, and connect with community partners for specific course projects.

Registrants are able to connect via Zoom to this workshop.
Register here.

Presented by Morgan Studer, M.A,
Director of Faculty and Community Resources

Friday, November 9th
11:30-1pm
CSL Conference Room
Hine Hall 234D

Lab Culture: University Writing Center is Here to help

Marilee Brooks-Gillies, left, director of the University Writing Center and assistant professor of English, visits with one of her staff members, Ashley Taber, an English senior. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

The Lab Culture series explores the research, traditions and quirks in labs and centers across the IUPUI campus.

Whether you consider yourself a Shakespeare or a Fakespeare, the University Writing Center has been dedicated to helping writers of every skill level produce pristine prose on campus for almost 40 years.

Located on the fourth floor of Cavanaugh Hall along with a second location in University Library, the writing center is open to students, staff and faculty. From poems to syllabi, the graduate and undergraduate writing consultants are eager to dissect documents and bounce around ideas to help improve the piece.

“The Writing Center is a site for writers to be supported by other writers,” said Marilee Brooks-Gillies, director of the writing center and an assistant professor of English. “We see this as a space to learn about and practice writing.”

Users must schedule sessions online. Writers can bring their own laptops to work, or they can use one of the several desktop computers available in the centers.

The center is open to students, staff and faculty at IUPUI. Every skill level is welcome. Video by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

While entering a room full of writers could be intimidating, the center has become a festive space. With the area currently decked out in Halloween decorations, Brooks-Gillies wants clients to feel comfortable while cultivating creativity.

Word of the week

A new word is selected each week. It could be academic; it could be tricky. It could be most groovy: “Reggae” was the term for Oct. 8-12.

“We’re trying to convey that there are a lot of different ways to think about the world, and language is a way to do that,” Brooks-Gillies explained.

Tea time

The writing center is always equipped with an array of hot tea selections. The beverage is meant to soothe, warm and sometimes caffeinate. It’s all meant to unclog writer’s block.

Research

The roster of undergraduate and graduate students often works on projects when not helping their fellow Jaguars with papers, resumes or short stories. The consultants build workshops to bring to classrooms across campus, and they have the opportunity to publish work. The papers are presented at regional and international conferences.

Dozens of books and binders contain data of the center’s usage — who uses the facility for what, and when? How many students come in a month, semester or year?

Various committees exist within the centers. Creative writing senior Savannah Cox works with the digital resources and online consulting committee. She helps develop handouts and other outreach materials to educate users before they sit down for their first session.

Cox said the main point users should keep in mind is to keep an open mind: “Be open to the suggestions. Another person might be able to see some things that might strengthen your work and help improve your overall work.”

Art of writing

Dozens of paintings produced every semester by the student staff are hung on the center’s walls.

“We want this to a welcoming community space,” Brooks-Gillies said.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tim Brouk

 

Peer-Led Team Learning International Society: 8th Annual Conference

Hosted by the Stem Education Innovation and Research Institute at IUPUI; this event will be held Thursday through Saturday, June 6-8 of 2019.

The title of this event will be ” Weaving Together Best Practices,” and they’re looking for presentations, workshops and posters! The deadline to submit in order to receive feedback is Friday, February 15, 2019. Submit here!

There are many threads of the program to be explored such as sustainability of PLTL campus programs, critical thinking, meta-cognition, and PLTL – discourse analysis including cyberPLTL, PLTL and the sense of belonging, workplace skills development and PLTL, and implementations in non-STEM disciplines.

If you have any questions, please contact Dr.Ne’Shaun Jones, Conference Chair info@pltlis.org!

Message from the Vice Chancellor for research

CROSSROADS IUB

Come join Crossroads IUB for a two-day celebration of how the arts and humanities catalyze science in support of environmental sustainability! Crossroads IUB includes an evening performance of “Rising Tide: The Crossroads Project,” at the IU Cinema, a special Crossroads First Thursdays festival at the Fine Arts Plaza, and a day-long Symposium with lectures, a workshop, and a panel discussion.

The two day event kicks off with the First Thursdays Festival (including special Crossroads-themed activities and guests), leading up to the Rising Tide: Crossroads Project performance at the IU Cinema. On Friday, October 5 the Crossroads IUB Symposium will welcome local experts, researchers, and artists to learn best practices for art-science collaboration in environmental sustainability.

image credited to Andrew McAllister

First Thursdays Festival is a free celebration of the Arts & Humanities at IU and is well attended by students, faculty and staff, as well as the Bloomington community. The Rising Tide performance is also free, made possible by the IU Cinema, but tickets are required: click here.

All are welcome to register and attend the Symposium on Friday, October 5, 2018 from 8:30 am to 3:00 pm. The goal of the Crossroads IUB Symposium is to explore how the arts, humanities and sciences synergize to inform and motivate sustainable changes. Using the Rising Tide: Crossroads Performance project as a successful model, symposium participants will learn best practices for interdisciplinary collaborations.

The Symposium will be in 2 sessions. The morning session will include keynote addresses from Rising Tide’s Dr. Rob Davies and IUPUI’s Dr. Jason M. Kelly, as well as a panel discussion featuring all Rising Tide performers and contributors. The panel will collectively address how the arts and humanities best synergize with sciences to catalyze environmental sustainability by describing the evolution of their work and detailing best practices for art-science collaboration. The afternoon session will allow participations to workshop interdisciplinary, Rising Tide-like projects.

Crossroads IUB is presented by the Integrated Program in the Environment (IPE), Environmental Resilience Institute, Jacobs School of Music, Arts and Humanities Council, and IU Cinema. The event is made possible through a New Frontiers Grant from the IU Office of the Vice President for Research.

The Integrated Program in the Environment (IPE) is the forefront of innovation in environmental studies at IU Bloomington, as outlined in the New Academic Directions report. IPE is the first place to discover what IUB offers in academics, research, creative activities and organizations focused on the environment. IPE serves under the Office of the Provost and is jointly administered by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, the School of Public Health, and the College of Arts and Sciences.

If you wish to register for the symposium, click hereRegistration will close Friday, September 28. Participants wishing to attend the Afternoon Workshop will describe their own Crossroads- like, interdisciplinary project (combining arts and humanities with science) in their registration. The projects should address global or local sustainability and/or environmental change. We encourage interested participants to collaborate on project proposals and attend the workshop together. Project proposals will be posted to the Crossroads IUB page as they’re accepted; interested parties can register to help workshop any of the accepted projects.

Thurs., Oct. 4: 5:00-7:30 pm – First Thursdays Festival, Fine Arts Plaza
Thurs., Oct. 4: 7:00 pm – Rising Tide: Crossroads Performance, IU Cinema
Fri., Oct. 5: 8:30 am – 3:00 pm – Crossroads IUB Symposium, Indiana Memorial Union (lunch provided)

 

Community Competition to Prevent Islamophobia Celebration & Workshop

Sponsored by IUPUI Religious Studies & IUPUI’s Millennium Chair of Liberal Arts

Friday, October 5, 2018

IUPUI University Library Lilly Auditorium

IUPUI University Library

Help us celebrate the community’s efforts to prevent anti-Muslim bias, learn how you can fight anti-Muslim prejudice, and meet the people who can help you do it.

9am: Greetings and introductory remarks by Millennium Chair Edward Curtis

9:15

  • Presentations by Winners of Community Competition to Prevent Islamophobia
  • Youth Photography Project by Downey Street Church & Islamic Society of North America
  • Islamophobia Prevention Youth Workshops, by CANDLES Holocaust Museum
  • Training Muslim Youth to Challenge Islamophobia, by American Friends Service Committee
  • Muslim Folklore Theater Workshop for Children, by Kristopher Steege and Hadeiyah Ameen
  • Displaying Local Muslim Poetry, by Brick Street Poetry & Sajjad Jawad

10:15 : Meet the Award Winners & Brainstorm What to Do Next

11:00 : Break

11:30-1:00   Speech: “The Roots of Islamophobia and What You Can Do About It”

Open Data and Open Government: A Workshop

View the original article.

The Center for International Media Law and Policy Studies at Indiana University Bloomington will hold a free daylong workshop March 17 in Indianapolis on access to information.

“Letting the Sunshine IN: An Open Data and Open Government Workshop” is open to anyone interested in open government and open data, including journalists, civic activists and neighborhood association members, said Anthony Fargo, director of the Center for International Media Law and Policy Studies and a co-organizer of the event.

The workshop will be in the ballroom of University Tower, 911 W. North St., on the IUPUI campus.

“The strength of our open government laws is that they apply to everyone, not just journalists or public officials,” said Fargo, an associate professor in The Media School at IU Bloomington. “Anyone at any time may need to gain access to records held by a government agency or attend a meeting of a public body, so all of us have a stake in learning how effective our access laws are.”

The workshop will take place during Sunshine Week, an annual national observance that highlights the importance of open government. Co-sponsors include the IndyPro Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and the Indiana Coalition for Open Government. Fargo and co-organizer Gerry Lanosga, an assistant professor in The Media School, are Indiana Coalition for Open Government board members.

Confirmed speakers at the conference include state, regional, and national journalists and open government advocates, who will participate in informational sessions about state and national access laws.

The workshop will close with a hands-on session on how to request data and metadata from public agencies. Experts will guide attendees in submitting actual requests to state agencies for information about their data sets. Participants should bring a laptop computer or other WiFi-capable device.

Lanosga said the goal is to launch an open online catalog of state data sets.

“We know that one of the key barriers to opening public data is lack of knowledge about the range of data that state agencies maintain,” he said. “This effort will go a long way to eliminating the unknowns about state data sets and make it easier for journalists and others in the public to request them.”

The workshop is made possible by a gift to the Center for International Media Law and Policy Studies from IU journalism alumna Barbara Restle. It is free to pre-registered participants and includes breakfast, lunch, and parking. Visitor parking is available in the North Street and Vermont Street parking garages and the Hine Hall Tower Garage.

Although there is no charge to attend the workshop, attendance is limited, and advance registration is required. The registration deadline is 5 p.m. March 12.

Click here for the workshop schedule and registration.

IAHI to host grant-writing workshop for faculty

Dr. Jason Kelly, IAHI Director

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis faculty can learn about writing and submitting applications for the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute Grant Program from peers and Dr. Jason M. Kelly, the institute’s director, during a free workshop on August 31st.

The IAHI grant program supports campuswide attainment of excellence in research and creative activity in the arts and humanities. This activity can impact people’s lives not only on campus, but throughout Indianapolis and the state in the forms of new scholarship and cultural exhibits.

“The grant program is designed to enhance the research and creative-activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty,” he said. “The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.”

Grants range in size from $500 to support travel to $30,000 to support research projects and scholarly activities conducted by a team of two or more faculty.

The workshop is scheduled from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, University Library Room 4115P, 755 W. Michigan St.

Information will include guidelines on applying for the grant program, including how to apply, deadlines and scope of projects, best practices for grant writing that are relatable to other funding agencies’ grants, and a Q&A session with Dr. Kelly.

Workshop registration can be completed online. The original press release for this event can be found at the IU Newsroom.