Surgical Silences: Civil War Surgeons and Narrative Space

“Surgical Silences: Civil War Surgeons and Narrative Space” considers the linguistic registers and narrative patterns visible in wartime surgeons’ written accounts. By surveying a range of rhetorical situations from the clinical (medical), the bureaucratic (military), and the intimate (personal), we can see how and why surgeons shifted registers in the face of medial exigency. Though disease and battle injuries demanded endurance and obedience to surgical routine, writing about traumatic labor often amounted to meaningful silences.
— Presented by Dr. Jane E. Schultz IUPUI Professor of English

Co-sponsored by the John Shaw Billings History of Medicine Society, the IUSM History of Medicine Student Interest Group and the Ruth Lilly Medical Library

Wednesday, December5, 2018 12:00—1:00 PM
Ruth Lilly Medical Library

Peer-Led Team Learning International Society: 8th Annual Conference

Hosted by the Stem Education Innovation and Research Institute at IUPUI; this event will be held Thursday through Saturday, June 6-8 of 2019.

The title of this event will be ” Weaving Together Best Practices,” and they’re looking for presentations, workshops and posters! The deadline to submit in order to receive feedback is Friday, February 15, 2019. Submit here!

There are many threads of the program to be explored such as sustainability of PLTL campus programs, critical thinking, meta-cognition, and PLTL – discourse analysis including cyberPLTL, PLTL and the sense of belonging, workplace skills development and PLTL, and implementations in non-STEM disciplines.

If you have any questions, please contact Dr.Ne’Shaun Jones, Conference Chair info@pltlis.org!

Message from the Vice Chancellor for research

Writer Dan Chaon (The 2018 Ray Bradbury Visiting Writer Lecture)

Dan Chaon’s most recent book is Ill Will, a national bestseller, named one of the ten best books of 2017 by Publishers Weekly. His other works include the short story collection Stay Awake (2012), a finalist for the Story Prize; the national bestseller Await Your Reply and Among the Missing, a finalist for the National Book Award. Chaon’s fiction has appeared in Best American Short Stories, The Pushcart Prize Anthologies, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. He is the recipient of an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series is provided by the Reiberg family, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI Department of English and the IUPUI Arts and Humanties Institute.

DATE AND TIME
Thu, October 25, 2018
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT

Get your tickets here!

Reiberg Reading Series: Michael Martone

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the Rufus & Louise Reiberg Readings Series present writer Michael Martone and special guests R. Craig Sautter, Karen Kovacik, and Terry Kirts to celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the Reiberg Reading Series.

Michael Martone’s recent books are The Moon Over Wapakoneta, Brooding, Winesburg, Indiana, and Four for a Quarter. The University of Georgia Press published his book of essays, The Flatness and Other Landscapes, winner of the AWP Award for Nonfiction, in 2000. His stories and essays have appeared in Harper’s, Esquire, North American Review, Iowa Review, and other magazines. Martone has won two Fellowships from the NEA and a grant from the Ingram Merrill Foundation. His stories and essays have appeared and been cited in the Pushcart Prize, The Best American Stories and The Best American Essays anthologies. In 2013 he received the national Indiana Authors Award, and in 2016, the Mark Twain Award for Distinguished Contribution to Midwestern Literature. Martone was born and grew up in Fort Wayne, Indiana. He attended Butler University and graduated from Indiana University. He holds the MA from The Writing Seminars of The Johns Hopkins University. Martone is currently a Professor at the University of Alabama where he has been teaching since 1996. He has been a faculty member of the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College since 1988.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series is provided by the Reiberg family, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI Department of English and the IUPUI Arts and Humanties Institute.

DATE AND TIME
Wed, October 3, 2018
7:30 PM – 9:00 PM EDT

Get your tickets here!

Applications are now open for the 2019-20 Young Scholars in American Religion program!

Young Scholars in American Religion will include a series of seminars devoted to the enhancement of teaching and research. The aims of the program are to develop ideas and methods of instruction in a supportive workshop environment, stimulate scholarly research and writing, and create a community of scholars that will continue into the future.

Please click here to apply

The dates for these seminars are:

Session I: March 20-24, 2019
Session II: October 2-6, 2019
Session III: April 1-5, 2020
Session IV: October 14-18, 2020

Making the City | The Ethics, Values, and Practices of Public Art in Urban Contexts

This semester’s third installment of The Ethics, values, and Practices of Public Art in Urban Contexts Seminar Series, “Making the City,” will be held on Monday, April 16, from 4-6pm at the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, University Library 4115P.

Cities across the US are grappling with major transformations that expose the many tensions inherent to historical disparities in economics, education, safety, and political access brought on by inequalities based in race and class. Midwest cities have responded to these challenges with a variety of approaches. This seminar series is concerned with addressing one of them: the role of culture in reshaping cities – specifically through public art.

In the discourse and practice of urban design, public art has increasingly been seen as a key tool in redeveloping our cities – from making cities more livable and safe to encouraging economic development and educational achievement.

Using art as a tool to address urban design challenges goes by a variety of different names: creative placemaking, civic art, and tactical urbanism, to name a few. These approaches are fundamentally tied to ethical frameworks and notions of value. Seminar meetings will discuss the intersections of ethics, public art, and urban design through shared readings, guest speakers, and conversation.

Click here to reserve your ticket on Eventbrite.

The Ethics, Values, and Practices of Public Art in Urban Contexts Seminar Series is supported by The Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society at Indiana University, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and the Herron School of Art and Design.

New Religion & Ethics Seminars coming spring and fall of 2018

The IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society (CRES) was pleased to announce two new Religion and Ethics Seminars to run next year, along with three current seminars that have been selected for renewal in 2018. Details and further information can be found on the CRES website.

Economic Justice: The Ethics of Doing Business with the Poor (renewed)

Islam in the Global Sphere (renewed; previously Islam in the American Public Sphere)

The Ethics, Values, and Practices of Public Art in Urban Contexts (renewed)

 

Global and Comparative Approaches to Religion, Ethics, and Political Theory will explore the overlapping intellectual goals of comparative religious ethics and global or comparatively oriented political theory, much of which is based in religious thinking about politics and justice. These two fields are both combinations of descriptive and normative analysis, frequently drawing on religious as well as philosophical thinking about fundamental issues of human social order.

The seminar will be led by Aaron Dean Stalnaker, Professor of Religious Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences, IU-Bloomington; and Hussein Banai, Professor of International Studies, School of Global International Studies, IU-Bloomington.

 

Mounds of the Midwest investigates how religious ideas have shaped attitudes to the natural environment by focusing on the Mounds of the Midwest. It will examine the meanings and burial practices of the early Native American peoples, highlight the history of these indigenous groups, and explore the multiple meanings of the Mounds today as revealed in contemporary governmental policies and the American public educational system. The goal is to create critical conversation around environmental ethics and the complex intersections of state power and religion.

The seminar will be led by Charmayne Champion-Shaw, Professor of Native American Indigenous Studies, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI; and Kelly Hayes, Professor of Religious Studies, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI.

Applications open for Young Scholars in American Religion program

Young Scholars in American Religion will include a series of seminars devoted to the enhancement of teaching and research. The aims of all sessions of the program are to develop ideas and methods of instruction in a supportive workshop environment, to stimulate scholarly research and writing, and to create a community of scholars that will continue into the future.

Please click here to apply.

Scholars eligible to apply are those working in a subfield of the area of religion in North America, broadly understood, who have a terminal degree in hand, a full-time academic position, and have launched their careers within the last seven years. Scholars are selected with the understanding that they will commit to the program for all seminar dates. Participants are expected to produce two course syllabi, with justification of teaching approach, and a publishable research article over the course of their seminars.

IUPUI’s Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture also has a new website at raac.iupui.edu.

The Key Limitation and Danger of the Electronic Health Record

Dr. Alice Dreger

Please join the IU Center for Bioethics for a special seminar on Electronic Health Records by Alice Dreger, Ph.D., author of Galileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and the Search for Justice in Science. The seminar discusses a key limitation and danger of the electronic health record (EHR), “In Which Winnie the Pooh Teaches Us Something Important about the EHR’s Central Lesion.”

The seminar will take place in the Glick Eye Institute, Room 103, on June 6 at 2pm.

The electronic health record (EHR) holds the potential to be a fantastic technology in many ways. It promises better patient access to records, the ability to look more systematically for risk before harm happens, a way for health care professionals to more accurately track patients longitudinally, and a means to kinds of medical research we could never do before. But the EHR also has the potential to obscure the importance of cohesive narrative in patients’ lives.

This talk uses A.A. Milne’s story of Owl’s house being blown down, along with research from clinical psychology, cross-cultural anthropology, and evolutionary biology, to suggest that, unless we think about the great big narrative holes the EHR is leaving in patients’ lives, we may not be healing people as well as we could. Drawing on her experiences as an historian of medicine and science—including as one who has composed short, private, client-centered medical histories for victims of iatrogenic trauma—the speaker will suggest that the macrohistory of science and medicine that helps us understand the power of the EHR also compels us to consider the need for a micro history of medicine that makes up for one of the EHR’s worst unintended consequences.