Art, Race, Space Symposium on 25 January 2013 at IUPUI

Art, Space, and Race Conference

Art, Race, Space Symposium

 

Date: January 25, 2013

Location: Campus Center, IUPUI Campus, 420 University Blvd.

Time: 8:00 am–5:30 pm

 

Artists and scholars from across the country will join leaders from Indianapolis’s arts and culture sector in an interdisciplinary daylong symposium dedicated to exploring the complicated relationships between art, race, and civic space.  Participants will begin by reflecting on artist Fred Wilson’s E Pluribus Unum, a public art commission for the Indianapolis Culture Trail that was cancelled in 2011 due to controversy surrounding Wilson’s appropriation of a freed slave figure from the Soldiers and Sailors Monument.  Building on the ideas about race, class, visual culture, and democratic debate that emerge from the Indianapolis project, presenters will also address related historical and contemporary examples from other parts of the United States.  In order to encourage public dialogue about art, race, and space, the symposium will provide an opportunity for audience members and presenters to engage in conversations about these matters throughout the day.

The symposium is free and open to the public.

Hosted by the IUPUI Museum Studies Program and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Campus maps and parking information.

Reading at the Table: The Sacred Wisdom of the American Indians by Larry Zimmerman

Zimmerman Flier

“The Sacred Wisdom of the American Indians”

Larry Zimmerman, Anthropology/Museum Studies, School of Liberal Arts

DATE: Thu Nov 08 2012
TIME: 11:30 AM – 01:00 PM
LOCATION: University Faculty Club

Professor Larry J. Zimmerman combines panoramic scope with a wealth of detail in this landmark testimony to the Native American peoples and their way of life. He shows how, despite their differences, all American Indians share a profound appreciation of the cycles of nature and a belief in the cosmic interconnectedness of all things. He tells the tragic tale of their conquest and dispossession, followed by their survival against the odds and the renewal of pride in a distinctive cultural heritage. He describes and celebrates their myths, their ceremonies, their tribes, their crafts, and their reverence for the land –inspiring us to turn our thoughts to nature and our own place in it. The five chapters are: Tribes & Territories; The Life of the Spirit; Symbol, Myth & Cosmos; Ritual & Sacrament; and The Survival of the Sacred.

A buffet lunch is available for $13.00 inclusive of tax and gratuity. Dessert and lemonade/ice tea/soft drinks are extra.

CONTACT INFORMATION

EVENT SITE: academicaffairs.iupui.edu/

REGISTRATION: academicaffairs.iupui.edu/events/eventDetails.asp?id=2911

Ray Bradbury biographer to present lecture in the humanities

Bradbury and Eller

Legendary American science-fiction and fantasy writer Ray Bradbury will be the subject of the 2012 John D. Barlow Lecture in the Humanities at IUPUI on Nov. 8.

“Becoming Ray Bradbury” author Jonathan R. Eller, professor of English and director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies in the Institute for American Thought, a research component of the IU School of Liberal Arts, will present the illustrated lecture, “Cry the Cosmos: Ray Bradbury and the American Imagination.”

The lecture will begin at 6:15 p.m. in the IUPUI Campus Center Theater, 420 University Blvd. A reception precedes the lecture in the Campus Center atrium at 5 p.m.

“For more than 60 years, Ray Bradbury has been one of the most recognized figures in American literature and popular culture,” Eller says. “Between 1950 and 1962, he captured the American imagination with such enduring titles as ‘The Martian Chronicles,’ ‘The Illustrated Man,’ ‘Fahrenheit 451,’ ‘The October Country,’ ‘Dandelion Wine’ and ‘Something Wicked This Way Comes.’ His increasing commitments to film, television and stage adaptations of his work led inevitably to his decline as a storywriter, but his early tales and media work soon combined to make him the nation’s most prominent public advocate of the Space Age — a role he fulfilled for the rest of his long life.”

Eller co-founded the Bradbury Center within the Institute for American Thought in 2007, and he became the center’s director in August 2011. He first met Ray Bradbury in 1989, eventually developing a working relationship that lasted until Bradbury’s death in June 2012. Since 2000, Eller has edited or co-edited several limited-press editions of Bradbury’s works, including “The Halloween Tree” (2005), “Dandelion Wine” (2007) and two collections of stories and precursors related to Bradbury’s publication of “Fahrenheit 451: Match to Flame” (2006) and “A Pleasure to Burn” (2010).

The IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI hosts the Barlow Lecture in the Humanities in honor of Liberal Arts Dean and Professor Emeritus John D. Barlow. The lecture is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. To RSVP, email LibaRSVP@iupui.edu with “Bradbury” in the subject line.

Barlow Flyer

The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series: Professor Matthew Groshek, Museum Studies/Herron “The Terroir of Home: When Place and Food Collide”

Matthew Groshek

The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series

Professor Matthew Groshek, Museum Studies/Herron

“The Terroir of Home: When Place and Food Collide”

Local foods have been touted as a key to economic stability, gains in health and a link to community. How do topophilia, home economics, family history and a love of food shape us into creatures of hunger, desire and culture?

Friday, October 19, 2012
CE 268, 4:30-5:30 PM

RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Groshek talk in the subject line.

 

 

2012 Frederick Douglass Symposium, “Rediscovering the Life and Times of Frederick Douglass: A Public Symposium”

Frederick Douglass

Date:  October 4-5, 2012
Location: IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

A free two-day public event to observe and assess the significance of the publication of the first scholarly edition of Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, the third and most inclusive autobiography by the 19th century’s best-known African American by the Frederick Douglass Papers, a unit of the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indianapolis’ Institute for American Thought. Douglass (1818-1895), a runaway slave, rose to become an internationally recognized orator, reformer, journalist, and diplomat.
Event Schedule:

Keynote Address—by Professor David W. Blight, the Class of 1954 Professor of American History at Yale University. CE 450 – 5-6:30 pm, October, 4th

Public Reception and Book Launch Party Reception—4th Floor Terrace6:30-8:00 pm, October 4th

Scholarly Symposium on Rediscovering the Life and Times of Frederick Douglass—CE 450 – 8:30 am – 4:00 pm, October 5th.

 

Sponsored by the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indianapolis and its English and History departments, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and the Indiana University Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.

For additional information or to register for this free event, email douglass@iupui.edu

Event website: http://liberalarts.iupui.edu/douglass/

Shakespeare at IUPUI: a trailer for a new WFYI documentary

CSI Shakespeare – In the spring of 2102, IUPUI presented the world premiere of a lost 400-year old play by William Shakespeare, titled “The History of Cardenio.” This half-hour documentary highlights the 20 year-effort by world-renowned Shakespeare scholar Gary Taylor to recreate the play, filtering old texts through modern high-tech databases to resurrect the original manuscript.  Viewers will also travel with Gary to the Globe Theatre in London and retrace his academic roots as a precocious and oft-published “enfant terrible” at Oxford University Press.  Then, we return to Indianapolis to witness the first-blown production of the work—an experimental collaboration with Hoosier Bard Productions, including the recording of a period-accurate but original musical score for vocals and lute, to christen the new urban theatre space at IUPUI.
7:30pm, November 1st.
Producer: Jim Simmons

 

 

Fourteenth Annual Meeting: THE MIDWEST PRAGMATIST STUDY GROUP of The Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, 22-­23 September 2012

John Dewey in 1902

 

DATE: 22-­23 September 2012

LOCATION: Cavanaugh Hall, Room 508; 425 University Blvd.; Indianapolis, IN 46202

No fee, no registration, open to the public

 

 

 

 

Program 

Saturday, September 22, 2012

 

1:00 PM­-2:15 PM:

 

Philosophy as Therapeutic Amelioration: Crisis and Reflection in the Thought of William James, David Rodick, Xavier University

 

2:30 PM-3:45 PM:

Photography and the Emotions, Richard Rubin

 

3:45 PM:

Refreshment Break

 

4:15 PM­-5:45 PM:

Key Texts Session: Racial Remediation: “An Historical Perspective on Current

Conditions” (1976/1977), “Racial Realism” (1992), and “The Space Traders”

(1992) by Derrick Bell; and “Democracy is Radical” (1937) and “Creative

Democracy: The Task Before Us” (1939) by John Dewey. Discussant: Tommy Curry,

Texas A&M University

 

5:45 PM:

Business Meeting

 

7:00 PM:

Dinner

 

 

Sunday, September 23, 2012

 

9:30 AM­-10:45 AM:

“Peirce and Frege on Logic,” Sergio Gallegos, Denison University

 

11:00 AM-­12:15 PM:

“We Who Must Fight in the Shade,” Tommy Curry, Texas A&M University

 

Support for this meeting of the Midwest Pragmatist Study Group comes from

the Institute for American Thought, the Santayana Edition, the Department of

Philosophy, and the American Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal

Arts at IUPUI.

 

Contact: M. A. Coleman <martcole@iupui.edu>

Artist-in-Residence Lecture: Tim Hardy, “From Shakespeare to Shaw to Sondheim: Theatre for the 21st Century”

Tim Hardy

DATE: Thursday, September 6, 2012

TIME: 7:30PM – 9:30PM

LOCATION: Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall, IUPUI; 735 W. New York St.; Indianapolis, IN 46202 

THIS EVENT IS FREE BUT SPACE IS LIMITED. TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT, CLICK HERE.

Tim Hardy looks at our seemingly constant need for drama of one kind or another — stories, theater, film, opera, literature. Concentrating principally on theater, he identifies how drama has changed through the centuries, reflecting the society it serves.  By staying relevant to its audiences, theater still succeeds in “holding a mirror up to nature” in such a way that we can both recognize ourselves and be wonderfully surprised and informed.

As a professional actor since the mid-sixties, Tim Hardy argues that if we don’t keep an ever-vigilant eye out for lazy, repetitive theatre — and he offers examples — if we don’t truthfully and completely re-invent the means whereby we would excite, inform, and delight our audiences, then we are on the short route to what the great director Peter Brook calls “dead theatre.”  From this there can be no recovery.

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute is pleased to welcome internationally-acclaimed actor/director Tim Hardy as a 2012 artist-in-residence.  Based in London, Mr. Hardy is on the faculty of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) and has performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company (in Peter Brook’s Marat/Sade and Peter Hall’s Henry V) and at prestigious theatres across the United Kingdom and Europe.  A company member of Opera Music Theatre London, Mr. Hardy has also performed in numerous operas and musical theatre productions including La Traviata, The Magic Flute, and Guys and Dolls. He has narrated over 300 television documentaries, including series for The Discovery Channel and The History Channel, and his on-camera television work includes roles opposite Ian McKellen and Michael Gambon. Mr. Hardy’s extensive directing credits include Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Twelfth Night, Julius Caesar, Twelve Angry Men, The Crucible, Gaslight, Lady Windermere’s Fan, The Seagull, The Arcadians, and The Doll’s House.

This event is co-sponsored by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and the The New Oxford Shakespeare at IUPUI.

For tickets, click here.