IUPUI professor provides retrospective as Rockefeller Foundation turns 100

Bill Schneider

INDIANAPOLIS — Before there was a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation or a Ford Foundation, there was the Rockefeller Foundation, whose philanthropic muscle dominated scientific and medical research for four decades.

The Rockefeller Foundation on May 14 announced its 100 Resilient Cities Centennial Challenge, a $100 million effort to help 100 cities around the world prepare to weather and rebound from either natural or manmade disasters. The campaign continues a visionary approach to “promoting the well-being of mankind throughout the world” that began with the foundation’s creation 100 years ago this month.

“Rockefeller is a well-known name, but most people aren’t familiar with the family’s specific contributions,” said Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis professor William H. Schneider. “Researchers get grants and fellowships. Those are things that didn’t exist before the Rockefeller Foundation.”

The Rockefellers’ contributions went beyond funding to creating the mechanisms for dispersing or awarding funds. Lessons learned by the Rockefeller Foundation could well serve today’s leading philanthropic giants, said Schneider, head of the Medical Humanities and Health Studies program in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

The May 16 issue of Nature magazine provides a historic perspective on the Rockefeller Foundation in an article written by Schneider, “Philanthropy: The difficult art of giving.” Schneider is a professor of history in the School of Liberal Arts and a professor of philanthropic studies in the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at IUPUI.

The IUPUI professor is the editor of “Rockefeller Philanthropy and Modern Biomedicine,” published by Indiana University Press in 2002. The content is the work of experts gathered for a conference at the Rockefeller Archives Center in Tarrytown, N.Y.

Schneider is also author of the forthcoming book, “The History of Blood Transfusions in Sub-Saharan Africa.”

To reach Schneider for interviews about the history of the Rockefeller Foundation and its impact on philanthropy, email whschnei@iupui.edu; call 317-274-4740; or contact Diane Brown, at 317-274-2195 or habrown@iu.edu.

 

Documentary about IUPUI “Cardenio” production earns three Emmy nominations

CSI Shakespeare - Cardenio

INDIANAPOLIS — The local public television documentary highlighting the re-creation of a “lost” Shakespeare play and its world premiere performances at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is in the running for three 2013 Emmy Awards.

“C.S.I. Shakespeare,” which spotlights the IUPUI performances of “The History of Cardenio,” received Emmy nominations in three categories: “Best Historical/Cultural Program,” “Best Program Editor” and “Best Program Writer,” the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Lower Great Lakes Chapter announced recently.

In spring 2012, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and Hoosier Bard Productions, under director Terri Bourus, presented the premiere of “The History of Cardenio,” a 400-year-old play by William Shakespeare and collaborator John Fletcher. Bourus is a School of Liberal Arts associate professor of English drama.

“C.S.I. Shakespeare,” a 30-minute documentary that first aired in November 2012 on WFYI 1 Public Television (20.1 DT), tells the story behind the play and its production as the first event for the IUPUI Campus Center Theater.
“These nominations should be a source of genuine pride and happiness for everyone who collaborated in the creation of this documentary,” said William Blomquist, dean of the School of Liberal Arts. “We very much appreciate our partnership with WFYI, and wish ‘CSI: Shakespeare’ all the best in the regional Emmys.”

The IUPUI performances of “Cardenio” were based on the Shakespeare/Fletcher script as re-imagined by Gary Taylor, an internationally recognized scholar and Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University. The performances were held in conjunction with an academic colloquium at IUPUI, “The History of Cardenio: Spain and England, Then and Now,” which attracted major Shakespeare and Cervantes scholars from around the world.
“C.S.I. Shakespeare” retraces Taylor’s 20-year quest for authenticity in re-creating the play, which included filtering old texts through modern high-tech databases to reconstruct the original.

In “C.S.I. Shakespeare,” producer and writer Jim Simmons, an Emmy Award-winning WFYI producer, and his team captured behind-the-scenes interviews with Taylor, Bourus, Hoosier Barbs actors and colloquium guests. The documentary also features on-stage scenes of “The History of Cardenio” live performances. Pete Saetre and Jerry Prince edited the program.
The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Lower Great Lakes Chapter announced the 2013 regional nominations on April 25. The nominations for “The History of Cardenio” were among 19 Emmy Award nominations WFYI received in recognition of outstanding local documentary and public affairs program productions.

The 44th Emmy Awards ceremony for the Lower Great Lakes Chapter will take place Saturday, June 1, at the Windows on the River in Cleveland, Ohio.

Production funding for “C.S.I. Shakespeare” was underwritten by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Samuel Kahn-Side Constraints and Hazy People: What Ethics is Really About

ethics

The Philosophy Club at IUPUI presents:
Side Constraints and Hazy People: What Ethics is Really About
Dr. Samuel Kahn
Department of Philosophy
IUPUI

This talk is aimed at a general audience. I begin by taking aim at ethical optimizers, people who believe that we ought always to choose the action that maximally produces some good such as happiness. I offer two arguments, one about suiting an action to an actor and one about positioning, to show that optimizing often produces sub-optimific results. I suggest that accepting these arguments leads one down the road of seeing ethics as providing general heuristics and side constraints rather than rigorist prescriptions. But general heuristics and side constraints about what? I use this question to transition into the second part of the talk, in which I discuss vagueness with regard to our most basic ethical concept, personhood, and how we ought to behave to the hazy and not-quite persons in our lives.
Friday 22 March
4:00 PM-5:45 PM
CE 307

Art, Race, Space Symposium broadcasts available online

Fred Wilson

Archived Web broadcasts of the Art, Race, Space Symposium, sponsored Jan. 25 by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the Museum Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, are available for viewing on the WCTY Government Access Channel 16 website. Eight recorded presentations from the symposium are listed in the Special Events section of the Channel 16 On-Demand Video Archive.

The symposium, supported by a grant from the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, emerged out of the necessity to revisit artist Fred Wilson’s “E Pluribus Unum,” a proposed sculpture for the Indianapolis Cultural Trail. The project was canceled in 2011 because of controversy surrounding Wilson’s appropriation of a freed slave figure from the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in downtown Indianapolis.

Several artists and scholars from around the country joined leaders from Indianapolis’ arts and culture sector as symposium presenters, including Wilson, who discussed “Inspirations: Musing on What Monuments, Memorials, Public Art, and Public Space Inspire Me,” as the symposium’s opening session.

Indianapolis hosts another world-premiere Shakespeare event this month

Measure for Measure

Hoosier Bard Productions, the theatrical arm of the New Oxford Shakespeare project at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, takes to the stage next month for a two-weekend premiere of two back-to-back versions of Measure for Measure at the IndyFringe Basile Theatre, 719 E. St. Clair St. Shakespeare’s original and uncensored Measure for Measure will kick off the first weekend (February 21, 22, and 23) while Thomas Middleton’s more familiar 1621 adaptation of Shakespeare’s play will be featured in the second weekend of the show (February 28 and March 1, 2). Tickets ($8 students with ID, $15 general admission) are available at indyfringe.org/measure-measure or 317-869-6660.

Measure for Measure features an international cast of stage veterans, local actors, and IUPUI students under the direction of Equity actor, IUPUI professor of drama, and Hoosier Bard founding director Terri Bourus.

Bourus returns to directing after last year’s local and international success of The History of Cardenio, Shakespeare’s “lost” play, “a winning blend of the twin geniuses of Cervantes and Shakespeare” (Indianapolis Star). Bourus’s “fast-paced emotional rollercoaster of a production” received rave reviews, and was hailed as “a lively gripping piece of theatre” (Shakespeare Bulletin) and “a rollicking experience” (Nuvo). Shakespeare scholars from around the world converged on Indianapolis, and the BBC praised Cardenio as “bold and brash and funny and moving”. The play and production were also the subject of the WFYI television documentary, “CSI: Shakespeare”.

Measure for Measure asks: when is sex legal? What is the relationship between politics and morality? It tells the tale of a liberal Duke who leaves his city under the control of the conservative fundamentalist Angelo. Angelo immediately starts enforcing laws that make illicit sex a capital offence and a young man, Claudio, is sentenced to death for getting his teenage girlfriend pregnant. When Isabella, Claudio’s devout sister, pleads with Angelo to save Claudio’s life, the results are explosive.

Audiences will want to come both weekends to experience the two very different worlds of Measure. During the first weekend, audiences will be treated to the warmth and optimism of Shakespeare’s Italian summer setting, which invigorates the more lighthearted and comedic version of the original play. The second weekend presents a darker interpretation of the story, set in the winter world of wartime Vienna.

“It’s a fabulous learning experience for IUPUI students to work alongside dedicated professional actors,” Bourus says. “It’s a unique challenge and opportunity for actors, to stretch their boundaries and perform two different interpretations of their characters back to back in successive weekends. “

Audiences will have the chance to hear more about the two texts and two interpretations at the talkbacks with Bourus and members of the cast, after each performance.

The second weekend will also feature a special ASL translated performance, under the direction of IUPUI English Professor Janet Acevedo.

The New Oxford Shakespeare project is also hosting a Master Workshop titled “Editing and Performing Measure for Measure” on Saturday, February 23 from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. In addition to Bourus, and NOS editors Anna Pruitt and Rory Loughnane, the workshop will feature two special guests, Professor Gary Taylor, one of the world’s leading Shakespeare scholars (Florida State University) and actor-director Christopher Marino (Chicago). In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to discuss some of the various issues that arise in editing and performing Shakespeare’s plays with the on-site editors of The New Oxford Shakespeare. Topics include: early modern adaptation; editing drama as a multimedia art form; theatre as a form of research.

Indy Fringe Ticket site: http://indyfringe.org/measure-measure

 

NOS site: http://liberalarts.iupui.edu/shakespeare

 

IUPUI Event calendar entry: http://events.iupui.edu/event/?event_id=7986

 

Hoosier Bard FB: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hoosier-Bard-Productions/156137937762740?fref=ts

SLA Summer 2013 Research, Creative Activity, and Scholarship Grants

SLA Summer 2013 Research, Creative Activity,
and Scholarship Grants

Call for Proposals

Purpose: The SLA Summer Research, Creative Activity, and Scholarship grant program is intended to support research, creative activity, and scholarship, not teaching and/or service activities.

Amounts and use of funds: The committee expects to make 6-7 grants; the typical award amount is approximately $5,000, but exceptional proposals requesting more will be considered.  Proposals for smaller amounts are welcome. A budget with justification is required. Grants will be made for projects requiring at least one month of full-time research. Funds may be used for salary and benefits, research assistance, travel, and collection of materials. They may also be used as matches or in combination with other research grants.

Please note: If you request salary, you must also include fringe benefits in your budget. You may request no more than $4,000 in salary. If you take your salary in June, the fringe rate is 27.41%, for total salary and fringe of $5,096. If you take your salary in July, the fringe rate is 28.59%, for total salary and fringe of $5,144.

Eligibility: Tenured and tenure-track faculty in the School of Liberal Arts who did not receive a SLA internal research grant last year. Applications from non-tenured assistant professors are encouraged.

Submission of Application

  • Deadline: Friday, March 8, 2013, 4:30 pm.
  • Please use standard 8 ½ by 11 page size with at least ½ inch margins. Use an Arial, Helvetica, Palatino Linotype, or Georgia typeface, a black font color, and a font size of 11 points or larger. Charts, graphs, figures, or custom cover sheets may be in color.
  • The Project Plan is limited to 5 pages.
  • Proposals should be submitted in PDF form via email to Edith Millikan (emillika@iupui.edu, CA 441, 278-6970).

Criteria: Applications will be judged on 1) the significance and quality of the research project; 2) the clarity of stated objectives and details of methodology; 3) the feasibility of the project relative to funding requested and time frame; and 4) potential for future funding and/or for completion of the project. Applications for new projects are encouraged.

Peer Review Meeting: Although not required, it is strongly suggested that applicants meet with Edith Millikan and/or Associate Dean Jeffrey Wilson (jeswilso@iupui.edu) for an informal peer review of the proposal. We will provide feedback on how well your proposal meets the criteria discussed above, and provide assistance with drafting your budget.

The Application

The application consists of a cover sheet (appended as the last page of this document, a five-page project plan with budget, and a 4-page CV. These may be submitted as a single PDF document, or separate PDFs.

Cover sheet with title, amount requested, signatures of the applicant and the applicant’s departmental chair, and an indication of other applications for funding (this will not penalize this application). This is not included in the 5-page limit. Your email submission serves as your signature on the application form. Your department chair’s electronic signature occurs by copying her or him on your email submission.

Project Plan (Limited to 5 pages) Please use the following outline. Give sufficient detail for each outline item to indicate a well-thought out plan, including tasks, to accomplish the project.

  • Purpose and Significance of the research, creative activity or scholarship, including brief review of the relevant scholarly literature and what your research will add to the body of literature (Criterion #1)
  • The Specific Objectives of the project (Criterion #2)
  • Work Plan, Methods and Materials (Criteria #2 and #3)

o   Describe the work that will be conducted during the summer for which you seek funding. Include, as applicable, tasks you will perform to accomplish your objectives; data sources and/or archival collections you will use; data collection methods if relevant; other participants who will be involved (if any) and their roles on the project; location where work will take place if off campus; and manuscript preparation activities.

  • Timeline for the Activities (Criteria #2 and #3)
  • Evaluation Process and Plans for Dissemination (Criteria #1, #2, #3, and #4)

o   Describe how you will evaluate the success of your objectives and the analysis performed.

o   Describe your plans for disseminating the results of your research: Conference paper, scholarly article, presentation, etc.

  • Connection of this Project to Future Research, including prospects or plans for external funding (Criterion #4)
  • Budget and Rationale explaining the proposed use of funds (Criterion #3)

o   Describe the type of expense you wish covered, i.e., salary and fringe benefits, hourly student assistance, travel, data purchase, publications to assist your research, photocopying, rights and permissions, etc.

CV, limited to 4 pages. Please tailor the CV to the proposed project. Please limit your publication list to those most relevant to your proposed project. Limit the sections on teaching and service activity as room permits.

Notification: A sub-committee of the Research Advisory Committee will evaluate proposals and notify applicants by Friday, April 5, 2013.

Final Report: Recipients will be expected to file a report on their research or creative activities by Friday, December 6, 2013. Please mark this on your calendars!

 

Click here for forms: SLA 2013 Research and Creative Activity Grant

Award: Medical Humanities Student Essay Award

Medical Humanities at IUPUI

The Medical Humanities Student Essay Award, sponsored by the IUPUI Medical Humanities – Health Studies Program, is given to a student at IUPUI whose writing is judged to be the best on a topic in medical humanities and health studies. This book award recognizes the work of students in understanding health and medicine from the perspectives of the Humanities, Law, and Social Sciences.  This competition is open to both undergraduate and graduate/professional students on the IUPUI campus.

Selection Process: Papers are judged by members of the Medical Humanities Program Committee and affiliated experts.  The award is presented and winners recognized at the annual Liberal Arts Honors Convocation ceremonies.  Undergraduate papers are judged separately from graduate papers.

Criteria: The paper must be written by an undergraduate or graduate/professional student for a course taken at IUPUI, and written within the past two academic years on a subject that utilizes the perspectives of the humanities or health studies (i.e., ethical, legal, social, historical, etc.) to gain a broader understanding of medicine and healthcare. Graduate theses and dissertations are not eligible for this award.

Submissions: The typical paper should be between 10 to 25 pages in length.  Papers are to be submitted electronically as a Microsoft Word or pdf document with a separate title page document, both of which should be attached to an email and sent to jizukac@iupui.edu by the annual deadline. Confirmations of receipt of entries will be emailed to the applicants. Entries received after the deadline cannot be accepted or considered for the competition.

For questions or more information, please call (317) 274-4740 or email Judi Campbell at jizukac@iupui.edu.

 

Art, Race, Space Symposium on 25 January 2013 at IUPUI

Art, Space, and Race Conference

Art, Race, Space Symposium

 

Date: January 25, 2013

Location: Campus Center, IUPUI Campus, 420 University Blvd.

Time: 8:00 am–5:30 pm

 

Artists and scholars from across the country will join leaders from Indianapolis’s arts and culture sector in an interdisciplinary daylong symposium dedicated to exploring the complicated relationships between art, race, and civic space.  Participants will begin by reflecting on artist Fred Wilson’s E Pluribus Unum, a public art commission for the Indianapolis Culture Trail that was cancelled in 2011 due to controversy surrounding Wilson’s appropriation of a freed slave figure from the Soldiers and Sailors Monument.  Building on the ideas about race, class, visual culture, and democratic debate that emerge from the Indianapolis project, presenters will also address related historical and contemporary examples from other parts of the United States.  In order to encourage public dialogue about art, race, and space, the symposium will provide an opportunity for audience members and presenters to engage in conversations about these matters throughout the day.

The symposium is free and open to the public.

Hosted by the IUPUI Museum Studies Program and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Campus maps and parking information.

Reading at the Table: The Sacred Wisdom of the American Indians by Larry Zimmerman

Zimmerman Flier

“The Sacred Wisdom of the American Indians”

Larry Zimmerman, Anthropology/Museum Studies, School of Liberal Arts

DATE: Thu Nov 08 2012
TIME: 11:30 AM – 01:00 PM
LOCATION: University Faculty Club

Professor Larry J. Zimmerman combines panoramic scope with a wealth of detail in this landmark testimony to the Native American peoples and their way of life. He shows how, despite their differences, all American Indians share a profound appreciation of the cycles of nature and a belief in the cosmic interconnectedness of all things. He tells the tragic tale of their conquest and dispossession, followed by their survival against the odds and the renewal of pride in a distinctive cultural heritage. He describes and celebrates their myths, their ceremonies, their tribes, their crafts, and their reverence for the land –inspiring us to turn our thoughts to nature and our own place in it. The five chapters are: Tribes & Territories; The Life of the Spirit; Symbol, Myth & Cosmos; Ritual & Sacrament; and The Survival of the Sacred.

A buffet lunch is available for $13.00 inclusive of tax and gratuity. Dessert and lemonade/ice tea/soft drinks are extra.

CONTACT INFORMATION

EVENT SITE: academicaffairs.iupui.edu/

REGISTRATION: academicaffairs.iupui.edu/events/eventDetails.asp?id=2911