Film Screening of Faat-Kiné

Come join us to watch the film, FAAT KINÉ (Senegal 2001)! Ousmane Sembene, the father of African cinema, calls his fellow Africans to a reckoning of the post-independence era at the beginning of a new century. FAAT KINÉ tells the story of the title character (Venus Seye), a gas-station manager in present-day Senegal, who has climbed the ladder of success in a male-dominated society after enduring numerous betrayals by men she trusted. A masterful portrait of the changing roles of women in Senegalese society, Sembene’s film is a poignant reminder that Africa will not be liberated from its colonial past without a concomitant liberation of African women.
This event is presented by the IUPUI Committee on African Studies (CAS)
Thursday April 25th, 6-8pm
Lilly Auditorium University Library 
We’ll see you there!

Negotiating the Diaspora: African Immigrant Women’s Memoirs Dialogue with Human Rights

Dr. Tobe Levin von Gleichen, a multi-lingual scholar, translator, editor and activist, is an Associate of the HutchinsCenter for African and African American Research at Harvard University; a Visiting Research Fellow at the International Gender Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford; an activist against female genital mutilation (FGM) and professor of English Emerita at the University of Maryland, University College. Her most notable works to date are Empathy and Rage, Female Genital Mutilation in African Literature, and Waging Empathy.

Please join IUPUI Committee on African Studies, CAS, as Dr. Levin von Gleichen lectures on the topic of human rights for immigrant women in the African diaspora. Come with questions and leave with knowledge.

Wednesday April 17th 12-1pm
Business Building BS 3018

We’ll see you there!

Run Toward Fear: Education & Art as Cultural Sites of Resistance

A Diversity Speaker Event Featuring Haki R. Madhubuti; a poet, professor, and publisher. A Leading poet and one of the architects in the Black Arts Movement, Haki R. Madhubuti has been a pivotal figure in the development of independent Black Institutions and a strong black literary and intellectual tradition. He is one of the world’s best-selling authors of poetry and nonfiction. In this public lecture, Prof. Madhubuti will address challenges and opportunities confronting us in our current historical moment, He will speak on the importance of developing critical stances in matters of culture, agency, social justice, equity and community.

Friday April 19th
2-3:30pm
Lilly Auditorium
UniversityLibrary
755W.MichiganAve

This event is free and open to the public! We’ll see you there!

Reading at the Table with Dr. Wendy Vogt

Dr. Wendy Vogt

Reading at the table will be presented by Wendy Vogt. Wendy Vogt, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of anthropology at IUPUI. In 2012, she received her doctorate from the School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Her research interests include politically engaged anthropology., migration, transit journeys, violence, political economy, human rights and transnational feminism. She teaches courses on Cultural Anthropology, Race & Ethnicity, Gender & Sexuality, Migration, Ethnographic Methods, Anthropological Theory, Applied Anthropology and International Studies.

Lives in Transit chronicles the dangerous journeys of Central American migrants in transit through Mexico. Drawing on fieldwork in humanitarian aid shelters and other key sites, the book examines the multiple forms of violence that migrants experience as their bodies, labor, and lives become implicated in global and local economies that profit from their mobility as racialized and gendered others. At the same time, it reveals new forms of intimacy, solidarity and activism that have emerged along transit routes over the past decade. Through the stories of migrants, shelter workers and local residents, Vogt encourages us to reimagine transit as both a site of violence and precarity as well as social struggle and resistance.

Please register in advance

Call in reservations are welcome at 317-274-7014

Buffet Lunch: $13
(Desert and soft drinks not included)

Tuesday April 9th, 2019
11:30am-1pm
UniversityClub Rm200
875W.NorthSt.
Indianapolis, IN 46202

‘Price of Progress’: New Play Explores Indiana Avenue Stories

A new play authored by IUPUI’s own Vernon A. Williams examines 80 years of history along historic Indiana Avenue, from bebop to hip-hop.

“The Price of Progress” is a two-hour, two-act show inspired by the 2010 book of the same name, written by anthropology professor Paul Mullins and Glenn White, as well as the rich history of the Indiana Avenue District, the Ransom Place neighborhood and the growth of the IUPUI campus.

John Hayes, left, and Jay Fuqua rehearse a scene from “The Price of Progress.” Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

The first act focuses on the music, fashion and businesses along Indiana Avenue. Names like Madam C.J. Walkerjazz guitarist Wes Montgomery and basketball legend Oscar Robertson abound. The second act tells IUPUI history through scenes portraying IUPUI’s founding with a re-creation of a radio interview with former Indianapolis Mayor Richard Lugar, breakthroughs by the Indiana University School of Medicine, the IUPUI 50th Anniversary Birthday Bash and much more.

“There will be some people in attendance who lived this show,” said Williams, a communications and community engagement strategist who also wrote 2018’s “Divine Nine,” which was staged in the Campus Center Theater. “Most will know much more than we could possibly convey onstage, and there will be some who will learn from it.”

Sponsored by the IUPUI Multicultural Center and the Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, “The Price for Progress” will be staged March 19, 20 and 22 at the Campus Center. All of the 6 p.m. shows are sold out, but more may be added, according to Williams.

Williams and director Marvin Bardo, who received his master’s degree from the School of Education in 2018, will present a multimedia play with live music, dance, video, and a cast of community and IUPUI performers. Bardo said he first became interested in the history of Indiana Avenue when he was a high school student in northwest Indiana. Classmates moving to Indianapolis to attend IUPUI raised his awareness even more.

“But I had no idea about the combination of the two,” said Bardo, who has directed shows at the Walker Theatre, “and I had no idea about the amount of rich history that was associated with both.”

Jay Fuqua, who earned a bachelor’s degree from the Herron School of Art and Design in 2015, portrays a preacher on the night Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in “The Price of Progress.” The young actor sings and raps in other scenes, too. Fuqua cherishes his years at IUPUI and says his performance has brought him greater appreciation for the history that surrounds the campus.

“Coming into this play, I was completely surprised by the history of IUPUI — how it all began,” Fuqua said. “I had no idea of the struggle and the price it actually cost to have this establishment that we have here today.”

John Hayes, who works in the payroll department in the Office of Financial Services, has been at IUPUI for just a few months, but he brings 40 years of theater experience to the show. As a new Jaguar, he, too, was impressed by the history around the university and how Williams and Bardo were able to transform the stories to the stage.

“I’ve learned more in this show than any other in my 40 years,” said Hayes, who portrays an IUPUI English professor throughout “The Price of Progress.” “It’s informational, and it’s entertaining.”

Read the original article from IUPUI New’ Tim Brouk

IUPUI Liberal Arts Faculty, Students Assist in Repatriation of Massive Artifact Collection

U.S. Department of State’s Aleisha Woodward, center, and National Cultural Heritage Administration of China Deputy Administrator Hu Bing, to her left, inspect ancient Chinese artifacts after a repatriation ceremony in Indianapolis on Feb. 28. Photo by James Brosher, Indiana University

A most unusual ceremony played out Feb. 28 at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in downtown Indianapolis, as members of China’s national cultural heritage administration and U.S. embassy gathered alongside FBI agents and officials from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Department of State.

On the side of the meeting room sat a few of the 361 artifacts — some thousands of years old — that were once in an Indiana man’s residence but were soon to return home to China after this repatriation ceremony of unparalleled magnitude in the history of the FBI’s Art Crime Team, a rapid-deployment team of 16 special agents from around the country who have specialized training and expertise in fine arts, antiquities and cultural property.

The ceremony drew worldwide attention, with a number of Chinese news crews on hand to document the handoff.

Associate professor Holly Cusack-McVeigh, center, was joined by students Rebekah Ryan, Emily Hanawalt, Liz Ale, Rebecca Jacobs and Brianna Jackson, from left, at the repatriation ceremony. Photo by James Brosher, Indiana University

And sprinkled among the crowd were students and faculty from the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, seeing the fruits of their labor — with more work still to be done.

“It was such immediate gratification to see the look on the delegates’ faces as they opened those objects that we’ve been delicately preparing for years,” said Liz Ale, a second-year museum studies graduate student.

In the fall of 2013, when FBI agents had just begun to uncover the bizarre story of Donald Miller’s home artifact collection, one of their first calls was to IUPUI associate professor of anthropology and museum studies Holly Cusack-McVeigh.

Could she help shed light on the magnitude of the collection? And could she mobilize a group that could move these delicate pieces with dignity and safety?

“On April 1, 2014, we had over two dozen current or former students from anthropology and museum studies on-site helping FBI agents,” Cusack-McVeigh recalled. “It was absolutely astounding to see a collection of this global scale.”

In conjunction with the authorities, Cusack-McVeigh and her IUPUI contingent began the process of moving items and then cleaning and identifying them off-site. The collection was museum-like in its size (42,000 pieces) and scope, but questions about where the items came from and their legality — headlines in the United States centered around the human remains of over 500 individuals, mostly Native Americans — weren’t easily answered.

But with the help of IUPUI’s team, hundreds of pieces are returning to their rightful homes. Two years ago, some 70 items were repatriated to the Peruvian government at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. Now, Chinese officials are taking home priceless pieces.

“This repatriation ceremony is important because of our current political climate and because our Chinese counterparts care deeply about their cultural heritage,” Cusack-McVeigh said. “The members of both delegations are working together because we care about these issues and recognize the value to the country of origin.”

And the work isn’t even close to complete. The IUPUI students are helping to package the Chinese artifacts for shipping across the globe, and then they’ll continue examining, cleaning, identifying and packaging thousands more for delivery to other countries and to Native American tribes in the U.S. in what amounts to amazing on-the-job training in anthropology and museum studies.

“This has been a one-of-a-kind opportunity for my students to take what they’re learning in the classroom and apply it to the real world, but also to apply it to something that is very relevant, very current and incredibly meaningful,” Cusack-McVeigh said. “This is as much a human rights issue as anything, and that is what my students are learning both in the classroom and here, as they work countless hours to help get all of these objects back where they belong.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ John Schwarb

Liberal Arts Talks- Digging Deeper into the 19th Century Central Indiana: A Bioarchaeological Analysis of the Bethel Cemetery

Jeremy Wilson presents: “Digging Deeper into 19th Century Central Indiana: A Bioarchaeological Analysis of the Bethel Cemetery”

In 2018, the IUPUI Department of Anthropology partnered with industry leaders to undertake one of the largest applied anthropological research projects ever in Indiana. This work, involving the detection, exhumation and analysis of over 500 individuals from the Bethel Cemetery, provided a unique opportunity to identify and reconstruct the lives and lifeways of early Hoosier pioneers, as well as later inhabitants that experienced industrialization, urbanization, and key moments in the state and nation’s history.

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FAQs

How much does this event cost and can I attend?

This event is free and open to the public.

What are my parking options for the event?

Please click here for hourly rates, a visitor parking map, and garages on IUPUI’s campus: 
*Note: Closest visitor parking garage to the Campus Center is Vermont St Parking Garage (XB).

5 Tips for Landing an Internship

For those of you trying to plan ahead for internships, here are tips from our expert career advisors about how to land the job.

Start early and talk to your career advisor

The IUPUI campus has many resources to help with each step in landing an internship. Intern fairs are a great way to search for opportunities, establish connections and get your name out there. Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Don’t wait to look for an internship. It’s common for businesses to search for summer interns as early as the fall semester. Students who wait until spring to look for a summer internship might have trouble getting a position because many opportunities will be filled.

It’s also smart to begin the internship search by visiting your career advisor. They can help you consider what you want to do with your degree, guide you to templates for your resume and cover letters, review your resume and cover letters, help you with networking, do a mock interview with you, notify you about career fairs, and more.

Search for opportunities

First, check to see if your school has a database or another kind of internship listing for your major. For students in the School of Liberal Arts, there’s a database available to get help with many things involving your career. JagJobsIndiana INTERNnet and Ascend Indiana are a few sites that are specifically intended for students looking for internships. Google and LinkedIn are also options, and of course you can just go directly to a company’s website to see if it’s hiring.

Career and intern fairs are a great way to find opportunities and get your name out there. When attending career events, informational interviews or job-shadowing opportunities, make sure to dress professionally, come with questions and bring your resume. Also, make sure to follow up with the people you met.

Once you have a list of internships you’d like to apply for, prioritize them. Don’t apply for every position that sounds interesting — but don’t apply for just one or two either, in case those companies don’t get back to you.

Use your connections

Connections give you an advantage in the workforce. Not only can they suggest people you haven’t heard of, but they could also help you get in the door for that first interview. Those who are close to you know how you work and will likely enjoy helping where they can. Ask your advisors, professors or peers for potential connections. In addition, your parents — or your friends’ parents — might know people who could help you make connections.

Research professionals in your field and reach out to them to see if they’ll talk with you. Other ways to make connections are attending career fairs, joining LinkedIn, scheduling informational interviews and job-shadowing opportunities, attending company presentations, and talking with guest speakers in your classes.

Once again, don’t forget to follow up and send a thank-you email or note to people who took any time to help you.

Prepare your resume and cover letter

Every industry has different expectations.

Your resume needs to be descriptive and show measurable outcomes about your work experiences, accomplishments, scholarships and skill sets. It should not be more than one page. Also, unless your GPA is close to a 4.0, don’t put it on there.

Your cover letter must be tailored specifically to the internship you’re applying for — do not create a general one you send out to everyone. Briefly include what you know about the company, why you want to work there and how your skills match the needs listed in the job description. When you’re done, have professors, advisors, your career development office, parents and friends proofread the documents.

Finally, identify and ask three people you know to be references. Make sure you tell them in advance when they might be receiving a phone call or email from potential employers.

Prepare for the interview

Dress to impress for your interview, complete with professional clothing and a well-groomed appearance. Stay away from strong perfume/cologne and distracting jewelry. Also, find out beforehand exactly where the interview is, how long it takes to get there and where to park to avoid any chance of being late.

Nail down your elevator pitch and rehearse your answers to typical interview questions before the big day, and request a mock interview with your career advisor or a professor.

Lastly, never forget to follow up within 24 hours by sending a thank-you email or handwritten note. It should reiterate your interest, state something you learned or appreciated, and thank them for their time.

Read the original story from IUPUI News’ Ashlynnn Neumeyer

Liberal Arts Talks: Public Art, Monuments, and Civic Life by Modupe Labode

In 2011, a nonprofit agency responded to protest and cancelled artist Fred Wilson’s project to create a work of public art for the Indianapolis Cultural Trail. The proposed work, E Pluribus Unum, referenced the figure of an African American man on the Indiana Soldiers and Soldiers Monument. This case is a point of departure to consider the role of public art, monuments, race, and history in civic life.

Please RSVP here to attend.

FAQs
How much does this event cost and can I attend?
This event is free and open to the public.

What are my parking options for the event?
Please visit the following link for hourly rates, a visitor parking map, and garages on IUPUI’s campus: https://parking.iupui.edu/pages/park/visitors/visitors.asp
*Note: Closest visitor parking garage to the Campus Center is Vermont St Parking Garage (XB).

Around IUPUI

Be sure to attend a pair of one-hour faculty Liberal Arts Talks next week in the Campus Center:

  • “The Green Challenge Deepens: Environmentalism in the Age of Climate Change” with John McCormick, professor of political science, 4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 27, Room 305. John McCormick revisits his 1995 book, “The Global Environmental Movement,” to examine the ways in which environmentalism has evolved in the era of climate change, globalization, the internet, nationalism and the rise of China. He asks how these five developments have altered the definition of environmental problems; how they have shaped the international response to those problems; and how the relationship between science, economics, trade and technology has exacerbated or addressed environmental change.
  • “Public Art, Monuments, and Civic Life” with Modupe Labode, associate professor of history, 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 28, Room 307. In 2011, a nonprofit agency responded to protest and canceled artist Fred Wilson’s project to create a work of public art for the Indianapolis Cultural Trail. The proposed work, “E Pluribus Unum,” referenced the figure of an African-American man on the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in downtown Indianapolis. This case is a point of departure to consider the role of public art, monuments, race and history in civic life.

Music and arts technology faculty member scores soundtrack

Jordan Munson lent his composition talents to the Phoenix Theatre. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Jordan Munson, a senior lecturer of music and arts technology, created the original soundtrack to the Phoenix Theatre‘s staging of John Kuntz’s play “The Hotel Nepenthe,” which opens Feb. 28 and runs through March 24.

Munson created original soundscapes with the show’s sound designer, Brian Hartz. The music adds to the dark comedy’s schizophrenic nature.

The play is described as such: “A gruesome murder, a fatal accident and a missing infant — anything can happen at Hotel Nepenthe, a locale straight out of the film noir of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Four actors portray 19 characters in this poignant work that oscillates between absurdity and deeply emotional honesty.”

Furniture design meets the human body

North Carolina designer Annie Evelyn will talk about the relationship between furniture and the human body as the keynote for the annual Phillip Tennant Furniture Design Lecture, slated for 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 27, at the Basile Auditorium in Eskenazi Hall.

Evelyn’s mission is to reshape our experiences with everyday furniture, from seating to lighting. Her creations can be seen at the Museum of Modern Art and Design in New York.

Read the original article from IUPUI News