Archives fortified by more than 50 years of IUPUI history

University associate archivist Stephen E. Towne checks the contents of one of the hundreds of boxes containing records, memos, photographs and blueprints in the IUPUI archives. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Nestled in the lower level of University Library, the Ruth Lilly Special Collections and Archives has been an IUPUI 50th Anniversary hot spot.

With tall ceilings, retractable shelves for optimal space-saving, and a temperature- and humidity-controlled atmosphere, the archives are the go-to for decades-old photographs, data and documentation of early IUPUI planning.

“Our job in the archives is to collect administrative, historical and legal records that have long-term or permanent value for the university,” said Stephen E. Towne, associate university archivist. “We do this for a variety of reasons — one, to know what the university has done in the past and build on the future. Two, people want to study this institution historically, so they come here to do research.”

The collection is always growing, with boxes of letters, memos, reports and blueprints received every year. The latest includes work from Harris Wofford, the former senator and close advisor to Martin Luther King Jr. and President John F. Kennedy.

The Ruth Lilly Special Collections and Archives has been busy during IUPUI’s 50th-year celebration.

The archives are open to IUPUI faculty, staff and students for research purposes. Just contact the office and get to work in the reading room.

More than 50 years

While IUPUI just celebrated its official 50th birthday on Jan. 24, programs go well before 1969. Records from the IU School of Medicine, the School of Health and Human Sciences, and the School of Nursing have roots reaching back more than 100 years ago.

Records recent and old are stored in boxes, which contain meticulously labeled manila folders. The aisles are organized in broad categories: IUPUI faculty, School of Medicine, and so on. The shelves open at the push of a button or the twist of a wheel.

‘Hine’s Quarters’

Towne said most users of the archives seek old photographs. Early shots of campus, head shots of IUPUI’s founders and images that display IUPUI’s growth are popular. Some photos have amusing stories. An exterior of a small building, for example, could have an amazing story behind it. Take a small office that once stood at 1219 W. Michigan St., near what are now School of Dentistry parking lots.

One of many in the archives, this aisle contains dozens of boxes containing thousands of records, photographs and letters from beyond IUPUI’s 50 years. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

“This is where the first IUPUI chancellor, Maynard Hine, had his offices for a while,” Towne explained. “It was a Curley’s Cleaners, and it had various nicknames — ‘Hine’s Quarters’ and then ‘The Ex-Chancellery’ because Hine occupied this building after he resigned as chancellor.”

Plater’s memos

William Plater, a longtime executive vice chancellor and dean of the faculties, left a lasting impression on IUPUI during his tenure from the 1980s into the 2000s. He transferred his copious records to the archives after his retirement in 2006. Plater’s legacy is still vital in the form of awards and honors. For events and other work, he likes to utilize the archives and reference his writings from 30 years ago.

“We have a wall here, about 300 feet of his stuff, along with his predecessors and successors,” Towne said. “We know what the contents are of these boxes, and we can find files very quickly. Bill Plater will contact us and say something like, ‘I remember a memo I wrote in 1989 about such and such, and I think I wrote it in October.’ Sure enough, we find it, and we send a copy to Bill Plater.”

While IUPUI is only 50 years young, the stories found in the archives are timeless.

Liberal Arts Talks- The Green Challenge Deepens: Environmentalism in the Age of Climate Change by John McCormick

John McCormick revisits his 1995 book The Global Environmental Movement to examine the ways in which environmentalism has evolved in the era of climate change, globalization, the internet, nationalism, and the rise of China. He asks how these five developments have altered the definition of environmental problems, how they have shaped the international response to those problems, and how the relationship between science, economics, trade and technology has exacerbated or addressed environmental change.

Please RSVP here to attend.

FAQs
How much does this event cost and can I attend?

This event is free and open to the public.

What are my parking options for the event?

Please visit the following link for hourly rates, a visitor parking map, and garages on IUPUI’s campus here
*Note: Closest visitor parking garage to the Campus Center is Vermont St Parking Garage (XB).

Don’t miss out on a stellar talk series! This even will be held at IUPUI Campus Center, CE 305 from 4-5pm on February 27. Did we mention its FREE? We’ll see you there!

University Library to Launch Books on Demand

Informatics and journalism librarian Willie Miller shared the perks of University Library’s program, Books on Demand, set to launch Feb. 5. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Just like you would your own Spotify playlist, you will soon be able to contribute to building the book collection at University Library for yourself and the IUPUI community.

Starting Feb. 5, the library is handing off the power of ordering books to faculty, staff and students to decide what they want by introducing Books on Demand, the instant library book ordering system. This change in process will not only save money and change the way the library purchases books, but it will also help the IUPUI community by providing a more relevant selection of books to support active research and class papers.

Once the program launches, when a member of the IUPUI community finds a book they want to read, they’ll click the “Get This for IUPUI” button online and choose either the e-book format or the print version. E-books will deliver within two hours of the request, and print books will arrive in a week for fast delivery or two weeks with regular delivery.

“This process will allow us to get the newest research in a variety of fields with a more efficient system,” said Willie Miller, informatics and journalism librarian and resource development liaison. “We’ll have the latest available books, published in nearly every subject area, on our campus and in our catalog in about a month. We’re also excited to be providing books that we know people will definitely use, and probably use more than once.”

If someone wants a book that’s not on the list, the Books on Demand webpage will have a whole section for participants to suggest options. Most of the books will be academic in nature, yet some popular books will also be found.

It’s also possible that a few textbooks could be offered through this service, but depending on what books faculty choose as the required text, not all will be available. The ones that are listed will give students the opportunity to share and reduce costs by checking out the book from the school library instead of paying for it or renting it themselves.

Another solution for when a book isn’t on University Library’s list is using the interlibrary loan system that will still be available. Any book found in libraries around the world can be sent to IUPUI to be borrowed.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Ashlynn Neumeyer

5 Tips For Getting Into Grad School

For some of us, graduation means no more grades or homework. For those who can’t get enough of the college experience, it means the cycle is about to start all over again with graduate school.

If you’re going to graduate school and you know it, clap your hands — and give these tips a try.

Students who have questions about graduate school are encouraged to reach out to others for guidance. Indiana University

Research the program
Whether or not you know what you want to study in graduate school, it’s always a good idea to research any program you’re interested in. Find out what the program offers and what’s required to get in. You should also look up the faculty and their interests and strengths. This will help you create your personal statement and cater it specifically to the program you want to enter.

Take the GRE early
Similarly to taking the SAT when you were looking past high school, it’s a good idea to take the GRE your sophomore or junior year in college. That way, if your score is lower than you want, you have time to retake the test. Also, some of your general education classes, such as math and English, help prepare you for the GRE questions, so it’s good to take it when the information is still fresh in your mind. If you missed this mark and are taking the test later, it’s not the end of the world. It only means you have a little less time than people who started earlier.

Write, revise and tailor your personal statement
Your personal statement is not something you should write overnight. You might have several drafts throughout the process, and that’s OK. The more revisiting and revising you do, the more satisfied with the final product you’ll be. This is your chance to showcase your accomplishments and goals and explain why you’re a perfect fit for the program.

Ask for strong letters of recommendation
Making sure to ask the right people for “strong” letters of recommendation is key. Ask people who will promote you and your abilities in an effective way. It’s important to choose people who know how you work, what your accomplishments are and what your future goals are. Specifically requesting a “strong” recommendation letter shows that you’re serious about this program, and it encourages the recommender to put real thought and effort into what they write for you.

Ask for help and pay attention to deadlines
Getting all your materials turned in on time is extremely important. Make sure you know when the deadline is and have everything done a little early. That way, if you have questions about the application process, you’ll have time to ask people who know. Reach out to the admissions staff in your program, and they’ll help you create a successful application. The IUPUI Graduate Office offers workshops on getting into graduate school; see the website for details.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Ashlynn Neumeyer 

Reading at the Table with Rosa Tezanos-Pinto

Rosa Tezanos-Pinto, Ph.D., is a highly respected professor, administrator, and internationally renowned researcher in the field of Latin American literature and culture. She has authored and co-authored seven books and over forty-five articles and book chapters. She is the editor of RANLE, Revista de la Academia Norteamericana de la Lengua Española and Alba de América. In 2012, Dr. Tezanos-Pinto was invited by the renowned Latin American journal Confluencia.

Dr. Tezanos-Pinto will be reading from her book La presencia hispana y el español de los Estados Unidos. In this book, a varied range of distinguished specialists travel through scenarios, documentary sources, linguistic studies, literary and film works, to rescue the substantial Hispanic contributions to culture, education, the development of the sciences and the economic life of the United States, without overlooking a prospective view of the future of Spanish, as the second major language of this country, in the coming decades.

This event will be held on Tuesday, Feruary 12, 2019., from 11:30-1pm at University Club.  875 W. North St., Room 200.

Register now!

Click here for more information on the IUPUI Reading at the Table Series!

Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Presents Eighth Annual Exhibition: Exploring the Story of Lot’s Wife

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, invited 12 Indiana artists to explore and expound upon the story of Lot’s Wife during the eighth annual Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Seminar and the accompanying art exhibition. Artists include Stan Blevins, Peggy Breidenbach, Alys Caviness-Gober, Marjie Giffin, A. Paul Johnson, Kasey May, Michael McAuley, William Peacock, Katherine
Simmons, Jennifer Strange, Teresa Vazquez, and Kevin Wilson.

In this exhibition, the artists consider questions that delve far beyond the story Lot’s Wife who, as told in Genesis 19, turns to see the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah and becomes a pillar of salt. Did she act in disobedience or out of compassion? What is our responsibility to bear witness? Is looking back redemptive or paralyzing? Might we see contemporary events (mass tragedies, refugees) in the light of this text? Exploring the story through
religion, art, poetry, and music, this exhibition will ask questions fundamental to the human experience

Directed by Rabbi Sandy Sasso, the RSA Seminar explores the varieties of religious experience and understanding. Through seminars led by an interdisciplinary faculty, artists gain the knowledge and inspiration to develop new artistic works. Artists share their creations through exhibitions and presentations to members of the Central Indiana community, including religious organizations, schools, libraries, and community groups.

On March 7, 2019, the first public exhibition of the 2018-19 RSA Seminar’s work will open featuring new works of painting, sculpture, music, and poetry developed by the cohort. A reception begins at 5:30 p.m. with performances beginning at 6:30 p.m. The exhibition will remain on display at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis through April 30.

This opening event and exhibition is free and open to the public at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260). Refreshments will also be served at the March 7 reception.

Thursday, March 7, 2019
Reception begins at 5:30 PM; performance begins at 6:30 PM
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community
Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available at
https://www.culturalecologies.org/rsa/.

REGISTER NOW!

The Reiberg Reading Series Presents: A Conversation with Novelists R.O. Kwon and Laura van den Berg

R.O. Kwon is the author of The Incendiaries, published by Riverhead (U.S.) and Virago (U.K.). The Incendiaries is an American Booksellers Association Indie Next #1 Great Read and Indies Introduce selection, and it was named a best book of the year by over forty publications. The novel is a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Award for Best First Book and Northern California Independent Booksellers Association Fiction Prize, and is nominated for the Aspen Prize and American Library Association Carnegie Medal. The Incendiaries is being translated into four languages.

Kwon’s writing has appeared in The Guardian, Vice, BuzzFeed, Noon, The Cut, Time, and elsewhere. She has received awards and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Yaddo, MacDowell, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. Born in South Korea, she has mostly lived in the United States.

Laura van den Berg was born and raised in Florida. She is the author of two collections of stories, The Isle of Youth (FSG, 2013) and What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us (Dzanc Books, 2009), and the novel Find Me (FSG, 2015). Farrar, Straus and Giroux will publish her next novel, The Third Hotel, in August 2018.

Laura’s honors include the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts & Letters, the Bard Fiction Prize, a MacDowell Colony Fellowship, a Civitella Ranieri Foundation Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize, an O. Henry Award, and the Jeannette Haien Ballard Writer’s Prize, a $25,000 annual prize given to “a young writer of proven excellence in poetry or prose.” Her debut collection was selected for the Barnes & Noble “Discover Great New Writers” program, and she has twice been shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. The Isle of Youth was named a “Best Book of 2013” by over a dozen outlets, including NPR, The Boston Globe, and O, The Oprah Magazine. Find Me was selected as a “Best Book of 2015” by NPR, Time Out New York, and BuzzFeed, and longlisted for the 2016 International Dylan Thomas Prize.

This event is free and open to the public in the Lilly Auditorium of the University Library. Refreshments will also be served. Books for sale provided by Barnes & Noble @ IUPUI.

Tuesday, February 5, 2019 at 7:30 PM – 10 PM

We’ll see you there!

Fall 2018 Herron Highlights

Kenneth Tyler in Herron’s printmaking lab on Sept. 17, 2018. Iman Pirzadeh

As spring semester begins, we’re looking back at all that happened with the Herron community last fall. Needless to say, our students, alumni, and faculty have made great creative strides – from commissioned projects to local and national exhibitions.

Following is a recap of highlights that you may have missed over the past four months.

  • Associate Professor Anila Agha exhibited laser-cut encaustic works at Sundaram Tagore Chelsea Nov. 15–Dec. 15, 2018, in “The Art of Paper,” a group show featuring nine international artists.
  • The Arts Council of Indianapolis named five recipients of the 2018 DeHaan Artist of Distinction Award, including associate professors Anila AghaStefan Petranek, and Cory Robinson. Each recipient was awarded a $10,000 grant to fund new and dynamic creative projects.
  • TIME Magazine featured CODO Design’s packaging in the special issue “Beer: The Story of the World’s Most Celebrated Drink.” CODO Design is the brainchild of Isaac Arthur (B.F.A. Visual Communication ’09) and Cody Fague (B.F.A. Visual Communication ’09), who began business planning for the Indianapolis-based branding firm during their senior year and cofounded it the Monday after graduating.
  • Audrey Barcio (B.A.E. Art Education ’07) exhibited Aug. 27–Sept. 14, 2018, alongside American sculptor Lynda Benglis and 10 other contemporary artists in “ART IN CONTEXT” at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art.
  • Emily Bennett (M.F.A. Visual Art ’17) exhibited Nov. 17–Dec. 15, 2018, in “Multiplied Motions,” a solo show at Gaslight Art Colony in Marshall, Ill.
  • As part of a commissioned project through Herron’s Basile Center, students McKayla BensheimerAaron DoddElizabeth JorgensonApril Knauber, and Elizabeth Jorgenson, along with alumnus Jared Cru Smith (B.F.A. Furniture Design ’11), created and installed sculptures, mosaics, and benches in the Elmira Annis Civic Plaza at the new Irvington branch of Indianapolis Public Library.
  • Amelia Briggs (B.F.A. Painting ’09) was featured in the Oct. 2018 issue of Maake Magazine, an artist-run online gallery and limited-edition print publication showcasing the work of emerging contemporary artists.
  • Internationally renowned artist and Herron alumna Vija Celmins (B.F.A. ’62) exhibited nearly 150 drawings, sculptures, paintings, and prints at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in her first North American retrospective in 25 years. “Vija Celmins: To Fix the Image in Memory” opened Dec. 15, 2018 and is on view through March 31.
  • Paula Differding, a beloved visual communication design professor, retired in December after 33 years of teaching. Differding will stay connected with the Herron community as a distinguished professor emerita.
  • Lorrie Fredette (B.F.A. Sculpture ’90) exhibited in “Tender Exchanges,” a solo show at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art. The exhibition opened Nov. 18, 2018, and is on view through Feb. 10.
  • Evan Hauser (B.F.A. Ceramics ’14) exhibited in “Canary Syndrome,” a group show featuring the ceramics and glass works of nine contemporary artists, at Ferrin Contemporary in North Adams, Mass., Sept. 27–Nov. 4, 2018.
  • In October, Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas, honoredAssociate Professor Robert Horvath as a 2018 Outstanding Alumnus from the university’s Lamar D. Fain College of Fine Arts.
  • Assistant Professor Katie Hudnall, Associate Professor Meredith Setser, and Adjunct Instructor Liz Wierzbicki (M.F.A. Visual Art ’14) each receivedgrants as part of the Indiana Arts Commission’s 2019 Individual Artist Program for creative research, travel, or new studio equipment.
  • Under the direction of Professor Craig McDaniel and photography technician Benjamin Martinkus, Herron M.F.A. students Kennedy ConnerFrank MullenHailey PottsAdam RathbunSarah Strong, and Denise Troyer collaborated with IUPUI music technology students on an interdisciplinary project exploring the elements of sound and movement in both visual art and music. “HEARING THINGS” involved an exhibition of sonic and kinetic artworks on Nov. 15 in Eskenazi Fine Arts Center and a live multimedia performance on Nov. 30 at the IUPUI Informatics and Communications Technology Complex building.
  • On Nov. 30, 2018, IDEA Fellow Maria Meschi and her visual communication design graduate peers hosted IUPUI’s first Open Innovation Sprint at Herron. The four-hour event involved 54 IUPUI students brainstorming solutions for the various problems surrounding scooters in Indianapolis and resulted in 861 ideas. The problem will be further explored in one of Associate Professor Youngbok Hong’s graduate classes this spring.
  • Professor David Morrison exhibited Nov. 15–Dec. 22, 2018, in a solo show, “Nature’s Ephemera,” at Garvey|Simon in New York, N.Y. Craig McDaniel wrote a short piece about Morrison’s artistic practice to accompany the exhibition. Additionally, a selection of Morrison’s works were featured in the Nov. 2018 issue of American Art Collector.
  • Michael Nannery (B.F.A. Printmaking ’11) exhibited Dec. 1-15, 2018, in a five-person group exhibition, “Permutations,” at Torrance Art Museum, Calif.
  • Asli Narin exhibited solo in “Carpe Noctum” at Millî Reasürans Art Gallery in Istanbul, Turkey, Nov. 28–Dec. 29, 2018. Click here to view installation images of the exhibition.
  • Michael Osheroff (M.F.A. Visual Art ’18) spoke as a panelist for Design Arts Society’s “LOVE/HATE” discussion on Nov. 10, 2018, in the newly reinstalled Design Gallery of the IMA Galleries at Newfields.
  • Yasha Persson (B.F.A. Photography ’92) exhibited mixed media works Nov. 2-30, 2018, in a solo show at the Indianapolis Artsgarden.
  • Brian Presnell (B.F.A. Furniture Design ’96) of Indy Urban Hardwood created tables using milled wood from over 40 on-site trees for the new Michigan Road branch of Indianapolis Public Library, in partnership with krM Architecture.
  • Jason Ramey (B.F.A. Furniture Design ’08) exhibited large-scale sculptures in a two-person show at Hutchinson Center for the Arts in Hutchinson, Minn. The show opened Dec. 10, 2018, and continues through Jan. 11.
  • In September, Associate Professor Danielle Riede was one of two recipientsto receive the 2018 Advocate for Equity in Accessibility Award. She joins a small yet dedicated cadre of IUPUI staff and faculty who advocate on behalf of students with disabilities.
  • Herron alumnus Casey Roberts (B.F.A. Photography) exhibited new cyanotype works at the Indianapolis-based Edington Gallery in the solo show “A Bird I Knew, Dreamt a Dream, of Valley View,” Dec. 7-22, 2018.
  • Cat Head Press received a $4.3 million grant from the Lilly Endowment Arts and Culture Initiative in partnership with the John Boner Neighborhood Centers, as well as other Near Eastside neighborhood collaborators, to bring to life the 10 East Art + Design District. The Indianapolis-based printshop and artist cooperative was established in 2016 by Dominic Senibaldi (M.F.A. Visual Art ’13), Michael Hoefle (M.F.A. Visual Art ’13), and Liz Wierzbicki(M.F.A. Visual Art ’14). On Jan. 4, Senibaldi left Herron to fulfill his executive director role in a full-time capacity.
  • Marna Shopoff (M.F.A. Visual Art ’14) exhibited new paintings Oct. 3-26, 2018, in “Première Couche,” a solo show at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery in New Orleans, La.
  • On Dec. 7, 2018, Johnson Simon (M.F.A. Visual Art ’18) participated in the Stutz Artist Association’s annual holiday open house as one of two recipients of the association’s 2018 Artist Residency program.
  • Visiting Lecturer Jake Sneath (M.F.A. Visual Art ’17) presented his work during the Society for Photography Education’s Midwest Chapter Conference on Nov. 1-4, 2018, at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.
  • Stuart Snoddy (B.F.A. Painting ’09) was featured in ArtMaze Magazine’s Anniversary Edition 10, curated by founder and Editor-in-Chief Maria Zemtsova and released on Nov. 27, 2018.
  • Emily Stergar (B.F.A. Sculpture ’14) exhibited Nov. 29–Dec. 15, 2018, in Arizona State University’s Faculty Mentor/Alumni Exhibition. Stergar’s work was also included in “Onyx,” a group exhibition featuring 46 contemporary artists, presented online by Alfa Gallery.
  • In November, the Indianapolis International Airport (IND) installed small-scale sculptures created by Phillip Tennant, professor emeritus of furniture design. Tennant’s work remains on display through March 10 in the ticketing hall.
  • Colin Tury (M.F.A. Visual Art ’14) was featured in Architectural Digest’s article “The Highlights from Detroit’s First Month of Design.” Detroit Month of Design occurred Sept. 1-30, 2018, during which Tury’s Fairfax Lounge Chair was included in the exhibition “Shape: Defining Furniture in Michigan’s Design Legacy” at Shinola’s flagship store.
  • The Herron galleries presented “Kenneth Tyler: The Art of Collaboration,” a survey of collaborations between master printer Kenneth Tyler (M.A.E. Art Education ’63) and some of the 20th century’s most iconic artists. Tyler visited the school during opening week of the exhibition to work with printmaking students and discuss his life’s work via an unforgettable artist talk. The exhibition closed on Nov. 10, 2018.
  • During IUPUI’s 2018 Spirit & Place Festival, Beatriz Vasquez (B.F.A. General Fine Arts ’06) participated in a collaborative public project showcasing the stories of historically marginalized communities in America.

Read the original article from Stories at Herron School of Art and Design 

New Luis Alberto Ambroggio Center for Latino Studies to Serve as Hub for Literature and Research

The Luis Alberto Ambroggio Center for Latino Studies is housed in Room 323 of Cavanaugh Hall and is open to the entire IUPUI community. Photo courtesy of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

In addition to being a world-renowned poet and essayist, Luis Alberto Ambroggio has been a lifelong collector of Spanish literature and history books, many from well before his time.

It’s a priceless collection. And it now resides at IUPUI.

The Luis Alberto Ambroggio Center for Latino Studies, part of the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, formally opened Nov. 1 in a ceremony at the center, housed in Room 323 of Cavanaugh Hall. Among the distinguished guests were Ambroggio; Garry Holland, education chair for the Greater Indianapolis Branch of the NAACP; Elia James from the Lawrence city government; IUPUI Executive Vice Chancellor Kathy Johnson; and representatives from the Indianapolis mayor’s office, the Lawrence mayor’s office and the office of Rep. André Carson.

“The center is not only for Latino studies; it’s open to anybody, in any major. Students can use the library to continue research,” said Jose Vargas-Vila, director of IUPUI’s Latino Studies program. “In the future, we’ll use it to invite scholars and writers to IUPUI.”

Nearly 2,000 volumes are in the center, covering classic Spanish literature, linguistics, American history and more. The center is in partnership with the North American Academy of the Spanish Language, of which associate professor Rosa Tezanos-Pinto is a full member and editor of the academy’s bulletin.

“Latino studies is a flourishing area of study in the School of Liberal Arts, and the Luis Alberto Ambroggio Center will do a wonderful job of serving students for years to come,” School of Liberal Arts interim dean Robert Rebein said. “To have such a wonderful collection within our walls is a remarkable testament to our school’s programs.”

The connection between Ambroggio and IUPUI was forged by Tezanos-Pinto through annual conferences around the world. Tezanos-Pinto told Ambroggio about the growing Latino Studies program at IUPUI, and an interest and a bond were formed.

“She made the impression, and Ambroggio chose this university — from among several others — to pass on his collection to a place that would be a permanent location,” Vargas-Vila said. “He wanted to donate the books that belonged to him and his parents.”

Some 700 students take classes in Latino studies each year from two full-time and four part-time faculty. Students have had internships with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, with the city of Lawrence and inside the Indiana Statehouse.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ John Schwarb

Digital Humanities Librarian Open Hours

Caitlin Pollock
Digital Humanities Librarian

Have questions about Digital Humanities? Come to IUPUI Arts and Humanities on Wednesdays from 12 to 1pm to meet with Caitlin Pollock, the Digital Humanities Librarian at the Center for Digital Scholarship at University Library! Caitlin can help you think through your project and develop next steps or workflows, and recommend methodologies, trainings, tools, and platforms. Caitlin can also advise on data visualization, Text Encoding Initiative Guidelines (TEI), textual analysis, data management, and project management. Your DH research can just have started or in the middle development. No appointments required, first come first serve.

IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute
University Library RM 4115T