IUPUI Study Inspires Play About Discrimination Toward African American Women In Central Indiana

Tiffany Gilliam performs during a dress rehearsal for the play "Same Blood: Stories of Inequity from 10 Black Women Living in Central Indiana" at the Phoenix Theatre Cultural Centre. A free performance of the play will take place at 7 p.m. May 14 at the Phoenix. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University
Tiffany Gilliam performs during a dress rehearsal for the play “Same Blood: Stories of Inequity from 10 Black Women Living in Central Indiana” at the Phoenix Theatre Cultural Centre. A free performance of the play will take place at 7 p.m. May 14 at the Phoenix. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issues of discrimination experienced by African American women in Central Indiana are taking center stage — literally — as part of a collaborative project between an IUPUI researcher and an Indianapolis-based playwright.

Sally Wasmuth, an assistant professor in the School of Health and Human Sciences, said she had been reading news and research studies that reported troubling statistics related to race and health care, suggesting biases held by health care workers could be contributing to negative health outcomes for African American women. She wanted to bring greater attention to health inequities faced by African American women in Indianapolis, so she partnered with Lauren Briggeman, the artistic director of a local theater company, to bring their stories to life.

Wasmuth interviewed 10 African American women living in the Indianapolis area about discrimination they had experienced in different health care settings. Briggeman then took those interviews and wove them into a play that she wrote, directed and produced through Summit Performance Indianapolis, a local theater company focused on exploring the lives and experiences of women.

The play, “Same Blood: Stories of Inequity from 10 Black Women Living in Central Indiana,” premiered May 7 at the Phoenix Theatre Cultural Centre in downtown Indianapolis. A second showing at the Phoenix Theatre will be free and open to the public at 7 p.m. May 14. After the performance, a short panel discussion will take place to talk about the play and answer questions from the audience.

Indianapolis resident Sherry Harris, one of the 10 women interviewed by Wasmuth, said watching a play inspired by her experiences with discrimination was difficult, but she thinks talking about these problems more openly is a necessary step toward positive change.

“I believe our community needs to hear this,” Harris said. “People want to turn around and say racism doesn’t exist. They don’t want to talk about it. They don’t want it to be a conversation. But it exists. I don’t know if it will ever change, but it exists.”

Actors and director Lauren Briggeman, bottom right, practice during a dress rehearsal for "Same Blood: Stories of Inequity from Black Women Living in Central Indiana" on May 7 at the Phoenix Theatre. The play was inspired by an IUPUI researcher's interviews with local African American women about the discrimination they experience in their everyday lives. Photos by Tim Brouk, Indiana University
Actors practice during a dress rehearsal for “Same Blood: Stories of Inequity from Black Women Living in Central Indiana” on May 7 at the Phoenix Theatre. The play was inspired by an IUPUI researcher’s interviews with local African American women about the discrimination they experience in their everyday lives. Photos by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wasmuth said that although she had planned to focus the interviews on health care inequity, discrimination was so prevalent in the lives of the women she talked to that her focus expanded to inequities found in multiple aspects of their lives, such as shopping at the grocery store, checking in at a doctor’s office or attending classes at a university.

“I think it’s important to highlight how vast the problem is,” Wasmuth said. “The thing that I was struck by was how often and how constant and how pervasive experiences of discrimination were.”

For some women, discrimination affected where they were looking to receive health care or from whom they were seeking health care services, she said. Other women actually worked in the health care system, so they were able to talk about experiences of discrimination not only as a patient, but also as a colleague.

Briggeman said she hopes hearing these women’s stories as part of a theatrical performance will help community members connect with their struggles on a more personal level.

“I think theater is the greatest creator of empathy,” Briggeman said. “What’s exciting to me is the honesty of each individual’s story, just being able to step back and hear that.”

Wasmuth said a goal of the project is to spark community conversation and action that leads to improved health outcomes for African American women in Indiana.

“One of the best ways that we can start to reduce some of these problems in our society is by unveiling what’s happening,” Wasmuth said. “By coming to this play, people will really get firsthand perspectives about things happening in our community right now, in 2019.”

This project was made possible by a nearly $25,000 Trailblazer Award from the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute’s Community Health Partnerships program. It is part of Wasmuth’s ongoing research on population health and the use of arts-based initiatives to promote occupational justice.

Read the original story from IUPUI NewsAndrea Zeek 

Commencement Speakers Hope To Inspire IUPUI’s Newest Graduates

Communications studies major Connor LaGrange will address more than 7,000 of his fellow graduates during IUPUI's May 11 commencement ceremony at Lucas Oil Stadium. Photo courtesy of the Division of Undergraduate Education
Communications studies major Connor LaGrange will address more than 7,000 of his fellow graduates during IUPUI’s May 11 commencement ceremony at Lucas Oil Stadium. Photo courtesy of the Division of Undergraduate Education

The pressure’s on for Connor LaGrange, not only to wrap up his final finals as an IUPUI undergraduate but also to deliver a five-minute speech during commencement.

While most Americans would rather stand on the edge of the Salesforce Tower than give a speech in front of thousands of people, LaGrange embraces it. He has been delivering speeches and presentations in an academic setting since his senior year in high school, when he was dually enrolled as a first-year communication studies student at IUPUI. As a senior supervisor in the IUPUI Speaker’s Lab, he worked with a wide array of students to improve their presentation skills — from shaky-kneed freshmen to international graduate students.

On May 11, all eyes will be on the Indianapolis native as he represents his class of 7,122 graduates. The ceremony starts at 10 a.m. at Lucas Oil Stadium.

“I’m approaching it as if I were sitting in the audience: What would I want to hear from the speaker?” said LaGrange, who will begin his pursuit of an applied communications graduate degree from IUPUI in the fall. “I’ll be talking about four points that I think we can use to be successful — not just academically or professionally, but life-related things that the parents and family members in the audience can use, too.”

While having the gift of gab will get you on podiums and behind lecterns, LaGrange said, fine-tuned communication skills improve businesses, health networks and other fields.

“I can walk into a room of engineers and not know engineering and be just fine,” he explained. “From clients to higher-ups, there isn’t a single place in our world where people aren’t communicating with one another in one fashion or another.”

LaGrange’s years at IUPUI were packed. But he wasn’t too busy to notice the university’s growth, which coincided with that of Indianapolis.

“It’s an incredible city, and I’m blessed to go to an incredible university in the heart of that city,” LaGrange said. “I think both institutions have hit their stride during my time at IUPUI.

“I think Indianapolis for sure made a name for itself attracting bigger companies and conferences. I see our economy only getting stronger. Hoosier hospitality is a thing, and IUPUI is one of the few Division I urban campuses that is a short walk to the heart of the city. Graduates no longer have to go to New York City or other bigger cities. Students will continue to get opportunities in their own backyard.”

Sarah Evans Barker, senior judge of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, will also speak at the commencement ceremony. Deemed a Living Legend by the Indiana Historical Society, she has been instrumental in numerous behind-the-scenes roles that have helped the university grow and thrive. Barker helped create the Bepko Scholars and Fellows Program, and she has worked with the Indiana University McKinney School of Law while participating as a member of the chancellor’s advisory board and several dean and chancellor searches.

Judge Sarah Evans Barker. Photo courtesy of the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana
Judge Sarah Evans Barker. Photo courtesy of the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana

“I’ve been able to see IUPUI grow and put down significant roots in the community,” said Barker, who earned a social service degree from IU Bloomington. “I’ve known many people who have been a creative force in determining IUPUI’s mission. It is an honor for me to give this talk to these graduates. In terms of my career, I’ve had a lifelong affiliation with the university.”

While Barker has addressed hundreds of rooms full of people throughout her impressive career, IUPUI’s commencement ceremony will be the judge’s largest audience by far. In the home of the Indianapolis Colts, she said, she may not have a touchdown dance for IUPUI’s newest graduates, but she hopes her remarks will inspire and ring true.

“I’m hoping that there will be enough cohesiveness that the purpose of the gathering will be realized,” Barker revealed. “I hope they can connect with some ideas that I want to leave with them.”

Read the original story from IUPUI NewsTim Brouk 

‘Price of Progress’: New Play Explores Indiana Avenue Stories

A new play authored by IUPUI’s own Vernon A. Williams examines 80 years of history along historic Indiana Avenue, from bebop to hip-hop.

“The Price of Progress” is a two-hour, two-act show inspired by the 2010 book of the same name, written by anthropology professor Paul Mullins and Glenn White, as well as the rich history of the Indiana Avenue District, the Ransom Place neighborhood and the growth of the IUPUI campus.

John Hayes, left, and Jay Fuqua rehearse a scene from “The Price of Progress.” Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

The first act focuses on the music, fashion and businesses along Indiana Avenue. Names like Madam C.J. Walkerjazz guitarist Wes Montgomery and basketball legend Oscar Robertson abound. The second act tells IUPUI history through scenes portraying IUPUI’s founding with a re-creation of a radio interview with former Indianapolis Mayor Richard Lugar, breakthroughs by the Indiana University School of Medicine, the IUPUI 50th Anniversary Birthday Bash and much more.

“There will be some people in attendance who lived this show,” said Williams, a communications and community engagement strategist who also wrote 2018’s “Divine Nine,” which was staged in the Campus Center Theater. “Most will know much more than we could possibly convey onstage, and there will be some who will learn from it.”

Sponsored by the IUPUI Multicultural Center and the Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, “The Price for Progress” will be staged March 19, 20 and 22 at the Campus Center. All of the 6 p.m. shows are sold out, but more may be added, according to Williams.

Williams and director Marvin Bardo, who received his master’s degree from the School of Education in 2018, will present a multimedia play with live music, dance, video, and a cast of community and IUPUI performers. Bardo said he first became interested in the history of Indiana Avenue when he was a high school student in northwest Indiana. Classmates moving to Indianapolis to attend IUPUI raised his awareness even more.

“But I had no idea about the combination of the two,” said Bardo, who has directed shows at the Walker Theatre, “and I had no idea about the amount of rich history that was associated with both.”

Jay Fuqua, who earned a bachelor’s degree from the Herron School of Art and Design in 2015, portrays a preacher on the night Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in “The Price of Progress.” The young actor sings and raps in other scenes, too. Fuqua cherishes his years at IUPUI and says his performance has brought him greater appreciation for the history that surrounds the campus.

“Coming into this play, I was completely surprised by the history of IUPUI — how it all began,” Fuqua said. “I had no idea of the struggle and the price it actually cost to have this establishment that we have here today.”

John Hayes, who works in the payroll department in the Office of Financial Services, has been at IUPUI for just a few months, but he brings 40 years of theater experience to the show. As a new Jaguar, he, too, was impressed by the history around the university and how Williams and Bardo were able to transform the stories to the stage.

“I’ve learned more in this show than any other in my 40 years,” said Hayes, who portrays an IUPUI English professor throughout “The Price of Progress.” “It’s informational, and it’s entertaining.”

Read the original article from IUPUI New’ Tim Brouk

A Staged Reading and Public Discussion of “Tale of Black Histories,” A Play Created By Édouard Glissant.

 

Tale of Black Histories was originally written and performed in French (Histoire du nègre) by members of the Institute for Martinican Studies in 1971. This avant-garde theater experience explores the history of Afro-Caribbean peoples through the periods of slavery, independence movements, and the Civil Rights era. Members of Indianapolis’ Asante Children’s Theatre will read from the first-ever English translation of the play under the direction of Gilbert Laumord, artistic director, SIYAJ Theater Company, Guadeloupe. A short lecture by the play’s translators, Dr. Andrew Daily (U. of Memphis) and Dr. Emily Sahakian (U. of Georgia), will precede the reading. Public discussion will follow. Come and make Tale of Black Histories part of Indianapolis’ own history!

Parking vouchers will be provided to cover the parking fee in the Hine Hall garage, located under the building (Access on North Street). ADA accessible.

This event is taking place in conjunction with the 65th annual meeting for the Society for French Historical Studies. It is supported by: Indiana Humanities, IUPUI Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Africana Studies Program, Office for International Affairs, Program for Global and International Studies, World Languages and Literatures Program, George Santayana Edition.

RSVP now with Eventbrite and check out the Facebook page!

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, is featuring Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation, a performance by critically acclaimed cellist Maya Beiser, as part of its eight annual exhibition exploring the story of Lot’s Wife. Beiser will perform excerpts from her cello-opera, Elsewhere, an imaginative and psychological retelling of the biblical story of Lot’s Wife.

Avant-garde cellist Maya Beiser defies categories. A major presence on the international stage, she has been praised by Rolling Stone as a “cello rock star” and described by the Boston Globe as “a force of nature.” Maya’s discography includes ten solo albums and numerous feature appearances on film and TV soundtracks. She is a 2015 United States Artists (USA) Distinguished Fellow and a 2017 Mellon Distinguished Visiting Artist at MIT. Her 2011 TED Talk has been watched by over one million people. Maya was a founding member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars and is a graduate of Yale University.

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation is free and open to the public. It will be held at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260), offered in partnership with the Center for Interfaith Cooperation; the Judaism, Arts, Interfaith and Civic Engagement Fund of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck; Indiana Humanities; and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis.

Wednesday, April 3, 2019
7 – 8:30 pm
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available at https://www.culturalecologies.org/rsa/.

RSVP NOW!

Herron Invites Artists to Participate in Lori Waxman’s Acclaimed ’60 wrd/min Art Critic’ Performance

Lori Waxman at work during her "60 wrd/min art critic" performance in St. Louis, Mississippi, in 2015. Courtesy of Lori Waxman
Lori Waxman at work during her “60 wrd/min art critic” performance in St. Louis, Mississippi, in 2015. Courtesy of Lori Waxman

This spring, the Galleries at Herron School of Art and Design will present “60 wrd/min art critic,” an ongoing performance art project by Chicago Tribune columnist Lori Waxman, providing Indiana artists the opportunity to submit their artwork for critical review and published recognition. Waxman’s performance will occur April 30–May 2, 2019, on the IUPUI campus in Herron’s Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life, located in Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.

Since 2005, Waxman’s internationally acclaimed performance has resulted in more than 700 written reviews for underserved and underrepresented visual artists across the United States and Europe. In her words, the project aims to “get the community thinking about where the responsibility for art criticism resides” by raising awareness about the lack of venues to cover the arts in certain regional arts communities, especially at a time when art columns are disappearing from newspapers and magazines. “60 wrd/min art critic” also reveals the art critique process in real-time as artist, artwork, critic, and review all exist in the same space.

During the three-day presentation at Herron, Waxman will review artwork by 30 artists of all ages, skill levels and artistic disciplines. Reviews are free of charge and will be scheduled and written in twenty-five-minute increments in Waxman’s pop-up office from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 30, and Wednesday, May 1, and from 1:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 2.

Artists may request an appointment at any time by emailing critic@60wordmin.org, stating date and time preferences.

Indianapolis is among sixteen U.S. cities to host “60 wrd/min art critic,” including Detroit; Durham, North Carolina; Lexington, Kentucky; and Portland, Maine. In 2012, a 100-day version of the performance was included in dOCUMENTA, a major survey of international contemporary art held every five years in Kassel, Germany. A book collecting 241 reviews written during dOCUMENTA (13) was later published by Onestar Press, Paris.

“60 wrd/min art critic” is a project of the Creative Capital/Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. This performance is made possible by the Indiana Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. To learn more about Waxman’s project, visit 60wrdmin.org.

Waxman’s performance is free and open to the public. Parking is free in the Sports Complex Garage adjacent to Eskenazi Hall or on levels 5 and 6 of the Riverwalk Garage, courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis, with validation from the Herron galleries. Visit HerronGalleries.org for more information.

Read the original article from Herron School of Art and Design 

7 Reasons Not to Miss The International Festival

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Travel around the world without leaving Indianapolis on Feb. 21, when the Office of International Affairs kicks off its 16th annual International Festival at the IUPUI Campus Center at 10:30 a.m.

Cultural performances, traditional fare and gallery exhibitions are just some of the planned events for the daylong celebration that teaches guests about different countries and their customs.

Here are just a few reasons why you shouldn’t miss the office’s biggest party of the year:

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

1. Free food

Tantalize your taste buds by visiting five food stations offering a variety of international cuisines, including:

  • China: Spicy potato salad, a light, spicy side dish flavored with hot chiles, sesame oil and a touch of sugar, tossed with scallions.
  • Turkey: Acuka, a dip made from walnuts and goat cheese, served with pita bread.
  • Middle East/South Asia: Spiced chicken shawarma, which will be served with a yogurt sauce and pita bread.
  • South Africa: Malva pudding, a sweet dessert made with eggs, sugar, butter, cream and just a touch of apricot.
  • India: Mango lassi, a smoothie-like drink.

Complimentary beverages will also be provided.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

2. Free swag

Win a free Office of International Affairs T-shirt or other IUPUI prizes by completing the GlobalJags passport. Students can pick up their passports at the Festival Info Booth, which will be located near the main entrance of the Campus Center. Participants must complete at least eight challenges to earn a prize. Prizes include swag from the Indiana Pacers and Global Gifts and gift cards from Barnes & Noble, Jockamo Upper Crust Pizza and the Indianapolis Indians.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

3. View international art

Visiting Chinese artist Dr. Lin Dihuan will be giving a reception for his Cultural Arts Gallery exhibition, “Waiting for a Flower to Bloom,” in the gallery at noon, followed by a lecture in Room 309 at 2 p.m. The Guangdong native has gained popularity thanks to his series of ink-and-brush paintings dedicated to China’s 24 solar terms. These illustrations were recently added to UNESCO’s List of Intangible Cultural Heritage. “Waiting for a Flower to Bloom” can be viewed free of charge in the Cultural Arts Gallery through Feb. 28.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

4. Selfie time

Get your picture taken at the international photo booth, which can be found in the lower level of the TV Lounge. Make sure to share all photos on social media with #GlobalJags.

5. Intercultural mixer

Mingle with international and domestic students and faculty, dine on delicious hors d’oeuvres, enjoy entertainment from other countries, share your culture, and learn about others at this special event from noon-1:30 p.m. in CE 309. This is an IUPUI Welcoming Campus Initiative hosted by the PIE Student Association and the Gateway Community of Practice on Intercultural Learning.

6. Learn something new

Nine lectures will be given between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. in CE 305. Topics range from international health care to the history of immigrants.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

7. View an international performance

Student, faculty and community groups will present cultural performances from around the world from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the Campus Center Atrium stage. Performances will include Indy Samba, Lawrence Township Mariachi Band, African Student Association Dance Team, tai chi with the Chinese Culture Club, and several forms of classical Indian dance including Bihu and Pushpanjali. Poetry will also be featured, with readings in seven languages from the Department of World Languages and Cultures and slam poetry from the Dreamers Alliance.

Guests can download a festival map in advance of the event, as well as recipes for the planned dishes being shared at the food stations. Festivities will take place from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Samantha Thompson 

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, is featuring Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation, a performance by critically acclaimed cellist Maya Beiser, as part of its eight annual exhibition exploring the story of Lot’s Wife. Beiser will perform excerpts from her cello-opera, Elsewhere, an imaginative and psychological retelling of the biblical story of Lot’s Wife.

Avant-garde cellist Maya Beiser defies categories. A major presence on the international stage, she has been praised by Rolling Stone as a “cello rock star” and described by the Boston Globe as “a force of nature.” Maya’s discography includes ten solo albums and numerous feature appearances on film and TV soundtracks. She is a 2015 United States Artists (USA) Distinguished Fellow and a 2017 Mellon Distinguished Visiting Artist at MIT. Her 2011 TED Talk has been watched by over one million people. Maya was a founding member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars and is a graduate of Yale University.

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation is free and open to the public. It will be held at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260), offered in partnership with the Center for Interfaith Cooperation; the Judaism, Arts, Interfaith and Civic Engagement Fund of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck; Indiana Humanities; and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis.

Wednesday, April 3, 2019
7 – 8:30 pm
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available here.

Get your tickets now!

Catch a Fire! Honoring the Black Arts: An Evening of Spoken Word Poetry and Drumming

Babalawo Awodele Ifasina and Lasana Kazembe

Come and enjoy an evening of spoken word poetry and drumming featuring Babalawo Awodele Ifasina on the drums and Lasana Kazembe doing spoken word poetry.

The IUPUI Africana Studies Program invites one and all to a special evening of creative artistic expression. JOIN US as we honor the Black Arts with an exciting presentation and performance featuring spoken word poetry and live music.

The event will be held at Lilly Auditorium in the university library on the lower level. Wednesday, February 20th at 6pm.

This event is FREE and open to the public!

IUPUI to party like it’s 1969

IUPUI will officially turn the big 5-0 on Jan. 24. It’s the campus’s birthday, but the presents are for you. Photo by Getty Images

On Jan. 24, 1969, the average cost of gas was 32 cents a gallon, “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” by Marvin Gaye was the No. 1 song on the radio, and “Sweet Caroline” crooner Neil Diamond turned 28 years old.

Also, and most importantly, IUPUI was officially established on that memorable day.

IUPUI’s golden anniversary will be celebrated in style throughout the day and well into the evening Jan. 24 in the Campus Center.

The day will feature a wide variety of activities designed to honor IUPUI’s past, celebrate our present and envision our future. Accomplishments by faculty, staff, students, alumni and community partners throughout the past 50 years will be recognized even as guests throughout the day will be looking ahead to the university’s next half-century.

Here’s a breakdown of what you can expect next week while celebrating IUPUI’s golden anniversary:

50th Anniversary Report to the Community

When and where: 10 to 11 30 a.m. on the fourth floor of the Campus Center.

Registrations are full for this invitation-only event that will feature remarks by IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar, IU President Michael A. McRobbie, Purdue Board of Trustees President Michael Berghoff and a panel of Indianapolis mayors — past and present — who will help celebrate the occasion of IUPUI’s official birthday in historic fashion. But the event will be live-streamed on broadcast.iu.edu.

Special sessions and party activities

When and where: Noon to 5 p.m. on various floors of the Campus Center.

Presentations from IUPUI faculty and staff, all 45 minutes or less, will enlighten throughout the afternoon. The talks are open to all. They include:

  • Professor of anthropology Paul Mullins will offer a featured session, “The Price of Progress: Race and Displacement in Indianapolis’ Near-Westside,” from noon to 12:45 p.m. and 2 to 2:45 p.m. in Room 309
  • Colleagues in the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research have organized an IUPUI Research Rock Stars session, highlighting 50 years of outstanding research at IUPUI.
  • University Library colleagues will share information about digital collections, including an opportunity to have a 3D scan made of your face — or your favorite IUPUI artifact — for the digital repository that will commemorate the day.

The party continues

When and where: Noon to 10 p.m. on various floors of the Campus Center.

Employees, students and visitors are invited to check out the activities on the Campus Center’s main floor and the theater level, which will include a 360-degree photo booth, an all-day dance party, a virtual-reality 3D tour of campus, a new interactive map of community engagement and 50th-birthday cakes made by local bakeries.

Get your golden jaguar

IUPUI is giving out 700 3D-printed “Golden Jaguars” to faculty, staff and students who print out a passport and collect stamps at various birthday locations around campus. The jaguars have been produced on campus by University Library’s digital scholarship group in the 3D Printing Studio.

Residence halls and organizations are competing for the most stamps to win golden jaguar figurines and a chance for pizza with Chancellor Paydar. Get started here.

Be sure to wear your JagSwag and post on social media about IUPUI’s birthday. The hashtag #MyIUPUI was created to celebrate this exciting day, so take advantage of this special occasion and show off your school spirit by spreading the word.

Read the original article from IUPUI News