Building A Prison to School Pipeline in Indiana

The notion that there is a school-to-prison pipeline has become part of our commonplace understanding of the social causes of mass incarceration. Far less attention, however, has been given to the consequences of removing access to education from prisons, a movement that has accelerated since the passage of the 1994 Violent Crime Control Act, despite the fact that multiple studies have demonstrated the value of education for reducing rates of recidivism. There has been even less public dialogue about the barriers that formerly incarcerated individuals face when they do try to pursue opportunities for education and training on the outside.

At this two-day conference, participants will hear from formerly incarcerated individuals about their struggles to attain educational opportunities, both behind the walls and after release. Attendees will also participate in action sessions, intended to help develop strategies to support reinstating educational opportunities “behind the walls” and to facilitate better access to higher education “on the outside”.

Register now!

A Stronger Body for a Healthier Mind: German Lebensreform, Midwestern Vegetarians, and the Politics of Resistance

Vegetarianism, nudism, alternative medicine, ecology, and organic farming: In the late 19th– and early 20th-century, diverse groups promoting “back-to-nature” lifestyles captured the popular imagination throughout Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Emphasizing a holistic approach to both physical and mental health, this so-called Lebensreform (“life reform”) movement sought to liberate body and mind from the ardor and exigencies of modern life. The roundtable discussion will focus on the intersection of everyday practice and political potential by addressing the origins of the Lebensreform movement during the socially restrictive German Kaiserreich, their appropriation in the United States (from the Chicago Vegetarian Society to utopian settlements), and their later role in the context of Nazi Germany.

Speakers include Thorsten Carstensen (Associate Professor of German, IUPUI), Mark Roseman (Distinguished Professor, Pat M Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies, IU Bloomington), and Marcel Schmid (Assistant Professor of German, Universityof Virginia).

Parking vouchers will be provided. The event, which is free and open to the public, will be followed by a light reception. For all questions, please contact Thorsten Carstensen at tcarsten@iupui.edu.

Monday, November 5, 6:30-8:00 p.m.
Campus Center, Room 305

Registration is encouraged!

Making a Career in History: Perspectives From IUPUI History Graduates

A panel of four graduates of the IUPUI history and public history programs will share their experiences in the history department; discuss the career paths that led them to their current jobs in the Indiana historical community; and talk about what their day-to-day work looks like, what they love about working with history, and what they wish they’d known as students. students will have the opportunity to ask questions!

September 24th, 2018
1:00-2:00 pm
Campus Center (CE) 305
420 University BLVD
Indianpolis, IN 46202

Medical Humanities and Health Studies Presents: Medicine and the Liberal Arts: Essentials for the Health Professions

Get great tips and have your questions answered by MHHS faculty, community practitioners and alumni about thoroughly preparing for careers in medicine, dentistry, nursing, clinical and non-clinical health- related professions using the unique wealth of health-focused courses in the

  • What courses will help me prepare for the MCAT?
  • Am I on a career path that’s right for ME? What else is out there?
  • Why should I do volunteer service and other extra– and co-curricular activities?
  • How can I prepare for interviews and write meaningful personal statements?
  • Who will be my patients? How do their socio-economic,/cultural/historical backgrounds impact the effectiveness of medical therapy?

IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Doughnuts & Coffee begin at 10:15 a.m. Panel Starts promptly at 10:30 a.m. Tai Chi & Pizza at Noon

For more information contact:
Judi Izuka Campbell
jizukac@iupui.edu; ph. 317-274-4740

  • MODERATOR
    Emily Beckman, DMH 
    Director & Asst. Professor, MHHS, IUSLA; embeckma@iupui.edu
  • PANELISTS
    Kevin Cramer, PhD
    Chair & Assoc. Professor, History IUSLA kcramer@iupui.edu
    Kenzie Latham Mintus, PhD, FGSA
    Advisor for Medical Sociology Asst. Professor, Sociology, IUSLA keelatha@iupui.edu
    Rosa Tezanos-Pinto, PhD
    Chair, World Languages and Cultures Assoc. Professor, Spanish
    Jing Wang, PhD
    Director, Chinese Language
    Assoc. Professor, Chinese Language & Culture
    Luonna M. Lancaster
    Volunteer Service Manager, Kindred Hospice
    Brittany Andrea Brown
    BA, MHHS, 2015
    BSN (Accelerated), IU School of Nursing, 2018
    Chad Childers
    BA, MHHS, 2017; pre-medicine
    2017 IUSLA Faculty Medal of Academic Distinction; Plater Medallion recipient

Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018
10:30 am – 1:00 pm
IUPUI Campus Center: CE 305
420 University Blvd,, Indianapolis 46202

The Entanglements Series: Sound, Art, and Ecology

What do we mean when we say that we’re listening? What is it that we hear? How do sounds help us articulate our emotions and shape our understanding?

In a world of rapid environmental transformation, how have our soundscapes changed? What is it that we’re not hearing? What does this mean for our futures?

Join us for lunch (it’s free!), a performance by Mary Lattimore, and a discussion with a panel of experts who focus on the intersections of sound, art, ecology, and culture.

Panelists

Alisha Lola Jones
Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology
Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology
Indiana University Bloomington

Dr. Jones teaches ethnomusicology in IU Bloomington’s Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology within the College of Arts and Sciences. Jones specializes in the study of music and religion in the African diaspora, and teaches courses such as “Music & Mysticism” and “Popular Music in African American Music Performance.”

Gustavo Valdivia
PhD Candidate
Johns Hopkins University

Gustavo Valdivia specializes in ethnographic research in Andean indigenous communities in Peru. His work blends environmental anthropology and social theory with the tools of modern environmental science. He seeks to produce a horizontal and democratic dialogue that articulates the voices of indigenous peasants whose lives and lands are marked by the recent trends of global change.

Moderator:
Enrique Ramirez
Curatorial Advisor to Exhibit Columbus

Dr. Ramirez is a scholar of modern and contemporary architectural history and is Curatorial Advisor to Exhibit Columbus. He has lectured widely and his work has appeared in diverse publications like Harvard Design Magazine, Metropolis, The Journal of Architecture, and Perspecta: The Yale Architectural Journal. His work has been recognized and supported by various organizations, including the Canadian Centre for Architecture, the Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation, and the Graham Foundation for Advanced Study in the Fine Arts.

Performance

Mary Lattimore is an American classically trained harpist based in Los Angeles, California. In addition to her solo work and collaborations with fellow Philadelphia musician Jeff Zeigler, she has also performed with multiple prominent indie musicians, including Thurston Moore, Kurt Vile, and Steve Gunn. Her newest album is “Hundreds of Days.” You can hear a sample and read a review at Pitchfork: https://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/mary-lattimore-hundreds-of-days/

About the Entanglements Series

The “Entanglements Series” is a program designed by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute. Events brings together scientists or social scientists with humanists and artists to discuss a “big question” that transcends disciplines. These big questions are often topics that philosophers have debated for thousands of years — for example, “what makes us human?” — but they might be questions that are of immediate pressing concern such as “how do we stop the next plague?”
Funding for the Entanglements Series is generously provided by an IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant. This program is offered in collaboration with the “Metaphonics: A Sonic Journey through Stuart Hyatt’s Field Works,” which will take place in the evening. You can get tickets for Metaphonics at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/metaphonics-a-sonic-journey-through-stuart-hyatts-field-works-tickets-48700574730

Eventbrite - The Entanglements Series: Sound, Art, and Ecology (free lunch included)

Reflecting on Religion and Philanthropy

Giving to religion makes up a third of all giving in America, and over half of all Americans say their religious or spiritual values motivate their philanthropic giving. If this is the case, why do religion and money remain such taboo topics in our society?

The full philanthropic impact of religious communities goes far beyond finances. The story of religious philanthropy speaks to when, why, and how religious institutions engage their broader communities in volunteering, advocacy, and cultivating a civil society.

Is philanthropy primarily meant to take care of those within one’s own community or the larger society? Does philanthropy provide for basic needs or promote institutional change? Should religious giving develop an individual’s character or shape the morality of society, or are such purposes off limits in a pluralist society?

Two leading historians will share their reflections on what we can learn from the intersections of religion and philanthropy in the past and what issues might define the topic into the future: Jim Hudnut Buemler, Anne Potter Wilson Distinguished Professor of American Religious History at Vanderbilt University, and David Hammack, Hiram C. Haydn Professor of History at Case Western University. The event will be moderated by David P. King and Philip Goff.

This public talk will be held on Thursday, May 17, at 5:30pm, at the Damenvervein Room of the Athenaeum, 410 E. Michigan Street.

Three Decades Later: Art and Race in Indianapolis

A public conversation with local artists about art and race in Indianapolis takes its start from the 1989 essay “Ethos and Creativity: The Impulse as Malleable” by Indianapolis writer Mari Evans. This essay combines autobiography, history, and conceptual analysis to relate local conditions to a broader understanding of the significance of artistic creation. Join a panel of Indianapolis artist to consider the essay’s continuing relevance to art, justice, and community.

The conversation will take place on Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 6:30 pm in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall, 735 West New York Street. Visitor parking is available in the Sports Complex Parking Garage, 875 West New York Street.

Panelists will include Phyllis Boyd, an urban designer and former gallery director who trained as a landscape architect and now serves as executive director of Groundwork Indy; David Hoppe, writer, editor, and playwright who edited the book in which Evans’ essay originally appeared; Adrian Matekja, Poet Laureate of Indiana and Ruth Lilly Professor at Indiana University; Carl Pope, a critically acclaimed, Indianapolis-based conceptualist whose museum installations and public art interventions explore the intersections between conceptual art, American Literature, hidden histories, and social justice; and LaShawnda Crowe Storm, a visual artist, activist, and community builder who uses the making of art to create space and place for difficult conversations promoting healing and change.

This event is sponsored by the Indiana University Bicentennial Celebration, the Institute for American Thought, the IUPUI Africana Studies Program, the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, the IUPUI School of Liberal Arts, the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, and Indiana Humanities.

Critical Conversations on Black Homicide

The Critical Conversations series is hosted by a partnership of IUPUI, the Concerned Clergy of Indianapolis, and the Baptist Minister’s Alliance. The partnership seeks to bring together the IUPUI campus and the faith-based community organizations around public health issues, providing a safe space to educate, inform, and strategize around these issues, leading to positive social change in the community.

The conversation will be held on February 15, 2018, at 6:30 pm in the IUPUI Hine Hall Auditorium, 875 W. North Street. Doors will open at 6 pm, and free parking will be available in the garage located under the building.

IUPUI Chancellor Nasser Paydar and Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett will give opening remarks, followed by an introduction by Dr. Molly Rosenberg, author of Black Homicide Report. Dr. Leah Gunning Francis, author of Ferguson and Faith: Sparking Leadership and Awakening Community will give a presentation.

The culminating panel discussion will include moderator Rev. David Greene, President of the Concerned Clergy of Indianapolis and Pastor of Purpose of Life Ministries Indianapolis; criminal justice and best practices expert Dr. Tom Stucky, Executive Associate Dean of the IUPUI School of Public and Environmental Affairs; clergy member Rev. Dr. Wayne L. Moore, President of the Baptist Minister’s Alliance and Pastor of Olivet Missionary Baptist Church; community member Gregory L. Wilson, Executive Director of the Indiana Civil Rights Commission; youth representative Anthony Beverly, Director of Stop the Violence Indianapolis; policymakers Rep. Greg Porter of the State of Indiana and Rep. Stephen Clay, President of the City-County Council of the City of Indianapolis; law enforcement representative Chief Bryan Roach, IMPD; and media member Steve Jefferson, Crimebeat Report from WTHR-Channel 13.

The Entanglements Series: What is the Future of Farming?

Along with the Wenner-Gren Foundation and Indy Reads Books, the IAHI is proud to present “What is the Future of Farming?” as a part of the Entanglements Series. Join us on Friday, May 19, at 7pm to discuss the local and global cultures of farming. The forum will be held at Indy Reads Books, 911 Mass Ave., and hopes to answer numerous questions.

What does it mean to be a farmer in the 21st century? How can we cultivate enough food to feed 9 billion people? How do changing economic and political conditions shape food production and distribution? In what ways are we preparing our food systems for the effects of climate change?

Support for the Entanglements Series is provided by the IU Office of the Vice President for Research and the New Frontiers Grant Program.

Free tickets are available via Eventbrite at future-of-farming.eventbrite.com.

A Conversation with Muslim Women: Islamophobia, Sexism, and Daily Life Challenges

Blue Square

This panel discussion will include light refreshments. While the doors open and refreshments start at 5:30, the discussion begins at 6:00 p.m. on March 7 in the IUPUI Campus Center, Room 305.

This discussion is sponsored by the IUPUI Women’s Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts, the IUPUI Office of Intercultural Literacy, Capacity, and Engagement, the IUPUI Office for Women, the IUPUI Department of World Languages and Cultures in the School of Liberal Arts, and the American Friends Service Committee.