Equity in Modern America with Jelani Cobb, Jeff Chang, and Negin Farsad

What do we mean when we use the word “equity”? How do we build an equitable society? Join us for a conversation with Jelani Cobb, Negin Farsad, and Jeff Chang about Equity in Modern America.

Jeff Chang is author of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation and We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation.

Jelani Cobb is author of The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of ProgressThe Devil and Dave Chappelle, and To the Break of Dawn: A Freestyle on the Hip Hop Aesthetic.

Negin Farsad is author of How to Make White People Laugh and director of The Muslims are Coming!

This event is part of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute’s Entanglements Series which puts scientists, social scientists, humanists, and artists in conversation with the audience to ask questions that transcend disciplinary boundaries.

Equity in Modern America is presented with the Kheprw Institute, the Central Indiana Community Foundation, Indiana Humanities, the Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library, and the IUPUI Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. Support for this event comes from the Indiana University New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities grant program.

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Poetry, Music, & Mind

What are the effects of poetry and music on the mind and the body? Where do art and medicine meet? Join us for a conversation with Adrian Matejka, Nate Marshall, and Eileen Misluk about Poetry, Music & Mind.

Adrian Matejka is a National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize-nominated poet who teaches at Indiana University Bloomington and is Poet Laureate of Indiana. His most recent book is Map to the Stars (Penguin, 2017).

Nate Marshall is the author of Wild Hundreds (University of Pittsburgh, 2015) and co-editor of The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop (Haymarket, 2015). He was the star of the award winning full-length documentary Louder Than a Bomb and has been featured on the HBO original series Brave New Voices. He lives on the South Side of Chicago.

Eileen Misluk is Director of Art Therapy and Assistant Clinical Professor at Herron School of Art + Design, IUPUI. She is a registered and board certified art therapist, licensed professional counselor, and licensed mental health counselor.

This event is part of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute’s Entanglements Series which puts scientists, social scientists, humanists, and artists in conversation with the audience to ask questions that transcend disciplinary boundaries.

Poetry, Music, & Mind is co-presented with the Department of English at IUPUI and the Reiberg Reading Series at IUPUI. Support for this event comes from the Indiana University New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanitiesgrant program.

RSVP NOW! 

Equity in Modern America with Jelani Cobb, Jeff Chang, and Negin Farsad

Equity in Modern America Header

What do we mean when we use the word “equity”? How do we build an equitable society? Join us for a conversation with Jelani Cobb, Negin Farsad, and Jeff Chang about Equity in Modern America.

March 28, 2019
7:30 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
The Athenaeum; 401 E Michigan St.; Indianapolis, IN 46204
Get Free Tickets Here

Jeff Chang is author of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation and We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation.

Jelani Cobb is author of The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress, The Devil and Dave Chappelle, and To the Break of Dawn: A Freestyle on the Hip Hop Aesthetic.

Negin Farsad is author of How to Make White People Laugh and director of The Muslims are Coming!

This event is part of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute’s Entanglements Series which puts scientists, social scientists, humanists, and artists in conversation with the audience to ask questions that transcend disciplinary boundaries.

Equity in Modern America is presented with the Kheprw Institute, the Central Indiana Community Foundation, Indiana Humanities, the Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library, and the IUPUI Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. Support for this event comes from the Indiana University New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities grant program.

Liberal Arts Talks: Public Art, Monuments, and Civic Life by Modupe Labode

In 2011, a nonprofit agency responded to protest and cancelled artist Fred Wilson’s project to create a work of public art for the Indianapolis Cultural Trail. The proposed work, E Pluribus Unum, referenced the figure of an African American man on the Indiana Soldiers and Soldiers Monument. This case is a point of departure to consider the role of public art, monuments, race, and history in civic life.

Please RSVP here to attend.

FAQs
How much does this event cost and can I attend?
This event is free and open to the public.

What are my parking options for the event?
Please visit the following link for hourly rates, a visitor parking map, and garages on IUPUI’s campus: https://parking.iupui.edu/pages/park/visitors/visitors.asp
*Note: Closest visitor parking garage to the Campus Center is Vermont St Parking Garage (XB).

Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Presents Eighth Annual Exhibition: Exploring the Story of Lot’s Wife

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, invited 12 Indiana artists to explore and expound upon the story of Lot’s Wife during the eighth annual Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Seminar and the accompanying art exhibition. Artists include Stan Blevins, Peggy Breidenbach, Alys Caviness-Gober, Marjie Giffin, A. Paul Johnson, Kasey May, Michael McAuley, William Peacock, Katherine
Simmons, Jennifer Strange, Teresa Vazquez, and Kevin Wilson.

In this exhibition, the artists consider questions that delve far beyond the story Lot’s Wife who, as told in Genesis 19, turns to see the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah and becomes a pillar of salt. Did she act in disobedience or out of compassion? What is our responsibility to bear witness? Is looking back redemptive or paralyzing? Might we see contemporary events (mass tragedies, refugees) in the light of this text? Exploring the story through
religion, art, poetry, and music, this exhibition will ask questions fundamental to the human experience

Directed by Rabbi Sandy Sasso, the RSA Seminar explores the varieties of religious experience and understanding. Through seminars led by an interdisciplinary faculty, artists gain the knowledge and inspiration to develop new artistic works. Artists share their creations through exhibitions and presentations to members of the Central Indiana community, including religious organizations, schools, libraries, and community groups.

On March 7, 2019, the first public exhibition of the 2018-19 RSA Seminar’s work will open featuring new works of painting, sculpture, music, and poetry developed by the cohort. A reception begins at 5:30 p.m. with performances beginning at 6:30 p.m. The exhibition will remain on display at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis through April 30.

This opening event and exhibition is free and open to the public at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260). Refreshments will also be served at the March 7 reception.

Thursday, March 7, 2019
Reception begins at 5:30 PM; performance begins at 6:30 PM
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community
Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available at
https://www.culturalecologies.org/rsa/.

REGISTER NOW!

The Reiberg Reading Series Presents: A Conversation with Novelists R.O. Kwon and Laura van den Berg

R.O. Kwon is the author of The Incendiaries, published by Riverhead (U.S.) and Virago (U.K.). The Incendiaries is an American Booksellers Association Indie Next #1 Great Read and Indies Introduce selection, and it was named a best book of the year by over forty publications. The novel is a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Award for Best First Book and Northern California Independent Booksellers Association Fiction Prize, and is nominated for the Aspen Prize and American Library Association Carnegie Medal. The Incendiaries is being translated into four languages.

Kwon’s writing has appeared in The Guardian, Vice, BuzzFeed, Noon, The Cut, Time, and elsewhere. She has received awards and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Yaddo, MacDowell, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. Born in South Korea, she has mostly lived in the United States.

Laura van den Berg was born and raised in Florida. She is the author of two collections of stories, The Isle of Youth (FSG, 2013) and What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us (Dzanc Books, 2009), and the novel Find Me (FSG, 2015). Farrar, Straus and Giroux will publish her next novel, The Third Hotel, in August 2018.

Laura’s honors include the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts & Letters, the Bard Fiction Prize, a MacDowell Colony Fellowship, a Civitella Ranieri Foundation Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize, an O. Henry Award, and the Jeannette Haien Ballard Writer’s Prize, a $25,000 annual prize given to “a young writer of proven excellence in poetry or prose.” Her debut collection was selected for the Barnes & Noble “Discover Great New Writers” program, and she has twice been shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. The Isle of Youth was named a “Best Book of 2013” by over a dozen outlets, including NPR, The Boston Globe, and O, The Oprah Magazine. Find Me was selected as a “Best Book of 2015” by NPR, Time Out New York, and BuzzFeed, and longlisted for the 2016 International Dylan Thomas Prize.

This event is free and open to the public in the Lilly Auditorium of the University Library. Refreshments will also be served. Books for sale provided by Barnes & Noble @ IUPUI.

Tuesday, February 5, 2019 at 7:30 PM – 10 PM

We’ll see you there!

IUPUI to party like it’s 1969

IUPUI will officially turn the big 5-0 on Jan. 24. It’s the campus’s birthday, but the presents are for you. Photo by Getty Images

On Jan. 24, 1969, the average cost of gas was 32 cents a gallon, “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” by Marvin Gaye was the No. 1 song on the radio, and “Sweet Caroline” crooner Neil Diamond turned 28 years old.

Also, and most importantly, IUPUI was officially established on that memorable day.

IUPUI’s golden anniversary will be celebrated in style throughout the day and well into the evening Jan. 24 in the Campus Center.

The day will feature a wide variety of activities designed to honor IUPUI’s past, celebrate our present and envision our future. Accomplishments by faculty, staff, students, alumni and community partners throughout the past 50 years will be recognized even as guests throughout the day will be looking ahead to the university’s next half-century.

Here’s a breakdown of what you can expect next week while celebrating IUPUI’s golden anniversary:

50th Anniversary Report to the Community

When and where: 10 to 11 30 a.m. on the fourth floor of the Campus Center.

Registrations are full for this invitation-only event that will feature remarks by IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar, IU President Michael A. McRobbie, Purdue Board of Trustees President Michael Berghoff and a panel of Indianapolis mayors — past and present — who will help celebrate the occasion of IUPUI’s official birthday in historic fashion. But the event will be live-streamed on broadcast.iu.edu.

Special sessions and party activities

When and where: Noon to 5 p.m. on various floors of the Campus Center.

Presentations from IUPUI faculty and staff, all 45 minutes or less, will enlighten throughout the afternoon. The talks are open to all. They include:

  • Professor of anthropology Paul Mullins will offer a featured session, “The Price of Progress: Race and Displacement in Indianapolis’ Near-Westside,” from noon to 12:45 p.m. and 2 to 2:45 p.m. in Room 309
  • Colleagues in the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research have organized an IUPUI Research Rock Stars session, highlighting 50 years of outstanding research at IUPUI.
  • University Library colleagues will share information about digital collections, including an opportunity to have a 3D scan made of your face — or your favorite IUPUI artifact — for the digital repository that will commemorate the day.

The party continues

When and where: Noon to 10 p.m. on various floors of the Campus Center.

Employees, students and visitors are invited to check out the activities on the Campus Center’s main floor and the theater level, which will include a 360-degree photo booth, an all-day dance party, a virtual-reality 3D tour of campus, a new interactive map of community engagement and 50th-birthday cakes made by local bakeries.

Get your golden jaguar

IUPUI is giving out 700 3D-printed “Golden Jaguars” to faculty, staff and students who print out a passport and collect stamps at various birthday locations around campus. The jaguars have been produced on campus by University Library’s digital scholarship group in the 3D Printing Studio.

Residence halls and organizations are competing for the most stamps to win golden jaguar figurines and a chance for pizza with Chancellor Paydar. Get started here.

Be sure to wear your JagSwag and post on social media about IUPUI’s birthday. The hashtag #MyIUPUI was created to celebrate this exciting day, so take advantage of this special occasion and show off your school spirit by spreading the word.

Read the original article from IUPUI News

Building A Prison to School Pipeline in Indiana

The notion that there is a school-to-prison pipeline has become part of our commonplace understanding of the social causes of mass incarceration. Far less attention, however, has been given to the consequences of removing access to education from prisons, a movement that has accelerated since the passage of the 1994 Violent Crime Control Act, despite the fact that multiple studies have demonstrated the value of education for reducing rates of recidivism. There has been even less public dialogue about the barriers that formerly incarcerated individuals face when they do try to pursue opportunities for education and training on the outside.

At this two-day conference, participants will hear from formerly incarcerated individuals about their struggles to attain educational opportunities, both behind the walls and after release. Attendees will also participate in action sessions, intended to help develop strategies to support reinstating educational opportunities “behind the walls” and to facilitate better access to higher education “on the outside”.

Register now!

A Stronger Body for a Healthier Mind: German Lebensreform, Midwestern Vegetarians, and the Politics of Resistance

Vegetarianism, nudism, alternative medicine, ecology, and organic farming: In the late 19th– and early 20th-century, diverse groups promoting “back-to-nature” lifestyles captured the popular imagination throughout Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Emphasizing a holistic approach to both physical and mental health, this so-called Lebensreform (“life reform”) movement sought to liberate body and mind from the ardor and exigencies of modern life. The roundtable discussion will focus on the intersection of everyday practice and political potential by addressing the origins of the Lebensreform movement during the socially restrictive German Kaiserreich, their appropriation in the United States (from the Chicago Vegetarian Society to utopian settlements), and their later role in the context of Nazi Germany.

Speakers include Thorsten Carstensen (Associate Professor of German, IUPUI), Mark Roseman (Distinguished Professor, Pat M Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies, IU Bloomington), and Marcel Schmid (Assistant Professor of German, Universityof Virginia).

Parking vouchers will be provided. The event, which is free and open to the public, will be followed by a light reception. For all questions, please contact Thorsten Carstensen at tcarsten@iupui.edu.

Monday, November 5, 6:30-8:00 p.m.
Campus Center, Room 305

Registration is encouraged!