For the record: IUPUI Talks Favorite Albums In Time for Record Store Day

From connecting with family members to influencing their research at IUPUI, music has played an important part in the lives of IUPUI staff and faculty members.

With Record Store Day sweeping into Indianapolis record shops on Saturday, April 13, we wanted to know what some of your favorite records are and why.

Jordan Munson, Department of Music and Arts Technology
“OK Computer,” Radiohead

A senior lecturer in music and arts technology, Jordan Munson teaches synthesis and sound design classes while leading the student performing group Electronic Music Ensemble. He also oversees the performance studios’ use within his department.

Radiohead’s epic 1997 release, “OK Computer,” directly influenced his professional aspirations. The record was groundbreaking in terms of the possibilities of electronic music and recording studio experimentation. Munson has pursued electronic music since then, creating for IUPUI and his solo performance work.

“It was influential in recording and production and all of these things I think about all the time now here at IUPUI,” Munson explained. “It was an interesting turning point. This was a milestone in terms of albums, production and concept.”

Check out Munson’s new, original music live at 12:30 p.m. Saturday at Indy CD and Vinyl‘s Record Store Day celebration.

Carolyn Springer, Herron School of Art and Design
“Kind of Blue,” Miles Davis

For most of the 21st century, Carolyn Springer‘s academic work has focused on color and design. She has worked as an adjunct instructor since 2005, primarily teaching color theory in the elective arts program.

Color is her thing, so it’s fitting that Miles Davis’ legendary “Kind of Blue” would resonate so much with Springer, an Indiana University alumna. After all, the record’s compositions include “Blue in Green” and “All Blues.”

“It has this warmth, even though it’s ‘Kind of Blue,'” Springer said. “The rich tones … it just felt like it was inside my soul.”

Jasdeep Bagga, School of Science
“Chunga’s Revenge,” Frank Zappa

Jasdeep Bagga is the webmaster for the School of Science, developing and upkeeping sites for the program’s nine departments. Before he became adept at coding, he was putting the needle to the groove on an impressive record collection.

Bagga goes by the nickname “Jazz,” which is also an ingredient in the eclectic sounds of the late Frank Zappa. Bagga was a freshman at IU Bloomington when he first dove into the discography of the man who composed such works as “My Guitar Wants to Kill Your Mama,” “Dirty Love” and, of course, “Don’t Eat the Yellow Snow.” He took a music history class that focused on Zappa’s music, career and life.

“The music blew me away,” Bagga remembered. “I did this crazy deep dive of Zappa, fell in love — and there was no going back from there.”

John King, Department of Media Arts and Science
“Copper Blue,” Sugar

A lecturer in media arts and science, John King has collected music since his teens, but the 1992 album by noted alt rockers Sugar has stuck with him through the decades and format changes. It’s the only record he has several copies of; he first bought it on cassette, then CD, then LP — and then all of the reissues, international pressings and promotional copies. When he was a high school student, King said, “Copper Blue” was one of the first albums recommended to him that went beyond pop or classic rock radio.

“My buddy Ryan said I would like it because it was so loud and distorted,” King recalled. “After I bought it, I kept going back to it so many times. There were certain songs that spoke to me lyrically. To me, there isn’t a bad song on the album or one I skip every time.

“Today, when I see it in clearance bins at Half Price Books or something, I’ll get it and then give it to people: ‘I got this for $1. Here, take this.’ I feel like I am rescuing it from oblivion.”

King, who teaches video production, scriptwriting and digital storytelling classes, believes vinyl records still hold a place in modern music consumption. You can listen to Spotify, but holding an LP still strikes a chord.

“The tactile, the idea of holding it your hand — there are marks of character on it,” King said. “I like that there is a loud pop on this record between tracks. You get another copy, and it’s not going to play like that. There’s a significance to ‘This one is mine.'”

Mandy Porter, Division of Student Affairs
“Tapestry,” Carole King

The soothing sounds of “Natural Woman,” “I Feel the Earth Move” and “It’s Too Late” echoed through the Porter household near Portage, Michigan. Mandy Porter, the IUPUI coordinator for student success and outreach, said she grew up in the “CD era” and consumed music accordingly. But her parents’ massive collection of LPs always fascinated her. The old records have become an anchor to childhood memories of her home. She also had to listen to her dad explain — at length — the superior sound of vinyl over CD and digital.

Porter started buying current acts like Adele and Sam Smith on vinyl, but she always went back to those old tunes from “Tapestry,” which has sold 25 million copies and become an iconic title in 1970s soft rock.

“Just listening to an album my mom listened to when she was my age,” Porter explained, “brings me back to multiple times in my life and my mom’s life. Hearing music the way she heard music is relating to my family.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tim Brouk

‘Price of Progress’: New Play Explores Indiana Avenue Stories

A new play authored by IUPUI’s own Vernon A. Williams examines 80 years of history along historic Indiana Avenue, from bebop to hip-hop.

“The Price of Progress” is a two-hour, two-act show inspired by the 2010 book of the same name, written by anthropology professor Paul Mullins and Glenn White, as well as the rich history of the Indiana Avenue District, the Ransom Place neighborhood and the growth of the IUPUI campus.

John Hayes, left, and Jay Fuqua rehearse a scene from “The Price of Progress.” Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

The first act focuses on the music, fashion and businesses along Indiana Avenue. Names like Madam C.J. Walkerjazz guitarist Wes Montgomery and basketball legend Oscar Robertson abound. The second act tells IUPUI history through scenes portraying IUPUI’s founding with a re-creation of a radio interview with former Indianapolis Mayor Richard Lugar, breakthroughs by the Indiana University School of Medicine, the IUPUI 50th Anniversary Birthday Bash and much more.

“There will be some people in attendance who lived this show,” said Williams, a communications and community engagement strategist who also wrote 2018’s “Divine Nine,” which was staged in the Campus Center Theater. “Most will know much more than we could possibly convey onstage, and there will be some who will learn from it.”

Sponsored by the IUPUI Multicultural Center and the Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, “The Price for Progress” will be staged March 19, 20 and 22 at the Campus Center. All of the 6 p.m. shows are sold out, but more may be added, according to Williams.

Williams and director Marvin Bardo, who received his master’s degree from the School of Education in 2018, will present a multimedia play with live music, dance, video, and a cast of community and IUPUI performers. Bardo said he first became interested in the history of Indiana Avenue when he was a high school student in northwest Indiana. Classmates moving to Indianapolis to attend IUPUI raised his awareness even more.

“But I had no idea about the combination of the two,” said Bardo, who has directed shows at the Walker Theatre, “and I had no idea about the amount of rich history that was associated with both.”

Jay Fuqua, who earned a bachelor’s degree from the Herron School of Art and Design in 2015, portrays a preacher on the night Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in “The Price of Progress.” The young actor sings and raps in other scenes, too. Fuqua cherishes his years at IUPUI and says his performance has brought him greater appreciation for the history that surrounds the campus.

“Coming into this play, I was completely surprised by the history of IUPUI — how it all began,” Fuqua said. “I had no idea of the struggle and the price it actually cost to have this establishment that we have here today.”

John Hayes, who works in the payroll department in the Office of Financial Services, has been at IUPUI for just a few months, but he brings 40 years of theater experience to the show. As a new Jaguar, he, too, was impressed by the history around the university and how Williams and Bardo were able to transform the stories to the stage.

“I’ve learned more in this show than any other in my 40 years,” said Hayes, who portrays an IUPUI English professor throughout “The Price of Progress.” “It’s informational, and it’s entertaining.”

Read the original article from IUPUI New’ Tim Brouk

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, is featuring Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation, a performance by critically acclaimed cellist Maya Beiser, as part of its eight annual exhibition exploring the story of Lot’s Wife. Beiser will perform excerpts from her cello-opera, Elsewhere, an imaginative and psychological retelling of the biblical story of Lot’s Wife.

Avant-garde cellist Maya Beiser defies categories. A major presence on the international stage, she has been praised by Rolling Stone as a “cello rock star” and described by the Boston Globe as “a force of nature.” Maya’s discography includes ten solo albums and numerous feature appearances on film and TV soundtracks. She is a 2015 United States Artists (USA) Distinguished Fellow and a 2017 Mellon Distinguished Visiting Artist at MIT. Her 2011 TED Talk has been watched by over one million people. Maya was a founding member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars and is a graduate of Yale University.

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation is free and open to the public. It will be held at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260), offered in partnership with the Center for Interfaith Cooperation; the Judaism, Arts, Interfaith and Civic Engagement Fund of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck; Indiana Humanities; and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis.

Wednesday, April 3, 2019
7 – 8:30 pm
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available at https://www.culturalecologies.org/rsa/.

RSVP NOW!

7 Reasons Not to Miss The International Festival

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Travel around the world without leaving Indianapolis on Feb. 21, when the Office of International Affairs kicks off its 16th annual International Festival at the IUPUI Campus Center at 10:30 a.m.

Cultural performances, traditional fare and gallery exhibitions are just some of the planned events for the daylong celebration that teaches guests about different countries and their customs.

Here are just a few reasons why you shouldn’t miss the office’s biggest party of the year:

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

1. Free food

Tantalize your taste buds by visiting five food stations offering a variety of international cuisines, including:

  • China: Spicy potato salad, a light, spicy side dish flavored with hot chiles, sesame oil and a touch of sugar, tossed with scallions.
  • Turkey: Acuka, a dip made from walnuts and goat cheese, served with pita bread.
  • Middle East/South Asia: Spiced chicken shawarma, which will be served with a yogurt sauce and pita bread.
  • South Africa: Malva pudding, a sweet dessert made with eggs, sugar, butter, cream and just a touch of apricot.
  • India: Mango lassi, a smoothie-like drink.

Complimentary beverages will also be provided.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

2. Free swag

Win a free Office of International Affairs T-shirt or other IUPUI prizes by completing the GlobalJags passport. Students can pick up their passports at the Festival Info Booth, which will be located near the main entrance of the Campus Center. Participants must complete at least eight challenges to earn a prize. Prizes include swag from the Indiana Pacers and Global Gifts and gift cards from Barnes & Noble, Jockamo Upper Crust Pizza and the Indianapolis Indians.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

3. View international art

Visiting Chinese artist Dr. Lin Dihuan will be giving a reception for his Cultural Arts Gallery exhibition, “Waiting for a Flower to Bloom,” in the gallery at noon, followed by a lecture in Room 309 at 2 p.m. The Guangdong native has gained popularity thanks to his series of ink-and-brush paintings dedicated to China’s 24 solar terms. These illustrations were recently added to UNESCO’s List of Intangible Cultural Heritage. “Waiting for a Flower to Bloom” can be viewed free of charge in the Cultural Arts Gallery through Feb. 28.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

4. Selfie time

Get your picture taken at the international photo booth, which can be found in the lower level of the TV Lounge. Make sure to share all photos on social media with #GlobalJags.

5. Intercultural mixer

Mingle with international and domestic students and faculty, dine on delicious hors d’oeuvres, enjoy entertainment from other countries, share your culture, and learn about others at this special event from noon-1:30 p.m. in CE 309. This is an IUPUI Welcoming Campus Initiative hosted by the PIE Student Association and the Gateway Community of Practice on Intercultural Learning.

6. Learn something new

Nine lectures will be given between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. in CE 305. Topics range from international health care to the history of immigrants.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

7. View an international performance

Student, faculty and community groups will present cultural performances from around the world from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the Campus Center Atrium stage. Performances will include Indy Samba, Lawrence Township Mariachi Band, African Student Association Dance Team, tai chi with the Chinese Culture Club, and several forms of classical Indian dance including Bihu and Pushpanjali. Poetry will also be featured, with readings in seven languages from the Department of World Languages and Cultures and slam poetry from the Dreamers Alliance.

Guests can download a festival map in advance of the event, as well as recipes for the planned dishes being shared at the food stations. Festivities will take place from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Samantha Thompson 

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, is featuring Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation, a performance by critically acclaimed cellist Maya Beiser, as part of its eight annual exhibition exploring the story of Lot’s Wife. Beiser will perform excerpts from her cello-opera, Elsewhere, an imaginative and psychological retelling of the biblical story of Lot’s Wife.

Avant-garde cellist Maya Beiser defies categories. A major presence on the international stage, she has been praised by Rolling Stone as a “cello rock star” and described by the Boston Globe as “a force of nature.” Maya’s discography includes ten solo albums and numerous feature appearances on film and TV soundtracks. She is a 2015 United States Artists (USA) Distinguished Fellow and a 2017 Mellon Distinguished Visiting Artist at MIT. Her 2011 TED Talk has been watched by over one million people. Maya was a founding member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars and is a graduate of Yale University.

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation is free and open to the public. It will be held at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260), offered in partnership with the Center for Interfaith Cooperation; the Judaism, Arts, Interfaith and Civic Engagement Fund of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck; Indiana Humanities; and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis.

Wednesday, April 3, 2019
7 – 8:30 pm
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available here.

Get your tickets now!

Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Presents Eighth Annual Exhibition: Exploring the Story of Lot’s Wife

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, invited 12 Indiana artists to explore and expound upon the story of Lot’s Wife during the eighth annual Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Seminar and the accompanying art exhibition. Artists include Stan Blevins, Peggy Breidenbach, Alys Caviness-Gober, Marjie Giffin, A. Paul Johnson, Kasey May, Michael McAuley, William Peacock, Katherine
Simmons, Jennifer Strange, Teresa Vazquez, and Kevin Wilson.

In this exhibition, the artists consider questions that delve far beyond the story Lot’s Wife who, as told in Genesis 19, turns to see the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah and becomes a pillar of salt. Did she act in disobedience or out of compassion? What is our responsibility to bear witness? Is looking back redemptive or paralyzing? Might we see contemporary events (mass tragedies, refugees) in the light of this text? Exploring the story through
religion, art, poetry, and music, this exhibition will ask questions fundamental to the human experience

Directed by Rabbi Sandy Sasso, the RSA Seminar explores the varieties of religious experience and understanding. Through seminars led by an interdisciplinary faculty, artists gain the knowledge and inspiration to develop new artistic works. Artists share their creations through exhibitions and presentations to members of the Central Indiana community, including religious organizations, schools, libraries, and community groups.

On March 7, 2019, the first public exhibition of the 2018-19 RSA Seminar’s work will open featuring new works of painting, sculpture, music, and poetry developed by the cohort. A reception begins at 5:30 p.m. with performances beginning at 6:30 p.m. The exhibition will remain on display at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis through April 30.

This opening event and exhibition is free and open to the public at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260). Refreshments will also be served at the March 7 reception.

Thursday, March 7, 2019
Reception begins at 5:30 PM; performance begins at 6:30 PM
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community
Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available at
https://www.culturalecologies.org/rsa/.

REGISTER NOW!

Catch a Fire! Honoring the Black Arts: An Evening of Spoken Word Poetry and Drumming

Babalawo Awodele Ifasina and Lasana Kazembe

Come and enjoy an evening of spoken word poetry and drumming featuring Babalawo Awodele Ifasina on the drums and Lasana Kazembe doing spoken word poetry.

The IUPUI Africana Studies Program invites one and all to a special evening of creative artistic expression. JOIN US as we honor the Black Arts with an exciting presentation and performance featuring spoken word poetry and live music.

The event will be held at Lilly Auditorium in the university library on the lower level. Wednesday, February 20th at 6pm.

This event is FREE and open to the public!

Moving ‘Home’ Showcases IUPUI and Community Dancers

 

Members of The Moving Company, IUPUI’s contemporary dance organization that was established in 1983, rehearse “Home Is Me,” a piece by alumna and guest choreographer Adrienne D. Jackson. The piece will be a part of the “Home” dance showcase Saturday, Dec. 8, in the Campus Center Theater. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

The Moving Company has called IUPUI its home since 1983. The contemporary dance group will unpack “Home” this weekend.

The group will perform four original pieces in its fall showcase, titled “Home,” at 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 8, at the Campus Center Theater. The concert is free and open to the public. The Moving Company will be joined by Xiphos CorpsCreate Freedom Arts Projects and Studio J2 Dance for the dance extravaganza.

One of the works, “Home Is Me,” showcases 16 of The Moving Company’s 20 performers dancing to up-tempo music and utilizing an array of dance expertise. Guest choreographer Adrienne D. Jackson scripted jumps, floor work and modern moves to tell the story of her “Home.”

“It’s just coming to terms with being who I am and being that person wherever I am,” said Jackson, an IUPUI alumna and current Indianapolis high school mathematics teacher. “It’s about settling into a comfortable space.”

The Moving Company dancers rehearsed all semester on the “Home” works while partaking in live special events around campus this semester like Regatta and the IUPUI 50th Anniversary kickoff event.

The student performers come from varied dance backgrounds, from ballet and jazz to modern and hip-hop. Student choreographers like Shay Sondgerath, a School of Health and Human Sciences junior, take full advantage of their dancers’ stylistic and physical flexibility. Sondgerath created a piece to Beyoncé’s “End of Time” that has been performed at IUPUI and Indiana Pacers basketball games.

An IUPUI alumna, Adrienne D. Jackson leads a rehearsal with The Moving Company on Nov. 29. Her guest piece, “Home Is Me,” will debut at the IUPUI dance organization’s fall showcase, “Home,” at 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 8, at the Campus Center Theater. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

“It’s our fun piece for the year, just to use throughout the semester,” Sondgerath said. “I love choreographing, seeing the dancers’ abilities and what all they can do. It’s awesome to see them do well.”

Meghan Nowels, president of The Moving Company, grew up dancing tap, ballet, lyrical, jazz and musical theater numbers, just to name a few. She wanted to continue her passion while studying tourism, conventions and event management at IUPUI. She found most of her fellow Moving Company dancers had similar stories, despite their different backgrounds.

“I found a home at IUPUI with The Moving Company and found friends,” said Nowels, a junior. “To be able to come together and dance and share a special time together is really amazing.”

All the sweat from spending hours practicing an eight-bar phrase and connecting the moves to an emotional level is worth it when concerts approach. Performing in front of an audience and sharing their effort is a big reason for The Moving Company’s longevity.

“The feeling you get when you perform is like nothing you can describe,” Nowels said. “I think that’s why a lot of people continue dancing with us.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tim Brouk

South African Singer-Songwriter to Perform in Columbus

Berita is an international award-winning “Afro soul” singer-songwriter. She is headlining the IUPUC-sponsored event Arts for AIDS on Tuesday, Dec. 4, in Columbus. Image courtesy of Berita

Sponsored by IUPUC, the annual Arts for Aids “Songs of Hope” event will raise awareness and funds for the AIDS crises abroad. The 2018 event is set for 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, at Yes Cinema in Columbus.

The concert will be headlined by Berita, a South African-based “Afro soul” singer-songwriter. The young performer has earned several national and international awards, including the Zimbabwe Achievers Award for Best Music Artist. Berita’s discography includes a 2017 self-titled effort.

Arts for AIDS is a Columbus-based initiative formed by combining the efforts of five organizations representing projects in Haiti, Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Night at the Symphony

The IU Jacobs School of Music Concert Orchestra will open its season in downtown Indianapolis to honor Leonard Bernstein’s 100th birthday at 7 p.m. Sept. 8 at the Hilbert Circle Theatre. The orchestra will perform the American composer’s masterful 1949 work, “The Age of Anxiety (Symphony No. 2 for piano and orchestra),” along with the overture of “La Gazza Ladra” by Gioachino Rossini and “Fontane di Roma” by Ottorino Respighi.

Conductor Thomas Wilkins will lead the IU Jacobs School of Music Concert Orchestra’s Leonard Bernstein tribute at 7 p.m. Sept. 8 at the Hilbert Circle Theatre in downtown Indianapolis. Photo courtesy of IU Jacobs School of Music

The 90-piece orchestra will feature Norman Krieger, pianist and IU professor of music, and conductor Thomas Wilkins, who came to IU in 2017 after leading orchestras in Los Angeles and Boston.

Tickets are $30.

Read more to learn about what’s happening at IUPUI!