The Key Limitation and Danger of the Electronic Health Record

Dr. Alice Dreger

Please join the IU Center for Bioethics for a special seminar on Electronic Health Records by Alice Dreger, Ph.D., author of Galileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and the Search for Justice in Science. The seminar discusses a key limitation and danger of the electronic health record (EHR), “In Which Winnie the Pooh Teaches Us Something Important about the EHR’s Central Lesion.”

The seminar will take place in the Glick Eye Institute, Room 103, on June 6 at 2pm.

The electronic health record (EHR) holds the potential to be a fantastic technology in many ways. It promises better patient access to records, the ability to look more systematically for risk before harm happens, a way for health care professionals to more accurately track patients longitudinally, and a means to kinds of medical research we could never do before. But the EHR also has the potential to obscure the importance of cohesive narrative in patients’ lives.

This talk uses A.A. Milne’s story of Owl’s house being blown down, along with research from clinical psychology, cross-cultural anthropology, and evolutionary biology, to suggest that, unless we think about the great big narrative holes the EHR is leaving in patients’ lives, we may not be healing people as well as we could. Drawing on her experiences as an historian of medicine and science—including as one who has composed short, private, client-centered medical histories for victims of iatrogenic trauma—the speaker will suggest that the macrohistory of science and medicine that helps us understand the power of the EHR also compels us to consider the need for a micro history of medicine that makes up for one of the EHR’s worst unintended consequences.

21st Century Great Conversations in Neuroscience, Art, and Related Therapeutics

OVERVIEW

A range of global and local experts will present their insights on how brain science and artistic processes inform one another during a one-and-half day symposium, 21st Century Great Conversations in Neuroscience, Art, and Related Therapeutics. The symposium will take place on April 8 from 8am-4pm and April 9 from 9am-12pm in Hine Hall Auditorium. Seating is limited, so please register for the symposium if you plan to attend.

This international symposium, organized by Juliet King, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, LMHC, of the Herron School of Art and Design and the Indiana University School of Medicine, will feature presentations by three international experts and three panel discussions with a mix of Indianapolis-based and global leaders in the fields of neuroscience, art, and related therapeutics.

Aimed at supporting the overall health and amelioration of disease for patients and their caregivers, families, and friends, the symposium highlights the collaborative approach of the IUPUI schools of Art and Design, Medicine, Engineering, Informatics, Health and Rehabilitation Services, Nursing, and Liberal Arts.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Anjan Chatterjee, MD is the Elliot Professor and Chief of Neurology at Pennsylvania Hospital. In 2002 he was awarded the Norman Geschwind Prize in Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology by the American Academy of Neurology. His current research focuses on spatial cognition, language, neuroethics, and neuroaesthetics.

Arne Dietrich, PhD is a cognitive neuroscientist and Professor of Psychology at the American University of Beirut, in Lebanon. Professor Dietrich’s research focuses on the neuroscience of creativity, altered states of consciousness, and the psychological effects of exercise.

Klaus Gramann, PhD is the Head of the Department of Biological Psychology and Neuropsychology Ergonomics at the Berlin Institute of Technology in Berlin, Germany. With a  doctorate in Psychology, Dr. Gramann has a concerted interest in the neuroscience of embodied and spatial cognition. His particular specialty is in Mobile Brain/Body Imaging.

ARTWORK

Presented for the first time, the artwork will feature slow-motion video portraits of four brain tumor patients from Indiana as they speak about how their diagnoses have changed their outlook on life. The artwork, funded by Indiana University’s New Frontiers Exploratory Grant, is part of a unique study bridging art, science, and medicine to generate both scientific data and artistic documentation of the human condition for patients being treated for brain tumors. 

Voices from Central State to feature a conversation with Nanny Vonnegut

Blue Square

The artist Nanny Vonnegut, daughter of the acclaimed author Kurt Vonnegut, will read her maternal grandmother Riah Cox’s brief memoir, “I Remember Jones,” written about Cox’s hospitalization at Central State in the 1940s. Along with IUPUI Professor of English Jane Schultz, Vonnegut will discuss her family, the history of mental health care, and the healing power of the arts. Vonnegut will be sharing some of her own artwork, as well as family photographs.

The program will be held at the Indiana Medical History Museum on September 26th and 27th, 2016, at 6pm. It is presented with funding support from IU’s New Frontiers Program, Indiana Humanities, and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute.

This event is the second of a three-part series of programs called “Voices from Central State,” all featuring writings by patients at Indiana’s flagship mental hospital during its 150-year history. Visit http://www.imhm.org for more information, and be sure to register in advance for your free tickets.

IU Grand Challenges 2016 RFP Announcement

10815833_GIU is releasing the request for proposals for the second round of Grand Challenges funding. The RFP is available here.

Almost a year ago, the university sought applications for the first round of Grand Challenges funding. We received 21 preliminary proposals from more than 400 faculty on six campuses, representing 29 schools and 37 centers. Five were selected for development into full proposals, and five impressive, compelling proposals were submitted in late April.

Following extensive faculty and community review, on June 20, 2016, at a packed event in Indianapolis, President McRobbie announced IU’s first Grand Challenge commitment: the Precision Health Initiative. PHI is a university-wide partnership dedicated to optimizing the prevention and treatment of human diseases through a more precise understanding of the genetic, developmental, behavioral and environmental factors that contribute to an individual’s health.

Led by Anantha Shekhar, the August M. Watanabe Professor and IU School of Medicine executive associate dean of research, PHI involves almost 40 new hires in the School of Medicine, the Schools of Public Health and Nursing on the IUPUI campus, and the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Informatics and Computing on the Bloomington campus. It also includes participation by key business and community partners, including Eli Lilly and Co., Roche Diagnostics, Cook Regentec, Deloitte, Regenstrief Institute, and IU Health.

The other four full proposal teams were invited to revise and resubmit this year, one on an expedited basis for review this fall.

But we are also turning our attention to new Grand Challenges proposals, and the RFP released today is part of a process that includes some important changes:

  1. The process seeks shorter, more focused proposals than last year. This should not only reduce the burden on proposal teams and reviewers, but also focus attention on the five most important criteria: impact, external partnerships, intra- and inter-campus interdisciplinary collaboration, strategic leveraging of IU resources, and sustainability.
  2. The deans and department chairs are being asked to play a more active role in sparking conversations about possible Grand Challenge initiatives, identifying topics that leverage existing strengths, facilitating the formation of teams, and encouraging and supporting strong proposals. The deans will also be invited to review the full proposals next spring.
  3. My office and the deans will be jointly funding teaching releases for leaders of teams preparing full proposals, where such releases are feasible given teaching schedules and other demands.
  4. In addition to public presentations of the full proposals on the IUPUI and Bloomington campuses, as was the case last year, teams this year will have a separate opportunity to present full proposals to members of the faculty, community, and administrative review committees.
  5. In addition to review by the Grand Challenges faculty review committee, community advisory board, and administrative steering committee, we will be sending out full proposals for external review by substantive experts.

You can read more about these and other changes in the new RFP or at www.grandchallenges.iu.edu.

In the meantime, congratulations to Anantha Shekhar and his team for blazing the trail with IU’s first Grand Challenge. Thank you very much to all of the colleagues who participated in last year’s Grand Challenges process as proposal authors, advisors, and reviewers, and especially to the full proposal team leaders and members. And thanks to all of you for your patience and support as Indiana University moves forward on this significant investment in our faculty, our research infrastructure, and the State of Indiana.

Voices from Central State Performance and Exhibition Series

Voices from Central State photo“Voices from Central State,” based on writings by patients at what was Indiana’s flagship psychiatric institution for nearly 150 years, begins with a one-woman show adapted from a patient’s memoir published in 1886 about her seven-year hospitalization.

The show, titled “Then There Is No Need to Speak,” will be performed at 7 p.m. on Aug. 26 and 27 at the Indiana Medical History Museum, 3045 W. Vermont St.

Each night, the 60-minute performance will be followed by a brief historical presentation by Kathleen Brian, a cultural and intellectual historian at Western Washington University who specializes in histories of science, medicine and public health.

The production is directed by Terri Bourus, a professor of English drama in the School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and founding artistic director of Hoosier Bard Productions. The script was adapted by Thomas Hummel from Anna Agnew’s memoir, “From Under a Cloud.” The patient, Anna Agnew, will be portrayed by Indianapolis actress Denise Jaeckel.

“What we’re looking to do with ‘Voices from Central State’ is tell an alternative kind of history through creative formats,” said Elizabeth Nelson, an associate faculty member in the Department of History at IUPUI and director of public programs at the Indiana Medical History Museum. “Most histories of medicine or mental health care are written from the point of view of doctors and administrators. It’s rare to have the patient perspective.”

“What we call mental illness — what our ancestors would have called ‘madness’ — has been part of the Western dramatic tradition for at least 25 centuries,” Bourus said.

“This interest in madness is part of drama’s fascination with extreme situations and extreme emotions,” Bourus continued. “At its best, theater makes it possible for spectators to imagine what it would be like to be another person, strikingly different from themselves. Theater provides us with a vicarious experience of the ‘other.’ That’s why memoirs, like Anna Agnew’s, are so invaluable. Agnew’s memoir tells a story of mental illness from the inside.”

The Indiana Medical History Museum is housed in the former department of pathology of the Indiana Hospital for the Insane, later known as Central State Hospital.

The second program in the “Voices from Central State” series, “I Remember Jones,” will take place at 6 p.m. on Sept. 26 and 27 at the museum. Nanette Vonnegut, daughter of acclaimed author Kurt Vonnegut, will read a short story by her maternal grandmother, Riah Cox, about her hospitalization in the 1940s.

Along with Jane Schultz, an IUPUI professor of English, Vonnegut will discuss a number of themes related to Cox’s story, including how mental illness affects families, the historical role of the nurse and the power of the arts to promote recovery.

The third program, titled “Leaving Home,” is an exhibit featuring newsletters produced by patients in the years leading up to the hospital’s closure in 1994. The exhibit opens Nov. 10 at the museum. That evening’s program begins with a 6 p.m. panel discussion about how the closing of the state hospital affected patients as well as Central Indiana residents who developed mental illness after the closing. Attendees may browse the exhibit beginning at 7 p.m.

All three programs require advance registration on the museum’s website. “Then There is No Need to Speak” is $5 for the public and free for students. “I Remember Jones” and the “Leaving Home” exhibit opening are free. “Leaving Home” will be on display at the Indiana Medical History Museum through March 2017.

“Voices from Central State” is supported by the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities program, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Arts Council of Indianapolis. It is presented by the Indiana Medical History Museum and the Medical Humanities and Health Studies program in the School of Liberal Arts with assistance from Discover Near West Indys.

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15 teams to share $1 million in collaborative grants through IU Research program

IU Vice President of Research Jorge JosIU Vice President of Research Jorge JoséBLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University Vice President for Research Jorge José has announced over $1 million in collaborative research grants to be shared among 15 newly formed research teams. Members of the teams represent 21 departments from eight schools on three IU campuses.

The IU Collaborative Research Grants program, initiated by José and now in its fifth year, awards teams of researchers up to $75,000 to support collaborative, innovative projects with a high likelihood of securing external funding. Each project team includes faculty members from different campuses, schools, departments or disciplines.

“As it was envisioned to do, the Collaborative Research Grants program continues to increase the capacity for our investigators to do meaningful and innovative work through new partnerships,” José said. “This increased capacity for collaboration is an especially important outcome of this program.”

This year, 44 investigators make up 15 teams that represent departments and schools from Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and IU Southeast, in addition to one team that had a member from Purdue University.

IU President Michael A. McRobbie called the program and the most recent round of awards integral to stimulating new opportunities for sharing knowledge and expertise that lead to discovery.

“Vice President José has energetically promoted and supported this program to encourage faculty to contribute their expertise in shared, innovative ways,” McRobbie said. “As the end of his tenure draws near, Indiana University can reflect positively on the distinct successes that have been achieved by this program: New and highly productive partnerships have been forged that have already led to new discoveries; the university’s investment has been realized more than ten-fold thanks to subsequent related funding; and a new framework has been developed for our faculty that stimulates creative, passionate investigation through shared knowledge.”

Since a collaboration funded by the inaugural round of grants in 2010-11, Giovanna Guidoboni, an associate professor of mathematics at IUPUI, and Alon Harris, professor of cellular and integrative physiology at the IU School of Medicine, have seen their initial round of work on modeling glaucoma result in enormous benefits.

Following their original round of research, the pair received three external grants, including one from the National Science Foundation for over $275,000. They have also founded a new scientific journal, the Journal for Modeling in Ophthalmology; established an agreement of international cooperation with the Polytechnic University of Milan (Italy); and co-organized an international workshop in Europe.

“That 2011 collaborative research grant has indeed led to an incredible number of great successes,” Guidoboni said.

Craig Pikaard, the Carlos O. Miller Professor and Distinguished Professor of Biology at IU Bloomington, was funded in 2011 with Haixu Tang, an associate professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at IU Bloomington. Pikaard said spin-out benefits from that original grant continue to this day.

“This is a valuable university program that helped jump-start the collaboration between my lab and the group Haixu Tang leads,” he said “It also helped me obtain a highly coveted Howard Hughes Medical Institute-Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation investigator position. Haixu and I continue to collaborate, and we hold regular meetings of our groups.”

In total, it is estimated that the $3 million distributed by IU during just the first three years of the grants program has thus far helped Collaborative Research Grant-funded investigators earn more than $88 million in new external funding. This figure is expected to grow as those funded more recently pursue external funding opportunities.

“The idea behind the program was to create incentives for researchers to initiate new collaborations to address important problems in transformative ways,” José said. “While we can fund only about 15 percent of the applications, just the process of preparing applications has created some new partnerships across the university. The program has been a success so far, and we believe it will continue to be in the future.”

The 15 projects awarded funding this year are:

Single Cell Studies With Scanning Sniffer Patch Microscopy:
Lane Allen Baker, Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Theodore Cummins, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine.

Investigating the Relationship Between Cumulative Disadvantage and Telomere Length as a Contributor to Cancer Disparities:
Silvia Bigatti, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, IUPUI; Brittney-Shea Herbert, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine; Kenzie Latham, Department of Sociology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI; and Anna Maria Storniolo, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, IU School of Medicine.

Mechanism of the Regulation of DNA Replication by PIF1 Family Helicases:
Matthew L. Bochman, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; Yuichiro Takagi, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Amber Mosley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Matrix Engineering With Adipose Stem Cells to Promote Islet Function and Longevity: Robert V. Considine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine; Raghu Mirmira, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; and Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University.

Using in vivo Microscopy to Build Predictive Models of Drug-induced Liver Injury: Kenneth Dunn, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, IU School of Medicine; Richard Day, Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, IU School of Medicine; and Steve Pressé, Department of Physics, School of Science, IUPUI.

Understanding Naturalistic Bicyclist Behavior for Safety and Sustainability:
David Good, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, IU Bloomington; Lauren Christopher, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Stanley Chien, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Jiang Zheng, Department of Computer and Information Science, School of Science, IUPUI; and Yaobin Chen, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI.

Neurotherapeutic Potential of Adipose Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium in ALS:
Kathryn Jones, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Keith March, Department of Medicine, Krannert Institute of Cardiology, IU School of Medicine.

The Impact of the Public Investment in Education in the Academic Performance of K-12 English Language Learners in Southern Indiana:
Haeil Jung, SPEA, IU Bloomington; Magdalena Herdoíza-Estévez, School of Education, IU Southeast; Cathy Johnson, School of Education, IU Southeast; and Jacquelyn Singleton, School of Education, IU Southeast.

Developing Remote Sensing Techniques for Detection of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria:
Lin Li, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; Kevin Mandernack, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Kehoe, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

Effect of Antarctic Weathering on Global Climate:
Kathy Licht, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Bish, Department of Geological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

A Novel Approach to Discover Drug Resistance Genes in Breast Cancer Cells:
Tao Lu, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; and Lang Li, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine.

Induction and Maintenance of Chronic Migraine: Regulation of TRP Channels by Endogenous N-acyl Amide Lipids:
Gerry Oxford, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; Heather Bradshaw, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Joyce Hurley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Optical-Based, Label-Free Multiplex Assay for Direct Quantification of microRNAs in Serum and Cancer Cells:
Rajesh Sardar, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Science, IUPUI; and Murray Korc, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine.

Developmental Adaptation to Chronic Hypoxia:
Robert Tepper, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; Mircea Ivan, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, IU School of Medicine; and Kenneth Nephew, Medical Sciences Program, IU School of Medicine-Bloomington.

Hippo/YAP Signaling Controls Protein Redistribution and Organ Size in Critical Illness:
Clark Wells, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biochemistry, IU School of Medicine; Teresa Zimmers, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine; and Leonidas Koniaris, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine.

Poet to direct ‘Cadaver, Speak’ reading in collaboration between schools of liberal arts, medicine

"Cadaver, Speak" cover
“Cadaver, Speak” cover

Poet Marianne Boruch will direct a readers’ theater performance of her latest poetry collection, “Cadaver, Speak,” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 30, in the Emerson Hall Anatomy Lecture Hall, 545 Barnhill Drive.

“Cadaver, Speak” is Boruch’s eighth collection of poetry. The collection is centered on a sequence of 30 poems — narrated by a 99-year-old woman who is dissected as part of an anatomy class — that explore issues of life and death, knowledge and bodies. Six students from the IU School of Medicine and five students from the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI will read segments of “Cadaver, Speak” with Boruch.

“Marianne Boruch gets us to confront the most intimate details of our lives in a language that is both talky and imagistically rich,” says Karen Kovacik, professor of English at IUPUI and former Indiana Poet Laureate. “Thanks to the wily narrator of this poem, the human body becomes a site of wonder.”

The reading, free and open to the public, is part of the 2014 Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series at IUPUI.

Boruch will also talk about the poem on WFYI’s “Sound Medicine” at 2 p.m. Oct. 26.

Boruch, who teaches creative writing at Purdue University, has published in The New Yorker magazine and was anthologized in the 1997 and 2009 editions of “The Best American Poetry.” She has been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, and she was a Fulbright/visiting professor at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in 2012. In 2013, she received the prestigious Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award for her previous collection, “The Book of Hours.” She also completed a residency at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center.

Emily Beckman, assistant clinical professor in the medical humanities and health studies program and adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, said the reading will be especially beneficial to first-year medical students.

“Students need to realize that the body on which they are working used to belong to a living, breathing human being with a story,” she said. “Boruch’s poem aims to not only tell that story, but encourages us to consider the individual, unique stories of all who are seeking healing.”

The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series is sponsored by the Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Founded in 1997 in honor of former IUPUI Department of English chair and Professor Emeritus Rufus Reiberg and his wife, Louise, the annual Reiberg Reading Series brings nationally and regionally known writers to the IUPUI campus to present their work. The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series is also made possible by the generous support of the Reiberg Family; the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research; the Office of Academic Affairs; University College; and University Library.

The Oct. 30 reading is co-sponsored by the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology in the IU School of Medicine and the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts IUPUI as well as the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute. The event was made possible by a grant from Indiana Humanities in cooperation with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Visitor parking is available for a fee in the Riley Hospital outpatient parking garage, 575 Riley Hospital Drive; the University Hospital garage, 600 University Blvd.; and the Vermont Street garage, 1004 W. Vermont St.

RSVPs are requested to medhum@iupui.edu or 317-278-1669.

 

“In the Shadow of Terror: Providing Healthcare on the Northern Cameroon-Nigeria Border ”

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Dr. Ellen Einterz, Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District

Over the past several years, northeastern Nigeria has been wracked by violence promulgated by a group of extremists whose stated aim is to topple the status quo and establish a universal caliphate based on Islamic law. Thousands have died, and at least a million left homeless since the carnage began. Border areas in neighboring countries, including Cameroon, have been touched by the climate of terror, military reaction, and the flight of refugees.

Since 1990, Dr. Ellen Einterz, an IU graduate, has lived on the border between Cameroon and Nigeria’s Borno State. She is the Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District. In her talk, she will briefly explore the conflict in its historical and present day context and provide an account of her recent personal experience as a physician in the exceptionally poor corner of Africa being rocked by this tragedy.

This lecture is presented by Medical Humanities & Health Studies and the IUPUI Global Health Student Interest Group and generous support from The IUPUI Office of International Affairs, The Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, and the Africana Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts.