Liberal Arts Talks

Join Dr. Audrey Gertz as she presents “From Secret Technophobe to??? – A Rookie’s Reflections on Online Teaching”

This past spring semester, I offered the course Spanish for Business online. During that time, I learned a lot about online teaching and made the typical rookie mistakes.

My own attitude towards technology is ambivalent. I will review experiences, along with what I learned since then, and explore what factors influence how we feel about technology, how we use it, and how it impacts our teaching.

RSVP NOW!

Liberal Arts Talks
Friday, November 30, 2018
4:00-5:00pm
Campus Center- IUPUI
420 University BLVD, CE 405
Indianapolis, IN 46202

 

Herron to Present Lecture by Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley, Undergraduate Student Exhibition

INDIANAPOLIS — Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI is presenting the 2018 Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture with Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley on Nov. 28, followed by an opening reception for the annual Undergraduate Student Exhibition and a holiday art sale supporting Herron student artists and designers.

MacArthur Award “genius” grant recipient Mary Reid Kelley combines painting, performance and her distinctive wordplay in graphically stylized films made in collaboration with her partner, Patrick Kelley. During the talk, the collaborative duo will discuss the visual language of “The Minotaur Trilogy” (2013–15), a series of short narrative films exploring the Greek Minotaur myth and, through it, the present-day roles of women, sexuality, language and art historical tropes.

Kassie Woodworth, “Circulate,” 2018. Paper and wood, 40 inches by 40 inches by 29 inches. Photo courtesy of Herron School of Art and Design

Opening in conjunction with the Kelleys’ talk is the Undergraduate Student Exhibition, an annual tradition featuring exceptional works produced by Herron students across a variety of artistic disciplines. This year’s guest juror is Betsy Stirratt, director of the Grunwald Gallery of Art at Indiana University Bloomington, who will award prizes to the top entries. Additionally, the ceramics, furniture design and printmaking clubs will sell student-made artwork and wares, and students in studio art and technology will present live puppet performances featuring laser-engraved sets and characters fabricated in the school’s Think It Make It Lab.

The talk and opening reception will take place from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Nov. 28 at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.

The opening reception is made possible by Prizm: The Artist’s Supply Store, with in-kind support provided by Sun King Brewing. Parking will be free in the Sports Complex Garage adjacent to Eskenazi Hall or on levels 5 and 6 of the Riverwalk Garage, courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis, with validation from the Herron galleries. Visit HerronGalleries.org for more information.

Located in Eskenazi Hall on the IUPUI campus, the Galleries at Herron are free and open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays.

Also on view in the Galleries at Herron through Dec. 12:

  • In the Marsh Gallery: Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley’s corresponding exhibition, “The Minotaur Trilogy,” comprising three films — “Priapus Agonistes” (2014), “Swinburne’s Pasiphae” (2014), and “The Thong of Dionysus” (2015) — that use punning wordplay, handmade costumes and sets, and bawdy humor to riff on classical mythology and pop culture.
  • In the Basile Gallery: “Stuff(ed),” an exhibition featuring the work of five contemporary artists who explore the playful, subversive power of sculpted fabric to transform and reimagine mass-market commodities and bric-a-brac from everyday life. Participating artists are Jessica Dance, Gil Yefman, Andrea Pritschow, David Gabbard and Natalie Baxter.

About Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley

Mary Reid Kelley earned a B.A. from St. Olaf College and an MFA from Yale University. She is the recipient of a 2016 MacArthur fellowship and has received awards from the American Academy in Rome, the Rema Hort Mann Foundation, and the College Art Association. Major exhibitions include Salt Lake Art Center, Utah; SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico; the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, Massachusetts; and ZKM Museum of Contemporary Art in Karlsruhe, Germany.

Patrick Kelley earned a BFA from St. Olaf College and an MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art. He has taught photography, video and new media courses at the University of Minnesota, St. Olaf College, St. Mary’s College of Maryland and Skidmore College in New York. His works have shown at the Bibliothèque Publique d’Information-Centre Pompidou, Paris, France; the Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Germany; and the Minnesota Museum of American Art.

About the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture

The Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture brings prominent contemporary artists to Herron to present their work and ideas.

About Betsy Stirratt

Betsy Stirratt is the founding director of the Grunwald Gallery of Art at Indiana University Bloomington. As director, Stirratt has curated exhibitions for over 30 years, including the exhibits “Personal: Selections from the Robert J. Shiffler Collection,” “Human Nature” and “The Miniature.”

About the Herron School of Art and Design

Founded in 1902, Herron School of Art and Design is the premier accredited professional school of art and design in the state of Indiana and is part of the thriving urban campus of IUPUI. Herron has more than 50 full-time faculty serving 11 undergraduate and three graduate programs and a curriculum that prepares graduates to be leaders in a world that requires a unique combination of creativity, conceptual skills and technical abilities. Herron is an engaged community and regional partner including five public galleries; community learning programs; and the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life.

Read the original article from IUPUI News

‘Frankenstein’ Is On The Move at 200

British history professor Jason Kelly holds a copy of “Frankenstein,” which was first published 200 years ago. Kelly and his students created A Frankenstein Atlas, a website that breaks down all 331 geographic points associated with the 200-year-old book and its creation. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

First published on Jan. 1, 1818, Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” and its undead monster have been captivating international audiences for two centuries.

The tale has been made into almost 100 movies around the planet — from Boris Karloff’s 1931 classic to 2017’s “Mary Shelley,” which depicted the trailblazing creation of the story in the early 19th century.

With so many reiterations and takes on the book, Jason M. Kelly, an associate professor of British history and director of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and his spring 2018 “Machines and the Age of Invention” class took a deep read of the book, poring over the many locations visited — or even just mentioned in passing — by Dr. Victor Frankenstein and the numerous other characters. From this, Kelly and his students constructed A Frankenstein Atlas, a living research project that maps 331 locations that reside in the book or were visited by Shelley during the writing process.

“It’s a slowly growing site to learn about ‘Frankenstein’ and explore the many facets of the book,” Kelly said. “In class, it allowed us to think about what kinds of historical sources and methods we use in the context of literary analysis.”

Kelly and his students are still publishing new data to A Frankenstein Atlas. Fueled by Github, other researchers and classes will be able to add new “branches” to the work, allowing the atlas — and the legacy of “Frankenstein” — to grow for another 200 years.

Question: How was the data created to fill and launch A Frankenstein Atlas?

Jason Kelly: The first thing we needed to do was read “Frankenstein.” So we did a group read of the book pretty quickly. Our first pass set the groundwork for our semester-long discussion of the historical context of “Frankenstein.” Each student was assigned two or three chapters, and their job was to code them. I created an online interface and helped them map their data.

Q: What struck you most about the novel while conducting the research?

JK: It’s an epistolary novel, a novel of letters, and it’s a travel journal at the same time. Mary and Percy Shelley, Claire (Clairmont, Mary Shelley’s stepsister) were touring through in 1816. They had been keeping travel journals. You can actually read sections of “Frankenstein” and go back to the travel journals to flesh out the spaces and places they’re talking about.

Because there is a strong geographical element to “Frankenstein,” and we used location as our jumping-off point, which gave us the opportunity to pursue historical geographic information systems approaches. The model that helped shape the project was “Mapping the Lakes,” a project that examined the Lake poets. We borrowed the format and developed it into this pedagogical platform. We made it an open source data set so that people can add to and develop it.

Q: As a professor of British history, how did your travel experience influence the project?

JK: I do a lot of research on the Grand Tour, a one or two year trip through Europe that many British elites took during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. And, fortunately, my research takes to locations across the continent. So, Percy and Mary’s visit to the continent—specifically Lake Geneva where she composed “Frankenstein”—was similar to my other work.

Q: What other sources did you use during your analysis?

JK: In one instance, we pulled data on where historical ice sheets, and we read journals from the 18th and 19th-century scientific expeditions. We even studied where whaling ships were likely to travel. These were the types of information that Mary had access to when she described the ice at the beginning and end of the book. We triangulated these data sets, and when we brought it all together, we were able to get a good sense where Mary was situating the action in the novel. It was a great exercise in the ways that science and literature can come together and talk to each other.

Q: What were your students’ reactions to the book?

JK: They loved it. They arrived with an image of Frankenstein mediated by the movies. But when they read the book, like almost anyone I’ve spoken to who has never read the book before, they said, “Oh, this isn’t at all what I thought it was about.” This is talking about all the same issues we’re grappling with today, like religion, ethics, responsibility and what makes us human. It’s such a contemporary novel, and it’s 200 years old.

Read the original article from IUPUI NewsTim Brouk

How Do Media and Technology Affect Your Health? Dr. Brian Primack Offers Insight at IUPUI Talk

Brian Primack

INDIANAPOLIS — Internationally recognized physician-researcher Dr. Brian Primack will break down media influences on youth and adult health outcomes during a presentation Oct. 12 at IUPUI.

His address is part of the Somerset CPAs and Advisors Executive Leadership Speaker Series in the Business of Medicine Physician MBA Program at the Kelley School of Business in Indianapolis.

 

The Prints of Collaboration: Kenneth Tyler Returns to Herron

 

Kenneth Tyler, a 1963 Herron alumnus, reflects on his time at the school of art and a near 40-year career in printmaking. Video by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

It only took one month into her graduate studies for Sarah Strong to meet one of her heroes roaming the halls of Herron School of Art and Design.

Herron distinguished alumnus Kenneth Tyler has been giving talks, overseeing the installation of an exhibit of his work and meeting students like Strong one-on-one all week. A printmaking and installation student, Strong was thrilled to ask the 86-year-old master of printmaking about his career and advice on process.

“He’s a wealth of information, of experience,” said Strong after Tyler’s visit to her print- and papermaking studio. “It is such a treasure to have him here.”

Master printmaker Kenneth Tyler, left, talks technique with Sarah Strong, a graduate student in printmaking and installation. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

Throughout a career that spanned almost 40 years, Tyler pushed the boundaries of printmaking. He was among the first to work massive — creating mural-sized paper prints. He collaborated with some of the 20th century’s greatest: Frank Stella, Roy Lichtenstein, Helen Frankenthaler and Jasper Johns, just to name a few. Tyler was one of the first printmakers to embrace computer technology to assist his printmaking techniques.

A collection of Tyler’s work with 20th-century greats is currently showing in Herron’s main galleries located within Eskenazi Hall at 735 W. New York St. “Kenneth Tyler: The Art of Collaboration” runs through Nov. 10.

Tyler received his master’s degree in 1963 from Herron when it was known as the John Herron Art Institute, years before it joined IUPUI. Among other techniques, he studied lithography under Garo Antreasian, an influential Indianapolis artist and instructor.

“I think without Herron, I probably would not have crossed the bridge and gotten to the other side,” said Tyler, who earned a Ford Foundation grant from his Herron work to help launch his early career. “It was a great experience.”

In the 1960s, Tyler quickly thrived at the Tamarind Institue, a lithography studio and workshop in Los Angeles. It was where his first breaks and collaborations with the world’s best artists came. Within 10 years after receiving his Herron degree, Tyler created his own studio, Gemini G.E.L., while gaining international acclaim.

As Tyler met with students this week, he observed their latest work while offering suggestions on technique and materials. Strong asked him about papermaking, a shared passion between the legendary artist and the graduate student.

“Most printmakers I know don’t make their own paper, and most papermakers I know aren’t printmakers,” Strong explained. “For Ken Tyler to come and be a master of both is very exciting for me. I can barely contain myself.”

Faculty members also absorbed Tyler’s expertise.

“He is one of the persons who is a true master in the field of printmaking,” said David Morrison, a professor of printmaking. “The innovation in the field is due to Ken. He’s always been one of my heroes in the print field.”

With a career that took him across the country and around the world, Tyler has rarely had time to revisit Herron. Currently living in Lakeville, Connecticut, Tyler was astounded at the growth of his alma mater and how much Indianapolis has grown.

“Everything has changed, and now we have one of the most outstanding art schools in America,” Tyler said. “It’s designed to give a broadside view of all of the possibilities in printmaking, which weren’t available when I was in school.

“This is like a citadel. This is like a golden paradise.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tim Brouk

Community Competition to Prevent Islamophobia Celebration & Workshop

Sponsored by IUPUI Religious Studies & IUPUI’s Millennium Chair of Liberal Arts

Friday, October 5, 2018

IUPUI University Library Lilly Auditorium

IUPUI University Library

Help us celebrate the community’s efforts to prevent anti-Muslim bias, learn how you can fight anti-Muslim prejudice, and meet the people who can help you do it.

9am: Greetings and introductory remarks by Millennium Chair Edward Curtis

9:15

  • Presentations by Winners of Community Competition to Prevent Islamophobia
  • Youth Photography Project by Downey Street Church & Islamic Society of North America
  • Islamophobia Prevention Youth Workshops, by CANDLES Holocaust Museum
  • Training Muslim Youth to Challenge Islamophobia, by American Friends Service Committee
  • Muslim Folklore Theater Workshop for Children, by Kristopher Steege and Hadeiyah Ameen
  • Displaying Local Muslim Poetry, by Brick Street Poetry & Sajjad Jawad

10:15 : Meet the Award Winners & Brainstorm What to Do Next

11:00 : Break

11:30-1:00   Speech: “The Roots of Islamophobia and What You Can Do About It”

Reflecting on Religion and Philanthropy

Giving to religion makes up a third of all giving in America, and over half of all Americans say their religious or spiritual values motivate their philanthropic giving. If this is the case, why do religion and money remain such taboo topics in our society?

The full philanthropic impact of religious communities goes far beyond finances. The story of religious philanthropy speaks to when, why, and how religious institutions engage their broader communities in volunteering, advocacy, and cultivating a civil society.

Is philanthropy primarily meant to take care of those within one’s own community or the larger society? Does philanthropy provide for basic needs or promote institutional change? Should religious giving develop an individual’s character or shape the morality of society, or are such purposes off limits in a pluralist society?

Two leading historians will share their reflections on what we can learn from the intersections of religion and philanthropy in the past and what issues might define the topic into the future: Jim Hudnut Buemler, Anne Potter Wilson Distinguished Professor of American Religious History at Vanderbilt University, and David Hammack, Hiram C. Haydn Professor of History at Case Western University. The event will be moderated by David P. King and Philip Goff.

This public talk will be held on Thursday, May 17, at 5:30pm, at the Damenvervein Room of the Athenaeum, 410 E. Michigan Street.

African Knowledge and Innovation Exchange

Globally recognized media and communications expert Tunji Lardner has held prestigious new media fellowships at some of the world’s leading universities, including Columbia and Stanford. As the inaugural Global TED Fellow and founder of WangoNet, he has mentored many young netpreneurs in Nigeria’s burgeoning CivicTech space.

All are invited to this unique lecture and brainstorming experience led by Ford Foundation Fellow Mr. Tunji Lardner. The lecture will be held on Wednesday, April 18, from 10:30am-2:30pm, in the Education and Social Work Building (ES), room 2132. Food and refreshments will be provided.

Mr. Lardner’s latest and most ambitious project is answering questions of how to design, build, and operate an online digital platform that addresses the knowledge and information asymmetry that exists between Africa and the rest of the world.

This event is sponsored by the IUPUI School of Public and Environmental Affairs, the IUPUI Office of International Affairs, the IUPUI Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, and the IUPUI School of Informatics and Computing.

For more information, contact Dr. Lilliard Richardson at lillrich@iupui.edu or Dr. Edgar Huang at ehuang@iupui.edu.

Masterclass: Ian Chang + Rafiq Bhatia (of Son Lux)

We are excited to welcome guest artists Ian Chang and Rafiq Bhatia to Indianapolis and the IUPUI campus. Drummer Ian Chang and guitarist Rafiq Bhatia are classically trained musicians and composers that make up two thirds of the popular rock trio Son Lux. The pair works heavily with music technology in their own compositions and within the group and will present a free performance masterclass at the IUPUI Campus Center’s Klipsch Theatre (lower level) at 1:00pm on Thursday, April 12. They will discuss their performance techniques and the integration of music technology into their work.

This event is made possible with generous support by the IUPUI Department of Music and Arts Technology, Pioneer Indy, and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute.

Drummer Ian Chang makes electronic music that is humanistic. In a metronomic genre, Chang takes a fresh approach that is rooted in physicality. Using drums to control and manipulate samples, he is able to realize complete musical ideas with unaccompanied and unedited performance. The result is a seamless marriage of raw performative intensity and sophisticated sound design. Find him on YouTube.

Rafiq Bhatia’s music reconciles meticulous sound art with mercurial improvisation to deliver searing emotional intensity. The composer-guitarist’s first two albums – Strata and Yes It Will – have been described by the New York Times as “transcending real sound in real time with the unexpected,” and by the Washington Post as “approximat[ing] life in the information age …profuse, immersive and immense.” Visit his website.

Feel free to RSVP to this event on Facebook.

How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? Du Bois, Black Moralism, and Secular Struggle for Change

On Thursday, March 29 from 6-8pm in the ICTC Auditorium (IT/ICTC 152), Dr. Anthony B. Pinn will present his talk, “How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?”

Dr. Anthony B. Pinn is the Agnes Cullen Arnold Professor of Humanities and Professor of Religion at Rice University. Dr. Pinn is the founding director of Rice’s Center for Engaged Research and Collaborative Learning (CERCL). In addition, he is Director of Research for the Institute for Humanist Studies (Washington, DC). His research interests include religion and culture; humanism; African American religious thought, religion and embodiment, and hip hop culture. He is the author/editor of over 35 books.

“The problem of the Twentieth Century,” Du Bois writes in The Souls of Black Folks, “is the problem of the color-line.” While undeniably impactful, what the color-line pronouncement points to, however, is only one dimension of a dualism, what Du Bois references as the “Negro Problem.” Shortly after making this statement, he asks a question: How does it feel to be a problem? In this lecture, Dr. Pinn will explore the manner in which Du Bois’s response to this question suggests the outline of a mode of moralism sensitive to the dynamics of blackness in the US. This Black Moralism pushes against the tendency to think about justice work as framed by the certainty of outcomes, and instead prompts a sense of struggle as perpetual rebellion without assurances. In this way it says something to and about secular humanism in a context of racial disregard.

The talk is sponsored by Secular Humanism Studies; the Department of Philosophy; The Millennium Chair of Liberal Arts; and the Department of Religious Studies at IUPUI.