Community Competition to Prevent Islamophobia Celebration & Workshop

Sponsored by IUPUI Religious Studies & IUPUI’s Millennium Chair of Liberal Arts

Friday, October 5, 2018

IUPUI University Library Lilly Auditorium

IUPUI University Library

Help us celebrate the community’s efforts to prevent anti-Muslim bias, learn how you can fight anti-Muslim prejudice, and meet the people who can help you do it.

9am: Greetings and introductory remarks by Millennium Chair Edward Curtis

9:15

  • Presentations by Winners of Community Competition to Prevent Islamophobia
  • Youth Photography Project by Downey Street Church & Islamic Society of North America
  • Islamophobia Prevention Youth Workshops, by CANDLES Holocaust Museum
  • Training Muslim Youth to Challenge Islamophobia, by American Friends Service Committee
  • Muslim Folklore Theater Workshop for Children, by Kristopher Steege and Hadeiyah Ameen
  • Displaying Local Muslim Poetry, by Brick Street Poetry & Sajjad Jawad

10:15 : Meet the Award Winners & Brainstorm What to Do Next

11:00 : Break

11:30-1:00   Speech: “The Roots of Islamophobia and What You Can Do About It”

Reflecting on Religion and Philanthropy

Giving to religion makes up a third of all giving in America, and over half of all Americans say their religious or spiritual values motivate their philanthropic giving. If this is the case, why do religion and money remain such taboo topics in our society?

The full philanthropic impact of religious communities goes far beyond finances. The story of religious philanthropy speaks to when, why, and how religious institutions engage their broader communities in volunteering, advocacy, and cultivating a civil society.

Is philanthropy primarily meant to take care of those within one’s own community or the larger society? Does philanthropy provide for basic needs or promote institutional change? Should religious giving develop an individual’s character or shape the morality of society, or are such purposes off limits in a pluralist society?

Two leading historians will share their reflections on what we can learn from the intersections of religion and philanthropy in the past and what issues might define the topic into the future: Jim Hudnut Buemler, Anne Potter Wilson Distinguished Professor of American Religious History at Vanderbilt University, and David Hammack, Hiram C. Haydn Professor of History at Case Western University. The event will be moderated by David P. King and Philip Goff.

This public talk will be held on Thursday, May 17, at 5:30pm, at the Damenvervein Room of the Athenaeum, 410 E. Michigan Street.

African Knowledge and Innovation Exchange

Globally recognized media and communications expert Tunji Lardner has held prestigious new media fellowships at some of the world’s leading universities, including Columbia and Stanford. As the inaugural Global TED Fellow and founder of WangoNet, he has mentored many young netpreneurs in Nigeria’s burgeoning CivicTech space.

All are invited to this unique lecture and brainstorming experience led by Ford Foundation Fellow Mr. Tunji Lardner. The lecture will be held on Wednesday, April 18, from 10:30am-2:30pm, in the Education and Social Work Building (ES), room 2132. Food and refreshments will be provided.

Mr. Lardner’s latest and most ambitious project is answering questions of how to design, build, and operate an online digital platform that addresses the knowledge and information asymmetry that exists between Africa and the rest of the world.

This event is sponsored by the IUPUI School of Public and Environmental Affairs, the IUPUI Office of International Affairs, the IUPUI Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, and the IUPUI School of Informatics and Computing.

For more information, contact Dr. Lilliard Richardson at lillrich@iupui.edu or Dr. Edgar Huang at ehuang@iupui.edu.

Masterclass: Ian Chang + Rafiq Bhatia (of Son Lux)

We are excited to welcome guest artists Ian Chang and Rafiq Bhatia to Indianapolis and the IUPUI campus. Drummer Ian Chang and guitarist Rafiq Bhatia are classically trained musicians and composers that make up two thirds of the popular rock trio Son Lux. The pair works heavily with music technology in their own compositions and within the group and will present a free performance masterclass at the IUPUI Campus Center’s Klipsch Theatre (lower level) at 1:00pm on Thursday, April 12. They will discuss their performance techniques and the integration of music technology into their work.

This event is made possible with generous support by the IUPUI Department of Music and Arts Technology, Pioneer Indy, and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute.

Drummer Ian Chang makes electronic music that is humanistic. In a metronomic genre, Chang takes a fresh approach that is rooted in physicality. Using drums to control and manipulate samples, he is able to realize complete musical ideas with unaccompanied and unedited performance. The result is a seamless marriage of raw performative intensity and sophisticated sound design. Find him on YouTube.

Rafiq Bhatia’s music reconciles meticulous sound art with mercurial improvisation to deliver searing emotional intensity. The composer-guitarist’s first two albums – Strata and Yes It Will – have been described by the New York Times as “transcending real sound in real time with the unexpected,” and by the Washington Post as “approximat[ing] life in the information age …profuse, immersive and immense.” Visit his website.

Feel free to RSVP to this event on Facebook.

How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? Du Bois, Black Moralism, and Secular Struggle for Change

On Thursday, March 29 from 6-8pm in the ICTC Auditorium (IT/ICTC 152), Dr. Anthony B. Pinn will present his talk, “How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?”

Dr. Anthony B. Pinn is the Agnes Cullen Arnold Professor of Humanities and Professor of Religion at Rice University. Dr. Pinn is the founding director of Rice’s Center for Engaged Research and Collaborative Learning (CERCL). In addition, he is Director of Research for the Institute for Humanist Studies (Washington, DC). His research interests include religion and culture; humanism; African American religious thought, religion and embodiment, and hip hop culture. He is the author/editor of over 35 books.

“The problem of the Twentieth Century,” Du Bois writes in The Souls of Black Folks, “is the problem of the color-line.” While undeniably impactful, what the color-line pronouncement points to, however, is only one dimension of a dualism, what Du Bois references as the “Negro Problem.” Shortly after making this statement, he asks a question: How does it feel to be a problem? In this lecture, Dr. Pinn will explore the manner in which Du Bois’s response to this question suggests the outline of a mode of moralism sensitive to the dynamics of blackness in the US. This Black Moralism pushes against the tendency to think about justice work as framed by the certainty of outcomes, and instead prompts a sense of struggle as perpetual rebellion without assurances. In this way it says something to and about secular humanism in a context of racial disregard.

The talk is sponsored by Secular Humanism Studies; the Department of Philosophy; The Millennium Chair of Liberal Arts; and the Department of Religious Studies at IUPUI.

Gendered Innovations: Lunch with Londa Schiebinger, MA, PhD

Dr. Londa Schiebinger will be on campus next week on Tuesday, March 6, to discuss The Secret Cures of Slaves as part of the History Talks! and IUPUI Diversity Speakers Series. In addition, she will present her work on Gendered Innovations over lunch.

This event is sponsored by the IUSM Office of Diversity Affairs. Lunch will be provided, so please be sure to register if you plan to attend! For more information or to register, click here.

Doing research wrong costs lives and money. For example, between 1997 and 2000, 10 drugs were withdrawn from the U.S. market because of life-threatening health effects. Eight of these posed ‘greater health risks for women than for men’ (U.S. GAO, 2001). Not only does developing a drug in the current market cost billions—but when drugs failed, they caused human suffering and death.

Gender bias also leads to missed market opportunities. In engineering, for example, considering short people (many women, but also many men) “out-of-position” drivers leads to greater injury in automobile accidents (see Pregnant Crash Test Dummies). In basic research, failing to use appropriate samples of male and female cells, tissues, and animals yields faulty results (see Stem Cells). In medicine, not recognizing osteoporosis as a male disease delays diagnosis and treatment in men (see Osteoporosis Research in Men). In city planning, not collecting data on caregiving work leads to inefficient transportation systems (see Housing and Neighborhood Design). We can’t afford to get the research wrong.

Doing research right can save lives and money. An analysis of the U.S. Women’s Health Initiative Hormone Therapy Trial, for example, found that for every $1 spent, $140 were returned to taxpayers in health care savings. The study also saved lives, adding 145,000 more quality-adjusted life years (Roth et al., 2014).

It is crucially important to identify gender bias. But analysis cannot stop there: Gendered Innovations offer state-of-the-art methods of sex and gender analysis. Integrating these methods into basic and applied research produces excellence in science, health & medicine, and engineering research, policy, and practice. The methods of sex and gender analysis are one set of methods among many that a researcher will bring to a project.

Londa Schiebinger, MA, PhD is the John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science at Stanford University. She currently directs the EU/US Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment project. She is a leading international expert on gender in science and technology and has addressed the United Nations on the topic of “Gender, Science, and Technology.” She is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize and Guggenheim Fellowship. Her work on Gendered Innovations harnesses the creative power of sex and gender analysis to enhance excellence and reproducibility in science and technology.  More info can be found here.

Square Peg Round Hole Coming to IUPUI

We are excited to welcome guest artists Square Peg Round Hole to Indianapolis and the IUPUI campus next week. The IU Bloomington-trained instrumental rock trio will present a performance lecture on campus Friday, March 2. They will be discussing the integration of multimedia technology into their percussion-driven music as well as tips for young musicians hoping to build a career. Click here for more details.

In addition, the group will cap off their stay in Indy with a performance at Pioneer on March 3 supported by IUPUI’s own Big Robot. Click here for more information.

These events are made possible with generous support by the IUPUI Department of Music and Arts Technology, Pioneer Indy, and the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Square Peg Round Hole formed in 2011 while studying music at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, in Bloomington, Indiana. The band has shared bills with Built To Spill, The Album Leaf, Mae, This Will Destroy You, and The Joy Formidable, and has been featured at major venues across the country including the Electric Factory, (Le) Poisson Rouge, Old National Centre, and the World Café Live. Find them on YouTube or their website for more information.

Secret Cures of Slaves: People, Plants, and Medicine in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World

As part of the History Talks! series, join Dr. Londa Schiebinger for a presentation on “The Secret Cures of Slaves: People, Plants, and Medicine in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World.” The talk will take place at the IUPUI Campus Center Room 450 C, 420 University Boulevard, on Tuesday, March 6, 2018 at 6:00 pm.

Dr. Londa Schiebinger is the John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science at Stanford University. She currently directs the EU/US Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment project. She is a leading international expert on gender in science and technology and has addressed the United Nations on the topic of “Gender, Science, and Technology.” She is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize and Guggenheim Fellowship. Her work on Gendered Innovations harnesses the creative power of sex and gender analysis to enhance excellence and reproducibility in science and technology.

To register for this event, or for more information, click here.

This event is hosted by the IUPUI History Department, the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, Spirit & Place, and the IUPUI Division of Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion.

Translational Research and Institutional Responsibility: Owning Up to Historical Atrocities

Dr. Dean Saitta, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Denver, will be the keynote speaker for the Center for Translating Research into Practice (TRIP) 7th Annual Keynote Address.

All across the nation, colleges and universities are taking responsibility for controversial aspects of their institutional histories. The University of Denver is one such example. In its founding year, 1864, a massacre of peacefully camped Native Americans by a US military force at Sand Creek, Colorado, shook the nation and raised questions about the complicity of the university’s founder, Governor John Evans, in the atrocity. In 2014, an interdisciplinary group of scholars decisively established Governor Evans’s culpability for this event. In his speech, Dr. Saitta will discuss the challenges of the translational work that was then undertaken by the University of Denver, work that was aimed at acknowledging and redressing the injuries and inequalities engendered by the enduring legacy of the Sand Creek Massacre.

The address will take place on Monday, February 19, 2018 at 6:00 pm at the IUPUI Campus Center, Room 450B. Parking is available in the Vermont Street Parking Garage. A Q&A session and informal reception will follow the address. The event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP here.

Professor Barbara Mills will speak at the IAHI next month

As part of the 2017 Midwest Archaeological Conference, Barbara Mills invites you to her lecture, “Current Debates in the Archaeology of the Chaco World.” The talk will be held at the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute on October 19th at 7pm. Mills is the Professor of Anthropology and American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona and Curator of Archaeology at the Arizona State Museum.

Chaco Canyon’s dense concentration of monumental architecture, along with the millions of objects that have been excavated, pose challenges to traditional models of Southwestern societies. The ways in which archaeologists interpret regional systems of interaction like Chaco’s has led to a number of debates. Some of these are about Chaco’s origins, while others focus on its most extensive “Classic” period, and still others consider Chaco’s reorganization and fragmentation. The questions asked are as hotly debated as their answers. This presentation will outline several important debates about inequality, historical memory, economy, migration, and religious ritual that are guiding exciting new research on Chaco.

This event is sponsored by the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and The Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in collaboration with the 2017 Midwest Archaeological Conference.

Free tickets are available at barbara-mills.eventbrite.com.

About the Speaker
Professor Mills is an anthropological archaeologist with broad interests in archaeological method and theory, especially (but not exclusively) as applied to the North American Southwest. Her work has focused on ceramic analysis and, more broadly, material culture as a tool to understand social relations in the past. She is interested in the way depositional practice can be used to understand memory, materiality, and relational logics. Her research on ceramic technology, craft specialization, and accumulations research has led to a series of papers and edited volumes on social inequality, identity, feasting, and migration.

Mills’s interests were fostered by more than a decade of work in the Silver Creek area of east-central Arizona, including a multi-year collaborative project with the White Mountain Apache Tribe. She also has field and research experience in a number of other areas of the Southwest, including Zuni, Chaco, Mimbres, Grasshopper, and most recently the Greater Hohokam area. Outside the U.S. she has research experience in Guatemala (Postclassic Maya), Kazakhstan (Bronze Age), and Turkey (Neolithic). She is currently a lead researcher on the Southwest Social Networks Project, which brings together data and a talented group of scholars to apply social network analysis (SNA) to archaeological data from the Southwest.