Archives fortified by more than 50 years of IUPUI history

University associate archivist Stephen E. Towne checks the contents of one of the hundreds of boxes containing records, memos, photographs and blueprints in the IUPUI archives. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Nestled in the lower level of University Library, the Ruth Lilly Special Collections and Archives has been an IUPUI 50th Anniversary hot spot.

With tall ceilings, retractable shelves for optimal space-saving, and a temperature- and humidity-controlled atmosphere, the archives are the go-to for decades-old photographs, data and documentation of early IUPUI planning.

“Our job in the archives is to collect administrative, historical and legal records that have long-term or permanent value for the university,” said Stephen E. Towne, associate university archivist. “We do this for a variety of reasons — one, to know what the university has done in the past and build on the future. Two, people want to study this institution historically, so they come here to do research.”

The collection is always growing, with boxes of letters, memos, reports and blueprints received every year. The latest includes work from Harris Wofford, the former senator and close advisor to Martin Luther King Jr. and President John F. Kennedy.

The Ruth Lilly Special Collections and Archives has been busy during IUPUI’s 50th-year celebration.

The archives are open to IUPUI faculty, staff and students for research purposes. Just contact the office and get to work in the reading room.

More than 50 years

While IUPUI just celebrated its official 50th birthday on Jan. 24, programs go well before 1969. Records from the IU School of Medicine, the School of Health and Human Sciences, and the School of Nursing have roots reaching back more than 100 years ago.

Records recent and old are stored in boxes, which contain meticulously labeled manila folders. The aisles are organized in broad categories: IUPUI faculty, School of Medicine, and so on. The shelves open at the push of a button or the twist of a wheel.

‘Hine’s Quarters’

Towne said most users of the archives seek old photographs. Early shots of campus, head shots of IUPUI’s founders and images that display IUPUI’s growth are popular. Some photos have amusing stories. An exterior of a small building, for example, could have an amazing story behind it. Take a small office that once stood at 1219 W. Michigan St., near what are now School of Dentistry parking lots.

One of many in the archives, this aisle contains dozens of boxes containing thousands of records, photographs and letters from beyond IUPUI’s 50 years. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

“This is where the first IUPUI chancellor, Maynard Hine, had his offices for a while,” Towne explained. “It was a Curley’s Cleaners, and it had various nicknames — ‘Hine’s Quarters’ and then ‘The Ex-Chancellery’ because Hine occupied this building after he resigned as chancellor.”

Plater’s memos

William Plater, a longtime executive vice chancellor and dean of the faculties, left a lasting impression on IUPUI during his tenure from the 1980s into the 2000s. He transferred his copious records to the archives after his retirement in 2006. Plater’s legacy is still vital in the form of awards and honors. For events and other work, he likes to utilize the archives and reference his writings from 30 years ago.

“We have a wall here, about 300 feet of his stuff, along with his predecessors and successors,” Towne said. “We know what the contents are of these boxes, and we can find files very quickly. Bill Plater will contact us and say something like, ‘I remember a memo I wrote in 1989 about such and such, and I think I wrote it in October.’ Sure enough, we find it, and we send a copy to Bill Plater.”

While IUPUI is only 50 years young, the stories found in the archives are timeless.

University Library to Launch Books on Demand

Informatics and journalism librarian Willie Miller shared the perks of University Library’s program, Books on Demand, set to launch Feb. 5. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Just like you would your own Spotify playlist, you will soon be able to contribute to building the book collection at University Library for yourself and the IUPUI community.

Starting Feb. 5, the library is handing off the power of ordering books to faculty, staff and students to decide what they want by introducing Books on Demand, the instant library book ordering system. This change in process will not only save money and change the way the library purchases books, but it will also help the IUPUI community by providing a more relevant selection of books to support active research and class papers.

Once the program launches, when a member of the IUPUI community finds a book they want to read, they’ll click the “Get This for IUPUI” button online and choose either the e-book format or the print version. E-books will deliver within two hours of the request, and print books will arrive in a week for fast delivery or two weeks with regular delivery.

“This process will allow us to get the newest research in a variety of fields with a more efficient system,” said Willie Miller, informatics and journalism librarian and resource development liaison. “We’ll have the latest available books, published in nearly every subject area, on our campus and in our catalog in about a month. We’re also excited to be providing books that we know people will definitely use, and probably use more than once.”

If someone wants a book that’s not on the list, the Books on Demand webpage will have a whole section for participants to suggest options. Most of the books will be academic in nature, yet some popular books will also be found.

It’s also possible that a few textbooks could be offered through this service, but depending on what books faculty choose as the required text, not all will be available. The ones that are listed will give students the opportunity to share and reduce costs by checking out the book from the school library instead of paying for it or renting it themselves.

Another solution for when a book isn’t on University Library’s list is using the interlibrary loan system that will still be available. Any book found in libraries around the world can be sent to IUPUI to be borrowed.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Ashlynn Neumeyer

Faces of IUPUI: James Kendrick

 

James Kendrick organizes the stacks in University Library, where he has been on staff for more than 30 years. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

James Kendrick has been on staff at University Library for more than 30 years, during which he earned his bachelor’s degree from the School of Science and is now pursuing a master’s degree from SPEA.

As the library’s stacks manager, Kendrick has touched thousands of books in its vast collection, which totals more than a million volumes. Over three decades, he has kept the library’s collection orderly and accessible to generations of IUPUI students, faculty and staff.

In addition to his integral role as stacks manager, Kendrick is the library’s United Way ambassador as well as a unit ambassador for the IUPUI Campus Campaign.

Read the original article from IUPUI News

The Human Library at IUPUI: Educational & Thought-provoking

The Human Library at IUPUI, a campus-funded Welcoming Campus Initiative, was designed to provide a safe place for conversations around difficult subjects and help advance understanding among a community of diverse people.

Read the original article from News at IUPUI.

Responses to the event, which took place April 2 in the Campus Center, captured the positive reactions of both “books” and “readers,” said Andrea Copeland, associate professor and chair, Department of Library and Information Science at the Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI, and lead organizer of the event.

Among responses from participants: “This was a wonderful experience! Loved it!” “It’s wonderful to take the time to slow down, connect and learn from one another.” “A great experience and opportunity to learn, to listen, and to be introspective.” “Unexpected, educational, thought-provoking, great experience overall!” “Excellent opportunity to engage in dialog and to learn about people’s lives. I learned so much, thank you!”

The IUPUI Human Library featured people as “books” who could be checked out by readers. “Usually, the knowledge vessel is a book. In this case, the knowledge vessel was a human,” Copeland said.

About 30 people volunteered to be books, including a recovering addict, an individual who was a survivor of the 1994 Rwanda genocide, a person who was overweight and chose to have bariatric surgery, a rape survivor, a person who became deaf at age 30 as a result of a neurological disorder, a transgender individual, and a Palestinian immigrant who is Muslim.

“Conversations people get to have around difficult topics is what’s so valuable about a human library. It really creates a safe place for that,” Copeland said.

The event drew people from Columbus, Muncie, Franklin College, and Eli Lilly and Company who want to have human libraries in their community and came to IUPUI to witness the one here, Copeland said.

As the number of human libraries in Central Indiana grows, Copeland said, it would be possible to build a book depot, a sort of shared library, making it easier to facilitate hosting human library events and enable really good books to reach more people.

From the NEH: Grants to Digitize Essential Humanities Books

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the largest funder of the humanities in the United States, announced seven grants, totaling more than $1 million, to convert important out-of-print humanities texts into freely available ebooks.

The third round of funding for the Humanities Open Book Program, offered jointly by NEH and Mellon, will make awards to publishers that have identified significant scholarly books that enhance public knowledge of topics such as American and European history, philosophy, classics, Asian and Latin American studies, architectural history, and literary criticism. With NEH and Mellon support, publishers will digitize these books, secure permission from copyright holders, and release them online for access by public audiences.

“NEH is pleased to join with Mellon in giving a second life to close to a thousand outstanding works of scholarship,” said NEH Senior Deputy Chairman Jon Parrish Peede. “The Humanities Open Book Program makes important texts accessible to new audiences by funding twenty-first-century approaches to disseminating humanities research.”

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University Library Dean David Lewis Designated Sagamore of the Wabash

David Lewis, left, and his Sagamore of the Wabash, with Indiana State Archivist Jim Corridan. Photo courtesy of IUPUI University Library.

On the eve of his retirement from IUPUI, University Library Dean David Lewis has been recognized with one of the highest distinctions in the state of Indiana, the Sagamore of the Wabash. The award is the highest honor bestowed by the governor of Indiana and is a personal tribute given to those who have rendered distinguished service to the state. On behalf of Gov. Eric Holcomb, Indiana State Archivist Jim Corridan conferred the honor on Lewis for his service to libraries across the state over the last 25 years.

Read the original article from News at IUPUI.

Lewis began his career at the IUPUI University Library in 1993, the opening year of the landmark building designed by renowned architect Edward Larrabee Barnes. In 2000, Lewis was appointed dean. After 18 years at the helm of the library, Lewis will retire in May. His career as an academic library leader for more than four decades has been characterized by a record of noteworthy accomplishments in the areas of academic technologies, digital humanities, open access to scholarly and educational resources, library integration into campus and community life, and innovative service development.

“David Lewis’ record of service to the IUPUI community is remarkable and will live on long after his well-deserved retirement,” IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar said. “His Sagamore of the Wabash distinction is well-earned and confirms the measures of success that we have known for many years.”

For more than two decades, Lewis has been a champion of creating access to information for Hoosiers through digital library resources.

He helped create the Marion County Internet Library, a collection of full-text research databases that can be accessed from within any public library, any K-12 school, or any college or university library in Marion County. He served on the Indiana State Library Advisory Council for seven years, leading the group from 2008 to 2012 and helping to advance strategic initiatives such as the Indiana Digital Summit, which provided guidance to the State Library regarding the development of digital content about the history and culture of Indiana. He also contributed to the early planning and continued growth of INSPIRE, Indiana’s virtual online library. INSPIRE is provided by the Indiana State Library and supported through the Build Indiana Fund and the Washington-based Institute for Museum and Library Services, in partnership with Academic Libraries of Indiana, a group Lewis presided over from 2013 to 2015.

As part of his work with ALI, Lewis oversaw a large-scale project in 2012-13 that had a significant impact across the Indiana academic library community. The Indiana Shared Print Project was, at the time, the largest collection-analysis project of its kind. Due to its scope and impact, the project received a $225,000 grant from the Indianapolis-based Lilly Endowment. It included 36 Indiana colleges and universities and allowed for the data-driven withdrawal of thousands of volumes from the participating libraries, which in turn freed up library space to meet other user needs. It also laid the groundwork for collaborative Indiana collections development going forward and identified unique print items within the collections of participating libraries for preservation and potential digitization.

Lewis has translated his extensive experience into thought leadership for academic librarianship. His record of publications, presentations, and professional service is diverse and extensive, ranging across the future of library collections, library space, the library and open access, scholarly communication, and provocative thinking about the future of the academic library. This work culminated in 2016 with the publication of his widely acclaimed book, “Reimagining the Academic Library.”

“I have had so many great colleagues in the Indiana library community, and much of the credit goes to them,” Lewis said. “The Sagamore of the Wabash is an unexpected honor.”

In recognition of his thought leadership, Lewis was named the 2018 Association of College and Research Libraries’ Academic/Research Librarian of the Year. The award showcases his long career of accomplishments and recognizes significant and influential research and the publication of a body of scholarly writing that contributes to academic or research library development.

Making the City | The Ethics, Values, and Practices of Public Art in Urban Contexts

This semester’s third installment of The Ethics, values, and Practices of Public Art in Urban Contexts Seminar Series, “Making the City,” will be held on Monday, April 16, from 4-6pm at the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, University Library 4115P.

Cities across the US are grappling with major transformations that expose the many tensions inherent to historical disparities in economics, education, safety, and political access brought on by inequalities based in race and class. Midwest cities have responded to these challenges with a variety of approaches. This seminar series is concerned with addressing one of them: the role of culture in reshaping cities – specifically through public art.

In the discourse and practice of urban design, public art has increasingly been seen as a key tool in redeveloping our cities – from making cities more livable and safe to encouraging economic development and educational achievement.

Using art as a tool to address urban design challenges goes by a variety of different names: creative placemaking, civic art, and tactical urbanism, to name a few. These approaches are fundamentally tied to ethical frameworks and notions of value. Seminar meetings will discuss the intersections of ethics, public art, and urban design through shared readings, guest speakers, and conversation.

Click here to reserve your ticket on Eventbrite.

The Ethics, Values, and Practices of Public Art in Urban Contexts Seminar Series is supported by The Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society at Indiana University, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and the Herron School of Art and Design.

Kristi Palmer Appointed Interim Dean of IUPUI University Library

Original article at News at IUPUI.

Associate Dean for Digital Scholarship Kristi Palmer will lead University Library as Interim Dean effective April 9.

IUPUI Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer Kathy E. Johnson has announced the appointment of Kristi Palmer as Interim Dean of University Library.

Palmer has served as Associate Dean for Digital Scholarship in University Library since 2014 and is an associate librarian. She will begin her new position as Interim Dean April 9 as David Lewis prepares to retire effective May 18.

As interim dean, Palmer will provide leadership and guidance of library operations, strategic direction, and responsibility for the mission of the library, connecting people with resources and services and transforming the lives of community members by facilitating discovery, creativity, teaching, learning, and research.

“I’m delighted that Kristi is taking on this role, which builds on her impressive leadership and service to the campus and the community through her responsibility for the library’s digital scholarship program and the Center for Digital Scholarship,” Johnson said.

As Associate Dean for Digital Scholarship, Palmer developed and implemented the library’s digital scholarship strategy. She supports the creation, digitization, and preservation of scholarly, historical, and cultural content as well as manages the campus’s institutional repository and other library tools for accessing digital content. She has been a leading supporter of the promotion of open access in the library.

Palmer is responsible for the library’s operations team, which provides security and management of the server environment, operating systems, and network and application infrastructures utilized by all areas of the library. As a member of the library’s administrative team, Palmer assists in the oversight of the library’s liaison program, including planning and program review and the assessment of liaison librarian performance.

“IUPUI has been a welcome constant in my educational and professional life for 17 years, and I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to serve my campus in this new role,” Palmer said. “I’m privileged to be part of a University Library staff that is committed and driven to fulfill our mission to inform, connect, and transform the IUPUI and Indianapolis community.”

Palmer began her career at IUPUI in 2003 as an assistant librarian and has steadily risen to her current rank and position. During her 15 years working on campus, she has served as Chair of the University Library Faculty Organization, been a member of the IUPUI Faculty Council Executive Committee, served as liaison to the IUPUI Staff Council, served on the IUPUI Libraries Faculty Council, and served on search and screen committees and administrative review committees. Presently, Palmer is the Chair of the Faculty Council Campus Planning Committee. She has been honored with the 2016 Indianapolis Business Journal “Forty Under 40” award and was named a 2009 Library Journal Mover and Shaker.

Palmer earned her bachelor’s degree in history from Ball State University in 1999 and her Master of Library Science from IUPUI in 2003.

Ryan White Letters at the Children’s Museum

Ryan White (1971-1990) was a hemophiliac who contracted AIDS from a blood transfusion. He was diagnosed at the age of 13. In the early 1980s, not much was known about the disease, and Ryan was not allowed to continue attending school in his hometown because parents thought he would spread the disease to others. After a fierce legal battle that brought national attention to Ryan and his family, he was allowed to return to school. However, discrimination continued, and Ryan and his family decided to move further south to Cicero, Indiana. There, Hamilton Heights schools educated their students about AIDS and its effects, and they welcomed him with open arms.

Meanwhile, Ryan became a spokesperson for AIDS communities, speaking locally and internationally about his experiences. He was friends with many celebrities and was able to speak at the President’s Commission on the AIDS Epidemic. A TV movie, “The Ryan White Story,” was made about his life, and it aired in 1989, gaining him further popularity. Ryan’s major goal in life was to have a normal childhood and normal experiences in high school. He enjoyed school and was able to skateboard, drive, and hold a job at a surf shop.

However, Ryan was still sick, and his illness caused his death on April 8th, 1990. Thousands attended his funeral in Indianapolis, including first Lady Barbara Bush. He was buried in Cicero, in part because of the warm welcome the community had given him. Ryan’s legacy lives on through the National CARE Act, IU’s Dance Marathon for Riley (as well as similar marathons at other universities), an AIDS walk at Hamilton Heights commemorating Ryan with a scholarship, and more.

In 2001, Ryan’s mother donated the contents of his room, in addition to other materials, to the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. The museum opened their ground-breaking permanent exhibit The Power of Children in 2004. The exhibit portrays Ryan’s life, as well as the lives of Ruby Bridges and Anne Frank.

In 2016, The Children’s Museum received a grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services to digitize letters sent to Ryan White in the 1980s in collaboration with IUPUI Library’s Program of Digital Scholarship. The archive of nearly 6,000 letters offers significant cultural information related to the AIDS epidemic, the perspective of children, and related issues of tolerance, education, and inspiration as well as a window to popular culture in the 1980s.

As part of this project, the Museum has created an online learning platform for youth in grades 3-12 to learn how to transcribe letters and research questions of interest about Ryan’s life and time period. In addition, the letters and transcriptions are available to scholars through the IUPUI Library online digital collections, allowing the letters to be used for research regarding the misunderstood disease and to share the legacy of Ryan White.

Visit The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis website to learn more.

The IU Open Access Policy

This letter from Jamie Wittenberg, Research Data Management Librarian and Head of the IU Libraries’ Department of Scholarly Communication, was first published here.

Jamie Wittenburg. Photo by Eric Rudd, IU Communications

In 2015, almost 45 percent of articles across all disciplines were published open access as part of a growing worldwide movement to remove financial barriers to scholarly research.

As the head of the Department of Scholarly Communication for IU Libraries, which supports open publishing, I hold the conviction that anyone should be able to read, save and share research regardless of their ability to pay for it. This is perhaps unsurprising — I’m a librarian, and advancing knowledge by providing access to scholarly work is a core mission of IU Libraries. Publishing research in such a way that it is freely available on the open web for use and reuse around the world is the principle of “open access.”

In February 2017, the Bloomington Faculty Council adopted a policy in support of open access in journal publishing, stating, in part, “the faculty of Indiana University Bloomington is committed to disseminating the fruits of its research and scholarship as widely as possible.” This policy marked a milestone for IU and for the open access community. IU Bloomington’s was the 56th faculty council in the world to unanimously pass an open access policy, joining Harvard, Duke, Princeton, Stanford, MIT and others.

Traditionally, scholarly articles are published in journals that require subscriptions, usually paid for out of library budgets. These subscription costs are increasing annually — profit margins for major academic journal publishers surpass those of Apple, Google and Amazon. As early as 2012, Harvard told its faculty that sustaining the rising costs of journals was impossible, labeling the current system “absurd” and “damaging.”

When I participate in national conversations about open access publishing, I hear a mix of concern and optimism for the future. In 2014-15, the average university library spent 73 percent of its materials budget on serials. Experts agree that the price of academic journals will continue to outstrip inflation in 2018 and beyond, with no indication of change by the profitable publishers, despite outcry from academics and libraries everywhere.

However, market forecasters also predict that the growing pace of open access publishing will continue to increase, already representing about one-third of research publications. Most federal agencies and many private foundations now require the faculty they fund to publish their findings openly. In conjunction, many institutions — and some entire countries — have implemented open access policies.

These models are changing the scholarly publishing landscape. In some disciplines, open access is the standard. Publications in astronomy and astrophysics, for example, are 87 percent open. In fields like medicine and agriculture, publishing in open access journals has also become the norm. Part of the reason is that the cost of research disproportionately affects researchers, students and citizens in developing countries — sometimes the communities in greatest need of, for example, the latest medical and agricultural research.

At IU, the Open Access Policy passed by the Bloomington Faculty Council empowers individual faculty members to make a version of their scholarly journal articles open to all, or to opt out. The policy is now aligned with the IU faculty annual reporting system, where most faculty already enter information about their research and creative activity.

My team in the Department of Scholarly Communication is processing nearly 1,600 faculty-authored publications from the reporting system for inclusion in the IUScholarWorks institutional repository.

In response to the growing need for open access support on campus, we are developing core library services that support open scholarship and research transparency in an integrated way. These include our open access services, research data services, journal publishing services and emerging services around affordable and open course materials. We provide consultations with students and faculty, publishing services and instruction.

To contact the Scholarly Communication Department, schedule a consultation, or learn more about support for open scholarship on campus, visit their website.