IU Online Conference

The fourth annual statewide IU Online Conference will be held October 30, 2019, at the Sheraton Indianapolis Hotel at Keystone Crossing.

Your conference hosts from the Office of Online Education, the Office of Collaborative Academic Programs, and eLearning Design and Services are seeking proposals from IU faculty, administrators, advisors, success coaches, and staff across the state who are innovators and collaborators in the online space.

We will consider proposals that address empirical research, showcase best practices, and/or describe lessons learned related to one or more of the following areas:

  • Program development and administration
  • Coaching, advising, student engagement, and co-curricular programming
  • Marketing, admissions, and recruitment
  • Teaching and learning innovation
  • Technology that advances digital learning

Of special interest are presentations describing intercampus and/or interdisciplinary collaborations and proposals that have application to multiple disciplines. Sessions will last for 30 to 45 minutes.

Proposals are due at 11:59pm on Friday, June 7th. Presenters will be notified in August.

Submit your proposals now! 

Spring Break Around the World 2019

During spring break, more than 160 IUPUI students experienced the world through study abroad, with “classrooms” ranging from museums to the beach to the rainforest. The following four program locations highlight how students explored different dimensions of their fields of study, conducted service projects and more.

Guanacaste, Costa Rica

Twelve Honors College students from a variety of majors journeyed to beautiful Guanacaste, Costa Rica, for the annual Honors College Service Learning program. The service portion of the trip was divided into two groups working at Cartagena and Tempate elementary schools, allowing the students to go beyond the textbook and get an in-depth understanding of the current education system in Costa Rica.

The first group taught a variety of English lessons — greetings, body parts, food and nutrition. The second group assisted with teaching the importance of hygiene and best dental practices.

“Words cannot describe the feeling of getting to see how excited the students were to learn English from us,” student Amber Greaney shared. “One day we walked in, and all the students started chanting ‘English, English, English’ all together. Although we were the ones doing service, I felt like I gained more from the experience than I could ever give to them. This trip was truly the best week of my life.”

The group also participated in two language exchanges with local universities, practicing their Spanish skills and making friends with local Santa Cruz students. The group saw why Costa Rica is famous for ecotourism, receiving a tour of the Diria coffee plantation, hiking the rainforest surrounding the Miravalles volcano, and taking a natural mud bath followed by a dip in natural hot and cold springs.

“Before visiting Costa Rica, I had always seen myself as belonging to the United States solely,” student Lilly Pollard said. “Every individual I met in Costa Rica was so incredibly inviting and kind. I was able to make an impact on individuals in another country by volunteering at schools. My experience made me expand my thoughts of what makes a community, helping me grow and become a better global citizen.”

Buenos Aires, Argentina

The Kelley School of Business‘ Argentina: Corporate Social Responsibility program exposed students to the economic and political history of Argentina, the social issues that its population faces today, and how businesses are helping to address those issues. The class completed a service-learning component and met with a variety of Argentine businesses.

“In discussion with these companies, I gained an understanding of how these businesses contribute toward the three pillars of sustainability,” shared program participant Vidula Gongade. “I also had an incredible volunteer experience with Proyecto Agua Segura, a company that creates solutions for the water crisis in the rural areas. My group and I visited a local school to build a rainwater-harvesting system with water filters and a vertical garden irrigation system.”

London

Two IUPUI programs based their courses in the United Kingdom’s capital city, a multicultural bastion with approximately 9 million inhabitants. With a timely topic, the Kelley School’s U.K.: Brexit, Business and Brits program explored how business is conducted in the U.K., examining the purpose and structure of the European Union and the potential impacts of Brexit.

“Studying abroad was one of the best decisions I made at IUPUI,” said Kelley student Gauri Nagaraj, who participated in the Brexit program. “I met so many new people, learned a lot of new things and explored the city of London — without Google Maps! It was an amazing experience to be in a city so full of history and culture.”

The second London program, offered by the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, took a look at the U.K.’s National Health Service for this year’s Health Systems Around the World course. Students visited London-area health facilities, met with local faculty, completed a public health scavenger hunt and toured historical sites directly related to health systems, including the Broad Street pump, site of the famous cholera outbreak of 1854.

Copenhagen, Denmark

Herron School of Art and Design‘s Exploring Art and Design in Denmark program allowed students to experience the public and private spaces that embody a people-centered approach to daily life in the Scandinavian city of Copenhagen. Students attended lectures from leading design groups with an emphasis on service design and had the opportunity to experience hygge firsthand by cooking a Danish and American meal in the home of some Danish hosts.

“Being exposed to well-designed solutions that address a particular problem has had the biggest influence on me,” student Caila Lutz reflected. “I am now confident that I can provide techniques and ideas similar to the ones used in Denmark for problem-solving in the United States. For example, at the airport, instead of scanning your ticket when you start boarding, you scan your ticket to get into a seating area when you first arrive at the gate, making the boarding process quicker and less stressful.

“I’ve learned so much from studying abroad, but with the growing city, there will always be more to learn.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Mandy Bray

5 Tips For Getting Into Grad School

For some of us, graduation means no more grades or homework. For those who can’t get enough of the college experience, it means the cycle is about to start all over again with graduate school.

If you’re going to graduate school and you know it, clap your hands — and give these tips a try.

Students who have questions about graduate school are encouraged to reach out to others for guidance. Indiana University

Research the program
Whether or not you know what you want to study in graduate school, it’s always a good idea to research any program you’re interested in. Find out what the program offers and what’s required to get in. You should also look up the faculty and their interests and strengths. This will help you create your personal statement and cater it specifically to the program you want to enter.

Take the GRE early
Similarly to taking the SAT when you were looking past high school, it’s a good idea to take the GRE your sophomore or junior year in college. That way, if your score is lower than you want, you have time to retake the test. Also, some of your general education classes, such as math and English, help prepare you for the GRE questions, so it’s good to take it when the information is still fresh in your mind. If you missed this mark and are taking the test later, it’s not the end of the world. It only means you have a little less time than people who started earlier.

Write, revise and tailor your personal statement
Your personal statement is not something you should write overnight. You might have several drafts throughout the process, and that’s OK. The more revisiting and revising you do, the more satisfied with the final product you’ll be. This is your chance to showcase your accomplishments and goals and explain why you’re a perfect fit for the program.

Ask for strong letters of recommendation
Making sure to ask the right people for “strong” letters of recommendation is key. Ask people who will promote you and your abilities in an effective way. It’s important to choose people who know how you work, what your accomplishments are and what your future goals are. Specifically requesting a “strong” recommendation letter shows that you’re serious about this program, and it encourages the recommender to put real thought and effort into what they write for you.

Ask for help and pay attention to deadlines
Getting all your materials turned in on time is extremely important. Make sure you know when the deadline is and have everything done a little early. That way, if you have questions about the application process, you’ll have time to ask people who know. Reach out to the admissions staff in your program, and they’ll help you create a successful application. The IUPUI Graduate Office offers workshops on getting into graduate school; see the website for details.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Ashlynn Neumeyer 

Education Pitch Competition Kickoff Event

edupitch is proud to introduce the first annual SDI Innovations Solutions for Education Competition – and you can be part of it!

The competition will reward business and product pitches from entrepreneurs around the Midwest to showcase their ideas for solutions in the education market. Ideas will range from early ideation pitches to finished products ready to launch. Some will be tech, some will be old-school, but they will all be new and innovative.

Anyone with a passion for entrepreneurship and education can enter. Rules, guidelines, and more information can be found here. Winners will receive prizes from a cash pool of $6,500 in addition to gift in kind prizes and an opportunity to partner with investors with established relationships and resources in education.

The campus kickoff event will take place on February 9 at 12pm at the Kelly Business School, BS4095. Presentation slides will be available online for those who can’t make it – find information at pitchedu.com. Please click here to register for the IUPUI kickoff event.

The deadline for team registration and presentation submissions is March 1, and final presentations will take place at the Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship in West Lafayette on April 14.

This competition is supported by Health CPA and Associates, The National Group, Purdue Railyard, the Match Box Coworking Studio, SDI Innovations, the Purdue Foundry, and the Purdue University Discovery Park.

To err is human? Kelley School researchers examine how errors affect credibility of online reviews

From News at IUPUI

Shoppers increasingly consult online reviews before making holiday purchases. But how do they decide which reviewers to trust?

Recently published research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business at IUPUI shows that consumer trust in online reviews is influenced by spelling errors and typos. But how much those errors influence each consumer depends on the type of error and that consumer’s general tendency to trust others.

The study, from Dena Cox and Anthony Cox, both professors of marketing at the Kelley School, and Jeffrey Cox, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Communication at Michigan State University, examined nearly 300 people’s reactions to different online reviews with either no errors; typographical errors, such as common keystroke errors like “wsa” instead of “was”; or spelling errors like “sevral” or “useing.”

The study’s results suggest consumers who have a high level of trust in other people distinguish between these two types of errors in online reviews.

Anthony Cox, who also serves as the faculty chair of the Kelley Business of Medicine Physician MBA Program at IUPUI, says these high-trust consumers view misspellings as “errors of knowledge,” which they are willing to overlook, and typos as “errors of carelessness,” which erode their confidence in the reviewer.

Furthermore, consumers who have a low level of trust in others are not influenced one way or the other by reviews that contain either typographical errors or spelling mistakes, he explained.

“For high-trusters, typographical errors signaled a general lack of conscientiousness or carelessness that harmed reviewer credibility and reduced involvement with the content of the review,” Anthony Cox said.

“For example, a typographical error, like substituting ‘regualr’ for ‘regular,’ seems more likely to be attributed to careless writing by someone who ‘knows better,'” he added. “Conversely, a spelling error, like substituting ‘hite’ for ‘height,’ might be attributed to a lack of education or to a cognitive challenge such as dyslexia, traits over which the writer has little control.”

Online reviews are a mixed blessing, Anthony Cox said: “They are a source of not only information but also misinformation. You don’t know the reviewers. You don’t even know if they are who they say they are, if they’ve actually used the product or if someone paid them to write the review.”

When looking at online reviews, read carefully, he said, because your own level of trust in others will likely play a role in how you react to them.

Money on the Table: How to Increase Profits Through Gender-Balanced Leadership

Blue Square
At noon on March 10, 2017, Melissa Greenwell, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Office, Finish Line, Inc. will be discussing and signing her new book about gender imbalance in corporate and business leadership and what to do about it. This event, which takes place at the IUPUI Campus Center, Room 305, is open to the campus and public. A free copy of the book will be given to the first 25 attendees.  A light lunch will be served, so please register for this event.
The discussion is co-sponsored by the IUPUI Office for Women and the IU Kelley School of Business.

Susan Sutton study abroad program awardees announced

Eric Raider and Claudia Grossman

A Department of World Languages and Cultures faculty member in the IU School of Liberal Arts and an academic advisor in the Kelley School of Business were chosen as the 2014 recipients of the Susan Buck Sutton awards. The IUPUI Office of International Affairs presents the awards to a campus faculty member and a staff member who made significant contributions to study abroad programs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Claudia Grossman, a senior lecturer and interim director of the Max Kade German-American Center, and Eric Raider, a Kelley School of Business academic advisor, were presented their awards at the IUPUI International Festival on Feb. 27.

The award is named in honor of Susan Buck Sutton, who was the first associate vice chancellor for international affairs at IUPUI.

Selection of award recipients is based on efforts to promote a campus climate where students are encouraged to study abroad and new programs are developed and supported.

Grossman’s efforts were noted in a nominating letter that said, “It is hard to imagine today’s international landscape at IUPUI were it not for the extraordinary creativity and investment of time and energy that Claudia Grossman has spent over the last two decades on making study abroad a reality for many students and faculty across several schools on this campus.”

A list of Grossman’s accomplishments in the area of study abroad were cited, including study abroad program development, creation and instruction of courses connected with study abroad, program direction, student advising and publications related to study abroad.

Raider’s work to expand the undergraduate study abroad program at the business school was cited, with one nominator saying, “Eric took the reins of the Kelley undergraduate program and has not looked back. It is evident that Eric is passionate about study abroad and has already made a lasting impact on our programs in Kelley.”