The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens Research Fellowships 2019-2020

The Huntington Library awards over 150 research fellowships annually. The application deadline for fellowships in the 2019-2020 academic year is November 15, 2019. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make contributions to its intellectual life.

Traditional Japanese gardens and red moon-shaped bridge Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens San Marino California

The Huntington is an independent research library with significant holdings in British and American history; British and American literature; art history; the history of science and medicine; and the history of the book. The Library collections range chronologically from the eleventh century to the present. 

Long-Term fellowships are for nine to twelve months in residence with a stipend of $50,000. Three long-term fellowships are funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities ($4,200/ month from the NEH; the balance of the stipend from the Huntington funds).

Short term fellowships are for one to five months in residence and carry stipends of $3,500.

The Dibner Program in the History of Science offers historians of science and technology the opportunity to study in the Burndy Library, a remarkable collection in the history of science and technology. Both long and short term fellowships are available.

Travel grants and exchange fellowships for study in the United Kingdom and Ireland are for study in any of the fields in which The Huntington’s own collections are strong and where the research will be carried out in the libraries or archives in the United Kingdom and Ireland. We also offer exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, Lincoln, and New Colleges, Oxford; Trinity Hall, Cambridge; Durham University; and Trinity College Dublin.

To learn more about these opportunities and applications, click here  to visit the Huntington Library website!

Two IUPUI Students Heading to Spain to Cover FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup

IUPUI Sports Capital Journalism Program students Frank Bonner and Ryan Gregory, from left, are covering the 16-nation FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup in Tenerife, Spain. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

The lineup of major sporting events covered by IUPUI students in the Sports Capital Journalism Program reads like a sports journalist’s bucket list: Olympic Games, Final Fours, Indianapolis 500s and the College Football Playoff.

It’s a list no other college program can match, and another spotlight event will be added this week as two journalism students fly to Tenerife, Spain, for the FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup. Teams from 16 nations, including the two-time defending champion U.S. team, will compete Sept. 22-30 to determine the world’s best.

Ryan Gregory, a junior from Fort Wayne majoring in sports journalism, and Frank Bonner, a graduate student from Indianapolis studying sports journalism, are making the trip along with Malcolm Moran, director of the Sports Capital Journalism Program. They’ll be writing stories primarily for USAB.com, USA Basketball’s official website, working from press row and interviewing players and coaches at arguably the biggest event in the sport.

“A lot of countries focus on this tournament more than the Olympics, because basketball can get overshadowed there. For this event, the whole focus is pure basketball,” Moran said.

“We’ve had students who have covered women’s basketball games in the Olympics, but this is the first time we’ve done the World Cup.”

The Sports Capital Journalism Program is part of the Department of Journalism and Public Relations in the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Students who take part in the program’s remarkable range of top-shelf sports opportunities have their expenses completely covered, which also differentiates IUPUI’s offering from many other schools.

The students will arrive in Spain with plenty of experience covering events. Gregory has covered the Indianapolis Colts, Indiana Fever and Indy Fuel, as well as the NCAA Division I Swimming and Diving Championships last year at the IU Natatorium. Bonner, before entering the sports journalism graduate school program, was a sports reporter at the Columbus Republic for two years.

“We have two seasoned veterans, and that’s important because there are going to be logistical challenges, your patience is tested, you’re dealing with all that — and you’re dealing with it somewhere else in the world,” Moran said.

The event can be a challenge for students, with the time commitment of nearly two weeks, including games and travel, in the heart of the semester. But the students’ professors are supportive of the trip, and there is time for classwork between games.

There’s plenty of studying to go around, as FIBA rules are different from what American fans and journalists are used to. The court is slightly smaller, timeouts can only be called by coaches and teams may inbound the ball without an official first touching it, similar to throw-ins in soccer.

“I want to be familiar with the tournament itself before learning the players,” Gregory said. “I feel like those details will come.”

Moran, who will travel with the students as an advisor and editor, covered the creation of USA Basketball nearly three decades ago while writing for The New York Times. He also wrote extensively about U.S. women’s team coach Dawn Staley and assistant coach Jennifer Rizzotti when they played in college.

The U.S. women’s team is vying for its third consecutive gold medal, a feat it has never achieved in the Women’s World Cup.

IAHI Conference yields “An Anthropocene Primer”

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the Rivers of the Anthropocene project is proud to announce the official launch of An Anthropocene Primer, Version 1.0 on October 23, 2017. An Anthropocene Primer is an innovative open access, open peer review publication that guides learners through the complex concepts and debates related to the Anthropocene, including climate change, pollution, and environmental justice.

This born-digital publication (www.anthropoceneprimer.org) is a critical and timely resource for learners across multiple fields from academia, to industry, to philanthropy to learn about issues and topics relating to the Anthropocene, a framework for understanding environmental change that highlights human impact on earth systems.

An Anthropocene Primer was created to provide learners in museums, schools, non-profits, and formal research institutions with an entry point into some of the big concepts and debates that dominate discussions about the Anthropocene. The primer is not intended to be comprehensive (this is, after all, An Anthropocene Primer, not The Anthropocene Primer), nor is it intended to be didactic. The primer is a framework to guide individual and collaborative learning from the beginner to advanced levels.

Version 1.0 of An Anthropocene Primer is available for open peer review from October 23, 2017 through February 1, 2018. Open peer review allows users to contribute to and engage with fellow readers and the authors as the editors develop it for a final print and open access ebook version. A video tutorial on how to participate in open peer review is available at www.anthropoceneprimer.org/index.php/videotutorials/.

Edited by Jason M. Kelly and Fiona P. McDonald, An Anthropocene Primer emerged from the “Anthropology of the Anthropocene” workshop (http://www.anthropologyoftheanthropocene.org) hosted by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute in May 2017. The participants from this workshop make up list of authors: Jason M. Kelly (IUPUI, USA), Fiona P. McDonald (IUPUI, USA), Alejandro Camargo (University of Montreal, Canada), Amelia Moore (University of Rhode Island, USA), Mark Kesling (The daVinci Pursuit, USA), Ananya Ghoshal (Forum on Contemporary Theory, India), George Marcus (University of California, Irvine, USA), Paul Stoller (West Chester University, USA), Dominic Boyer (Rice University, USA), Serenella Iovino (University of Turin, Italy), Rebecca Ballestra (Artist, Monaco/Italy), Eduardo S. Brondizio (IU, Bloomington), Jim Enote (A:shiwiw A:wan Museum and Heritage Center, Zuni, USA), Ignatius Gutsa (University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe), Cymene Howe (Rice University, USA), Sue Jackson (Griffith University, Australia), Phil Scarpino (IUPUI, USA). This workshop was funded by the Wenner-Gren Foundation and the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities grant program.

IU announces new international research grants

A new funding opportunity sponsored by President Michael A. McRobbie is available to support high-impact international collaborative research projects that engage one or more of IU’s Global Gateways and the communities they serve.

Indiana University’s Global Gateways in China, Europe, and India are designed to strengthen and broaden IU’s global engagement through support for research and teaching, conferences and workshops, study abroad opportunities, and engagement with alumni, businesses, and nongovernmental organizations. The Gateways provide logistical support and facilities for IU faculty, students, and alumni, creating the context in which international collaborations and exchanges flourish. (Read more about IU’s Global Gateways.)

Projects may be based at a Gateway or within the region served by a Gateway, but in either case should make full use of the resources, expertise, and networks of one or more Gateways. Applicants are required to consult with the faculty director of the relevant IU Global Gateway prior to submission to determine project feasibility and engagement with the Gateway.

Proposals are due October 21, 2016, and must be submitted through IU’s new InfoReady grant application system.

The Request for Proposals and application materials are available here.

 

Yvonne Chaka Chaka “Princess of Africa” at IUPUI

Yvonne Chaka Chaka – internationally famous South African singer, songwriter, Chaka_Headshotentrepreneur, and humanitarian – is dubbed the “Princess of Africa” by her fans, including Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu.
She’ll be coming to Indianapolis October 12 and 13, sponsored by SOHO, a locally-based NGO that works in Swaziland, as well as various IUPUI units. Chaka Chaka will be speaking at IUPUI with Gail Masondo, author and life recovery coach, on: INDABA: Empowering Women and Youth in Africa & the U.S.

Monday, October 12th
IUPUI Campus Center, room 450

  • 1:30 – 2:45pm: Yvonne Chaka and Gail Masondo in Conversation
  • 2:45 – 4:00pm: Game-Changers Panel with Campus and Community Partners: What Can I Do?
    Ongoing Social Involvement and Resource Fair in CE 4th floor atriumAll events are free and open to the public. Learn more at: http://go.iu.edu/chaka

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Offers Fellowships to Assist Research and Artistic Creation

Application Deadline: September 19, 2015

TJohn Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Logo courtesy of GF.orghe foundation offers fellowships to further the development of scholars and artists by assisting them to engage in research in any field of knowledge and creation in any of the arts, under the freest possible conditions and irrespective of race, color, or creed. The foundation provides fellowships for advanced professionals in all fields (natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, creative arts) except the performing arts. The foundation selects its fellows on the basis of two separate competitions, one for the United States and Canada, the other for Latin America and the Caribbean.

The foundation understands advanced professionals to be those who as writers, scholars, or scientists have a significant record of publication, or as artists, playwrights, filmmakers, photographers, composers, or the like, have a significant record of exhibition or performance of their work.

The foundation only supports individuals. It does not make grants to institutions or organizations.

The amounts of the grants will be adjusted to the needs of the fellows, considering their other resources and the purpose and scope of their plans. Appointments are ordinarily made for one year, and in no instance for a period shorter than six consecutive months.

Applicants should be: New Faculty/New Investigator/PhD/M.D./Other Professional

The Application deadline is September 19, 2015

Application information can be found here.

IUPUI 11th Annual International Festival Features Richard Kiely and Susan Sutton

unnamedYou are invited to join us at the IUPUI International Festival on Thursday, Feb. 19th and the concurrent International Lecture Series!

Speakers include Dr. Richard Kiely, Director of Engaged Learning & Research at Cornell presenting on “Facilitating Transformational Learning in Global Service-Learning: Lessons Learned in the Field” and “Toward a Critical Global Citizenship: Opportunities and Challenges,” as well as Dr. Susan Sutton, Senior Advisor for International Initiatives at Bryn Mawr College, presenting “The Internationalization of Higher Education: How Today’s Landscape Differs from the Past.”

Dr. Richard Kiely, is an expert in adult learning and well known for his research on international service learning program design and assessment, intercultural learning, transformative student learning outcomes in service learning, and critical global citizenship.
Dr. Susan Buck Sutton is Senior Advisor for International Initiatives at Bryn Mawr College, and formerly served as Association Vice Chancellor of International Affairs at IUPUI, Associate Vice President of International Affairs and Chancellor’s Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University.

Lecture series hosted in partnership with the Center for Service & Learning and the Department of World Languages & Cultures

Additional lectures throughout the festival hosted by the Department of World Languages & Cultures!

View full festival schedule

 

Overseas Conference Fund Grant Applications Available Now

imagesIndiana University, through the Office of the Vice President for International Affairs (OVPIA), administers several internal grant awards each year and also advises IU faculty members on other selected external grants.

Overseas conference grants provide support for faculty to participate in an international conference. Open to all IU faculty, for travel expenses for participation in an international conference. The faculty member must be presenting a paper, participating in a poster session, be a panel member, or giving a keynote speech. Applicants must be full-time academic appointees at an IU campus. Applications must have matching commitment with IU institutional funds, e.g., from department, school, or campus. Conferences held in the U.S., Puerto Rico, and Mexico are excluded. The maximum award is $1,500.

Deadline: January 12 (SLA Internal Deadline January 5), 5 pm

Address inquiries to: iagrants@iu.edu

Guidelines and Application

Call for Nominations: Max Planck Research Award

Alexander von Humboldt Foundation
Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Excellent scientists and scholars of all nationalities who are expected to continue producing outstanding academic achievements in international collaboration – not least with the assistance of this award – are eligible to be nominated for the Max Planck Research Award.

On an annually-alternating basis, the call for nominations addresses areas within the natural and engineering sciences, the life sciences, and the social sciences and humanities.

The Max Planck Research Award 2015 will be conferred in the area of humanities and social sciences in the subject

Religion and Modernity: Secularisation and Social and Religious Pluralism
.
The multidisciplinary field “Religion and Modernity: Secularisation and Social and Religious Pluralism” addresses a range of diverse fundamental, partly interconnected research questions with reference to the development and change of religious thought and practice on their way to modernity and up to the present time. Is the conventional equation between modernity and secularisation a valid one? To what extent is the system of values, which shapes modern culture and society, rooted in the Christian tradition of the Middle Ages or in that of the early modern period (individualism, human rights, the intrinsic value of a secular order in contrast to a spiritual one)? Other questions playing a role within this debate address the adaptability of different religious and confessional communities to the challenges of modernity, as well as the relationship between state/secular authority and church(es) or other religious communities in the recent past and particularly in our present time. Concepts which are important in this area are for example laicism (Laïcité) or “civil religion” or privileging large religious communities. Finally the rise of religious pluralism and the individualisation of religious experience are relevant phenomena for this topic.

Every year, the Humboldt Foundation and the Max Planck Society grant two research awards to one researcher working abroad and one researcher working in Germany. These two awards will be bestowed independently.

The Presidents/Vice Chancellors of universities and the heads of research institutions in Germany are eligible to make nominations (c.f. list of eligible nominators). Direct applications are not accepted. As a rule, each award is endowed with 750,000 EUR and may be used over a period of three to a maximum of five years to fund research chosen by the award winner.

Sponsor deadline: 31 Jan 2015, Nominations

Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung Max Planck Research Award

Students to Dive in For Better English

UntitledThirty-five undergraduate students from two Japanese institutions are coming to Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis this summer to improve their English-language skills while learning more about U.S. culture.

The students will immerse themselves in English-only classes and extracurricular activities offered and organized by the International Center for Intercultural Communication, part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. And when each school day ends, they will go “home” to the English-speaking Hoosier families serving as their summer hosts.

Twenty-two Tsuda College students will arrive Saturday to participate in what is now known as the annual Women in Leadership Intensive Summer English Program. Two weeks after the Tsuda students finish Aug. 22, the center will host 13 students from Hakuoh University, a co-ed institution.
The Hakuoh Intensive Summer English Program runs Sept. 3 to 15.

For students of Tsuda College — started 100 years ago as Japan’s first college for women — their three-week intensive English-language immersion course is the latest chapter in a 20-year tradition that IUPUI will mark with a special celebration Aug. 21.

“It’s really been magnificent,” International Center for Intercultural Communication director and Chancellor’s Professor of English Ulla M. Connor said of the program that started after a chance encounter between Connor and Tsuda English professor Mary Althaus, now vice president of the Japanese college.

Twenty years ago, when Althaus suggested the ICIC-Tsuda partnership, most Japanese schools focused on exchange programs with universities either in California or on the East Coast. IUPUI is one of only three exchange programs for Tsuda students, and the only U.S. university that offers them a summer intensive English program, Connor said. About 25 students have attended the IUPUI program each year, and the school has never had difficulty recruiting students to attend.

At the request of the Japanese college, women in leadership has been the program’s focus in the past five or so years, Connor said. The Tsuda students use a mainstream book on female leaders, selected readings and academic activities specifically chosen for their inclusion of content on distinguished female leaders and their focus on developing communication skills for women in leadership roles. The class also includes guest lectures by prominent local women such as retired Eli Lilly and Co. human resources professional Joann Ingulli-Fattic and Girls Inc. director of research Catherine Cushinberry.

Althaus and members of the Japan-America Society of Indiana are scheduled to attend the Tsuda anniversary celebration. IUPUI administrators scheduled to attend include Chancellor Charles R. Bantz, School of Liberal Arts Dean Bill Blomquist and IU Associate Vice President of International Affairs Gil Latz.

This summer will mark the sixth year for the International Center for Intercultural Communication’s program for Hakuoh University. This year’s edition revolves around five U.S. culture themes that college students can relate to, such as sports and city life in the U.S. The ICIC-Hakuoh program has been the more traditional two-way exchange program.

“For students who have an interest in Japanese, studying abroad is an invaluable experience,” said Laura Woods, an IUPUI student who spent a year at Hakuoh, earning enough credits for an individualized major in Japanese. “I recommend Hakuoh University as a good place to experience Japanese college life.

“During the year that I studied at Hakuoh University, I was able to significantly improve in my Japanese language ability; and because the classes are conducted completely in Japanese, I was able to learn more quickly than I could in America,” said Woods, who is featured in a promotional spotlight on the Hakuoh University website.