Hilary Kahn to lead Office of International Affairs at IUPUI

INDIANAPOLIS — Hilary E. Kahn has been named IUPUI associate vice chancellor for international affairs as well as associate vice president for international affairs at Indiana University effective Sept. 1, subject to approval by the IU Board of Trustees. In addition, Kahn will serve on the faculty in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Kahn currently serves as assistant dean for international education and global initiatives and as the director of the Center for the Study of Global Change in the Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies at IU Bloomington.

Hilary E. Kahn

Leading the campus’s efforts to internationalize curricula and enacting an internationalization plan will be at the top of Kahn’s priority list when she arrives in the IUPUI Office of International Affairs. Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer Kathy E. Johnson said Kahn’s expertise, research and leadership in international education will be an asset to the future of international programs at IUPUI.

“Dr. Kahn has cultivated an impressive national reputation associated with her knowledge, leadership and advocacy for international education. At the same time, she has demonstrated her capacity for being an effective, transparent, collaborative and approachable colleague across roles held on the Bloomington and IUPUI campuses,” Johnson said. “I’m confident she will be well prepared to make rapid progress when she joins us this fall.”

In this new role, Kahn will serve as a member of the Council of Deans, the Academic Deans group and the Forum Council at IUPUI. She will also be a member of the leadership team in the IU Office of the Vice President for International Affairs.

“I am delighted to have been selected to serve IUPUI and take its global identity to even greater heights,” Kahn said. “Building on what is already a strong foundation for international education, I look forward to working across campus and with other stakeholders to advance opportunities for internationalized learning, research, partnerships, and student and scholar mobility.”

Kahn is the immediate past president and an executive board member of the Association of International Education Administrators, and she serves on the advisory board for the Diversity & Democracy publication and on the global learning advisory council for the Association of American Colleges and Universities. She is the author of multiple articles and chapters, as well as three books.

Kahn received her master’s and doctoral degrees in anthropology from the University of Buffalo and her bachelor’s degree in anthropology from IU Bloomington.

Read the original story from IUPUI News

Film Screening of Faat-Kiné

Come join us to watch the film, FAAT KINÉ (Senegal 2001)! Ousmane Sembene, the father of African cinema, calls his fellow Africans to a reckoning of the post-independence era at the beginning of a new century. FAAT KINÉ tells the story of the title character (Venus Seye), a gas-station manager in present-day Senegal, who has climbed the ladder of success in a male-dominated society after enduring numerous betrayals by men she trusted. A masterful portrait of the changing roles of women in Senegalese society, Sembene’s film is a poignant reminder that Africa will not be liberated from its colonial past without a concomitant liberation of African women.
This event is presented by the IUPUI Committee on African Studies (CAS)
Thursday April 25th, 6-8pm
Lilly Auditorium University Library 
We’ll see you there!

Spring Break Around the World 2019

During spring break, more than 160 IUPUI students experienced the world through study abroad, with “classrooms” ranging from museums to the beach to the rainforest. The following four program locations highlight how students explored different dimensions of their fields of study, conducted service projects and more.

Guanacaste, Costa Rica

Twelve Honors College students from a variety of majors journeyed to beautiful Guanacaste, Costa Rica, for the annual Honors College Service Learning program. The service portion of the trip was divided into two groups working at Cartagena and Tempate elementary schools, allowing the students to go beyond the textbook and get an in-depth understanding of the current education system in Costa Rica.

The first group taught a variety of English lessons — greetings, body parts, food and nutrition. The second group assisted with teaching the importance of hygiene and best dental practices.

“Words cannot describe the feeling of getting to see how excited the students were to learn English from us,” student Amber Greaney shared. “One day we walked in, and all the students started chanting ‘English, English, English’ all together. Although we were the ones doing service, I felt like I gained more from the experience than I could ever give to them. This trip was truly the best week of my life.”

The group also participated in two language exchanges with local universities, practicing their Spanish skills and making friends with local Santa Cruz students. The group saw why Costa Rica is famous for ecotourism, receiving a tour of the Diria coffee plantation, hiking the rainforest surrounding the Miravalles volcano, and taking a natural mud bath followed by a dip in natural hot and cold springs.

“Before visiting Costa Rica, I had always seen myself as belonging to the United States solely,” student Lilly Pollard said. “Every individual I met in Costa Rica was so incredibly inviting and kind. I was able to make an impact on individuals in another country by volunteering at schools. My experience made me expand my thoughts of what makes a community, helping me grow and become a better global citizen.”

Buenos Aires, Argentina

The Kelley School of Business‘ Argentina: Corporate Social Responsibility program exposed students to the economic and political history of Argentina, the social issues that its population faces today, and how businesses are helping to address those issues. The class completed a service-learning component and met with a variety of Argentine businesses.

“In discussion with these companies, I gained an understanding of how these businesses contribute toward the three pillars of sustainability,” shared program participant Vidula Gongade. “I also had an incredible volunteer experience with Proyecto Agua Segura, a company that creates solutions for the water crisis in the rural areas. My group and I visited a local school to build a rainwater-harvesting system with water filters and a vertical garden irrigation system.”

London

Two IUPUI programs based their courses in the United Kingdom’s capital city, a multicultural bastion with approximately 9 million inhabitants. With a timely topic, the Kelley School’s U.K.: Brexit, Business and Brits program explored how business is conducted in the U.K., examining the purpose and structure of the European Union and the potential impacts of Brexit.

“Studying abroad was one of the best decisions I made at IUPUI,” said Kelley student Gauri Nagaraj, who participated in the Brexit program. “I met so many new people, learned a lot of new things and explored the city of London — without Google Maps! It was an amazing experience to be in a city so full of history and culture.”

The second London program, offered by the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, took a look at the U.K.’s National Health Service for this year’s Health Systems Around the World course. Students visited London-area health facilities, met with local faculty, completed a public health scavenger hunt and toured historical sites directly related to health systems, including the Broad Street pump, site of the famous cholera outbreak of 1854.

Copenhagen, Denmark

Herron School of Art and Design‘s Exploring Art and Design in Denmark program allowed students to experience the public and private spaces that embody a people-centered approach to daily life in the Scandinavian city of Copenhagen. Students attended lectures from leading design groups with an emphasis on service design and had the opportunity to experience hygge firsthand by cooking a Danish and American meal in the home of some Danish hosts.

“Being exposed to well-designed solutions that address a particular problem has had the biggest influence on me,” student Caila Lutz reflected. “I am now confident that I can provide techniques and ideas similar to the ones used in Denmark for problem-solving in the United States. For example, at the airport, instead of scanning your ticket when you start boarding, you scan your ticket to get into a seating area when you first arrive at the gate, making the boarding process quicker and less stressful.

“I’ve learned so much from studying abroad, but with the growing city, there will always be more to learn.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Mandy Bray

Design, Culture, and Everyday Life in Denmark

Aaron Ganci and Haley Francis-Halstead in Copenhagen. @hollabackhaley

This spring break, twenty-two students from Herron’sfurniture designvisual art, and visual communication design programs traveled to Copenhagen, Denmark, with associate professors Aaron Ganci and Helen Sanematsu to experience one of Europe’s modernist design epicenters. They traveled via bicycle to design studios, museums, and cultural attractions and sampled a plethora of Danish cuisines.

“It was inspiring to see my students experience Denmark. We visited several design agencies to learn about their people-centered approach to design, went to a few museums, had a bike tour of the city with a local designer, and made a dinner together to experience hygge. Our trip to the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art was especially inspiring because we had a personal tour from their director of education who taught us about the history of land, the collection, and the architecture. I can’t wait to get back with more students!”

Aaron Ganci, associate professor of visual communication design

“The museums we visited during our study abroad were amazing and made me fall in love with the arts all over again. But above all, the talks with the designers were what stood out to me.

We went to EGGS Design and spoke to Katja [Egmose] and Nikolaj [Bebe], who are the creative directors for EGGS in Copenhagen. Katja had us do an exercise where a few groups had arthritis and the other groups were mute. The groups with arthritis (I was in that group) had to tape their knuckles and wrists, which would mimic the lack of movement with arthritis.

This was an important exercise because we had to go to the grocery store and pick up ingredients to make lunch while our hands and wrists were taped. This seemed weird at first, and we got some interesting looks from the people in the store, but as we were shopping – trying to hold on to the basket, use our phones to look up translations, and take out our credit cards – it all made sense.

Design isn’t about making something pretty; design is about creating a solution to a problem. Our problem was the fact that everyday tasks were made more difficult because of our mobility issues. Katja said we should always try and put ourselves in the shoes of the people for whom we are creating a solution.”

Romarie Quinones-Perez, visual communication design student

“Being exposed to well-designed solutions that address a particular problem has had the biggest influence on me. I am now confident that I can provide techniques and ideas similar to the ones used in Denmark for problem solving in the United States. For example, at the airport, instead of scanning your ticket when they start boarding, you scan your ticket to get into a seating area when you first arrive at the gate, therefore, making the boarding process quicker and less stressful.”

Caila Lutz, visual communication design student

“Denmark always ranks in the top 3 of the world’s happiest countries, and it was awesome to get some idea of why by being there and hanging out with Danish folks. We used our previous experience in design to share our own networks with our students, and we all learned a lot about how design can make life better.”

Helen Sanematsu, associate professor of visual communication design

“Everyone there was so kind! Me and the other grad student took a day trip to Møns Klint, a beach with giant white sand cliffs. We had a four-mile hike to get to there, after a train and two bus rides. During our hike back, it started to rain and the wind was really strong. We stopped to use the restroom in what turned out to be a nursing home and the manager offered us a ride to the train station. It was a 40-minute drive and she told us a lot about Denmark and even stopped at a couple churches to show us the architecture and art inside.

I think part of why everything felt so intentionally placed and beautiful in Denmark is because the people there really value what they have – not just as possessions but also in terms of quality and design as well as togetherness. So many things there are designed to maximum potential and to be aesthetically pleasing, which compliments their emphasis on togetherness and coziness. It is definitely something I have taken home with me and makes me look at things differently.”

Tiffany Pierce, visual art student

“The people there were amazing, and the architecture was breathtaking. It was an incredible experience I would want to have again and again!”

Deven Grose, visual communication design student

Read the original article from Herron School of Art + Design

IUPUI Liberal Arts Faculty, Students Assist in Repatriation of Massive Artifact Collection

U.S. Department of State’s Aleisha Woodward, center, and National Cultural Heritage Administration of China Deputy Administrator Hu Bing, to her left, inspect ancient Chinese artifacts after a repatriation ceremony in Indianapolis on Feb. 28. Photo by James Brosher, Indiana University

A most unusual ceremony played out Feb. 28 at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in downtown Indianapolis, as members of China’s national cultural heritage administration and U.S. embassy gathered alongside FBI agents and officials from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Department of State.

On the side of the meeting room sat a few of the 361 artifacts — some thousands of years old — that were once in an Indiana man’s residence but were soon to return home to China after this repatriation ceremony of unparalleled magnitude in the history of the FBI’s Art Crime Team, a rapid-deployment team of 16 special agents from around the country who have specialized training and expertise in fine arts, antiquities and cultural property.

The ceremony drew worldwide attention, with a number of Chinese news crews on hand to document the handoff.

Associate professor Holly Cusack-McVeigh, center, was joined by students Rebekah Ryan, Emily Hanawalt, Liz Ale, Rebecca Jacobs and Brianna Jackson, from left, at the repatriation ceremony. Photo by James Brosher, Indiana University

And sprinkled among the crowd were students and faculty from the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, seeing the fruits of their labor — with more work still to be done.

“It was such immediate gratification to see the look on the delegates’ faces as they opened those objects that we’ve been delicately preparing for years,” said Liz Ale, a second-year museum studies graduate student.

In the fall of 2013, when FBI agents had just begun to uncover the bizarre story of Donald Miller’s home artifact collection, one of their first calls was to IUPUI associate professor of anthropology and museum studies Holly Cusack-McVeigh.

Could she help shed light on the magnitude of the collection? And could she mobilize a group that could move these delicate pieces with dignity and safety?

“On April 1, 2014, we had over two dozen current or former students from anthropology and museum studies on-site helping FBI agents,” Cusack-McVeigh recalled. “It was absolutely astounding to see a collection of this global scale.”

In conjunction with the authorities, Cusack-McVeigh and her IUPUI contingent began the process of moving items and then cleaning and identifying them off-site. The collection was museum-like in its size (42,000 pieces) and scope, but questions about where the items came from and their legality — headlines in the United States centered around the human remains of over 500 individuals, mostly Native Americans — weren’t easily answered.

But with the help of IUPUI’s team, hundreds of pieces are returning to their rightful homes. Two years ago, some 70 items were repatriated to the Peruvian government at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. Now, Chinese officials are taking home priceless pieces.

“This repatriation ceremony is important because of our current political climate and because our Chinese counterparts care deeply about their cultural heritage,” Cusack-McVeigh said. “The members of both delegations are working together because we care about these issues and recognize the value to the country of origin.”

And the work isn’t even close to complete. The IUPUI students are helping to package the Chinese artifacts for shipping across the globe, and then they’ll continue examining, cleaning, identifying and packaging thousands more for delivery to other countries and to Native American tribes in the U.S. in what amounts to amazing on-the-job training in anthropology and museum studies.

“This has been a one-of-a-kind opportunity for my students to take what they’re learning in the classroom and apply it to the real world, but also to apply it to something that is very relevant, very current and incredibly meaningful,” Cusack-McVeigh said. “This is as much a human rights issue as anything, and that is what my students are learning both in the classroom and here, as they work countless hours to help get all of these objects back where they belong.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ John Schwarb

A Staged Reading and Public Discussion of “Tale of Black Histories,” A Play Created By Édouard Glissant.

 

Tale of Black Histories was originally written and performed in French (Histoire du nègre) by members of the Institute for Martinican Studies in 1971. This avant-garde theater experience explores the history of Afro-Caribbean peoples through the periods of slavery, independence movements, and the Civil Rights era. Members of Indianapolis’ Asante Children’s Theatre will read from the first-ever English translation of the play under the direction of Gilbert Laumord, artistic director, SIYAJ Theater Company, Guadeloupe. A short lecture by the play’s translators, Dr. Andrew Daily (U. of Memphis) and Dr. Emily Sahakian (U. of Georgia), will precede the reading. Public discussion will follow. Come and make Tale of Black Histories part of Indianapolis’ own history!

Parking vouchers will be provided to cover the parking fee in the Hine Hall garage, located under the building (Access on North Street). ADA accessible.

This event is taking place in conjunction with the 65th annual meeting for the Society for French Historical Studies. It is supported by: Indiana Humanities, IUPUI Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Africana Studies Program, Office for International Affairs, Program for Global and International Studies, World Languages and Literatures Program, George Santayana Edition.

RSVP now with Eventbrite and check out the Facebook page!

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, is featuring Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation, a performance by critically acclaimed cellist Maya Beiser, as part of its eight annual exhibition exploring the story of Lot’s Wife. Beiser will perform excerpts from her cello-opera, Elsewhere, an imaginative and psychological retelling of the biblical story of Lot’s Wife.

Avant-garde cellist Maya Beiser defies categories. A major presence on the international stage, she has been praised by Rolling Stone as a “cello rock star” and described by the Boston Globe as “a force of nature.” Maya’s discography includes ten solo albums and numerous feature appearances on film and TV soundtracks. She is a 2015 United States Artists (USA) Distinguished Fellow and a 2017 Mellon Distinguished Visiting Artist at MIT. Her 2011 TED Talk has been watched by over one million people. Maya was a founding member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars and is a graduate of Yale University.

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation is free and open to the public. It will be held at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260), offered in partnership with the Center for Interfaith Cooperation; the Judaism, Arts, Interfaith and Civic Engagement Fund of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck; Indiana Humanities; and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis.

Wednesday, April 3, 2019
7 – 8:30 pm
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available at https://www.culturalecologies.org/rsa/.

RSVP NOW!

7 Reasons Not to Miss The International Festival

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Travel around the world without leaving Indianapolis on Feb. 21, when the Office of International Affairs kicks off its 16th annual International Festival at the IUPUI Campus Center at 10:30 a.m.

Cultural performances, traditional fare and gallery exhibitions are just some of the planned events for the daylong celebration that teaches guests about different countries and their customs.

Here are just a few reasons why you shouldn’t miss the office’s biggest party of the year:

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

1. Free food

Tantalize your taste buds by visiting five food stations offering a variety of international cuisines, including:

  • China: Spicy potato salad, a light, spicy side dish flavored with hot chiles, sesame oil and a touch of sugar, tossed with scallions.
  • Turkey: Acuka, a dip made from walnuts and goat cheese, served with pita bread.
  • Middle East/South Asia: Spiced chicken shawarma, which will be served with a yogurt sauce and pita bread.
  • South Africa: Malva pudding, a sweet dessert made with eggs, sugar, butter, cream and just a touch of apricot.
  • India: Mango lassi, a smoothie-like drink.

Complimentary beverages will also be provided.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

2. Free swag

Win a free Office of International Affairs T-shirt or other IUPUI prizes by completing the GlobalJags passport. Students can pick up their passports at the Festival Info Booth, which will be located near the main entrance of the Campus Center. Participants must complete at least eight challenges to earn a prize. Prizes include swag from the Indiana Pacers and Global Gifts and gift cards from Barnes & Noble, Jockamo Upper Crust Pizza and the Indianapolis Indians.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

3. View international art

Visiting Chinese artist Dr. Lin Dihuan will be giving a reception for his Cultural Arts Gallery exhibition, “Waiting for a Flower to Bloom,” in the gallery at noon, followed by a lecture in Room 309 at 2 p.m. The Guangdong native has gained popularity thanks to his series of ink-and-brush paintings dedicated to China’s 24 solar terms. These illustrations were recently added to UNESCO’s List of Intangible Cultural Heritage. “Waiting for a Flower to Bloom” can be viewed free of charge in the Cultural Arts Gallery through Feb. 28.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

4. Selfie time

Get your picture taken at the international photo booth, which can be found in the lower level of the TV Lounge. Make sure to share all photos on social media with #GlobalJags.

5. Intercultural mixer

Mingle with international and domestic students and faculty, dine on delicious hors d’oeuvres, enjoy entertainment from other countries, share your culture, and learn about others at this special event from noon-1:30 p.m. in CE 309. This is an IUPUI Welcoming Campus Initiative hosted by the PIE Student Association and the Gateway Community of Practice on Intercultural Learning.

6. Learn something new

Nine lectures will be given between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. in CE 305. Topics range from international health care to the history of immigrants.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

7. View an international performance

Student, faculty and community groups will present cultural performances from around the world from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the Campus Center Atrium stage. Performances will include Indy Samba, Lawrence Township Mariachi Band, African Student Association Dance Team, tai chi with the Chinese Culture Club, and several forms of classical Indian dance including Bihu and Pushpanjali. Poetry will also be featured, with readings in seven languages from the Department of World Languages and Cultures and slam poetry from the Dreamers Alliance.

Guests can download a festival map in advance of the event, as well as recipes for the planned dishes being shared at the food stations. Festivities will take place from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Samantha Thompson 

IU Liberal Arts Talks with Catherine Beck

Join Catherine Beck, as she presents, “A Language Support Needs Analysis of International Law Students.”

This project takes a fresh look at the language support needs of international students enrolled in several programs at the IU McKinney School of Law to to determine whether the current Legal English courses are meeting the stakeholders’ needs.

The project was timed to inform a reevaluation of the current Memorandum of Agreement between the law school and the School of Liberal Arts.

Thursday, January 31, 2019
4-5pm at the Campus Center CE307

RSVP Now!

 

A Message From The Office of the Vice President for International Affairs (OVPIA)

Dear colleagues:

OVPIA supports a variety of competitive funding opportunities that help IU faculty members advance their research and teaching through international engagement. These include a number of exchange programs as well as internal grant programs:

  • Global Gateway Seed Grants for ASEAN, China, Europe, India, and Mexico (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to event)
  • International Short-Term Visitors Grants (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to event)
  • Language Learning Grants (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to start of program)
  • Overseas Conference Grants (deadlines: January 15, April 1, and July 1, 2019)
  • Overseas Study Program Development Grants (deadline: February 2, 2019)
  • President’s International Research Awards (PIRA) (deadline February 1, 2019)
  • Renmin University of China–IU joint research grants (deadline: April 1, 2019)

Watch for a Fall 2019 application deadline for Short-Term Exchange Programs for the 2020-2021 academic year. Exchange positions may be offered in Brazil, China, Germany, Ghana, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, and Thailand.

As you plan your international activities over the coming months, I encourage you to consider these opportunities. Follow this link for guidelines and on-line application forms:https://ovpia.iu.edu/faculty/index.html —and please feel free to email ovpia@iu.edu with any questions.