This house is a very fine art project

View the original article here.

Professor Laura Holzman and the 2017 House Life Project house

For six months, an abandoned, boarded-up house, one of several on North Tacoma Avenue in the Near Eastside neighborhood, was transformed into a hub for an array of art forms by Herron School of Art and Design faculty and graduate students, along with Indianapolis residents and artists. The one-story structure was home to the 2017 House Life Project.

From May to October, the house hosted drawing, painting, and creative writing sessions; meals; workshops; and weekly porch parties with the goal of “public creation and discovery, resulting in tangible outputs such as dialogical artworks and interactive art installations.” Much artistic exploration has gone on inside and in the yard of the old house. While most neighboring houses are long abandoned, the 2017 House Life Project brought in more than 100 kids, veteran artists, and everyone in between.

“It’s really a neighborhood-driven, community-oriented project,” said Laura Holzman, an IUPUI assistant professor of art history and museum studies, curator for House Life Project, and public scholar of curatorial practices and visual art. “We had at least 120 people come to the (Aug. 26) open house. On a week-to-week basis, we usually had 15, 20 people here including kids with their families and neighbors who show up and participate.”

The House Life Project concept was created in 2015 by Meredith Brickell, a local artist who lives on the Near Eastside.

There is no running water or electricity in the house, but when it was open, it brimmed with life. One of the first transformations made to the former home was via the boarded-up windows. Project volunteers attached hinges and locks to the window frames. The boards that were once meant to keep things out became small doors of light all season long. Of course, the boards are colorfully painted by local artists Zavier Garth, Bernny Owens, and Christopher Williams. Garth and Williams became involved with House Life Project in 2016, when they lived next to a previous project site. The many portals of natural light activate fresh creations by artists like Andrea Jandernoa, a Herron graduate student with an emphasis on integrated studio work and social practice.

 

Jandernoa was one of the first artists to respond to a spring callout to help with House Life Project. The community-minded initiative fit perfectly with her passion of using art to build and help communities. “I see myself almost as a public servant,” said Jandernoa, who previously taught art at Emma Donnan Middle School. “To me, as a social projects artist, it’s really important to situate yourself within a community where you are creating ‘with’ and ‘for’ and ‘because of.'”

Now, House Life Project has moved out of 605 N. Tacoma Ave. The tables, chairs, art supplies, magazines and other creations made within the old walls are packed up. The painted boards and siding remain, and so does the legacy of the work Holzman, Jandernoa, and the rest of the project’s team and neighbors put in for the name of community fellowship and creativity.

“To an outsider, this street might look abandoned,” Holzman said. “But it’s really about saying ‘There is community that exists. There is creativity that exists here.'”

Even now that the front door is padlocked, the work isn’t finished. Print materials are planned to document and discuss what went on for six months at 605 N. Tacoma Ave.  “We want to share the work our writers have been doing and to share more broadly the art we’ve created,” Holzman said. “We’re based in a house, but we’re nomadic in nature.”

Herron’s 2017 Undergraduate Student Exhibition

The Galleries at Herron School of Art and Design are pleased to present the 2017 Undergraduate Student Exhibition, located in Eskenazi Hall on the IUPUI campus.

The exhibition is an annual tradition featuring exceptional works produced by Herron students across a variety of artistic disciplines. Chris Reitz, gallery director of the Hite Art Institute, will serve as a guest juror and will award prizes for the top student entries.

Robert Horvath, Gold Room, 2017

Coinciding with the student exhibition is “Petit Mort,” a selection of oil paintings and digital compositions created by Associate Professor Robert Horvath during a recent sabbatical. Inspired by the complex nature of 18th-century figurative porcelain, Horvath’s newest body of work juxtaposes homoerotic imagery and Rococo style to raise questions of censorship in relation to present-day social issues for the LGBTQ community.

The exhibitions open with a public reception at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St., on November 29 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. The Undergraduate Student Exhibition will take place in the Berkshire, Reese, Paul, and Marsh Galleries, with “Petit Mort” showing in the Basile Gallery. During the reception, visitors can shop locally from a selection of affordable prints and ceramic wares made by Herron artists while supporting student clubs. The student sale will take place in the grand hallway of Eskenazi Hall from 4 to 8:30 p.m.

The Galleries at Herron are free and open to the public Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesdays until 8 p.m. For more information, visit HerronGalleries.org.

Parking is available courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor’s section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or on the upper floors of the Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6 p.m. Park on any floor after 6 p.m. and bring your parking ticket to the Herron galleries for validation.

Poet, essayist, and critic Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib will speak at IUPUI

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the IUPUI English Department are pleased to present the Rufus and Louise Reiberg Reading Series featuring poet and essayist Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib. Willis-Abdurraqib will read from his collected works at the Basile Auditorium on November 16th at 7:30pm. Free tickets are available at willis-abdurraqib.eventbrite.com.

Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib is a poet, essayist, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His poetry has been published in Muzzle, Vinyl, PEN American, and various other journals. His essays and music criticism have been published in The FADER, Pitchfork, The New Yorker, and The New York Times. His first full length collection, The Crown Ain’t Worth Much, released in June 2016 from Button Poetry, was named a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book prize. His limited edition chapbook, Vintage Sadness, was released in summer 2017. His first collection of essays, They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us, will be released this winter. He is a Callaloo Creative Writing Fellow, an interviewer at Union Station Magazine, and a poetry editor at Muzzle Magazine. He is also a member of the poetry collective Echo Hotel with poet/essayist Eve Ewing.

Additionally, he is a columnist at MTV News, where he writes about music and fights to get Room Raiders back on the air. He thinks poems can change the world, but really wants to talk to you about music, sports, and sneakers.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series is provided by the Reiberg family, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and the IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

IUPUI Center for Digital Scholarship goes 3D

View the original press release by reporter Vanessa Richards at the IUPUI newsroom.

Jenny Johnson demonstrates 3D scanner

The handheld Creaform 3D scanner looks like an old-school video game controller, a clunky throwback to the early days of Atari. But these mobile 3D scanners used by the staff in the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship are very advanced, and they are changing the way we record recent history, ancient history, and even the future.

“About two years ago, we decided to explore 3D technology and what scanning could look like,” said Jenny Johnson, head of digitization services for the Center for Digital Scholarship. “Every community and cultural heritage institution that we work with has 3D objects. As the technology has gotten better, computer processing has gotten better, and because costs have been reduced a little bit with the technology, we decided to dive into the specifics and see what we could do. The Benjamin Harrison team was really interested in this, and they’ve got an eCollection initiative to document more of their items.”

This statue of Harrison has been 3D printed using the 3D scan file

The Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site houses a large collection of former U.S. President Benjamin Harrison’s belongings in his former home, including furniture, pottery, silver, plates, and dresses. In collaboration with the Center for Digital Scholarship, these items will soon be scanned, and the digital files will be available online to view and to download. This means that anyone with access to a 3D printer will be able to create copies of the collection items. The Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site eCollection initiative is planned to go online around November.

Archaeologists are using the technology, as well. The Lawrenz Gun Club is a Mississippian Period fortified Native American village and mound complex in the central Illinois River Valley, active between the years 1150 and 1425. Jeremy Wilson, associate professor of anthropology at IUPUI, studies it; he and his team have been working on the site since 2010. He works with the IUPUI 3D digital archivists to record what they have found. Wilson’s ultimate goal, in partnership with associate professor Dan Johnson from the geography department, is to build a virtual representation of the site and how the village changed over time.

 

The digital renderings of these items are available in the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship’s online collection.

IU seeking institutional nominees for the Japan Foundation’s “Performing Arts Japan for North America” award

Blue Square

The Japan Foundation’s “Performing Arts Japan for North America” program is designed to provide financial assistance for non-profit organizations in the US and Canada that aim to introduce Japanese performing arts to local audiences. PAJ Touring Grants help present Japanese performing arts at multiple locations in the United States and Canada, with an emphasis on locations outside major metropolitan areas. PAJ Collaboration Grants help Japanese and American/Canadian artists develop new work, which will further an appreciation of Japanese culture when presented to American/Canadian audiences. The PAJ program offers two types of support:

  • The Touring Grant assists with the presentation of Japanese performing arts at multiple locations in the United States and/or Canada, with emphasis on locations outside major metropolitan areas where there is little exposure to Japanese performing arts.
  • The Collaboration Grant facilitates the collaboration of Japanese and American/Canadian artists so that they may create new work with the potential to develop into a touring project and further an appreciation of Japanese culture when presented to audiences in the United States and Canada.

Grants are determined on a cost-sharing basis and are awarded only to U.S.-based or Canada-based non-profit organizations and are subject to the relevant laws and regulations of the Japan Foundation. Applicants are eligible to apply for one project only through one of the two categories. Only one applicant from each Indiana University campus, so applications must go through the limited submissions process for each institution to determine its nominee.

To apply for IU Internal competition, please find the application at the IU Research Gateway website. The internal deadline for IUPUI is August 30, 2017.

Video installation by Ragnar Kjartansson and The National headlines summer exhibitions at the Herron Galleries

This summer, the Herron School of Art and Design will feature the first Indiana exhibition of “A Lot of Sorrow,” a video installation by Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson and indie-rock band The National.

“A Lot of Sorrow,” one of Kjartansson’s most well-known and acclaimed works, is a six-hour, single-channel video of a performance recorded at MoMA PS1 in 2013. For this piece, Kjartansson, best known for his durational performance and video work, invited The National to play their hit song “Sorrow” live on stage repeatedly and continuously for six hours, nine minutes, and 35 seconds. As hours pass and fatigue sets in, the band members experiment and improvise, yielding unexpected outcomes while Kjartansson periodically steps on stage to offer food and drink.

Kjartansson explores the creative potential of repetition by stretching a single pop song into a six-hour concert. Filmed with multiple cameras, Kjartansson’s large-screen video projection becomes an immersive experience that ARTnewscalled “astonishingly riveting,” and The New YorkTimes critic Roberta Smith described as “unimaginably expansive.”

The video will start from the beginning each day, allowing interested visitors to watch the entire 6-hour performance during gallery hours.

“A Lot of Sorrow” debuted at Luhring Augustine Bushwick in New York City in 2014 with more recent screenings at The Art Institute of Chicago, the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C.

An opening reception will take place from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m. on Friday, July 7 in conjunction with the Indianapolis Downtown Artists & Dealer’s Association’s (IDADA) monthly First Friday art tour. The exhibition runs June 14 to September 2, 2017 in Herron’s Berkshire, Reese, and Paul Galleries. All Herron exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Also on view this summer in the Herron Galleries:

  • “Mirror Mirror,” featuring new paintings and a site-specific installation by New York-based artist Jaqueline Cedar (June 14 to September 2) in the Marsh Gallery;
  • “Fold, Staple, Riot: The Art and Subculture of Zine Making” highlighting local and national self-publishing communities (June 14 to July 15) in the Basile Gallery;
  • New work by Herron alumnus Samuel Levi Jones (B.F.A. Photography ’09) from July 26 to September 2 in the Basile Gallery.

Parking is available courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or on the upper floors of the Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6 p.m. Park on any floor after 6 p.m. Bring your parking ticket to the Herron galleries for validation.

To view the original press release for this event, visit the Herron School of Art and Design website.

21st Century Great Conversations in Neuroscience, Art, and Related Therapeutics

OVERVIEW

A range of global and local experts will present their insights on how brain science and artistic processes inform one another during a one-and-half day symposium, 21st Century Great Conversations in Neuroscience, Art, and Related Therapeutics. The symposium will take place on April 8 from 8am-4pm and April 9 from 9am-12pm in Hine Hall Auditorium. Seating is limited, so please register for the symposium if you plan to attend.

This international symposium, organized by Juliet King, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, LMHC, of the Herron School of Art and Design and the Indiana University School of Medicine, will feature presentations by three international experts and three panel discussions with a mix of Indianapolis-based and global leaders in the fields of neuroscience, art, and related therapeutics.

Aimed at supporting the overall health and amelioration of disease for patients and their caregivers, families, and friends, the symposium highlights the collaborative approach of the IUPUI schools of Art and Design, Medicine, Engineering, Informatics, Health and Rehabilitation Services, Nursing, and Liberal Arts.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Anjan Chatterjee, MD is the Elliot Professor and Chief of Neurology at Pennsylvania Hospital. In 2002 he was awarded the Norman Geschwind Prize in Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology by the American Academy of Neurology. His current research focuses on spatial cognition, language, neuroethics, and neuroaesthetics.

Arne Dietrich, PhD is a cognitive neuroscientist and Professor of Psychology at the American University of Beirut, in Lebanon. Professor Dietrich’s research focuses on the neuroscience of creativity, altered states of consciousness, and the psychological effects of exercise.

Klaus Gramann, PhD is the Head of the Department of Biological Psychology and Neuropsychology Ergonomics at the Berlin Institute of Technology in Berlin, Germany. With a  doctorate in Psychology, Dr. Gramann has a concerted interest in the neuroscience of embodied and spatial cognition. His particular specialty is in Mobile Brain/Body Imaging.

ARTWORK

Presented for the first time, the artwork will feature slow-motion video portraits of four brain tumor patients from Indiana as they speak about how their diagnoses have changed their outlook on life. The artwork, funded by Indiana University’s New Frontiers Exploratory Grant, is part of a unique study bridging art, science, and medicine to generate both scientific data and artistic documentation of the human condition for patients being treated for brain tumors. 

Love and Affection in a Hostile World – Phyllis Bramson Exhibit

“It’s an Old Story … But a New Day”

This exhibition surveys three decades of work by the Chicago-based artist Phyllis Bramson. Bringing together more than 25 paintings and assemblages, Love and Affection in a Hostile World explores Bramson’s ongoing interest in Eastern mythology and iconography from the perspective of the Western imagination.

Bramson will deliver the 2017 Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 8, in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall. An opening reception will immediately follow the talk. The exhibition will then be on display in the Berkshire, Reese, and Paul Galleries until April 15.

Reading at the Table Series to feature Anila Agha

nbaker_ruag_agha_150929_3074copyIntersections

Feb. 15, 2017, 11:30am-1:00pm

University Place Conference Center, Room 200

Anila Quayyum Agha, MFA, Herron School of Art and Design

Imagine a single lightbulb inside a cube made of six 6.5 ft.-square panels of wood with intricate laser cutouts and hung from a ceiling. When the light is on, the sculpture floods the room with lace-like shadows resembling architectural motifs found in mosques. That is “Intersections.”

At the 2014 ArtPrize competition held in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Intersections wowed audiences and judges alike. It swept both the public and jury awards at ArtPrize and resulted in prize winnings of $300,000.  Professor Anila Agha’s work has garnered many honors, competitive grants, and was selected for display nationally at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, and internationally at the National Museum of Sculpture in Spain.

Join Dr. Agha to learn more about her vision that resulted in this magnificent piece of art.

The annual Reading at the Table series provides an opportunity for members of the IUPUI community to celebrate published books written by IUPUI faculty or staff. During each luncheon, the featured author/editor will read from his or her work and open the floor to discussion. Seating is limited; registration is encouraged and can be completed on the campus Events Page. Walk-ins will be handled on a first-come, first-served basis—if space is available. Purchase of a buffet-style lunch for $13.00 (dessert and soft drinks not included) is required to attend this event.

Herron Art Library hosting public reception and lecture on papermaking in the Islamic world

31qnds3gwc_actualHerron Art Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is hosting a free reception and lecture Nov. 16 presented by Radha Pandey, papermaker and letterpress printer, on Islamic-world papermaking.

The event will begin with a reception at the Herron Art Library, 735 W. New York St., at 4:30 p.m., followed by the lecture in the Herron auditorium at 6 p.m. The lecture will conclude with a Q&A session with hands-on samples of traditional Islamic papers from India, dyestuffs, and tools used for burnishing and sheetforming.

The talk will cover traditional Islamic-world papermaking history and technique, with a focus on contemporary practices in India.

The Kagzi family will be used as a case study to illuminate the introduction of papermaking in India and how it changed under British rule. The discussion will also cover how papermaking affected printing, publishing and literacy, and why it is relevant today.

Pandey earned her MFA in book arts from the University of Iowa Center for the Book, where she studied letterpress printing, bookbinding and papermaking with a focus on Western, Eastern and Islamic papermaking techniques. Her artist’s books are held in 25 public collections, including the Library of Congress and Yale University. Currently, Pandey is the lead papermaker and studio coordinator at the Morgan Conservatory in Cleveland.

The event is free to the public. RSVPs to ulibert@iupui.edu are strongly encouraged, as space is limited. Paid parking is available at the Sports Complex Garage at West New York and Blake streets, as well as at the Riverwalk Garage, just south of the Sports Complex Garage.

About Herron Art Library at IUPUI: The Herron Art Library is a full-service branch of IUPUI University Library. The library serves IUPUI students, faculty and staff as well as the local community and beyond. The collections focus on the study of the fine arts with an emphasis on modern and contemporary areas as well as a notable fine press and artist’s book collection nearing 1,000 items.

See the original news release for this event from the IUPUI Newsroom.