IUPUI Center for Service and Learning: Summer 2013 Service Learning Assistant Scholarships

The Center for Service and Learning is accepting applications for Summer 2013 Service Learning Assistant Scholarships. The summer application window will remain open from now through March 1st, 2013.

Service Learning Assistant (SLA) Scholarships are available to recognize IUPUI students who have been selected by faculty or professional staff to support community engaged faculty/staff work in teaching, research and service. SLAs may assist their faculty/staff mentor:

  • to design/implement/conduct SoTL research on a service learning class,
  • to conduct a community engaged research project,
  • to build capacity within a campus department or unit that expands the number and quality of service learning courses at the undergraduate, graduate and professional levels of the curriculum,
  • to implement a professional service project in and with the community.

IUPUI faculty and staff are invited to apply for an SLA scholarship.

  • Upon approval, instructors identify a student to serve as their SLA.  The scholarship award is then transferred from the faculty/staff mentor to the student.
  • Please note that awards are granted to support faculty work. Applications to support independent student research projects will not be supported.

To learn more about program requirements, funding levels, or to complete an online application, please visit: http://csl.iupui.edu/OSL/slaapps.asp.

 

NEH Preservation and Access research and Development Grants

NEH Logo

NEH Division of Preservation and Access

Receipt Deadline May 1, 2013 for Projects Beginning January 2014

Preservation and Access Research and Development grants support projects that address major challenges in preserving or providing access to humanities collections and resources. These challenges include the need to find better ways to preserve materials of critical importance to the nation’s cultural heritage—from fragile artifacts and manuscripts to analog recordings and digital assets subject to technological obsolescence—and to develop advanced modes of searching, discovering, and using such materials.

Applicants should define a specific problem, devise procedures and potential solutions, and explain how they would evaluate their projects and disseminate their findings. Project results must serve the needs of a significant number of humanists.

For details: http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/preservation-and-access-research-and-development

 

Gilder Lehrman Center Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery Fellowship

A residential fellowship with The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition

http://www.yale.edu/glc/info/trafficking.htm

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition (GLC), part of the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale University, invites applications for a residential fellowship from scholars and public intellectuals to study the fundamental origins and circumstances surrounding debt bondage, forced labor, human trafficking, and other forms of modern day slavery. Traditional academics as well as writers/researchers without academic institutional affiliation are encouraged to apply. The Center is offering one fellowship in 2013-14.

This is an interdisciplinary fellowship program, based in history and the social sciences, which aims to promote innovative research on the origins and conditions that lead to contemporary slavery. In recent years many NGOs and other activists have worked very hard to provide data, to engage in intervention, and to raise public and governmental awareness on this international problem. At the GLC and at Yale, and at other cooperating institutions such as the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati we believe the issues of modern slavery would benefit from a more robust research base rooted in, but not necessarily limited to, historical analysis and interpretation.

The Fellow will be expected to be in full-time residence during the academic year beginning September 1, 2013. An earned doctorate in a relevant field or alternatively equivalent qualifications for research and teaching are expected for the successful candidate. In addition to working on his/her own research project, the Fellow is expected to teach one course related to his/her research and hold related office hours for students, participate in the fall conference and offer one public lecture or conduct a workshop either at Yale or at the Freedom Center in Cincinnati. The Fellow is also expected to interact with students and faculty, contribute to the intellectual life of the Center, and participate in its collective activities and development. Ideally, the fellow will also complete a significant publication during his/her residency.

Under the direction of Professor David W. Blight, the Center fosters an intellectual community at Yale through the interaction of students, faculty, and visiting scholars interested in the understanding of all aspects of the institution of slavery from the earliest times to the present. The Center organizes various activities, including lectures, speaker series, workshops, and conferences. For more information, visit www.yale.edu/glc.

Stipend and Resource Information
The successful fellow will receive an academic year stipend of $55,000 plus individual health insurance coverage. All Gilder Lehrman Center Fellows will have full access to the Yale University libraries and email. Normally, Fellows can expect shared office space, computer access and basic office supplies. Interested candidates, who have other sources of funding, may apply with a clear indication of their funding situation. All applicants should indicate clearly whether they are seeking full or partial funding. AA/EOE; applications from women and minorities are encouraged.

Application Process
Applicants should apply through Academic Jobs On-Line athttps://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/2477 and must include the following:

  1. Cover letter, including current e-mail address
  2. Current curriculum vitae, including publications
  3. A 1500-word description of the proposed research project. The description should include the background, nature, importance, specific objectives, and methodology of the proposed research project.
  4. Two letters of recommendation. Referees should discuss the candidate’s teaching ability as well as other points. Letters of reference can be uploaded directly by the referees through the online application site.
  5. An official university transcript (graduate level, if applicable).
  6. A summary of the proposed course (300-word max)

Deadline for submission: March 1, 2013

For additional information email gilder.lehrman.center@yale.edu.
Late or incomplete applications will NOT be accepted.

 

Gilder Lehrman Center 2013-14 Faculty and Postdoctoral Fellowship Program

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University invites applications for its 2013-2014 Fellowship Program. The Center seeks to promote a better understanding of all aspects of the institution of slavery from the earliest times to the present. We especially welcome proposals that will utilize the special collections of the Yale University Libraries or other research collections of the New England area, and explicitly engage issues of slavery, resistance, abolition, and their legacies. Scholars from all disciplines are encouraged to apply. To support both established and younger scholars in researching projects that can be linked to the aims of the Center, the GLC offers two types of residential fellowships:

One-month Fellowships

The Gilder Lehrman Center will award several one-month fellowships between September 2013 and May 2014. Please specify your preference for residency in your application. The one-month fellowships are designed for scholars who are working on short-term projects including articles, book chapters, or other research endeavors. The one-month fellowship provides support of $3,208, plus library privileges and office space.

 Four-month Fellowships

The Gilder Lehrman Center will award two four-month fellowships, one in the fall semester (from September to December 2013), and one in the spring semester (from either January to April 2014 or February to May 2014). Please specify your preference for residency in your application. The four-month fellowships are designed for scholars who are working on short-term projects including articles, book chapters, or other research endeavors. The four-month fellowship provides support of $12,832, plus health insurance (if requested), library privileges, and office space.

Fellowship Requirements

Applicants MUST have received the Ph.D. prior to the beginning of their appointment. Both established and younger scholars are invited to apply. Fellows will be expected to participate in the intellectual life of the GLC and the larger Yale community, and to acknowledge the support of the GLC and the MacMillan Center in publications and lectures that stem from research conducted during the fellowship term. All fellows will be expected to offer one public lecture during their tenure at Yale.

Application Information

To apply to the Gilder Lehrman Center Fellowship Program, you are required to submit the following materials via Academic Jobs Online:

  • Cover Letter
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV),
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Three to five page statement regarding intended research project (research statement)

A complete application, including letters of recommendation, must be uploaded to the Academic Jobs Online website by Friday, March 1, 2013. No late applications will be accepted.

Click here to access Academic Jobs Online and to apply for the GLC fellowship.

 

David B. Larson Fellowship in Health and Spirituality

Deadline: April 17
Application Form: MS WordPDF (59kb)

  • Research on the relation of religiousness and spirituality to physical, mental, and social health
  • Open to U.S. citizens or permanent residents with a doctoral degree conferred prior to April 15
  • Stipend: $4,200 per month (6 to 12 months)

Further information:

John W. Kluge Center
phone: (202) 707-3302
fax: (202) 707-3595
email: scholarly@loc.gov

The Library of Congress invites qualified scholars to apply for a post-doctoral fellowship in the field of health and spirituality. Made possible by a generous endowment from the International Center for the Integration of Health and Spirituality (ICIHS), the fellowship is named in honor of the Center’s late founder, David B. Larson, an epidemiologist and psychiatrist, who focused on potentially relevant but understudied factors which might help in prevention, coping, and recovering from illness.

The fellowship is designed to continue Dr. Larson’s legacy of promoting meaningful, scholarly study of these two important and increasingly interrelated fields. It seeks to encourage the pursuit of scholarly excellence in the scientific study of the relation of religiousness and spirituality to physical, mental, and social health. The fellowship provides an opportunity for a period of six to twelve months of concentrated use of the collections of the Library of Congress, through full-time residency in the Library’s John W. Kluge Center. The Kluge Center is located in the splendid Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library, and it furnishes attractive work and discussion space for its scholars as well as easy access to the Library’s specialized staff and to the intellectual community of Washington. If necessary, special arrangements may be made with the National Library of Medicine for access to its materials as well.

Applicant Eligibility

Applicants must by U.S. citizens or permanent residents and must possess a doctoral degree awarded by the deadline date. For the purposes of the Larson Fellowship, doctoral degrees include the Ph.D., M.D., Sc.D., Dr.P.H., D.S.W., P.Psy., D.S.T., Th.D., and J.D.

Tenure & Stipend

The fellowship is tenable for a period from six to twelve months, at a stipend of $4,200 per month, for residential research at the Library of Congress. Stipends will be paid monthly by the Library of Congress by means of electronic transfer to a U.S. bank account. Transportation arrangements and housing are the responsibility of the Fellow. The Library of Congress does not supply health insurance coverage but can provide contacts with commercial providers. If a Fellow becomes ill or injured during the term of appointment, there is no provision for health care.

Applications

Applicants must submit a formal application packet, including an application form, a two page curriculum vitae which should indicate major prior scholarship, a one paragraph project summary, a bibliography of basic sources, a research proposal of no more than 1,500 words, and three letters of reference (in English) from people who have read the research proposal. The research proposal must define those aspects the applicant wishes to study in the relationships of religiousness and spirituality to physical, mental, and social health. Research perspectives may begin with, but need not be limited to, medical, psychiatric, psychological, nursing, public health, religious, ministerial, legal, sociological, anthropological, or historical experience. Interdisciplinary or cross-cultural proposals are welcomed. Applicants should be prepared to indicate those Library of Congress collections they anticipate using. Among the collections available to researchers are the world’s largest law library and outstanding multi-lingual collections of books and periodicals. Deep special collections of manuscripts, maps, music, films, recorded sound, prints and photographs, are also available. Further information about the Library’s collections can be found on the Library’s website: http://www.loc.gov/rr/ .

Due Date

The application deadline is April 17, with the fellowship commencing anytime after September 1. Application materials must be post-marked by the deadline date to be considered. Applicants are urged to consider submitting their application materials online or by fax, to avoid any problems caused by mail delivery.

Expectations

The Larson Fellow is expected to develop research of a publishable quality. As a Kluge Center resident scholar, fellows are also expected to present a public seminar about their research, to participate actively in Kluge Center events and programs.

Contact Information

Completed application packets, questions, and other requests for information should be sent to the following address. Please note that containing mail delivery problems at the Library may require submitting the application packet by fax or email, to insure delivery by the deadline date:

Larson Fellowships
Library of Congress, LJ-120
101 Independence Avenue, SE
Washington, DC 20540-4860
tel. 202 707-3302; fax 202 707-3595
email: scholarly@loc.gov

Short-Term Research Fellowships

The New York Public Library is pleased to offer Short-Term Research Fellowships to support visiting scholars from outside the New York metropolitan area engaged in graduate-level, post-doctoral, and independent research.  Fellowship stipends are $1,000 per week for up to four weeks and researchers must be in residence at the Library for a minimum of two weeks between July 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014.  Scholars needing to conduct on-site research in the Library’s special collections to support projects in the humanities including but not limited to art history, cultural studies, history, literature, performing arts and photography are welcome to apply. Applicants must be United States citizens or permanent residents with the legal right to work in the U.S.

In 2013-2014, the Library will offer additional fellowships to support the study of food and society focusing on manuscript cookbooks and related archival collections held by the Library. With support from the Pine Tree Foundation, the Food Studies Fellowships are intended to support multidisciplinary research and expose individuals working in the area of food studies to manuscript recipe books and archival collections held at the Library. Applicants for this fellowship should follow the same guidelines as the Short-Term Research Fellowship program.

Short-Term Research Fellowship important dates

Application Deadline:  April 8, 2013.
Notification:  May 3, 2013.
Award Period:  July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2014.

Questions about the Short-Term Research Fellowships should be directed to the curatorial staff in the area of the applicant’s interest.  Please visit www.nypl.org/collections/nypl-collections for detailed information about the research resources of The New York Public Library.

Download the Application Guidelines to ensure Short-Term Research Fellowship applications are complete before submission.

Application:  Complete applications consist of an abbreviated CV with current contact information, a research-project proposal, and desired length of residency sent as a single PDF or Word attachment no more than five pages in length.  The application and a single letter of recommendation in support of the research project must be sent to short.term@nypl.org before the April 8, 2013 deadline.

Research project proposals: The research-project proposal is to include a general description or abstract of the research project, its title and format, i.e. dissertation/book/article. Applicants should then identify specific material(s) to be consulted during the desired dates of the fellowship period. Successful applications will also include an in depth explanation of how collections existing only at the New York Public Library are essential to the progress and completion of the research project.

Fellowship Announcement. The awarding of the fellowships will be announced by May 3, 2013. Fellowship recipients and their research projects will be acknowledged on The New York Public Library website and in Library publicity.

Residency. Fellows must take up residency between July 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014.  Fellows are expected to be in continuous residence for the duration of the fellowship award period as specified in the proposal.  The maximum proposal length is six weeks.

Fellow’s Report. Each fellow is required to write a brief statement about his or her project and work completed at the Library by the end of the award period.

 

RESEARCH NOTICE: ECA Open Competition for Professional Fellows Program – Limited Submission

Internal Deadline: 2/19/2013

ECA Proposal Deadline: 3/25/2013

 

Brief Description:

The Professional Fellows Division in the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs; Office of Citizen Exchanges announces an open grant competition to conduct the Professional Fellows Program (PFP) in the regions of Africa (AF), East Asia and Pacific (EAP), Europe and Eurasia (EUR), the Near East (NEA), South and Central Asia (SCA) and the Western Hemisphere (WHA). Proposals must address one of the following three themes: 1) Legislative Process and Governance, 2) Economic Empowerment, and 3) Rule of Law.

 

The Professional Fellows Program is a two-way, global exchange program designed to promote mutual understanding, enhance leadership skills, and build lasting and sustainable partnerships between mid-level emerging leaders from foreign countries and the United States. The Professional Fellows Program supports the following broad goals:

1.     Promote mutual understanding and lasting partnerships between mid-level, emerging leaders from foreign countries and the United States;

2.     Provide a forum for American and foreign emerging leaders to collaborate and share ideas, approaches, and strategies regarding some of the world&39;s most pressing challenges; and

3.     Build a global network of professionals able to work effectively in a dynamic and increasingly interconnected environment.

 

Award Amount:

·         Approximate Grant Award: $350,000 to $750,000

·         Cost Sharing or Matching Funds. There is no minimum or maximum required.

 

Limitation: One per Indiana University

Eligible applicants may not submit more than one proposal in this competition. If more than one proposal is received from the same applicant, all submissions will be declared technically ineligible and will receive no further consideration in the review process. Please note: Applicant organizations are defined by their legal name, and EIN number.

 

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by February 19, 2013 for internal coordination. Although not required, it is recommended that you contact limited submission indicating your interest in this program to help expedite the review process.

 

Provide:

·         1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references)

·         A Letter of Nomination from Chair or Dean

·         Abbreviated CV for the PI (not to exceed 3 pages)

 

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=1974

URL for complete guidelines: http://eca.state.gov/organizational-funding/open-grant-solicitations

 

Call for applications Paris IAS / Academic year 2014-2015

The Institute for Advanced Study of Paris (IAS Paris)

Call for applications Paris IAS / Academic year 2014-2015

The Paris Institute for Advanced Study welcomes applications from all over the world from established scholars and scientists in the fields of the humanities, the social sciences and related fields for periods of five or nine months, respectively.  Paris IAS will host  twenty international guest researchers for 2014-2015 to work freely on the project of their choice, to benefit from the scientific environment of the Institute, and to create contacts with researchers in the academic institutions of Greater Paris.

Date of publication: February 1, 2013 
Deadline for applications: April 30, 2013

Applicants may request residencies for the following periods:

• 1 September 2014 to 31 January 2015 (5 months)
or
• 1 October 2014 to 30 June 2015 (9 months)
 or
• 1 February to 30 June 2015 (5 months)

CONDITIONS OF ELIGIBILITY

Researchers from all countries are eligible.

Applicants, who have spent more than a total of 12 months in France during the last 3 years prior to the application, are not eligible.

This call for applications is open to :

• Senior Fellows: having a full professorship or seniority at the professor-level and having a minimum of 10 years of full time research experience


• Junior Fellows: Having the status of postdoctoral researcher, holding  a position in a university or research institution, and having  a minimum of 3 and maximum of 9 years of full-time research experience after the Ph.D.Knowledge of French and English is required.

THE APPLICATION

The application, in English or French, should be submitted via an online application system (see our website http://paris-iea.fr for a detailed description of the procedure).  Paper applications are not accepted.

For additional information :
About Paris IAS : http://paris-iea.fr/en

Terms and conditions : http://paris-iea.fr/en/terms-and-conditions

Fellow’s Charter : http://paris-iea.fr/en/fellows-charter

E-mail address : candidature2014@paris-iea.fr

NEH Grant: Bridging Cultures through Film: International Topics, Deadline June 12

Brief Summary

The Bridging Cultures through Film: International Topics program supports documentary films that examine international and transnational themes in the humanities. These projects are meant to spark Americans’ engagement with the broader world by exploring one or more countries and cultures outside of the United States. Proposed documentaries must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship.

The Division of Public Programs encourages the exploration of innovative nonfiction storytelling that presents multiple points of view in creative formats. The proposed film should range in length from a standard broadcast length of thirty minutes to a feature-length documentary.

We invite a wide range of approaches to international and transnational topics and themes, such as an examination of a critical issue in ethics, religion, or history, viewed through an international lens; an exploration of a topic that transcends a single nation-state, with the topic being explored across borders; or an exploration of the history and culture(s) of a specific region, country, or community outside of the United States.

http://www.neh.gov/grants/public/bridging-cultures-through-film-international-topics

New Frontiers/New Currents Grant, Deadline Feb. 1, 2013

New Frontiers/New Currents Grant:

2013 Deadlines: February 1 and August 1 (and within 6-12 months of the date of the anticipated conference or seminar)

Funding of up to $20,000 is available for New Currents programs, specifically workshops, symposia, small conferences, roundtables that offer new perspectives on, and new insights into, areas of scholarship and research in the arts and humanities.  The goal of this initiative is to host major distinguished thinkers on timely topics of significant and broad interest to the arts and humanities community and beyond, with funding preference provided to those topics more likely to have interdisciplinary interest across the arts and humanities. While presentations or participation by Indiana University faculty as part of the funded project are welcome, the majority of speakers/participants should be drawn from the outside academic community, and all speakers/participants should be nationally recognized. Written commitments by all participants in the event must be provided with the proposal.

Key to this funding initiative is dissemination, certainly including but also beyond the Indiana University community. Thus, contractual evidence for publication/dissemination of proceedings (with contributions by conference participants) as appropriate for the discipline and event is required for funding through this mechanism (see bullets below).

Application Format:

Proposals for New Currents Grants must be submitted no later than six months before the anticipated date of the event and no earlier than a year before the event, at http://research.iu.edu/funding_newfrontiers.shtml. All proposals must include:

  • a project description (3 page maximum)
  • list of confirmed speakers and rationale for their selection (2 page maximum)
  • project budget submitted using the Work on your budget function on the online application form
  • budget justification for funds requested • up-to-date c.v.(s) of proposer(s) (3 page maximum)
  • two letters of support: one from department or unit head and an additional letter from an expert in the field, not necessarily from Indiana University, assessing the significance and innovation of the project and the likelihood of its impact and success
  • a letter confirming participation from all internal and external participants
  • contractual evidence of significant dissemination, reflecting the importance placed upon dissemination for this initiative. Such evidence might include:
  • agreement with an outside publisher for publication of the conference proceedings,
  • agreement/contract with a gallery or concert facility for a presentation of a concert or gallery show outside of Indiana University with accompanying program notes,
  • agreement/contract for webinars or other new media forms of dissemination,
  • agreement/contract for publication of a themed issue of a scholarly journal
  • similar evidence as that listed above appropriate to the discipline and event.
  • Costs associated with dissemination (including publication costs) cannot be included in the budget proposal.

Recipients of funding are required to submit a brief interim report within one month after the completion of the meeting portion of the project, and a brief final report following the dissemination portion of the project. Failure to do so will preclude eligibility for future internal funding from the programs.