IU Researchers Awarded $2.3 million to Continue Studies on Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

Drs. Kelley and Fehrenbacher have been awarded a five-year, $2.3 million grant from the NCI to continue their studies on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, or CIPN. Tim Yates photo.

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana University School of Medicine cancer researchers who have been working to lessen the debilitating side effects caused by chemotherapy have been awarded $2.3 million to continue their studies.

Jill Fehrenbacher, PhD, and Mark Kelley, PhD, are recipients of the five-year grant (1R01CA231267) from the National Cancer Institute, which will enable them to continue their studies on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, or CIPN.

The duo and their colleagues will test the effectiveness of a small, targeted molecule called APX3330 to prevent or reverse CIPN caused by cancer drugs in tumor-bearing mice.

“For patients with CIPN, this might be an option for pain relief or neuropathic symptom relief in the future,” said Fehrenbacher, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology at IU School of Medicine and a researcher at the IU Simon Cancer Center. “Alternatively, for patients undergoing chemotherapy treatments, it might be something we can administer alongside the chemotherapy drugs so they never develop CIPN.”

Fehrenbacher added: “The critical element of this grant is that we also are validating our preliminary results that the drug does not compromise the ability of the chemotherapy to kill the cancer cells.”

Although cancer treatments are becoming more effective and people are consequently surviving cancer in increasing rates, many patients report neuropathy — a nerve problem that causes pain, numbness and tingling in the hands and feet and muscle pain and weakness. As many as 30 to 60 percent of cancer patients say they experience neuropathy.

Neuropathy can become severe enough for some patients that their treatment needs to be reduced or stopped. The effects also can linger well beyond the course of the treatment.

Currently, there are no effective treatments or preventive treatments against neuropathy because researchers don’t yet understand all of the mechanisms that lead to it. It is believed that neuropathy develops over time as a cumulative effect of chemotherapy that alters the function of sensory neurons, which are responsible for detecting pain and touch.

In 2017, Kelley, associate director of basic science research at the IU Simon Cancer Center, was first awarded a $2.9 million grant (1R01CA205166) from the National Cancer Institute to study CIPN. Fehrenbacher is also a co-principal investigator of that initial grant. That grant was awarded because Kelley, Fehrenbacher, and colleagues had previously demonstrated in the lab that increasing the repair activity of a protein called APE1/Ref-1 decreased neurotoxicity. The aims of the 2017 grant are to study, in detail, the mechanisms by which APE1 alters the function of the sensory neurons. Interestingly, they also found that APX3330 was effective in reducing APE1’s ability to facilitate the growth and spread of tumors in mice models, therefore this new drug has the potential to block the advancement of cancer and CIPN.

“It’s very rewarding to receive funding for these studies from the NCI in continued support of our efforts to further advance APX3330 for anti-CIPN studies, both in the lab as well as in the clinic,” Kelley said.

Kelley pointed out that APX3330 is currently in phase I trials, supported by Apexian Pharmaceuticals, to test its safety for people. Kelley is a co-founder and chief scientific officer at Apexian, which plans to advance APX3330 for phase II trials for anti-tumor and anti-CIPN studies. Kelley called those studies a “potential win-win for patients.”

APX3330 was developed based on Kelley’s nearly three decades of cancer research.

The National Cancer Institute awarded both grants as part of its Provocative Questionsinitiative, a program aimed at promoting cancer-related research on important yet understudied areas or research questions that have proven difficult to address.

Melissa Fishel, PhD, and Karen Pollok, PhD, scientists from the cancer center’s Tumor Microenvironment and Metastasis research program, are collaborators on this study as is Theodore Cummins, PhD, an electrophysiologist in the School of Science at IUPUI.

Read the original article from IUPUI News‘ Michael Schug

A Message from Rafael Macia from the Institute for European Studies

Just as a reminder before the November 5th deadline, please see below the announcement for EURO’s research and travel awards for Fall 2018 – Spring 2019. You can find more information, along with the application forms for graduate students, and for faculty.

Research and Travel Awards for Faculty
The Institute for European Studies is happy to announce two grant competitions for the Fall of 2018 and the Spring of 2019. Eligible applicants are allowed to apply for both, but with the understanding that only one award may be accepted per person.

The Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence Grant offers one $1,500 award in the Fall and one in the Spring to an IU faculty member (TT or NTT) to support research and / or travel related to any aspect of European politics, society, or culture, whether current or historical in scope.

EURO’s Title VI Grant offers 2 awards of $1,500 each in the Fall and 2 in the Spring to IU faculty to support international research and / or travel, as well as 2 awards of $750 each (also Fall and Spring) to support domestic research and / or travel related to any aspect of European politics, society, or culture, whether current or historical in scope.

Research and Travel Awards for Graduate Students

The Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence Grant: One $1,500 award in the Fall and one in the Spring to an IU graduate student to support research and/or travel related to any aspect of European politics, society, or culture, whether current or historical in scope.

Research funds may be used to conduct preliminary thesis or dissertation feasibility studies or to compile evidence for their Master’s thesis or dissertation. While priority is given to students pursuing an MA or doctoral minor in European Studies, all IU graduate students are welcome to apply.

Grant recipients are expected to send a report detailing how the grant was used and on invitation, to present their results at a lecture hosted by the Institute for European Studies.

The Fall application deadline for all competitions is November 5, 2018, at 5 pm.

The Spring application deadline for all competitions is March 25, 2019, at 5 pm.

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens Research Fellowships 2019-2020

The Huntington Library awards over 150 research fellowships annually. The application deadline for fellowships in the 2019-2020 academic year is November 15, 2019. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make contributions to its intellectual life.

Traditional Japanese gardens and red moon-shaped bridge Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens San Marino California

The Huntington is an independent research library with significant holdings in British and American history; British and American literature; art history; the history of science and medicine; and the history of the book. The Library collections range chronologically from the eleventh century to the present. 

Long-Term fellowships are for nine to twelve months in residence with a stipend of $50,000. Three long-term fellowships are funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities ($4,200/ month from the NEH; the balance of the stipend from the Huntington funds).

Short term fellowships are for one to five months in residence and carry stipends of $3,500.

The Dibner Program in the History of Science offers historians of science and technology the opportunity to study in the Burndy Library, a remarkable collection in the history of science and technology. Both long and short term fellowships are available.

Travel grants and exchange fellowships for study in the United Kingdom and Ireland are for study in any of the fields in which The Huntington’s own collections are strong and where the research will be carried out in the libraries or archives in the United Kingdom and Ireland. We also offer exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, Lincoln, and New Colleges, Oxford; Trinity Hall, Cambridge; Durham University; and Trinity College Dublin.

To learn more about these opportunities and applications, click here  to visit the Huntington Library website!

Internal Grants for Faculty From Office of the Vice President for International Affairs (OVPIA)

OVPIA supports a variety of competitive funding opportunities that help IU faculty members advance their research and teaching through international engagement. These include a number of exchange programs as well as internal grant programs!

  •   Short-Term Exchange Program for the 2019-2020 academic year (deadline: October 12, 2018); exchange positions will be offered in Brazil, China, Germany, Ghana, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, and Thailand.
  • Freie Universität Berlin- IU Joint Research Workshops and Short-Term Research Grants (deadline September 28th)
  • Global Gateway Seed Grants for China, Europe, India, Mexico, and ASEAN (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to event)
  • International Short-Term Visitors Grans (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to event)
  • Language Learning Grants (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to start of program)
  • Overseas Conference Grant (deadlines: October 1, 2018; January 15, April 1, and July 1, 2019)
  • Overseas Study Program Development Grants (deadlines: November 1, 2018; February 2, 2019)
  • President’s International Research Awards (PIRA) (deadline TBD)
  • Renmin University of China- IU joint research grants (deadline: November 1, 2018; April 1, 2019)

As you plan international activities, check out these opportunities! Follow this link for guidelines and on-line application forms! If you have any questions, email ovpia@iu.edu!

Two IUPUI Students Heading to Spain to Cover FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup

IUPUI Sports Capital Journalism Program students Frank Bonner and Ryan Gregory, from left, are covering the 16-nation FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup in Tenerife, Spain. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

The lineup of major sporting events covered by IUPUI students in the Sports Capital Journalism Program reads like a sports journalist’s bucket list: Olympic Games, Final Fours, Indianapolis 500s and the College Football Playoff.

It’s a list no other college program can match, and another spotlight event will be added this week as two journalism students fly to Tenerife, Spain, for the FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup. Teams from 16 nations, including the two-time defending champion U.S. team, will compete Sept. 22-30 to determine the world’s best.

Ryan Gregory, a junior from Fort Wayne majoring in sports journalism, and Frank Bonner, a graduate student from Indianapolis studying sports journalism, are making the trip along with Malcolm Moran, director of the Sports Capital Journalism Program. They’ll be writing stories primarily for USAB.com, USA Basketball’s official website, working from press row and interviewing players and coaches at arguably the biggest event in the sport.

“A lot of countries focus on this tournament more than the Olympics, because basketball can get overshadowed there. For this event, the whole focus is pure basketball,” Moran said.

“We’ve had students who have covered women’s basketball games in the Olympics, but this is the first time we’ve done the World Cup.”

The Sports Capital Journalism Program is part of the Department of Journalism and Public Relations in the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Students who take part in the program’s remarkable range of top-shelf sports opportunities have their expenses completely covered, which also differentiates IUPUI’s offering from many other schools.

The students will arrive in Spain with plenty of experience covering events. Gregory has covered the Indianapolis Colts, Indiana Fever and Indy Fuel, as well as the NCAA Division I Swimming and Diving Championships last year at the IU Natatorium. Bonner, before entering the sports journalism graduate school program, was a sports reporter at the Columbus Republic for two years.

“We have two seasoned veterans, and that’s important because there are going to be logistical challenges, your patience is tested, you’re dealing with all that — and you’re dealing with it somewhere else in the world,” Moran said.

The event can be a challenge for students, with the time commitment of nearly two weeks, including games and travel, in the heart of the semester. But the students’ professors are supportive of the trip, and there is time for classwork between games.

There’s plenty of studying to go around, as FIBA rules are different from what American fans and journalists are used to. The court is slightly smaller, timeouts can only be called by coaches and teams may inbound the ball without an official first touching it, similar to throw-ins in soccer.

“I want to be familiar with the tournament itself before learning the players,” Gregory said. “I feel like those details will come.”

Moran, who will travel with the students as an advisor and editor, covered the creation of USA Basketball nearly three decades ago while writing for The New York Times. He also wrote extensively about U.S. women’s team coach Dawn Staley and assistant coach Jennifer Rizzotti when they played in college.

The U.S. women’s team is vying for its third consecutive gold medal, a feat it has never achieved in the Women’s World Cup.

IUPUI Arts and Humanities Internal (IAHI) Grant

Award cycle:
FY 2018-19

Funding available:
varies by category

The IAHI Grant Program is designed to enhance the research and creative activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty. The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.

The program has five categories of funding. They are:

  1. Small Travel Grants for Conferences and Exhibitions: up to $500 to support travel to a conference or exhibition related to a research or creative project. Applicants may receive only one award per year.
  2. Event Support Grants: up to $1,000 to support a public event at IUPUI related to a research or creative project. Applicants may receive only one award per year.
  3. Research/Creative Activity Grant: up to $5,000 for travel, equipment, materials, space, hourly assistance, etc. Applicants may apply and receive this grant on a yearly basis.
  4. Matching Grant for Research/Creative Activity: up to $15,000 total project that may be used for things such as release time, summer salary, research assistant support, or a research workshop or conference, as well as incidental expenses. This grant requires a 1 to 2 match from the school, department, and/or center sponsoring the faculty (i.e. $10,000 grant, $5,000 school). Salary requests are allowed and cannot exceed one month of salary per person. A matching grant recipient is eligible to apply for a new matching grant no sooner than two years from the previous grant proposal submission.
  5. Collaborative Grant for Research/Creative Activity: up to $30,000 to support research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by a team of two or more arts and humanities faculty from different units on campus. Funds might be used for things such as release time, summer salary, research assistant support, or a research workshop or conference, as well as incidental expenses. A Collaborative Grant recipient is eligible to apply for a new Collaborative Grant no sooner than two years from the previous grant award. Funding preference in this category will be given to projects that correspond to one of the following themes: Social Justice and the Urban Environment or Global Exchange and a Changing Planet.

Eligibility

Eligible PIs

  • All full-time tenured and tenure-eligible faculty from all schools and units at IUPUI.
  • Under certain circumstances, non-tenure-track faculty members whose evaluation criteria include research or creative activity may also be eligible with an explanation in the letter of support from their chair or dean.
  • An associate member (or non-eligible member) of the IUPUI faculty can be a participant in a grant in collaboration with a PI who is an eligible member of the IUPUI faculty.

Ineligible PIs

  • Visiting faculty members
  • Associate faculty members
  • Postdoctoral fellows

Funding

Allowed

  • See Categories.

Not Allowed

  • Funds will not be granted for a project currently supported by another internal funding mechanism unless a case is made in justifying the complementary funding.

Application requirements

  • All grants are intended for support of research and scholarly activity, not for support of teaching and/or service activities. Scholarship of teaching may be supported under this grant program, if it has strong and clearly articulated research outcomes.
  • Projects will be limited to one (1) year in duration.
  • An investigator may not serve as PI or Co-PI on more than one IAHI grant proposal in a given round.
  • Applications will be judged on the merit of the proposed research or creative activity, qualifications of the applicant, significance of the research to the field, the potential for additional external funding, and the project’s importance to the individual’s future research plans. Applications for new projects are encouraged.

Application sections include:

  • Cover page
  • Abstract
  • Project Plan not to exceed five pages
  • References cited
  • Budget and Justification
  • Biographical Sketch or CV not to exceed five pages, include funding history
  • Letters of support from collaborators and department chair
  • IRB, IACUC, and/or IBC forms if applicable

    Categories 1 and 2

    Submission deadlines: Open

    Categories 3, 4, and 5

    Submission deadlines: October 1 and February 1

Ready to apply?! Click here! 

Information from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research (OVCR)

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies Receives NEH Grant

Photo by Liz Kaye, IU Communications

The Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at IUPUI, one of the most extensive single-author archives housed at a university, has received a $50,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Read the original article from News at IUPUI.

On April 9, the NEH announced $18.6 million in grants for 199 humanities projects across the country, including a number of humanities collections and reference resources grants.

The grant will allow the center to prepare a preservation plan and operational procedures that will help it to eventually expand into a museum and archive with gallery space, all open to the public.

“Ray Bradbury’s archives are a treasure not only for this campus but for all scholars and fans of Mr. Bradbury and his work everywhere,” said Thomas J. Davis, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, which hosts the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies. “This generous grant will eventually allow more people to study and enjoy his life’s work and personal items.”

The center was founded in 2007, and the collection, housed in Room 121 of Cavanaugh Hall in the heart of the IUPUI campus, spans the lifetime of the science fiction master (1920-2012). His literary works, art, correspondence, manuscripts, photographs, audiovisual materials, and more are all preserved — nearly 15 tons of materials in all. His home office has also been meticulously recreated with its original contents.

“He kept everything — everything was a memento to life for him,” said Jonathan R. Eller, director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies and Chancellor’s Professor of English. “All his life, he was learning and observing. When he was beginning to dream about human beings going to outer space, the moon, and Mars, that was his dream before it was popular. His dreams became our dreams through books like ‘The Martian Chronicles.'”

Bradbury’s work continues to inspire millions today, from astronauts to statesmen to children. Literary and Hollywood legends such as Herman Wouk, Steven Spielberg, Charlton Heston, Gregory Peck, and Walt Disney, among many others, wrote letters to Bradbury during his lifetime — those are also housed in the collection.

The NEH grant will allow for the hiring of two graduate interns — at least one from the School of Liberal Arts’ Museum Studies program — devoted to coordinating all the work required to expand into a museum and gallery.

“We will be learning best practices for preservation and for inventory and accessioning, as well as the kind of activities that a gallery or archive or museum does to make sure the public has access to these items,” Eller said. “Once we’ve benefited from this grant, a lot of doors will open.”

From the NEH: Grants to Digitize Essential Humanities Books

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the largest funder of the humanities in the United States, announced seven grants, totaling more than $1 million, to convert important out-of-print humanities texts into freely available ebooks.

The third round of funding for the Humanities Open Book Program, offered jointly by NEH and Mellon, will make awards to publishers that have identified significant scholarly books that enhance public knowledge of topics such as American and European history, philosophy, classics, Asian and Latin American studies, architectural history, and literary criticism. With NEH and Mellon support, publishers will digitize these books, secure permission from copyright holders, and release them online for access by public audiences.

“NEH is pleased to join with Mellon in giving a second life to close to a thousand outstanding works of scholarship,” said NEH Senior Deputy Chairman Jon Parrish Peede. “The Humanities Open Book Program makes important texts accessible to new audiences by funding twenty-first-century approaches to disseminating humanities research.”

[read more]

Multidisciplinary Funding Opportunities from the Russell Sage Foundation

The Russell Sage Foundation has two opportunities to fund multidisciplinary research.

Race, Ethnicity, & Immigration: The primary goal of this program is to find ways in which researchers from different social science traditions studying issues of race, ethnicity, and immigration may complement one another in productive and innovative ways. Multi-disciplinary perspectives and methods that both strengthen the data, theory, and methods of social science research and foster an understanding of how we might better achieve the American ideals of a pluralist society are encouraged.

The Russell Sage Foundation’s (RSF) Integrating Biology and Social Science Knowledge (BioSS) initiative will support innovative social science research on social and economic outcomes that improves our understanding of the interactive mechanisms by which environmental influences affect biological mechanisms, and vice versa.

Faculty members interested in pursuing these opportunities should contact the IU Office of the Vice President’s (VPR) Foundation Relations team, who have particular expertise in engaging with foundations. Letters of intent are due May 24, 2018. Email Josh Moore (moorejom@iu.edu) for more information.

Core Fulbright Program Competition

From the Vice President for International Affairs:

The competition for the 2019-20 Core Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program is now open. The Core Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program sends more than 500 American scholars and professionals annually to more than 125 countries, where they lecture and/or conduct research in a wide variety of academic and professional fields. Visit the CIES website for application details.

Keep in mind that grant lengths vary and are specified in the award description; grant benefits vary but generally include travel and living expenses for the awardee and accompanying dependents; the competition is open to all U.S. citizens; the application deadline is August 1, 2018; and the Catalog of Awards is available here.

For more information, visit the CIES website and contact IUPUI’s Fulbright representative, Leslie Bozeman.