Mother Nature Inspired IUPUI Students’ Design For A Safer Football Helmet

The thick peel of a pomelo was one of nature's bio-inspired designs the students examined.
The thick peel of a pomelo was one of nature’s bio-inspired designs the students examined.

Two IUPUI students drew upon the wisdom of Mother Nature to create biologically inspired designs that could be used to create a safer football helmet.

Their research has been published in the Society of Automotive Engineering International Journal of Transportation Safety.

The student authors of the paper, “Cellular Helmet Liner Design through Bio-Inspired Structures and Topology Optimization of Compliant Mechanism Lattices,” are Jacob DeHart, a media arts and science student in the School of Informatics and Computing, and Joel Najmon, an engineering student in the School of Engineering and Technology.

Zebulun Wood, a lecturer in media arts and science, and Andres Tovar, an associate professor of mechanical and energy engineering and an assistant professor of biomedical engineering, are co-authors and co-directors of this research project.

“Our research and design algorithms show innovative, energy-absorbing cellular helmet liners,” Najmon said. “Cellular helmet liners are ideal for impact energy absorption, as their structures can mimic the excellent absorbing capabilities of foam and energy protective biological structures while maintaining the ability to be engineered for specific impact, dynamic responses.”

The two students were given the reins to experiment and explore different ways of making something that could be useful to people, DeHart said. “I took a more interpretative look at nature, mimicking functions and forms from nature, while Joel took a more scientific one, putting numbers into a program to get results.”

This work shows lessons learned from bio-inspired designs using protective structures such as pomelo peel, nautilus shell and woodpecker skull, Tovar said. “Our work explores a design approach to tailor the response of a cellular material subject to impact, an approach that offers the potential to mitigate head injury by decreasing acceleration, decreasing penetration and increasing specific energy absorption.”

“What this study really gets to is that nature, through millions of years of innovation and evolution, knows best,” Wood said. “We took some of nature’s hardest surfaces — surfaces that could be translated to helmet design — and re-created them in a way that can be simulated in engineering software.”

Nature may have provided inspiration for the cellular designs, but it took the students months to figure out how the bio-inspired shapes developed by DeHart could be re-created in a way that they could be used by Najmon in engineering simulation software that showed whether their helmet liner would reduce risk of injury.

The challenge the two students faced, Wood said, was to learn how to create geometric shapes that were inspired by nature but could also be simulated in engineering software. “Until our experiment, that was very difficult to do. It’s still difficult to do. Now IUPUI knows how to get those shapes to work together.”

The kind of collaboration that enabled the students to bridge the gap between the domains of media arts and science and engineering could only happen at a campus like IUPUI that encourages people in different fields to work together, Wood said.

The helmet liner study was supported by a grant from the Sports Innovation Institute at IUPUI.

Read the original article from IUPUI NewsJohn Schwarb and Rich Schneider

Digital Scholarship Team Gives Blind Students Unique Senior Portraits

Dressed in their emerald green graduation gowns and mortarboards, the 19 graduating seniors from the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired lined up for their class pictures.

Two queues occupied the cafeteria space inside the historic school: one for the traditional still-portrait photographer and another for a team from the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship manning two 3D-scanning stations. Most of the students sat down for both.

The scanning took only about a minute for each student. The digital composites will be sent to the school’s records as well as to the students, who can then 3D-print the scan.

Emma Parker, a biomedical engineering sophomore and 3D digital assistant for the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, does a 3D scan of Kurt Stickradt, a senior at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. Photos by Tim Brouk, Indiana University
Emma Parker, a biomedical engineering sophomore and 3D digital assistant for the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, does a 3D scan of Kurt Stickradt, a senior at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. Photos by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

“We hope this becomes a new tradition for us,” said school superintendent Jim Durst. “A picture is worth a thousand words, and an object is worth a thousand pictures. Our kids can have access to information through 3D printing, but this really personalizes it at a level we hadn’t thought of or anticipated.”

The technicians used Creaform portable 3D scanners, which take about 1,000 digital photographs per second. The software stitches the images together to create a surface in staggering detail. The 3D scans can sharpen the details of a face — or any object — to a tenth of a millimeter.

The Center for Digital Scholarship has been busy for years with collaborations with the Benjamin Harrison Presidential SiteIndianapolis Motor Speedway MuseumIndianapolis Firefighters Museum, and several other institutions and programs. Typically, the team scans inanimate objects for virtual online museum experiences that users can access anywhere on the planet. At the 2018 Regatta, the team scanned 200 students’ faces, including one who 3D-printed a life-size version of his face to make into a Halloween mask. At the Jan. 24 50th Anniversary Birthday Bash, 400 students were scanned.

Steve Mannheimer, professor of media arts and science, had worked with the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired for years as part of assistive, accessible and inclusive technology research with the Department of Human-Centered Computing. He met with Durst to plan the April 16 scanning session.

Decades of two-dimensional class photos line the school’s halls, but many of the students can’t see them. The goal of the class of 2019’s 3D scans is for that to change.

“One research question is, ‘Will the students recognize themselves?'” Mannheimer said. “Thanks to digital technology, we can provide tactual, acoustic, gestural opportunities to say, ‘How will this help somebody who may be differently abled to better interact with the world?'”

Durst was excited about what the 3D scanning will lead his students to.

“In the future, when they come back years from now with their children and grandchildren,” he said, “they can say, ‘Here’s my picture. This is what I look like,’ without depending on somebody else to find their picture.”

Visually impaired students had the option of keeping their eyes closed, as the handheld scanners emit bright lights while scanning. No sound is emitted during the process as the technician holds the scanner about an arm’s length from the subject.

Derek Miller, 3D project coordinator for the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, scans a graduating senior at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. The student will be able to send the file to a 3D printer. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

“It’s like a projector that slides across a surface’s mountains and valleys,” said Derek Miller, 3D project coordinator. “We can also capture color and texture of materials.”

Inspired by a few other assistive technology initiatives, Miller hopes to offer scanning services to the school again — not only to the graduating class, but for every class. From kindergarten to senior year, blind students will be able to realize their physical growth from their 3D-scanned portraits.

“It’s going to allow them to feel themselves tactilely,” Miller said. “Someday, hopefully, we’ll be able to scan a blind student at the age of 5 and then scan them every year. In theory, we could build a timeline of them growing that they can actually feel.”

Senior Cassondra Ernstes was one of the first students to get scanned. She was thrilled to be among the first class to have such unique senior pictures.

“That was pretty interesting. I didn’t feel anything,” Ernstes said. “I’ll be 3D-printing this. We’ve never had anything like this before. It’s pretty different, but pretty cool.”

Read the original story from IUPUI New’s Tim Brouk 

These scanners were supported by a grant from the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Kibo, Chatbot Tech That Enhances Interest In Books, Wins 2019 JagStart Competition

Radhika Ravindran pitches Kibo during the 2019 JagStart competition. Photo courtesy of the IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research
Radhika Ravindran pitches Kibo during the 2019 JagStart competition. Photo courtesy of the IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research

An idea that originated more than five years ago was developed and refined into a project that won IUPUI’s 2019 JagStart Student Idea Pitch Competition on April 12.

Radhika Ravindran, a master’s degree candidate in the School of Informatics and Computing, has a younger brother who doesn’t enjoy reading but likes using his smartphone, including sending text messages to friends. She wondered why the same activity couldn’t be used for reading books.

“While there are services to help consume books differently, nothing addresses the lack of attention span and engagement aspects of it,” Ravindran said. “My solution, Kibo, uses chatbot technology to make book-reading like a conversation and more engaging than ever.”

Ravindran delivered a three-minute elevator pitch and participated in a two-minute Q&A session with a panel of judges during the IUPUI student competition. Kibo was named the best of the 11 projects in the competition, and Ravindran was awarded $2,500 to further develop it.

“Originally I thought of making Kibo an application for home use,” Ravindran said. “But with the JagStart competition award and insights from two contacts I have made, I’m planning to turn it into an education application that could benefit students up to the university level.”

Samuel Kropp, a bachelor’s degree candidate in the Kelley School of Business, won second place and $1,500 for The Aquaponics Company. The company is based around the sustainable science of aquaponics — the combination of fish farming and hydroponics. The goal is to scale down commercial aquaponics to an in-house system to be sold directly to household consumers.

Eli Hoopengarner, a double bachelor’s degree candidate in the School of Engineering and Technology and the School of Liberal Arts, won third place and $750 for The FlexWheel. The product improves motorsport driver comfort, allocates stronger muscle groups to decrease a driver’s fatigue and provides energy dissipation upon impact.

Kristina Tinsley, a bachelor’s degree candidate in the Kelley School of Business and a member of the Honors College, and Madhura Mhatre, a master’s degree candidate in the School of Informatics and Computing, won the audience choice prizes and $500 apiece. Tinsley pitched Archived, a smartphone app that increases visitor engagement at museums and helps maintain museum inventory. Mhatre pitched Swelter Produce, which addresses the challenge of desert farming by using renewable resources to generate clean energy from heat and to extract water from humid air in arid environments for irrigation.

JagStart is organized through IUPUI’s Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research. It has undergone different iterations, including a business pitch competition, since it started in 2012. Simon Atkinson, vice chancellor for research, said it is important that resources like JagStart are available for innovative IUPUI students.

Simon Atkinson
Simon Atkinson

“These students are future entrepreneurs and leaders for Indiana,” Atkinson said. “Competitions like JagStart and other resources offered by IUPUI help them hone the soft skills that will carry them far in whatever career they choose.”

Other competitors in the 2019 JagStart Student Idea Pitch Competition and their projects were:

  • Michael Daniells: Breeze Microloans, a mobile application platform that provides access to short-term, low-principal, low-interest-rate loans.
  • Sneh Khatri: Kidzie, an application that promotes the development and well-being of young children through features that enhance parent-child communication.
  • Dakota Merkel: Rest in Peace, a social media platform that allows people to actively remember their loved ones years after they pass away.
  • Yi-shan Tabitha Tsai: epiQ, a mobile application that helps students achieve basic furniture needs.
  • Natalie Woods: Green Roofs, a product designed to allow residents in an urban environment to have their own green spaces.
  • Szu-Yu Yang and Swaroop John: Pickcart, an online-shopping-style mobile application for university students to access free food items from their on-campus food pantries.

Read the original story from IUPUI NewsSteve Martin 

Funding Available through Indiana Campus Compact

Guest Contributor: Lauren French, Master’s Student Non-Profit Mgmt., Graduate Assistant, CSL

Effective service learning and community engagement [SLCE] demands additional support to move from vision to impact and sustainability. Indiana Campus Compact [ICC ] is one important source of funding for administrators, faculty, staff, and students, who wish to partner with the community to deepen and expand programs. ICC is a partnership among 44 Indiana colleges and universities, representing 70 campuses, dedicated to preparing college students to advance the public good in their communities. IUPUI is proud to be a member campus and has found previous success in seeking funding through ICC.

Indiana Campus Compact has thousands of dollars in the form of grants and fellowships for faculty, staff, students, and the community organizations they work with. These include:

  • Service Engagement Grants: Support students, professional staff, faculty, or department level projects that integrate one or more forms of educationally meaningful service learning and community engagement.
    • Funding categories include:
    • Scholarship of Engagement [includes SL course development, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning on SL, Community Engaged Research and Professional Service Projects]
    • Student Community Service
    • Listening to Communities [support for campus community dialogues]
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $2,250 are available; upcoming proposal deadlines are February 11th, 2019 & May 13th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • Conference Scholarships: These scholarships support faculty, staff, or students at ICC campuses to present on their engaged work at regional and national conferences.
    • The presentation must relate to ICC’s mission.
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $500 are available and proposals are accepted on a rolling basis. The deadline for proposals is at least 6 weeks prior to the conference; conferences must take place before April 30th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • The Faculty Fellows Program: This is a year-long learning community experience for full-time faculty that supports the integration of service learning and community engagement into all aspects of faculty work: teaching, research, and service. Participants will work together to develop a research or creative project to enhance and advance the field of service learning and community engagement.
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $3,750 are available; deadline for letter of intent to apply is Tuesday, March 19th, 2019 and deadline for full proposal is Tuesday, May 14th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • Social Innovation Microlending Program: This program is available to students and alum of ICC campuses who are social entrepreneurs and would like to obtain a loan to start a social venture.
    • Loans are provided through a partnership with Bankable on behalf of the Indiana Small Business Administration.
    • ICC provides consultation and professional development for funded social entrepreneurs through events and partnerships with other organizations.
    • Funding Levels: Loan amounts vary from $500 to $50,000  [a typical loan amount will range from $5,000 to $10,000]. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

Greening IUPUI Grant

Taking Your Good Idea to the Next Level

Are you an IUPUI student, faculty, or staff member that has come up with a way to advance campus sustainability? Submit your idea, and you could win a Greening IUPUI Grant to make it happen.

Greening IUPUI Grants are awarded one time per year to projects that advance our campus sustainability principles and improve IUPUI’s STARS score. IUPUI dedicates a total of $50,000 annually to fund these projects.  You can review the Greening IUPUI Grant Guidelines here

Application Information

Deadlines

  • Application period opens: December 1, 2018
  • Application period closes: February 1, 2019 (11:59pm)
  • Applicants notified: April 1, 2019

Eligibility

IUPUI students, faculty, and staff may apply.  Students must have a faculty or staff member’s support and designate them as the project contact person on the application

Guidelines

Review the full Greening IUPUI Grant Fund Guidelines before applying.
Proposals should focus on one or more of the following areas:

  • Planning & Administration (Strategic initiatives, diversity, affordability, innovation)
  • Academic (Courses, research, other educational pursuits)
  • Campus Engagement (student engagement programs, events)
  • Public Engagement (volunteer opportunities, campus-community partnerships)
  • Operations (Grounds, energy, waste, water, purchasing, transportation, buildings)
  • Health & Wellness (Food, health, equity, and human sustainability

Proposals will be received by the Greening IUPUI Grant Review Committee who will evaluate the applications based on the following criteria:

  • Improving IUPUI’s STARS score
  • Long-term impact for IUPUI
  • High-impact learning experience(s)
  • Visibility
  • Student involvement
  • Reasonable timeline and feasibility
  • Financial considerations

To Apply

Complete the Greening IUPUI Grant application. You can preview the application before starting the application process.

Past Grant Awards

Need ideas?! Check out our sustainability principles, latest STARS report, and a few recent grant awards! Submit your Final Assessment Report here!

Fall 2018 Herron Highlights

Kenneth Tyler in Herron’s printmaking lab on Sept. 17, 2018. Iman Pirzadeh

As spring semester begins, we’re looking back at all that happened with the Herron community last fall. Needless to say, our students, alumni, and faculty have made great creative strides – from commissioned projects to local and national exhibitions.

Following is a recap of highlights that you may have missed over the past four months.

  • Associate Professor Anila Agha exhibited laser-cut encaustic works at Sundaram Tagore Chelsea Nov. 15–Dec. 15, 2018, in “The Art of Paper,” a group show featuring nine international artists.
  • The Arts Council of Indianapolis named five recipients of the 2018 DeHaan Artist of Distinction Award, including associate professors Anila AghaStefan Petranek, and Cory Robinson. Each recipient was awarded a $10,000 grant to fund new and dynamic creative projects.
  • TIME Magazine featured CODO Design’s packaging in the special issue “Beer: The Story of the World’s Most Celebrated Drink.” CODO Design is the brainchild of Isaac Arthur (B.F.A. Visual Communication ’09) and Cody Fague (B.F.A. Visual Communication ’09), who began business planning for the Indianapolis-based branding firm during their senior year and cofounded it the Monday after graduating.
  • Audrey Barcio (B.A.E. Art Education ’07) exhibited Aug. 27–Sept. 14, 2018, alongside American sculptor Lynda Benglis and 10 other contemporary artists in “ART IN CONTEXT” at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art.
  • Emily Bennett (M.F.A. Visual Art ’17) exhibited Nov. 17–Dec. 15, 2018, in “Multiplied Motions,” a solo show at Gaslight Art Colony in Marshall, Ill.
  • As part of a commissioned project through Herron’s Basile Center, students McKayla BensheimerAaron DoddElizabeth JorgensonApril Knauber, and Elizabeth Jorgenson, along with alumnus Jared Cru Smith (B.F.A. Furniture Design ’11), created and installed sculptures, mosaics, and benches in the Elmira Annis Civic Plaza at the new Irvington branch of Indianapolis Public Library.
  • Amelia Briggs (B.F.A. Painting ’09) was featured in the Oct. 2018 issue of Maake Magazine, an artist-run online gallery and limited-edition print publication showcasing the work of emerging contemporary artists.
  • Internationally renowned artist and Herron alumna Vija Celmins (B.F.A. ’62) exhibited nearly 150 drawings, sculptures, paintings, and prints at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in her first North American retrospective in 25 years. “Vija Celmins: To Fix the Image in Memory” opened Dec. 15, 2018 and is on view through March 31.
  • Paula Differding, a beloved visual communication design professor, retired in December after 33 years of teaching. Differding will stay connected with the Herron community as a distinguished professor emerita.
  • Lorrie Fredette (B.F.A. Sculpture ’90) exhibited in “Tender Exchanges,” a solo show at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art. The exhibition opened Nov. 18, 2018, and is on view through Feb. 10.
  • Evan Hauser (B.F.A. Ceramics ’14) exhibited in “Canary Syndrome,” a group show featuring the ceramics and glass works of nine contemporary artists, at Ferrin Contemporary in North Adams, Mass., Sept. 27–Nov. 4, 2018.
  • In October, Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas, honoredAssociate Professor Robert Horvath as a 2018 Outstanding Alumnus from the university’s Lamar D. Fain College of Fine Arts.
  • Assistant Professor Katie Hudnall, Associate Professor Meredith Setser, and Adjunct Instructor Liz Wierzbicki (M.F.A. Visual Art ’14) each receivedgrants as part of the Indiana Arts Commission’s 2019 Individual Artist Program for creative research, travel, or new studio equipment.
  • Under the direction of Professor Craig McDaniel and photography technician Benjamin Martinkus, Herron M.F.A. students Kennedy ConnerFrank MullenHailey PottsAdam RathbunSarah Strong, and Denise Troyer collaborated with IUPUI music technology students on an interdisciplinary project exploring the elements of sound and movement in both visual art and music. “HEARING THINGS” involved an exhibition of sonic and kinetic artworks on Nov. 15 in Eskenazi Fine Arts Center and a live multimedia performance on Nov. 30 at the IUPUI Informatics and Communications Technology Complex building.
  • On Nov. 30, 2018, IDEA Fellow Maria Meschi and her visual communication design graduate peers hosted IUPUI’s first Open Innovation Sprint at Herron. The four-hour event involved 54 IUPUI students brainstorming solutions for the various problems surrounding scooters in Indianapolis and resulted in 861 ideas. The problem will be further explored in one of Associate Professor Youngbok Hong’s graduate classes this spring.
  • Professor David Morrison exhibited Nov. 15–Dec. 22, 2018, in a solo show, “Nature’s Ephemera,” at Garvey|Simon in New York, N.Y. Craig McDaniel wrote a short piece about Morrison’s artistic practice to accompany the exhibition. Additionally, a selection of Morrison’s works were featured in the Nov. 2018 issue of American Art Collector.
  • Michael Nannery (B.F.A. Printmaking ’11) exhibited Dec. 1-15, 2018, in a five-person group exhibition, “Permutations,” at Torrance Art Museum, Calif.
  • Asli Narin exhibited solo in “Carpe Noctum” at Millî Reasürans Art Gallery in Istanbul, Turkey, Nov. 28–Dec. 29, 2018. Click here to view installation images of the exhibition.
  • Michael Osheroff (M.F.A. Visual Art ’18) spoke as a panelist for Design Arts Society’s “LOVE/HATE” discussion on Nov. 10, 2018, in the newly reinstalled Design Gallery of the IMA Galleries at Newfields.
  • Yasha Persson (B.F.A. Photography ’92) exhibited mixed media works Nov. 2-30, 2018, in a solo show at the Indianapolis Artsgarden.
  • Brian Presnell (B.F.A. Furniture Design ’96) of Indy Urban Hardwood created tables using milled wood from over 40 on-site trees for the new Michigan Road branch of Indianapolis Public Library, in partnership with krM Architecture.
  • Jason Ramey (B.F.A. Furniture Design ’08) exhibited large-scale sculptures in a two-person show at Hutchinson Center for the Arts in Hutchinson, Minn. The show opened Dec. 10, 2018, and continues through Jan. 11.
  • In September, Associate Professor Danielle Riede was one of two recipientsto receive the 2018 Advocate for Equity in Accessibility Award. She joins a small yet dedicated cadre of IUPUI staff and faculty who advocate on behalf of students with disabilities.
  • Herron alumnus Casey Roberts (B.F.A. Photography) exhibited new cyanotype works at the Indianapolis-based Edington Gallery in the solo show “A Bird I Knew, Dreamt a Dream, of Valley View,” Dec. 7-22, 2018.
  • Cat Head Press received a $4.3 million grant from the Lilly Endowment Arts and Culture Initiative in partnership with the John Boner Neighborhood Centers, as well as other Near Eastside neighborhood collaborators, to bring to life the 10 East Art + Design District. The Indianapolis-based printshop and artist cooperative was established in 2016 by Dominic Senibaldi (M.F.A. Visual Art ’13), Michael Hoefle (M.F.A. Visual Art ’13), and Liz Wierzbicki(M.F.A. Visual Art ’14). On Jan. 4, Senibaldi left Herron to fulfill his executive director role in a full-time capacity.
  • Marna Shopoff (M.F.A. Visual Art ’14) exhibited new paintings Oct. 3-26, 2018, in “Première Couche,” a solo show at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery in New Orleans, La.
  • On Dec. 7, 2018, Johnson Simon (M.F.A. Visual Art ’18) participated in the Stutz Artist Association’s annual holiday open house as one of two recipients of the association’s 2018 Artist Residency program.
  • Visiting Lecturer Jake Sneath (M.F.A. Visual Art ’17) presented his work during the Society for Photography Education’s Midwest Chapter Conference on Nov. 1-4, 2018, at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.
  • Stuart Snoddy (B.F.A. Painting ’09) was featured in ArtMaze Magazine’s Anniversary Edition 10, curated by founder and Editor-in-Chief Maria Zemtsova and released on Nov. 27, 2018.
  • Emily Stergar (B.F.A. Sculpture ’14) exhibited Nov. 29–Dec. 15, 2018, in Arizona State University’s Faculty Mentor/Alumni Exhibition. Stergar’s work was also included in “Onyx,” a group exhibition featuring 46 contemporary artists, presented online by Alfa Gallery.
  • In November, the Indianapolis International Airport (IND) installed small-scale sculptures created by Phillip Tennant, professor emeritus of furniture design. Tennant’s work remains on display through March 10 in the ticketing hall.
  • Colin Tury (M.F.A. Visual Art ’14) was featured in Architectural Digest’s article “The Highlights from Detroit’s First Month of Design.” Detroit Month of Design occurred Sept. 1-30, 2018, during which Tury’s Fairfax Lounge Chair was included in the exhibition “Shape: Defining Furniture in Michigan’s Design Legacy” at Shinola’s flagship store.
  • The Herron galleries presented “Kenneth Tyler: The Art of Collaboration,” a survey of collaborations between master printer Kenneth Tyler (M.A.E. Art Education ’63) and some of the 20th century’s most iconic artists. Tyler visited the school during opening week of the exhibition to work with printmaking students and discuss his life’s work via an unforgettable artist talk. The exhibition closed on Nov. 10, 2018.
  • During IUPUI’s 2018 Spirit & Place Festival, Beatriz Vasquez (B.F.A. General Fine Arts ’06) participated in a collaborative public project showcasing the stories of historically marginalized communities in America.

Read the original article from Stories at Herron School of Art and Design 

IU Researchers Awarded $2.3 million to Continue Studies on Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

Drs. Kelley and Fehrenbacher have been awarded a five-year, $2.3 million grant from the NCI to continue their studies on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, or CIPN. Tim Yates photo.

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana University School of Medicine cancer researchers who have been working to lessen the debilitating side effects caused by chemotherapy have been awarded $2.3 million to continue their studies.

Jill Fehrenbacher, PhD, and Mark Kelley, PhD, are recipients of the five-year grant (1R01CA231267) from the National Cancer Institute, which will enable them to continue their studies on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, or CIPN.

The duo and their colleagues will test the effectiveness of a small, targeted molecule called APX3330 to prevent or reverse CIPN caused by cancer drugs in tumor-bearing mice.

“For patients with CIPN, this might be an option for pain relief or neuropathic symptom relief in the future,” said Fehrenbacher, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology at IU School of Medicine and a researcher at the IU Simon Cancer Center. “Alternatively, for patients undergoing chemotherapy treatments, it might be something we can administer alongside the chemotherapy drugs so they never develop CIPN.”

Fehrenbacher added: “The critical element of this grant is that we also are validating our preliminary results that the drug does not compromise the ability of the chemotherapy to kill the cancer cells.”

Although cancer treatments are becoming more effective and people are consequently surviving cancer in increasing rates, many patients report neuropathy — a nerve problem that causes pain, numbness and tingling in the hands and feet and muscle pain and weakness. As many as 30 to 60 percent of cancer patients say they experience neuropathy.

Neuropathy can become severe enough for some patients that their treatment needs to be reduced or stopped. The effects also can linger well beyond the course of the treatment.

Currently, there are no effective treatments or preventive treatments against neuropathy because researchers don’t yet understand all of the mechanisms that lead to it. It is believed that neuropathy develops over time as a cumulative effect of chemotherapy that alters the function of sensory neurons, which are responsible for detecting pain and touch.

In 2017, Kelley, associate director of basic science research at the IU Simon Cancer Center, was first awarded a $2.9 million grant (1R01CA205166) from the National Cancer Institute to study CIPN. Fehrenbacher is also a co-principal investigator of that initial grant. That grant was awarded because Kelley, Fehrenbacher, and colleagues had previously demonstrated in the lab that increasing the repair activity of a protein called APE1/Ref-1 decreased neurotoxicity. The aims of the 2017 grant are to study, in detail, the mechanisms by which APE1 alters the function of the sensory neurons. Interestingly, they also found that APX3330 was effective in reducing APE1’s ability to facilitate the growth and spread of tumors in mice models, therefore this new drug has the potential to block the advancement of cancer and CIPN.

“It’s very rewarding to receive funding for these studies from the NCI in continued support of our efforts to further advance APX3330 for anti-CIPN studies, both in the lab as well as in the clinic,” Kelley said.

Kelley pointed out that APX3330 is currently in phase I trials, supported by Apexian Pharmaceuticals, to test its safety for people. Kelley is a co-founder and chief scientific officer at Apexian, which plans to advance APX3330 for phase II trials for anti-tumor and anti-CIPN studies. Kelley called those studies a “potential win-win for patients.”

APX3330 was developed based on Kelley’s nearly three decades of cancer research.

The National Cancer Institute awarded both grants as part of its Provocative Questionsinitiative, a program aimed at promoting cancer-related research on important yet understudied areas or research questions that have proven difficult to address.

Melissa Fishel, PhD, and Karen Pollok, PhD, scientists from the cancer center’s Tumor Microenvironment and Metastasis research program, are collaborators on this study as is Theodore Cummins, PhD, an electrophysiologist in the School of Science at IUPUI.

Read the original article from IUPUI News‘ Michael Schug

A Message from Rafael Macia from the Institute for European Studies

Just as a reminder before the November 5th deadline, please see below the announcement for EURO’s research and travel awards for Fall 2018 – Spring 2019. You can find more information, along with the application forms for graduate students, and for faculty.

Research and Travel Awards for Faculty
The Institute for European Studies is happy to announce two grant competitions for the Fall of 2018 and the Spring of 2019. Eligible applicants are allowed to apply for both, but with the understanding that only one award may be accepted per person.

The Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence Grant offers one $1,500 award in the Fall and one in the Spring to an IU faculty member (TT or NTT) to support research and / or travel related to any aspect of European politics, society, or culture, whether current or historical in scope.

EURO’s Title VI Grant offers 2 awards of $1,500 each in the Fall and 2 in the Spring to IU faculty to support international research and / or travel, as well as 2 awards of $750 each (also Fall and Spring) to support domestic research and / or travel related to any aspect of European politics, society, or culture, whether current or historical in scope.

Research and Travel Awards for Graduate Students

The Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence Grant: One $1,500 award in the Fall and one in the Spring to an IU graduate student to support research and/or travel related to any aspect of European politics, society, or culture, whether current or historical in scope.

Research funds may be used to conduct preliminary thesis or dissertation feasibility studies or to compile evidence for their Master’s thesis or dissertation. While priority is given to students pursuing an MA or doctoral minor in European Studies, all IU graduate students are welcome to apply.

Grant recipients are expected to send a report detailing how the grant was used and on invitation, to present their results at a lecture hosted by the Institute for European Studies.

The Fall application deadline for all competitions is November 5, 2018, at 5 pm.

The Spring application deadline for all competitions is March 25, 2019, at 5 pm.

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens Research Fellowships 2019-2020

The Huntington Library awards over 150 research fellowships annually. The application deadline for fellowships in the 2019-2020 academic year is November 15, 2019. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make contributions to its intellectual life.

Traditional Japanese gardens and red moon-shaped bridge Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens San Marino California

The Huntington is an independent research library with significant holdings in British and American history; British and American literature; art history; the history of science and medicine; and the history of the book. The Library collections range chronologically from the eleventh century to the present. 

Long-Term fellowships are for nine to twelve months in residence with a stipend of $50,000. Three long-term fellowships are funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities ($4,200/ month from the NEH; the balance of the stipend from the Huntington funds).

Short term fellowships are for one to five months in residence and carry stipends of $3,500.

The Dibner Program in the History of Science offers historians of science and technology the opportunity to study in the Burndy Library, a remarkable collection in the history of science and technology. Both long and short term fellowships are available.

Travel grants and exchange fellowships for study in the United Kingdom and Ireland are for study in any of the fields in which The Huntington’s own collections are strong and where the research will be carried out in the libraries or archives in the United Kingdom and Ireland. We also offer exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, Lincoln, and New Colleges, Oxford; Trinity Hall, Cambridge; Durham University; and Trinity College Dublin.

To learn more about these opportunities and applications, click here  to visit the Huntington Library website!

Internal Grants for Faculty From Office of the Vice President for International Affairs (OVPIA)

OVPIA supports a variety of competitive funding opportunities that help IU faculty members advance their research and teaching through international engagement. These include a number of exchange programs as well as internal grant programs!

  •   Short-Term Exchange Program for the 2019-2020 academic year (deadline: October 12, 2018); exchange positions will be offered in Brazil, China, Germany, Ghana, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, and Thailand.
  • Freie Universität Berlin- IU Joint Research Workshops and Short-Term Research Grants (deadline September 28th)
  • Global Gateway Seed Grants for China, Europe, India, Mexico, and ASEAN (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to event)
  • International Short-Term Visitors Grans (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to event)
  • Language Learning Grants (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to start of program)
  • Overseas Conference Grant (deadlines: October 1, 2018; January 15, April 1, and July 1, 2019)
  • Overseas Study Program Development Grants (deadlines: November 1, 2018; February 2, 2019)
  • President’s International Research Awards (PIRA) (deadline TBD)
  • Renmin University of China- IU joint research grants (deadline: November 1, 2018; April 1, 2019)

As you plan international activities, check out these opportunities! Follow this link for guidelines and on-line application forms! If you have any questions, email ovpia@iu.edu!