MPH Data Day

Indiana’s Management Performance Hub (MPH) provides analytics solutions tailored to address complex management and policy questions enabling improved outcomes for Hoosiers. They empower partners to leverage data in innovative ways, facilitating data-driven decision making and data-informed policy making.

On March 6, MPH is hosting Data Day 2018 at the Indiana Statehouse. The MPH Data Day is an open event for people who want to share ideas and learn how Indiana is leading the nation with data and innovation. MPH partners who use Indiana data to positively impact the lives of Hoosiers will present their projects.

Presentations will run from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm in the North Atrium of the Statehouse. Food, refreshments, and data success stories will be shared.

Three Decades Later: Art and Race in Indianapolis

A public conversation with local artists about art and race in Indianapolis takes its start from the 1989 essay “Ethos and Creativity: The Impulse as Malleable” by Indianapolis writer Mari Evans. This essay combines autobiography, history, and conceptual analysis to relate local conditions to a broader understanding of the significance of artistic creation. Join a panel of Indianapolis artist to consider the essay’s continuing relevance to art, justice, and community.

The conversation will take place on Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 6:30 pm in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall, 735 West New York Street. Visitor parking is available in the Sports Complex Parking Garage, 875 West New York Street.

Panelists will include Phyllis Boyd, an urban designer and former gallery director who trained as a landscape architect and now serves as executive director of Groundwork Indy; David Hoppe, writer, editor, and playwright who edited the book in which Evans’ essay originally appeared; Adrian Matekja, Poet Laureate of Indiana and Ruth Lilly Professor at Indiana University; Carl Pope, a critically acclaimed, Indianapolis-based conceptualist whose museum installations and public art interventions explore the intersections between conceptual art, American Literature, hidden histories, and social justice; and LaShawnda Crowe Storm, a visual artist, activist, and community builder who uses the making of art to create space and place for difficult conversations promoting healing and change.

This event is sponsored by the Indiana University Bicentennial Celebration, the Institute for American Thought, the IUPUI Africana Studies Program, the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, the IUPUI School of Liberal Arts, the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, and Indiana Humanities.

Critical Conversations on Black Homicide

The Critical Conversations series is hosted by a partnership of IUPUI, the Concerned Clergy of Indianapolis, and the Baptist Minister’s Alliance. The partnership seeks to bring together the IUPUI campus and the faith-based community organizations around public health issues, providing a safe space to educate, inform, and strategize around these issues, leading to positive social change in the community.

The conversation will be held on February 15, 2018, at 6:30 pm in the IUPUI Hine Hall Auditorium, 875 W. North Street. Doors will open at 6 pm, and free parking will be available in the garage located under the building.

IUPUI Chancellor Nasser Paydar and Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett will give opening remarks, followed by an introduction by Dr. Molly Rosenberg, author of Black Homicide Report. Dr. Leah Gunning Francis, author of Ferguson and Faith: Sparking Leadership and Awakening Community will give a presentation.

The culminating panel discussion will include moderator Rev. David Greene, President of the Concerned Clergy of Indianapolis and Pastor of Purpose of Life Ministries Indianapolis; criminal justice and best practices expert Dr. Tom Stucky, Executive Associate Dean of the IUPUI School of Public and Environmental Affairs; clergy member Rev. Dr. Wayne L. Moore, President of the Baptist Minister’s Alliance and Pastor of Olivet Missionary Baptist Church; community member Gregory L. Wilson, Executive Director of the Indiana Civil Rights Commission; youth representative Anthony Beverly, Director of Stop the Violence Indianapolis; policymakers Rep. Greg Porter of the State of Indiana and Rep. Stephen Clay, President of the City-County Council of the City of Indianapolis; law enforcement representative Chief Bryan Roach, IMPD; and media member Steve Jefferson, Crimebeat Report from WTHR-Channel 13.

Critical Conversations: Talking Religion on Campus

Religion is often considered a taboo subject, so how do we engage in inclusive dialogue on important, yet often controversial, topics involving religion, tradition, and spirituality? A courageous group of individuals representing a diversity of religious traditions, including individuals without such traditions or beliefs, will share their journey through such a dialogue.

Discussion will focus in on questions like how we dialogue on religion in a group setting, the parameters for employees’ engagement in religion in the workplace, how to have meaningful dialog on religion in a safe space, and finding common ground among divergent religious views.

This event is open to all IUPUI faculty, staff, and students of any religion, tradition, spiritual practice, or belief – including those who neither hold nor practice any form of religion or spiritual belief. Support is provided by the IUPUI Office of Intercultural Literacy, Capacity, and Engagement, a part of the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.

It will be held in University Library 1126 on Wednesday, December 6th from noon to 1 pm. The moderator will be Dan Griffith, Director of IUPUI’s Conflict Resolution and Dialogue Programs. Feel free to contact him with questions in advance at

The Entanglements Series: What is the Future of Farming?

Along with the Wenner-Gren Foundation and Indy Reads Books, the IAHI is proud to present “What is the Future of Farming?” as a part of the Entanglements Series. Join us on Friday, May 19, at 7pm to discuss the local and global cultures of farming. The forum will be held at Indy Reads Books, 911 Mass Ave., and hopes to answer numerous questions.

What does it mean to be a farmer in the 21st century? How can we cultivate enough food to feed 9 billion people? How do changing economic and political conditions shape food production and distribution? In what ways are we preparing our food systems for the effects of climate change?

Support for the Entanglements Series is provided by the IU Office of the Vice President for Research and the New Frontiers Grant Program.

Free tickets are available via Eventbrite at

A Conversation with Muslim Women: Islamophobia, Sexism, and Daily Life Challenges

Blue Square

This panel discussion will include light refreshments. While the doors open and refreshments start at 5:30, the discussion begins at 6:00 p.m. on March 7 in the IUPUI Campus Center, Room 305.

This discussion is sponsored by the IUPUI Women’s Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts, the IUPUI Office of Intercultural Literacy, Capacity, and Engagement, the IUPUI Office for Women, the IUPUI Department of World Languages and Cultures in the School of Liberal Arts, and the American Friends Service Committee.

IUPUI Symposium on Civil Discourse: Join the Movement to End Harassment

Blue Square
Emily May

March 6 in the IUPUI Campus Center Theatre, the keynote presentation of the 2017 IUPUI Symposium on Civil Discourse will be “Online, On Campus, and On the Streets: You Have the Right to Be in Public Space.”

Learn from social entrepreneur Emily May, co-founder and executive director of Hollaback and Heartmob, how to respond to, fight and end online, public and street harassment.

The keynote address is scheduled for 1:30 to 2:45 p.m., followed by a panel discussion from 3 to 4:15 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

This event is sponsored by the Office of Intercultural Literacy, Capacity and Engagement; the Division of Student Affairs; the Office of Equal Opportunity; the Office for Women; the Department of Psychology in the School of Science; and the Office of International Affairs.

Forum: U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks, Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson featured at Women in Leadership

INDIANAPOLIS — U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks and Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson will beSusan Brooks, official portrait,113th Congress the featured speakers at the Hazelett Women in Leadership Forum Nov. 23 at the Indiana Statehouse.

They will address the topic of women’s leadership in government, discussing what skills women bring to government and what perspectives they offer.

The forum was created by Ambassador Randall L. Tobias, the Randall L. Tobias Foundation, the IU Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the IUPUI Office for Women. Gary Mayor Karen-Freeman-Wilson

Participants are asked to register for the forum, which is free and open to the public. It begins with a reception at 5 p.m. in the Rotunda, followed by the presentations at 6 p.m. in the North Atrium.

“This program grows out of a desire to honor and hear from individuals who are successful leaders,” said Carol Madison, executive director of the Tobias Center. “Our speakers are individuals who exemplify excellence in leadership and work to support the advancement of women in leadership roles.

“To that end, the IU Tobias Center, the IUPUI Office for Women and IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar invite the community, corporate leaders, students and scholars to share in a learning experience focused on women leaders in all walks of life,” Madison said. “Honorees offer insights into knowledge about leadership in the modern workplace, including their reflections on the role of gender, work/life balance and effective communication.”

Brooks represents the 5th District of Indiana, which spans eight counties in Central Indiana. When elected, she became the first Republican congresswoman from Indiana since the 1950s.

Brooks served as deputy mayor of Indianapolis under Mayor Steve Goldsmith and was appointed U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Indiana in 2001 by President George W. Bush. She has also held the position of senior vice president and general counsel for Ivy Tech Community College, with a focus on statewide workforce-development strategies.

On Dec. 31, 2011, Freeman-Wilson became the first woman to lead Gary and the first African-American female mayor in Indiana.

Previously, she was the Indiana attorney general, focusing her efforts on youth, seniors and abused patients in nursing homes. She was one of the first attorneys general in the country to combat gas price-gouging and to ensure that tobacco-settlement dollars were directed toward smoking cessation and health care. Freeman-Wilson has also served as the executive director of the Indiana Civil Rights Commission.

The Hazelett Forum was established to honor the late Susie Hazelett, former executive director of the Randall L. Tobias Foundation, who was instrumental in helping to establish the IU Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence.

The Tobias Center focuses on research and programs related to the study of leadership across all sectors, including corporate, public service, education, religion, medicine and nonprofit organizations. Its focus on multiple sectors and on both the practice and theory of leadership distinguish its agenda among leadership programs nationwide.