Herron Sculpture Graduate Took Country Roads To Commencement

Shelby Lahne, a Herron School of Art and Design sculpture graduate, watches her pet goats Crackerjack, left, and Peanut play on her property in rural Shelby County. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
Shelby Lahne, a Herron School of Art and Design sculpture graduate, watches her pet goats Crackerjack, left, and Peanut play on her property in rural Shelby County. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

The roads to graduation for 7,122 students at the May 11 IUPUI commencement differ tremendously. Some left home half-a-planet away to study here; many others earned their degrees without having to leave beautiful and bustling Indianapolis.

A senior about to graduate, Shelby Lahne was born and raised in Pleasant View, Indiana, and went to high school in Fairland, population 315. She commuted 30 to 40 minutes to classes daily. While home is only a county away, her experience is another world from the downtown Indianapolis campus, which is where she earned a degree in sculpture from the Herron School of Art and Design. Pleasant View consists of an offramp from I-74 east, a gas station and a handful of roads with quaint houses on large plots of land.

While most of her classmates weren’t raised in small-town Indiana, it has fueled her art in terms of direction and materials.

Shelby Lahne poses with part of her installation piece, "Nests," which currently hangs in University Library. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
Shelby Lahne poses with part of her installation piece, “Nests,” which currently hangs in University Library. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

“I think being from a small town but going to school in the big city gives me a different perspective on things,” said Lahne, whose high school graduating class was about 100 students.

Thousands of IUPUI students, staff and faculty have seen — and walked under — a recent commission of Lahne’s: “Nests” has hung in the second-floor lobby of University Library since the fall, and it will continue to show for another year. The four large constructions sway quietly by thick rope. That rope is also wrapped around each nest made of burlap over a steel, egg-shaped understructure.

“Over the steel rods, there is a layer of chicken wire, and over that is a layer of carpet padding,” Lahne revealed. “I got the idea from looking at weaver bird nests. Instead of cup-shaped nests, they create dome-shaped nests with just one little hole in them. They make them in large groups for protection purposes.

“I thought that was very interesting because it’s like the library itself — everyone comes here. We may all be doing our own thing, but we’re still in here together.”

Following “Nests,” Lahne continued with the suspension theme in her work. Ropes, pulleys and the defiance of gravity were utilized in most pieces.

Photos courtesy of Shelby Lahne
Photos courtesy of Shelby Lahne

“I’ve used a lot of concrete and cinder blocks,” Lahne said. “They all have to do with weight, tension and balance.

“A lot of my ideas come from different building materials, like metal, concrete and rope. Out in the country, you just find these things in someone’s yard or their barn. They are typically thought of as junk or scrap, but the materials seem to have a story to them.”

Before her years at IUPUI, Lahne earned an associate degree in art therapy from Vincennes University. She expected to pursue the field at IUPUI, but she found a better fit in Herron’s sculpture program, which is headquartered in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Lahne’s recent pieces have shown well in Herron galleries and classrooms, and the young artist will pursue a graduate degree in sculpture.

As she looks for her next stop along her academic journey, Lahne must decide what to do with her two beloved pets. An option would be finding a farm for Peanut and Crackerjack while she continues her studies.

Peanut and Crackerjack love to eat and roam around Shelby Lahne's property in Shelby County. Photos by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
Peanut and Crackerjack love to eat and roam around Shelby Lahne’s property in Shelby County. Photos by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Like it has for countless young Hoosiers, 4-H Club became a big part of Lahne’s high school years when a friend roped her into showing goats for the Shelby County Fair. Not getting attached to your show animals is a rite of passage for many 4-H kids. Lahne was, however, able to rescue a pair of goats from slaughter. First was Peanut. He was kept at her grandfather’s house just outside of the town limits. Since a solitary goat is an unhappy one, Crackerjack, a pygmy mix, was welcomed into the herd. The smaller, younger goat was another 4-H animal that is now enjoying a retirement full of fresh alfalfa hay, more than an acre of lawn with delicious grass and jelly beans for treats.

Lahne constructed a pen and a small barn for her pets. It’s true that the goats are eating machines, but they don’t eat cans or other items meant for the recycling bins. But they will decimate any kind of yard waste with haste.

“They’re similar to a dog,” Lahne said of her goats. “They always follow me around. If I have them out, they’re always where I am, and whatever I’m trying to do, they’re always in the way. Peanut wants to be petted all the time.”

Lahne has shown numerous pictures and videos of Peanut, a Boer breed now weighing in at 200 pounds, and Crackerjack, who is now almost 100 pounds, to her classmates.

“Everyone at the sculpture building wants me to bring them in,” said Lahne, with a laugh. “That would be impossible to do. If you try to pet Crackerjack, he’ll think you’re playing and try to headbutt you.”

Small-town living inspired Herron sculpture graduate Shelby Lahne to achieve commissions, goats and commencement. Video by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

Read the original story from IUPUI NewsTim Brouk 

Apply to Participate in the 2019-20 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar

The Religion, Spirituality, and the Arts Program (RSA) is a program of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute that brings together artists, religious leaders, religious communities, humanities experts, and a broad range of publics from diverse backgrounds and disciplinary perspectives for sustained study, analysis, and discussion of religious texts in a classroom environment. Directed by Rabbi Sandy Sasso, these textual discussions, which explore the varieties of religious experience and understanding, provide the inspiration for creating new artistic works (e.g. music, poetry, fiction, drama, visual art, dance). Artists share their creations through exhibitions and presentations to members of the Central Indiana community, including religious organizations, congregations, schools, libraries, and community groups.

2019-20 Theme

We will explore the story of Jonah in the Bible and the Quran and consider a variety of themes including the arbitrariness of unwarranted compassion and the desire to escape calls to human responsibility. When others cry out, Jonah runs away or sleeps. Might we see contemporary responses to crises through Jonah’s actions? What about the human desire to flee distasteful obligations? Through visual arts, poetry, and music we will explore the symbolism of the big fish as “reassuring womb” or “terrifying tomb” and the strange prophet who hates change but nevertheless brings it about in the end.

Faculty

The faculty list for the 2018-19 seminar is still growing. So far, the faculty include

  • Anila Quayyum Agha, Associate Professor of Drawing and Illustration in the Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI

  • Julia Muney Moore, Director of Public Art for the Arts Council of Indianapolis

  • Sandy Sasso, Rabbi Emerita of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck

  • Steven Stolen Host of WFYI’s Stolen Moments

  • Shari Wagner, Author and Indiana Poet Laureate (2016-2017)

  • Joseph Tucker Edmonds, Assistant Professor of Africana Studies and Religious Studies at IUPUI

Meetings

Sessions will be held for 2 1/2 hours weekly for a total of eight weeks and will meet evenings from 6:00–8:30 p.m. on 9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 11/7, 12/12, 1/9 or 1/16, 2/6

How to Apply

Applications for this seminar will be accepted from April 29 to May 28, 2019.

Applicants may be anyone in the community who is active (as a professional or amateur) in the artistic disciplines. Selected applicants must be able to make a commitment to attend all seminar sessions and engage in open and respectful dialogue. Seminar participants will produce creative work to be performed and/or exhibited in a public forum. Seminar participants will receive a $150 stipend at the conclusion of the group exhibition.

Application Form

To apply to be an artist-participant in the current seminar, please submit your application using the online form.

In addition to basic demographic information, the form asks you to answer the following questions:

      • How do you see your art form interacting with a religious text?

      • How do you imagine this experience will impact your creative work?

You will also need to upload

      • An artist resume

      • Three examples of your work

For more information, please visit our website! 

Herron’s Top 100 Honorees of 2019

Devin Johannis (middle) with Leslie Kidwell (left), president of the IUPUI Alumni Association, and Nasser H. Paydar (right), IUPUI chancellor and executive vice president of Indiana University. Courtesy of Shannon McCullough.
Devin Johannis (middle) with Leslie Kidwell (left), president of the IUPUI Alumni Association, and Nasser H. Paydar (right), IUPUI chancellor and executive vice president of Indiana University. Courtesy of Shannon McCullough.

Every year, IUPUI honors the achievements of their student body by recognizing exceptional students through the IUPUI Top 100 list. Changemakers, innovators, achievers, and leaders are included.

Several students at Herron are being honored this year: newcomers Devin Johannis and Jazmine Hooper, in addition to returning honorees Haley Francis-Halstead and Sydney Patberg.

Devin Johannis
Succeeding on his own terms is something Devin Johannis specializes in. He had an untraditional start at Herron: he was admitted through the newly founded artistic support program. When he received a notification that a portfolio of his work would be due in a week, he had to make do with what he could. “I remember grabbing some colored pencils and pens that were lying around and just looking things up online, trying to make art,” he said. This hard work paid off, and Johannis was soon directly admitted. After an experience while studying abroad in Italy where he saw the same pattern his father uses as trim moulding on architectural columns and church designs, he began to think more about tradition in his work. This eventually led him to furniture design as his major.

“Tradition is such an important part of being a designer now. So many people have made so many things before you, it can only benefit you to know more about it…I would’ve felt blind without it,” he said.

The experience of being a artistic support student serves as a source of inspiration for Johannis, and drives him to help students in similar situations. He is a mentor through IUPUI’s O-Team program. He’s also contributed to the National Mentoring Symposium, IUPUI’s Sophomore Experience program, and IUPUI’s Bridge first year seminar, among others. “My mentor played a huge role in getting me admitted, and through her, I realized how beneficial it can be to have a mentorship. I wanted to know what it means to be a mentor, so that’s why I pursued it,” Johannis said.

Herron School of Art and Design's Top 100 honorees of 2019, pictured with members of the Student Services team during the recognition dinner on April 12th, 2019.   Courtesy of Shannon McCullough
Herron School of Art and Design’s Top 100 honorees of 2019, pictured with members of the Student Services team during the recognition dinner on April 12th, 2019. Courtesy of Shannon McCullough

Having been listed as one of IUPUI’s top 100, Johannis has proven he is well on his way to becoming a successful creator. With that being said, he stresses the importance of maintaining momentum. “I still try to ground myself, and pretend in my head that at any moment I could get kicked out. The more success, the more things I’m able to achieve — the more praise that comes with it. That’s great, but it’s really easy to get lost in that, to be like ‘cool, I’m in the Top 100! I made it!’ and stop trying,” Johannis said. “I don’t want to ever be like that. I’ve always got another goal, and I’ve always got to keep going.

Johannis is graduating this year with a B.F.A. in furniture design, a minor in art history, and an architectural and interior design graphics certificate. True to his word, he plans on applying for jobs that could push him towards his goal after graduation: getting in-field experience and then pursuing a master’s degree to become a fine arts professor. “There’s something about being out in the actual career field that allows professors to specialize their classes and make it feel like it really is their coursework. That’s something I don’t want to miss out on,” he said. “When people take a class with me, I want them to be able to say ‘oh, that’s his work. There’s a lot that he can provide that’s unique to the course and I couldn’t get elsewhere.'”

Jazmine Hooper
Jazmine Hooper is a leader, first and foremost. She is a member of the Herron Ambassador program, the president of Herron’s Student Council, and the student representative for the Herron Alumni Association, among other leadership appointments. All of these enable Hooper to maximize outreach and help incoming students. “Being able to have these interactions with students and being able to give them advice and clarity is extremely valuable,” she said.

Hooper believes in the importance of the student connection due to the significance of her own time at Herron. She originally intended to major in visual communication design, but ended up in drawing and illustration. Now, she’s currently experimenting with printmaking. She attributes this to Herron’s “beautiful way of making you take classes outside your comfort zone.” “You’re going to be taking electives out of your major,” she said. “I discovered book arts, printmaking — things that I’ve absolutely fallen in love with.” She cites Herron’s inherent experimentation as the reason why she didn’t have to “settle” for a medium that might’ve not worked for her.

Malala, Magician 2 1/2″ x 3″. Courtesy of Jazmine Hooper.

When giving advice to incoming freshmen, Hooper believes one of the most important things to remember is that “everything has a purpose,” especially foundation studies. “I throw back to things I learned freshman year all the time,” she said. “I might be setting up a composition for a print and use gestalt theory without even recognizing it. You have to have patience.”

Being a part of the IUPUI Top 100 is extremely important to Hooper. It was a goal for her since her sophomore year, and she can graduate knowing she’s achieved it. “To get that recognition is a really big deal to me,” she said. After graduating with her B.F.A. in drawing and illustration (along with her minors in book arts and art history), she plans to further her body of work by contributing to the Indianapolis artistic sphere. “Whether I end up as a gallery attendant or creative director or anything else, I just want to be able to express myself creatively and maintain my personal practice,” Hooper says. She plans on eventually going to graduate school to become a professor of the arts.

Haley Francis-Halstead
Haley Francis-Halstead is receiving a B.F.A. in visual communication design(VCD). She has a wide spectrum of experience, ranging from restaurant industry social media marketing to being the executive director of Herron’s VCD capstone exhibition in 2019. She has worked tirelessly to support IUPUI over the course of her education, having been an employee in the Office of Community Engagement, Housing and Residence Life, and IUPUI’s chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha. In her spare time, she creates YouTube vlogs about her experiences as an art student. Francis-Halstead has made the Top 100 two consecutive years.

Sydney Patberg
Sydney Patberg is receiving a B.A.E. in art education. She has already worked in-field, having been employed as an art teacher for both U Craft Me Up and Columbus Canvas. She contributes to IUPUI’s Greek life scene as the chapter president for Phi Mu Fraternity since November 2017, helping to raise over $25,000 annually on behalf of the organization. She also participates in Jagathon yearly, helping to raise money for Riley Hospital for Children. Patberg has also made the Top 100 two consecutive years.

Read the original story from Herron School of Art + Design 

Herron’s Ninth Annual ‘Look/See’ Event Celebrates Indianapolis’s Emerging Artists, Art Therapists And Design Strategists

Herron Professor’s New Book Explores Public Art’s Impact

Laura Holzman stands in the 2017 House Life Project on Sept. 20, 2017. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University
Laura Holzman stands in the 2017 House Life Project on Sept. 20, 2017. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

You’ve seen the “Rocky” movies. You hum the theme song every time you run up a flight of stairs. You might even have posed in front of the statue when visiting Philadelphia. But have you thought about the impact the statue has made on the city and public art in general?

A new book by Laura Holzman, IUPUI associate professor of art history and museum studies, explores the history and public discourse concerning public art in early-21st-century Philadelphia. “Contested Image: Defining Philadelphia for the Twenty-First Century” focuses on the “Rocky” statue as well as “The Gross Clinic” by Thomas Eakins and the Barnes Foundation art collection.

The book is available through Temple University Press and many other online outlets.

Deep Time / Deep Futures with Nina Elder

Join us for a special gathering of the Public Art and Ethics Seminar to discuss Nina Elder’s newest installation, The Score, commissioned as part of the IU Grand Challenges Prepared for Environmental Change project in partnership with City State.

Nina Elder is an artist, adventurer, and arts administrator. Her work focuses on changing cultures and ecologies. Through extensive travel and research, resulting in meticulous drawings and interdisciplinary creative projects, Nina promotes curiosity, exploration, and a collective sense of stewardship. Nina advocates for collaboration, often fostering relationships between institutions, artists, scientists and diverse communities. She is the co-founder of the Wheelhouse Institute, a women’s climate leadership initiative. Nina lectures as a visiting artist/scholar at universities, develops publicly engaged programs, and consults with organizations that seek to grow through interdisciplinary programing. Nina’s art work is widely exhibited and collected and has been featured in Art in America, VICE Magazine, and on PBS. Her research has been supported by the Andy Warhol Foundation, the Rauschenburg Foundation award for Arts & Activism, the Pollock Krasner Foundation, and the Mellon Foundation. She is currently an Art + Environment Research Fellow at the Nevada Museum of Art, a Polar Lab Research Fellow at the Anchorage Museum, and a Researcher in Residence in the Art and Ecology Program at the University of New Mexico.

The IU Grand Challenges Prepared for Environmental Change project positions Indiana to combat the growing threats caused by extreme and unpredictable weather patterns and environmental changes that result. It brings together a broad, bipartisan coalition of government, business, nonprofit, and community leaders to help Indiana better prepare for the challenges that environmental change brings to our economy, health and livelihood.

City State is a program of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute in partnership with Ignition Arts, iMOCA, People for Urban Progress, and PRINTtEXT. City State is generously supported by the Central Indiana Community Foundation, Eskenazi Health, IndyGo and Blue Indy.

This event is supported by the IU Grand Challenges Prepared for Environmental Change project; the IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society; and City State.

RSVP NOW! 

Big Tent @ the IUPUI

The IUPUI premiere event of a one-of-a-kind portable multimedia venue designed by Music and Arts Technology faculty Robin Cox and Ben Smith. Events will include live performances and installation work by MAT faculty and students, Herron faculty Danielle Riede, and 2018 commissioned works by IU Bloomington faculty and students. Support for this event has been provided by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, The IUPUI Department of Music and Arts Technology,  and the Office of the Vice Provost for Research at IU Bloomington.  http://www.thebigtent.org

Monday April 1st 5:30pm-9:30pm
Campus Center Ballroom 450

 

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, is featuring Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation, a performance by critically acclaimed cellist Maya Beiser, as part of its eight annual exhibition exploring the story of Lot’s Wife. Beiser will perform excerpts from her cello-opera, Elsewhere, an imaginative and psychological retelling of the biblical story of Lot’s Wife.

Avant-garde cellist Maya Beiser defies categories. A major presence on the international stage, she has been praised by Rolling Stone as a “cello rock star” and described by the Boston Globe as “a force of nature.” Maya’s discography includes ten solo albums and numerous feature appearances on film and TV soundtracks. She is a 2015 United States Artists (USA) Distinguished Fellow and a 2017 Mellon Distinguished Visiting Artist at MIT. Her 2011 TED Talk has been watched by over one million people. Maya was a founding member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars and is a graduate of Yale University.

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation is free and open to the public. It will be held at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260), offered in partnership with the Center for Interfaith Cooperation; the Judaism, Arts, Interfaith and Civic Engagement Fund of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck; Indiana Humanities; and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis.

Wednesday, April 3, 2019
7 – 8:30 pm
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available at https://www.culturalecologies.org/rsa/.

RSVP NOW!

Herron Invites Artists to Participate in Lori Waxman’s Acclaimed ’60 wrd/min Art Critic’ Performance

Lori Waxman at work during her "60 wrd/min art critic" performance in St. Louis, Mississippi, in 2015. Courtesy of Lori Waxman
Lori Waxman at work during her “60 wrd/min art critic” performance in St. Louis, Mississippi, in 2015. Courtesy of Lori Waxman

This spring, the Galleries at Herron School of Art and Design will present “60 wrd/min art critic,” an ongoing performance art project by Chicago Tribune columnist Lori Waxman, providing Indiana artists the opportunity to submit their artwork for critical review and published recognition. Waxman’s performance will occur April 30–May 2, 2019, on the IUPUI campus in Herron’s Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life, located in Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.

Since 2005, Waxman’s internationally acclaimed performance has resulted in more than 700 written reviews for underserved and underrepresented visual artists across the United States and Europe. In her words, the project aims to “get the community thinking about where the responsibility for art criticism resides” by raising awareness about the lack of venues to cover the arts in certain regional arts communities, especially at a time when art columns are disappearing from newspapers and magazines. “60 wrd/min art critic” also reveals the art critique process in real-time as artist, artwork, critic, and review all exist in the same space.

During the three-day presentation at Herron, Waxman will review artwork by 30 artists of all ages, skill levels and artistic disciplines. Reviews are free of charge and will be scheduled and written in twenty-five-minute increments in Waxman’s pop-up office from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 30, and Wednesday, May 1, and from 1:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 2.

Artists may request an appointment at any time by emailing critic@60wordmin.org, stating date and time preferences.

Indianapolis is among sixteen U.S. cities to host “60 wrd/min art critic,” including Detroit; Durham, North Carolina; Lexington, Kentucky; and Portland, Maine. In 2012, a 100-day version of the performance was included in dOCUMENTA, a major survey of international contemporary art held every five years in Kassel, Germany. A book collecting 241 reviews written during dOCUMENTA (13) was later published by Onestar Press, Paris.

“60 wrd/min art critic” is a project of the Creative Capital/Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. This performance is made possible by the Indiana Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. To learn more about Waxman’s project, visit 60wrdmin.org.

Waxman’s performance is free and open to the public. Parking is free in the Sports Complex Garage adjacent to Eskenazi Hall or on levels 5 and 6 of the Riverwalk Garage, courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis, with validation from the Herron galleries. Visit HerronGalleries.org for more information.

Read the original article from Herron School of Art and Design 

#MyIUPUI memories with Michael Barclay