Herron announces spring 2018 speaker series featuring Carrie Mae Weems, Lori Waxman, and Tom Loeser

From the Herron School of Art + Design:

The Galleries at Herron School of Art + Design is pleased to announce three exceptional public talks during the spring 2018 semester with art critic Lori Waxman, furniture maker Tom Loeser, and internationally renowned artist Carrie Mae Weems.

Each year, artists, designers, and other cultural producers are invited to speak at Herron School of Art and Design on timely issues related to contemporary art and culture. This spring, the talks will explore the role of the contemporary art critic, one furniture designer’s irreverent challenge to tradition and expectations, and an artist’s life-long investigation of cultural identity and systems of power.

Spring 2018 endowed talks

Lori Waxman will speak on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at 5:30 p.m. as part of the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture. Waxman has written about contemporary art for the Chicago Tribune, Artforum, and other periodicals for the past 18 years. Her books include “Girls! Girls! Girls! in Contemporary Art” and “60 wrd/min art critic,” which was also the name of Waxman’s live performance of art criticism at dOCUMENTA (13). Waxman teaches art history at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Tom Loeser will speak on Monday, March 5, 2018, at 5:30 p.m. as part of the Phillip Tennant Furniture Artisan Lecture. Loeser has been head of the wood/furniture area at University of Wisconsin–Madison since 1991. Loeser designs and builds one-of-a-kind functional and dysfunctional objects that are often carved and painted. His work is always based on the history of design and object-making as a starting point for developing new form and meaning.

Carrie Mae Weems will speak on Wednesday, April 4, 2018, at 5:30 p.m. as part of the Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Artist Lecture. One of the most important and celebrated contemporary American artists, Carrie Mae Weems has investigated issues of race, gender, and class for over thirty years. Her artwork continues to raise important questions about cultural identity and the politics of representation. Weems is the recipient of the MacArthur “Genius” grant, the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Prix de Rome.

Support for Herron’s endowed talks is made possible by Jane Fortune, Phillip Tennant, and the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Great Frame Up Indianapolis.

All talks are free, open to the public, and held in the Basile Auditorium at Eskenazi Hall located at 735 West New York St., on the IUPUI campus. For more information, visit HerronGalleries.org.

 

Herron’s 2017 Undergraduate Student Exhibition

View the original announcement here.

The Galleries at Herron School of Art and Design are pleased to present the 2017 Undergraduate Student Exhibition, located in Eskenazi Hall on the IUPUI campus.

The exhibition is an annual tradition featuring exceptional works produced by Herron students across a variety of artistic disciplines. Chris Reitz, gallery director of the Hite Art Institute, will serve as a guest juror and will award prizes for the top student entries.

Robert Horvath, Gold Room, 2017

Coinciding with the student exhibition is “Petit Mort,” a selection of oil paintings and digital compositions created by Associate Professor Robert Horvath during a recent sabbatical. Inspired by the complex nature of 18th-century figurative porcelain, Horvath’s newest body of work juxtaposes homoerotic imagery and Rococo style to raise questions of censorship in relation to present-day social issues for the LGBTQ community.

The exhibitions open with a public reception at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St., on November 29 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. The Undergraduate Student Exhibition will take place in the Berkshire, Reese, Paul, and Marsh Galleries, with “Petit Mort” showing in the Basile Gallery. During the reception, visitors can shop locally from a selection of affordable prints and ceramic wares made by Herron artists while supporting student clubs. The student sale will take place in the grand hallway of Eskenazi Hall from 4 to 8:30 p.m.

The Galleries at Herron are free and open to the public Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesdays until 8 p.m. For more information, visit HerronGalleries.org.

Parking is available courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor’s section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or on the upper floors of the Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6 p.m. Park on any floor after 6 p.m. and bring your parking ticket to the Herron galleries for validation.

IUPUI Center for Digital Scholarship goes 3D

View the original press release by reporter Vanessa Richards at the IUPUI newsroom.

Jenny Johnson demonstrates 3D scanner

The handheld Creaform 3D scanner looks like an old-school video game controller, a clunky throwback to the early days of Atari. But these mobile 3D scanners used by the staff in the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship are very advanced, and they are changing the way we record recent history, ancient history, and even the future.

“About two years ago, we decided to explore 3D technology and what scanning could look like,” said Jenny Johnson, head of digitization services for the Center for Digital Scholarship. “Every community and cultural heritage institution that we work with has 3D objects. As the technology has gotten better, computer processing has gotten better, and because costs have been reduced a little bit with the technology, we decided to dive into the specifics and see what we could do. The Benjamin Harrison team was really interested in this, and they’ve got an eCollection initiative to document more of their items.”

This statue of Harrison has been 3D printed using the 3D scan file

The Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site houses a large collection of former U.S. President Benjamin Harrison’s belongings in his former home, including furniture, pottery, silver, plates, and dresses. In collaboration with the Center for Digital Scholarship, these items will soon be scanned, and the digital files will be available online to view and to download. This means that anyone with access to a 3D printer will be able to create copies of the collection items. The Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site eCollection initiative is planned to go online around November.

Archaeologists are using the technology, as well. The Lawrenz Gun Club is a Mississippian Period fortified Native American village and mound complex in the central Illinois River Valley, active between the years 1150 and 1425. Jeremy Wilson, associate professor of anthropology at IUPUI, studies it; he and his team have been working on the site since 2010. He works with the IUPUI 3D digital archivists to record what they have found. Wilson’s ultimate goal, in partnership with associate professor Dan Johnson from the geography department, is to build a virtual representation of the site and how the village changed over time.

 

The digital renderings of these items are available in the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship’s online collection.

Video installation by Ragnar Kjartansson and The National headlines summer exhibitions at the Herron Galleries

This summer, the Herron School of Art and Design will feature the first Indiana exhibition of “A Lot of Sorrow,” a video installation by Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson and indie-rock band The National.

“A Lot of Sorrow,” one of Kjartansson’s most well-known and acclaimed works, is a six-hour, single-channel video of a performance recorded at MoMA PS1 in 2013. For this piece, Kjartansson, best known for his durational performance and video work, invited The National to play their hit song “Sorrow” live on stage repeatedly and continuously for six hours, nine minutes, and 35 seconds. As hours pass and fatigue sets in, the band members experiment and improvise, yielding unexpected outcomes while Kjartansson periodically steps on stage to offer food and drink.

Kjartansson explores the creative potential of repetition by stretching a single pop song into a six-hour concert. Filmed with multiple cameras, Kjartansson’s large-screen video projection becomes an immersive experience that ARTnewscalled “astonishingly riveting,” and The New YorkTimes critic Roberta Smith described as “unimaginably expansive.”

The video will start from the beginning each day, allowing interested visitors to watch the entire 6-hour performance during gallery hours.

“A Lot of Sorrow” debuted at Luhring Augustine Bushwick in New York City in 2014 with more recent screenings at The Art Institute of Chicago, the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C.

An opening reception will take place from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m. on Friday, July 7 in conjunction with the Indianapolis Downtown Artists & Dealer’s Association’s (IDADA) monthly First Friday art tour. The exhibition runs June 14 to September 2, 2017 in Herron’s Berkshire, Reese, and Paul Galleries. All Herron exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Also on view this summer in the Herron Galleries:

  • “Mirror Mirror,” featuring new paintings and a site-specific installation by New York-based artist Jaqueline Cedar (June 14 to September 2) in the Marsh Gallery;
  • “Fold, Staple, Riot: The Art and Subculture of Zine Making” highlighting local and national self-publishing communities (June 14 to July 15) in the Basile Gallery;
  • New work by Herron alumnus Samuel Levi Jones (B.F.A. Photography ’09) from July 26 to September 2 in the Basile Gallery.

Parking is available courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or on the upper floors of the Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6 p.m. Park on any floor after 6 p.m. Bring your parking ticket to the Herron galleries for validation.

To view the original press release for this event, visit the Herron School of Art and Design website.

IUPUI University Library begins 3-D digitization of Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum items

As the Indianapolis Motor Speedway adds another chapter to its history with the 101st running of the Indianapolis 500, the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is continuing to preserve some of the historic items that have been a part of “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.”

Through a pilot project with the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum, University Library has scanned several museum artifacts in 3-D, creating a new database where race fans can view historic items from all angles with a click of a mouse.

Among the items scanned are helmets from legendary drivers Mario Andretti and Rick Mears, uniforms from Peter Revson and Bill Vukovich, vintage hood ornaments from cars, and a cross-section of a piece of the racing surface that shows its 108-year evolution from crushed stone to bricks to multiple layers of asphalt.

“We’re fortunate to have thousands of artifacts in our possession, but there are limitations to how we can share them with the public, from museum floor space to just the delicate nature of some items,” said Betsy Smith, executive director of the IMS Museum. “Scanning historic — and sometimes fragile — pieces in 3-D and saving them in a digital collection is a wonderful way of making more of our collection available, and we’ve been delighted to begin to do that in partnership with the IUPUI University Library.”

Thirteen items have been scanned and cataloged so far in the project, with the IMS Museum and University Library hoping to do more if funding materializes.

“There’s so much more in the IMS Museum to discover, and with this 3-D technology, we can create as vibrant of a database as we have with other pieces of IMS and Indianapolis 500 history,” said Jenny Johnson, head of digitization services for the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

The Center has scanned and posted a searchable collection of thousands of images from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in recent years, and last year it launched a “500” Festival database with more than 8,000 items including programs, tickets, badges, photos of celebrities, and more. There are also audio race summaries of every Indianapolis 500 through 2014, featuring Indianapolis Motor Speedway Radio Network clips and commentary from IMS historian Donald Davidson.

To view the original press release, visit the IUPUI Newsroom article.

Love and Affection in a Hostile World – Phyllis Bramson Exhibit

“It’s an Old Story … But a New Day”

This exhibition surveys three decades of work by the Chicago-based artist Phyllis Bramson. Bringing together more than 25 paintings and assemblages, Love and Affection in a Hostile World explores Bramson’s ongoing interest in Eastern mythology and iconography from the perspective of the Western imagination.

Bramson will deliver the 2017 Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 8, in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall. An opening reception will immediately follow the talk. The exhibition will then be on display in the Berkshire, Reese, and Paul Galleries until April 15.

States of Incarceration Exhibit opens April 13

Indianapolis Central Public Library Atrium

States of Incarceration is a traveling exhibit and website created by over 500 students and others deeply affected by incarceration in 20 cities across the United States. These students grew up in a country that incarcerates more of its people, including immigrants, than any country in the world – and at any point in its history. Recently, they have witnessed a new bipartisan consensus that the criminal justice system is broken and yet there is intense conflict over how to fix it.

The exhibit will be open from April 13 to May 14 at the Indianapolis Central Library, 40 E. St. Claire Street.

States of Incarceration explores the roots of mass incarceration through stories rooted in our own communities, and its goal is to open national dialogue on what should happen next. More information and specific exhibition hours can be found on the exhibition website.

The exhibition will also include several public events, including the screening and panel discussion of the documentary “13th”, a conversation on the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program, the Pages to Prison book drive, an opening reception and panel, a spoken word performance, a mental health first aid certification class, and a public conversation. Some of these events require registration to attend; please click on the links provided to see event details.

Support for this exhibition has been provided by The New School Humanities Action Lab, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Indiana Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Netflix, Circle City (IN) Chapter of Links, Inc., Create Forward, LLC, Mental Health First Aid, Midwest Pages for Prisoners, the IUPUI Museum Studies Program, the Cultural Heritage Research Center, the IU School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI Social Justice Education, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Inside-Out Center, and the Indianapolis Public Library.

IUPUI Student Research Day

The 2017 IUPUI Student Research Day will be held on Friday, April 7, from 10a.m. to 2p.m. in Hine Hall and University Tower. All are invited to join this celebration of student research that helps IUPUI fulfill its promise of endless possibilities through discovery, exploration, and innovation. This event will spotlight the rich, cutting-edge, multi-faceted research and creative activities that so many IUPUI students are conducting with faculty mentors.

More information can be found on the Research Day website. This event is sponsored by the IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research.

Reading at the Table Series to feature Anila Agha

nbaker_ruag_agha_150929_3074copyIntersections

Feb. 15, 2017, 11:30am-1:00pm

University Place Conference Center, Room 200

Anila Quayyum Agha, MFA, Herron School of Art and Design

Imagine a single lightbulb inside a cube made of six 6.5 ft.-square panels of wood with intricate laser cutouts and hung from a ceiling. When the light is on, the sculpture floods the room with lace-like shadows resembling architectural motifs found in mosques. That is “Intersections.”

At the 2014 ArtPrize competition held in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Intersections wowed audiences and judges alike. It swept both the public and jury awards at ArtPrize and resulted in prize winnings of $300,000.  Professor Anila Agha’s work has garnered many honors, competitive grants, and was selected for display nationally at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, and internationally at the National Museum of Sculpture in Spain.

Join Dr. Agha to learn more about her vision that resulted in this magnificent piece of art.

The annual Reading at the Table series provides an opportunity for members of the IUPUI community to celebrate published books written by IUPUI faculty or staff. During each luncheon, the featured author/editor will read from his or her work and open the floor to discussion. Seating is limited; registration is encouraged and can be completed on the campus Events Page. Walk-ins will be handled on a first-come, first-served basis—if space is available. Purchase of a buffet-style lunch for $13.00 (dessert and soft drinks not included) is required to attend this event.

Artist Faith Ringgold to speak at Herron Undergraduate Student Exhibition opening

tar-beachArtist Faith Ringgold will present the 2016 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture at the Herron School of Art and Design.

The event will take place at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 30 in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. The lecture, with a book signing and reception immediately following, coincides with the opening of the Undergraduate Student Exhibition and is free and open to the public.

Ringgold creates art in many mediums, including quilting, which she has described as a way to make her subject matter more approachable. Her art and activism of the 1960s and ’70s called out museums for not being inclusive of works by women and people of color. “Tar Beach,” one of the most famous of her narrative quilts, now resides at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

Ringgold created “Tar Beach” as part of theWoman on a Bridge” series, begun in the late 1980s. The story of a young girl’s resilient flights of fancy from the “tar beach” rooftop of her family home also became the first of 20 children’s books written and/or illustrated by Ringgold. “Tar Beach” has won numerous awards, including a Caldecott Honor and the Coretta Scott King illustrator award.

Ringgold is the recipient of more than 75 awards, including 23 honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degrees and fellowships. Her work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art and the Boston Museum of Fine Art. She lives and works in Englewood, New Jersey. She is a professor emerita of the University of California, San Diego, where she taught art from 1984 until 2002. 

About the Undergraduate Exhibition
This year’s Undergraduate Exhibition jurist is Liz Garvey of Garvey Simon Art Access in New York City. Garvey will choose works from student submissions across a wide variety of media. The exhibition will take place in the Berkshire, Reese, Paul, and Marsh galleries. The Basile Gallery will feature a sampling of broadsides and artists’ books from the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here CoalitionThe collection represents the solidarity with the people of Iraq that poured forth from around the globe in response to the 2007 car bombing of the intellectual center of Baghdad.

About the Jane Fortune Lecture
“I want to make an impact on the community that surrounds me and help make the arts accessible to our residents,” said Jane Fortune, author, cultural editor, art historian, art collector, and philanthropist, when she established the Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture. This series brings prominent female artists to the Herron School of Art and Design and has included Polly Apfelbaum, Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons, Deborah Butterfield, Judy Chicago, and Eleanor Antin. For gallery hours and parking information, visit the Herron Galleries online.

View original press release from the IUPUI Newsroom.