IU Online Conference

The fourth annual statewide IU Online Conference will be held October 30, 2019, at the Sheraton Indianapolis Hotel at Keystone Crossing.

Your conference hosts from the Office of Online Education, the Office of Collaborative Academic Programs, and eLearning Design and Services are seeking proposals from IU faculty, administrators, advisors, success coaches, and staff across the state who are innovators and collaborators in the online space.

We will consider proposals that address empirical research, showcase best practices, and/or describe lessons learned related to one or more of the following areas:

  • Program development and administration
  • Coaching, advising, student engagement, and co-curricular programming
  • Marketing, admissions, and recruitment
  • Teaching and learning innovation
  • Technology that advances digital learning

Of special interest are presentations describing intercampus and/or interdisciplinary collaborations and proposals that have application to multiple disciplines. Sessions will last for 30 to 45 minutes.

Proposals are due at 11:59pm on Friday, June 7th. Presenters will be notified in August.

Submit your proposals now! 

Kibo, Chatbot Tech That Enhances Interest In Books, Wins 2019 JagStart Competition

Radhika Ravindran pitches Kibo during the 2019 JagStart competition. Photo courtesy of the IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research
Radhika Ravindran pitches Kibo during the 2019 JagStart competition. Photo courtesy of the IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research

An idea that originated more than five years ago was developed and refined into a project that won IUPUI’s 2019 JagStart Student Idea Pitch Competition on April 12.

Radhika Ravindran, a master’s degree candidate in the School of Informatics and Computing, has a younger brother who doesn’t enjoy reading but likes using his smartphone, including sending text messages to friends. She wondered why the same activity couldn’t be used for reading books.

“While there are services to help consume books differently, nothing addresses the lack of attention span and engagement aspects of it,” Ravindran said. “My solution, Kibo, uses chatbot technology to make book-reading like a conversation and more engaging than ever.”

Ravindran delivered a three-minute elevator pitch and participated in a two-minute Q&A session with a panel of judges during the IUPUI student competition. Kibo was named the best of the 11 projects in the competition, and Ravindran was awarded $2,500 to further develop it.

“Originally I thought of making Kibo an application for home use,” Ravindran said. “But with the JagStart competition award and insights from two contacts I have made, I’m planning to turn it into an education application that could benefit students up to the university level.”

Samuel Kropp, a bachelor’s degree candidate in the Kelley School of Business, won second place and $1,500 for The Aquaponics Company. The company is based around the sustainable science of aquaponics — the combination of fish farming and hydroponics. The goal is to scale down commercial aquaponics to an in-house system to be sold directly to household consumers.

Eli Hoopengarner, a double bachelor’s degree candidate in the School of Engineering and Technology and the School of Liberal Arts, won third place and $750 for The FlexWheel. The product improves motorsport driver comfort, allocates stronger muscle groups to decrease a driver’s fatigue and provides energy dissipation upon impact.

Kristina Tinsley, a bachelor’s degree candidate in the Kelley School of Business and a member of the Honors College, and Madhura Mhatre, a master’s degree candidate in the School of Informatics and Computing, won the audience choice prizes and $500 apiece. Tinsley pitched Archived, a smartphone app that increases visitor engagement at museums and helps maintain museum inventory. Mhatre pitched Swelter Produce, which addresses the challenge of desert farming by using renewable resources to generate clean energy from heat and to extract water from humid air in arid environments for irrigation.

JagStart is organized through IUPUI’s Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research. It has undergone different iterations, including a business pitch competition, since it started in 2012. Simon Atkinson, vice chancellor for research, said it is important that resources like JagStart are available for innovative IUPUI students.

Simon Atkinson
Simon Atkinson

“These students are future entrepreneurs and leaders for Indiana,” Atkinson said. “Competitions like JagStart and other resources offered by IUPUI help them hone the soft skills that will carry them far in whatever career they choose.”

Other competitors in the 2019 JagStart Student Idea Pitch Competition and their projects were:

  • Michael Daniells: Breeze Microloans, a mobile application platform that provides access to short-term, low-principal, low-interest-rate loans.
  • Sneh Khatri: Kidzie, an application that promotes the development and well-being of young children through features that enhance parent-child communication.
  • Dakota Merkel: Rest in Peace, a social media platform that allows people to actively remember their loved ones years after they pass away.
  • Yi-shan Tabitha Tsai: epiQ, a mobile application that helps students achieve basic furniture needs.
  • Natalie Woods: Green Roofs, a product designed to allow residents in an urban environment to have their own green spaces.
  • Szu-Yu Yang and Swaroop John: Pickcart, an online-shopping-style mobile application for university students to access free food items from their on-campus food pantries.

Read the original story from IUPUI NewsSteve Martin 

5 Tips for Landing an Internship

For those of you trying to plan ahead for internships, here are tips from our expert career advisors about how to land the job.

Start early and talk to your career advisor

The IUPUI campus has many resources to help with each step in landing an internship. Intern fairs are a great way to search for opportunities, establish connections and get your name out there. Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Don’t wait to look for an internship. It’s common for businesses to search for summer interns as early as the fall semester. Students who wait until spring to look for a summer internship might have trouble getting a position because many opportunities will be filled.

It’s also smart to begin the internship search by visiting your career advisor. They can help you consider what you want to do with your degree, guide you to templates for your resume and cover letters, review your resume and cover letters, help you with networking, do a mock interview with you, notify you about career fairs, and more.

Search for opportunities

First, check to see if your school has a database or another kind of internship listing for your major. For students in the School of Liberal Arts, there’s a database available to get help with many things involving your career. JagJobsIndiana INTERNnet and Ascend Indiana are a few sites that are specifically intended for students looking for internships. Google and LinkedIn are also options, and of course you can just go directly to a company’s website to see if it’s hiring.

Career and intern fairs are a great way to find opportunities and get your name out there. When attending career events, informational interviews or job-shadowing opportunities, make sure to dress professionally, come with questions and bring your resume. Also, make sure to follow up with the people you met.

Once you have a list of internships you’d like to apply for, prioritize them. Don’t apply for every position that sounds interesting — but don’t apply for just one or two either, in case those companies don’t get back to you.

Use your connections

Connections give you an advantage in the workforce. Not only can they suggest people you haven’t heard of, but they could also help you get in the door for that first interview. Those who are close to you know how you work and will likely enjoy helping where they can. Ask your advisors, professors or peers for potential connections. In addition, your parents — or your friends’ parents — might know people who could help you make connections.

Research professionals in your field and reach out to them to see if they’ll talk with you. Other ways to make connections are attending career fairs, joining LinkedIn, scheduling informational interviews and job-shadowing opportunities, attending company presentations, and talking with guest speakers in your classes.

Once again, don’t forget to follow up and send a thank-you email or note to people who took any time to help you.

Prepare your resume and cover letter

Every industry has different expectations.

Your resume needs to be descriptive and show measurable outcomes about your work experiences, accomplishments, scholarships and skill sets. It should not be more than one page. Also, unless your GPA is close to a 4.0, don’t put it on there.

Your cover letter must be tailored specifically to the internship you’re applying for — do not create a general one you send out to everyone. Briefly include what you know about the company, why you want to work there and how your skills match the needs listed in the job description. When you’re done, have professors, advisors, your career development office, parents and friends proofread the documents.

Finally, identify and ask three people you know to be references. Make sure you tell them in advance when they might be receiving a phone call or email from potential employers.

Prepare for the interview

Dress to impress for your interview, complete with professional clothing and a well-groomed appearance. Stay away from strong perfume/cologne and distracting jewelry. Also, find out beforehand exactly where the interview is, how long it takes to get there and where to park to avoid any chance of being late.

Nail down your elevator pitch and rehearse your answers to typical interview questions before the big day, and request a mock interview with your career advisor or a professor.

Lastly, never forget to follow up within 24 hours by sending a thank-you email or handwritten note. It should reiterate your interest, state something you learned or appreciated, and thank them for their time.

Read the original story from IUPUI News’ Ashlynnn Neumeyer

Spirit & Place Festival Call for Applications

Spirit & Place is a platform that connects Central Indiana residents through events, community conversations and skill-building opportunities aimed at launching innovative experiments, revealing invisible stories, and sparking radical collaborations. Using the arts, humanities, and religion, Spirit & Place catalyzes civic engagement and builds bridges of understanding.

It’s signature public offering is the Spirit & Place Festival which will occur from November 1 – 10, 2019 and this year’s theme is R/EVOLUTION. Learn more about the festival and the theme by visiting the Spirit & Place website.

Information about the process for submitting festival events may be found in the application guidelines. All interested participants are welcome to attend an information meeting on February 6 at WFYI (1630 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis) or by contacting Erin Kelley, Spirit & Place Program Director, at ekkelley@iupui.edu or 317-274-2462. The application deadline is Friday, April 12 at midnight.

Greening IUPUI Grant

Taking Your Good Idea to the Next Level

Are you an IUPUI student, faculty, or staff member that has come up with a way to advance campus sustainability? Submit your idea, and you could win a Greening IUPUI Grant to make it happen.

Greening IUPUI Grants are awarded one time per year to projects that advance our campus sustainability principles and improve IUPUI’s STARS score. IUPUI dedicates a total of $50,000 annually to fund these projects.  You can review the Greening IUPUI Grant Guidelines here

Application Information

Deadlines

  • Application period opens: December 1, 2018
  • Application period closes: February 1, 2019 (11:59pm)
  • Applicants notified: April 1, 2019

Eligibility

IUPUI students, faculty, and staff may apply.  Students must have a faculty or staff member’s support and designate them as the project contact person on the application

Guidelines

Review the full Greening IUPUI Grant Fund Guidelines before applying.
Proposals should focus on one or more of the following areas:

  • Planning & Administration (Strategic initiatives, diversity, affordability, innovation)
  • Academic (Courses, research, other educational pursuits)
  • Campus Engagement (student engagement programs, events)
  • Public Engagement (volunteer opportunities, campus-community partnerships)
  • Operations (Grounds, energy, waste, water, purchasing, transportation, buildings)
  • Health & Wellness (Food, health, equity, and human sustainability

Proposals will be received by the Greening IUPUI Grant Review Committee who will evaluate the applications based on the following criteria:

  • Improving IUPUI’s STARS score
  • Long-term impact for IUPUI
  • High-impact learning experience(s)
  • Visibility
  • Student involvement
  • Reasonable timeline and feasibility
  • Financial considerations

To Apply

Complete the Greening IUPUI Grant application. You can preview the application before starting the application process.

Past Grant Awards

Need ideas?! Check out our sustainability principles, latest STARS report, and a few recent grant awards! Submit your Final Assessment Report here!

IUPUI to party like it’s 1969

IUPUI will officially turn the big 5-0 on Jan. 24. It’s the campus’s birthday, but the presents are for you. Photo by Getty Images

On Jan. 24, 1969, the average cost of gas was 32 cents a gallon, “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” by Marvin Gaye was the No. 1 song on the radio, and “Sweet Caroline” crooner Neil Diamond turned 28 years old.

Also, and most importantly, IUPUI was officially established on that memorable day.

IUPUI’s golden anniversary will be celebrated in style throughout the day and well into the evening Jan. 24 in the Campus Center.

The day will feature a wide variety of activities designed to honor IUPUI’s past, celebrate our present and envision our future. Accomplishments by faculty, staff, students, alumni and community partners throughout the past 50 years will be recognized even as guests throughout the day will be looking ahead to the university’s next half-century.

Here’s a breakdown of what you can expect next week while celebrating IUPUI’s golden anniversary:

50th Anniversary Report to the Community

When and where: 10 to 11 30 a.m. on the fourth floor of the Campus Center.

Registrations are full for this invitation-only event that will feature remarks by IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar, IU President Michael A. McRobbie, Purdue Board of Trustees President Michael Berghoff and a panel of Indianapolis mayors — past and present — who will help celebrate the occasion of IUPUI’s official birthday in historic fashion. But the event will be live-streamed on broadcast.iu.edu.

Special sessions and party activities

When and where: Noon to 5 p.m. on various floors of the Campus Center.

Presentations from IUPUI faculty and staff, all 45 minutes or less, will enlighten throughout the afternoon. The talks are open to all. They include:

  • Professor of anthropology Paul Mullins will offer a featured session, “The Price of Progress: Race and Displacement in Indianapolis’ Near-Westside,” from noon to 12:45 p.m. and 2 to 2:45 p.m. in Room 309
  • Colleagues in the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research have organized an IUPUI Research Rock Stars session, highlighting 50 years of outstanding research at IUPUI.
  • University Library colleagues will share information about digital collections, including an opportunity to have a 3D scan made of your face — or your favorite IUPUI artifact — for the digital repository that will commemorate the day.

The party continues

When and where: Noon to 10 p.m. on various floors of the Campus Center.

Employees, students and visitors are invited to check out the activities on the Campus Center’s main floor and the theater level, which will include a 360-degree photo booth, an all-day dance party, a virtual-reality 3D tour of campus, a new interactive map of community engagement and 50th-birthday cakes made by local bakeries.

Get your golden jaguar

IUPUI is giving out 700 3D-printed “Golden Jaguars” to faculty, staff and students who print out a passport and collect stamps at various birthday locations around campus. The jaguars have been produced on campus by University Library’s digital scholarship group in the 3D Printing Studio.

Residence halls and organizations are competing for the most stamps to win golden jaguar figurines and a chance for pizza with Chancellor Paydar. Get started here.

Be sure to wear your JagSwag and post on social media about IUPUI’s birthday. The hashtag #MyIUPUI was created to celebrate this exciting day, so take advantage of this special occasion and show off your school spirit by spreading the word.

Read the original article from IUPUI News

January Photo Caption Contest

Students with robot January 1984

Submit your captions to November’s photo from University Archives in the Ruth Lilly Special Collections and Archives photo caption contest. Participants will be eligible to win a prize.

Congratulations to Andy Smith for his December winning caption,”With sagging and other signs of age showing, you know him today as the Poop Emoji. But in his younger years audiences everywhere knew him as the Healthy Red Blood Cell Emoji.”

So login and post away!

Curtis Memorial Oratorical Contest

The IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI invites you to a special event to celebrate the scholarship of our students and further the notion that the building of a community requires the open and free exchange of ideas.

This contest provides IUPUI undergraduate students an opportunity to showcase their commitment to peaceful resolution of conflict through extemporaneous oration.

The theme of the of the event is Peaceful Conflict Resolution and Communication.

Did you ever wonder why there is so much conflict in society?  Or, how you could contribute to the solutions?

The two TLC’s (Themed Learning Communities) taking part in tonight’s event explore issues of culture, race, and ethnicity patterns of human interaction, through the disciplines of sociology, religious studies, and human communication via public speaking and inter-group dialogue.

Come join us!

Tuesday, December 4, 2018
Campus Center – IUPUI
420 University Blvd, CE 002
Indianapolis, IN 46202
5:30pm – Reception
6:00pm – Event Begins

The Curtis Memorial Oratorical Contest was founded by Professor Emeritus of Communication Studies, Richard Curtis, and his wife, Beth, to honor the memory of his brothers, Robert and Dana, both of whom were killed at war.

Enter to Win the Photo Archives Contest

Associate professor of painting Richard Nicholson talks to students in 1987. Photo courtesy of IUPUI University Archives

Submit your captions to November’s photo from University Archives in the Ruth Lilly Special Collections and Archives photo caption contest. Participants will be eligible to win a prize.

Congratulations to Matt Hinsman for his October-winning caption:”No IUPUI building is complete until the scratching post is installed. Go, Jags!”

So login and post away!