Faces of IUPUI: James Kendrick

 

James Kendrick organizes the stacks in University Library, where he has been on staff for more than 30 years. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

James Kendrick has been on staff at University Library for more than 30 years, during which he earned his bachelor’s degree from the School of Science and is now pursuing a master’s degree from SPEA.

As the library’s stacks manager, Kendrick has touched thousands of books in its vast collection, which totals more than a million volumes. Over three decades, he has kept the library’s collection orderly and accessible to generations of IUPUI students, faculty and staff.

In addition to his integral role as stacks manager, Kendrick is the library’s United Way ambassador as well as a unit ambassador for the IUPUI Campus Campaign.

Read the original article from IUPUI News

New Luis Alberto Ambroggio Center for Latino Studies to Serve as Hub for Literature and Research

The Luis Alberto Ambroggio Center for Latino Studies is housed in Room 323 of Cavanaugh Hall and is open to the entire IUPUI community. Photo courtesy of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

In addition to being a world-renowned poet and essayist, Luis Alberto Ambroggio has been a lifelong collector of Spanish literature and history books, many from well before his time.

It’s a priceless collection. And it now resides at IUPUI.

The Luis Alberto Ambroggio Center for Latino Studies, part of the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, formally opened Nov. 1 in a ceremony at the center, housed in Room 323 of Cavanaugh Hall. Among the distinguished guests were Ambroggio; Garry Holland, education chair for the Greater Indianapolis Branch of the NAACP; Elia James from the Lawrence city government; IUPUI Executive Vice Chancellor Kathy Johnson; and representatives from the Indianapolis mayor’s office, the Lawrence mayor’s office and the office of Rep. André Carson.

“The center is not only for Latino studies; it’s open to anybody, in any major. Students can use the library to continue research,” said Jose Vargas-Vila, director of IUPUI’s Latino Studies program. “In the future, we’ll use it to invite scholars and writers to IUPUI.”

Nearly 2,000 volumes are in the center, covering classic Spanish literature, linguistics, American history and more. The center is in partnership with the North American Academy of the Spanish Language, of which associate professor Rosa Tezanos-Pinto is a full member and editor of the academy’s bulletin.

“Latino studies is a flourishing area of study in the School of Liberal Arts, and the Luis Alberto Ambroggio Center will do a wonderful job of serving students for years to come,” School of Liberal Arts interim dean Robert Rebein said. “To have such a wonderful collection within our walls is a remarkable testament to our school’s programs.”

The connection between Ambroggio and IUPUI was forged by Tezanos-Pinto through annual conferences around the world. Tezanos-Pinto told Ambroggio about the growing Latino Studies program at IUPUI, and an interest and a bond were formed.

“She made the impression, and Ambroggio chose this university — from among several others — to pass on his collection to a place that would be a permanent location,” Vargas-Vila said. “He wanted to donate the books that belonged to him and his parents.”

Some 700 students take classes in Latino studies each year from two full-time and four part-time faculty. Students have had internships with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, with the city of Lawrence and inside the Indiana Statehouse.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ John Schwarb

‘Frankenstein’ Is On The Move at 200

British history professor Jason Kelly holds a copy of “Frankenstein,” which was first published 200 years ago. Kelly and his students created A Frankenstein Atlas, a website that breaks down all 331 geographic points associated with the 200-year-old book and its creation. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

First published on Jan. 1, 1818, Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” and its undead monster have been captivating international audiences for two centuries.

The tale has been made into almost 100 movies around the planet — from Boris Karloff’s 1931 classic to 2017’s “Mary Shelley,” which depicted the trailblazing creation of the story in the early 19th century.

With so many reiterations and takes on the book, Jason M. Kelly, an associate professor of British history and director of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and his spring 2018 “Machines and the Age of Invention” class took a deep read of the book, poring over the many locations visited — or even just mentioned in passing — by Dr. Victor Frankenstein and the numerous other characters. From this, Kelly and his students constructed A Frankenstein Atlas, a living research project that maps 331 locations that reside in the book or were visited by Shelley during the writing process.

“It’s a slowly growing site to learn about ‘Frankenstein’ and explore the many facets of the book,” Kelly said. “In class, it allowed us to think about what kinds of historical sources and methods we use in the context of literary analysis.”

Kelly and his students are still publishing new data to A Frankenstein Atlas. Fueled by Github, other researchers and classes will be able to add new “branches” to the work, allowing the atlas — and the legacy of “Frankenstein” — to grow for another 200 years.

Question: How was the data created to fill and launch A Frankenstein Atlas?

Jason Kelly: The first thing we needed to do was read “Frankenstein.” So we did a group read of the book pretty quickly. Our first pass set the groundwork for our semester-long discussion of the historical context of “Frankenstein.” Each student was assigned two or three chapters, and their job was to code them. I created an online interface and helped them map their data.

Q: What struck you most about the novel while conducting the research?

JK: It’s an epistolary novel, a novel of letters, and it’s a travel journal at the same time. Mary and Percy Shelley, Claire (Clairmont, Mary Shelley’s stepsister) were touring through in 1816. They had been keeping travel journals. You can actually read sections of “Frankenstein” and go back to the travel journals to flesh out the spaces and places they’re talking about.

Because there is a strong geographical element to “Frankenstein,” and we used location as our jumping-off point, which gave us the opportunity to pursue historical geographic information systems approaches. The model that helped shape the project was “Mapping the Lakes,” a project that examined the Lake poets. We borrowed the format and developed it into this pedagogical platform. We made it an open source data set so that people can add to and develop it.

Q: As a professor of British history, how did your travel experience influence the project?

JK: I do a lot of research on the Grand Tour, a one or two year trip through Europe that many British elites took during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. And, fortunately, my research takes to locations across the continent. So, Percy and Mary’s visit to the continent—specifically Lake Geneva where she composed “Frankenstein”—was similar to my other work.

Q: What other sources did you use during your analysis?

JK: In one instance, we pulled data on where historical ice sheets, and we read journals from the 18th and 19th-century scientific expeditions. We even studied where whaling ships were likely to travel. These were the types of information that Mary had access to when she described the ice at the beginning and end of the book. We triangulated these data sets, and when we brought it all together, we were able to get a good sense where Mary was situating the action in the novel. It was a great exercise in the ways that science and literature can come together and talk to each other.

Q: What were your students’ reactions to the book?

JK: They loved it. They arrived with an image of Frankenstein mediated by the movies. But when they read the book, like almost anyone I’ve spoken to who has never read the book before, they said, “Oh, this isn’t at all what I thought it was about.” This is talking about all the same issues we’re grappling with today, like religion, ethics, responsibility and what makes us human. It’s such a contemporary novel, and it’s 200 years old.

Read the original article from IUPUI NewsTim Brouk

Genesis: Giving Jags a Creative Voice Since 1972

Sarah Layden, English lecturer and faculty advisor, stands while working with Genesis’ managing editors, Caroline Niepokoj, Wesley Stevens and Ashley Williams, from left, during a recent meeting. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

Veronica Baker’s dual passions for science and creative writing have flourished during her three-plus years at IUPUI.

The senior’s career goal is to combine her talents for biology and writing. Thanks to the Genesis literary magazine, it’s not just cells she is putting under the microscope. As one of the biannual magazine’s several editors, Baker helps dissect hundreds of submissions each semester from writers who hope to get published in the magazine, which debuted in 1972.

“I want to be a science teacher, but I also want to write on the side,” Baker said.

Recent editions of Genesis, IUPUI’s literary magazine since 1972. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

Genesis features poetry, short stories, essays and visual art submitted from students — graduate and undergrads. The pieces are scrutinized by the committee, and the magazine is designed in-house. The deadline for the Fall 2018 edition is Oct. 14.

Dating back 46 years, genesis is one of the longest-standing traditions on campus. Thousands of Metros, then Jaguars, got their first published credit in genesis.

“To have your work published is the first step in creating your career,” said Ashley Williams, a managing editor for genesis. “Once you have that credential, it’s easier to get your foot in the door.”

Recent editions of genesis have shown well at the Indiana Collegiate Press Association. The publication has earned 10 statewide awards since 2016.

In the spring, genesis’ team of editors considered about 200 submissions. There is no set amount. If 200 pieces meet the team’s standards, then 200 pieces get in. All editors must have passed the Department of English’s Literary Editing and Publishing course before joining the staff.

“We look at all of the pieces individually,” said Baker, explaining that personal tastes and biases must be eliminated when critiquing a potential genesis piece. “It’s usually more how the work is written — the content, the craft.”

Every editor gets a read, and then they vote on whether the submission gets in. If it passes, the poem or story gets copyedited, placed, laid out via InDesign and printed.

While the planet becomes increasingly more digital and STEM-focused, genesis’ success at IUPUI endures. Whether it’s 1972 or 2018, and whether they’ve been writing creatively for years or just months, getting their work published in print is still a thrill for students. Caroline Niepokoj submitted her short story “The Wooden Girl” during the English creative writing major’s sophomore year.

“I didn’t really like the story, but I submitted it anyway,” recalled Niepokoj, now a senior. “It got published, and I got really excited about it. I realized that I can actually write and actually knew what I was doing.

“It gave me more confidence in my own writing, my own capabilities and the craft.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tim Brouk

Writer Dan Chaon (The 2018 Ray Bradbury Visiting Writer Lecture)

Dan Chaon’s most recent book is Ill Will, a national bestseller, named one of the ten best books of 2017 by Publishers Weekly. His other works include the short story collection Stay Awake (2012), a finalist for the Story Prize; the national bestseller Await Your Reply and Among the Missing, a finalist for the National Book Award. Chaon’s fiction has appeared in Best American Short Stories, The Pushcart Prize Anthologies, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. He is the recipient of an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series is provided by the Reiberg family, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI Department of English and the IUPUI Arts and Humanties Institute.

DATE AND TIME
Thu, October 25, 2018
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT

Get your tickets here!

Reiberg Reading Series: Michael Martone

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the Rufus & Louise Reiberg Readings Series present writer Michael Martone and special guests R. Craig Sautter, Karen Kovacik, and Terry Kirts to celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the Reiberg Reading Series.

Michael Martone’s recent books are The Moon Over Wapakoneta, Brooding, Winesburg, Indiana, and Four for a Quarter. The University of Georgia Press published his book of essays, The Flatness and Other Landscapes, winner of the AWP Award for Nonfiction, in 2000. His stories and essays have appeared in Harper’s, Esquire, North American Review, Iowa Review, and other magazines. Martone has won two Fellowships from the NEA and a grant from the Ingram Merrill Foundation. His stories and essays have appeared and been cited in the Pushcart Prize, The Best American Stories and The Best American Essays anthologies. In 2013 he received the national Indiana Authors Award, and in 2016, the Mark Twain Award for Distinguished Contribution to Midwestern Literature. Martone was born and grew up in Fort Wayne, Indiana. He attended Butler University and graduated from Indiana University. He holds the MA from The Writing Seminars of The Johns Hopkins University. Martone is currently a Professor at the University of Alabama where he has been teaching since 1996. He has been a faculty member of the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College since 1988.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series is provided by the Reiberg family, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI Department of English and the IUPUI Arts and Humanties Institute.

DATE AND TIME
Wed, October 3, 2018
7:30 PM – 9:00 PM EDT

Get your tickets here!

Author to Speak on Family Challenges at Commencement

A’Lelia Bundles

Fresh from practically defeating the Indiana Pacers by himself in the playoffs, Lebron James will ease some of the pain by helping pay tribute to one of Indianapolis’ most renowned women.

Read the original article from News at IU‘s Tim Brouk.

The star forward for the Cleveland Cavaliers has been attached as an executive producer, along with Oscar-winning actress Octavia Spencer, on a future Netflix series focusing on Madam C. J. Walker, the namesake for the Madam Walker Theatre Center near IUPUI and the nation’s first African-American female self-made millionaire. James and Spencer are connected through the William Morris talent agency.

“What I can say is that the writing process is tentatively scheduled to start during the summer,” said Walker’s great-great-granddaughter A’Lelia Bundles via telephone from Washington, D.C. “Once the writers are assembled, they’ll map out the arc of the story. I’m a consultant on the series. If all goes well and the planets align properly, I will be involved periodically while they are developing the storyline.”

The series is based on Bundles’ best-selling 2001 book, “On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C. J. Walker,” which follows Walker’s life from a Southern cotton fields worker to a poor washer-woman in St. Louis to the employer of thousands of African-American women in her own hair care and cosmetics firm, Madam C. J. Walker Manufacturing Company, based in downtown Indianapolis. The book was optioned by Zero Gravity Management in 2016.

Bundles is finishing up another book, “The Joy Goddess of Harlem: A’Lelia Walker and the Harlem Renaissance,” based on her great-grandmother and namesake, who was the daughter of Madam Walker. A’Lelia Walker was a major cultural influencer in New York while representing the family business in the Big Apple.

As guest speaker at IUPUI’s commencement on May 12 at Lucas Oil Stadium, Bundles will talk about those women and her own career as a former ABC and NBC news producer and journalist. Several thousand students and their families will be in attendance.

A North Central High School graduate raised in Indianapolis on Grandview Drive, Bundles received degrees from Harvard College and Columbia University before settling in Washington, D.C. Her father, S. Henry Bundles, was president of the Center for Leadership Development in Indianapolis and now lives in Florida. Her late mother, A’Lelia Mae Perry Bundles, was vice president of the Walker Company while being involved in Indianapolis politics.

IUPUI Human Library

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Organizers of a Human Library at IUPUI are recruiting 75 Indianapolis-area residents who have faced discrimination to become “books” at an event that will challenge stereotypes and prejudices through dialogue.

The IUPUI Human Library, a campus-funded Welcoming Campus Initiative, will take place from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday, April 2, at the Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

People who would like to be a human book are asked to complete a form.

“The Human Library is a place where real people and their stories are ‘on loan’ to readers,” said Andrea Copeland, associate professor and chair, Department of Library and Information Science at the Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI, and lead organizer of the event. “It’s a place where difficult questions are expected, appreciated, and answered.”

The framework of a library is particularly appropriate, Copeland said: “People go to libraries in search of new knowledge. Usually, the knowledge vessel is a book. In this case, the knowledge vessel is a human.”

People who would like to volunteer to serve as books must be at least 18 years old. They are asked to answer why they would want to be a book, what types of discrimination they have faced based on status, and what the title and three possible chapters of their book would be. Human books will be expected to participate for at least two of the hours the Human Library will be open. When the human books are checked out, they will meet with a reader, or readers, for 30 minutes.

Volunteer human books will receive training on being a book, and readers will be given guidelines for respectful communication.

Students, faculty, and staff from the School of Informatics and Computing, the School of Liberal Arts, University Library, and the Indianapolis Public Library are working together to develop the event.

A large media arts screen featuring information about some of the books and an online human book catalog are being developed to help visitors select which books they would like to check out. Each book title will have a word that illustrates the form of discrimination the human book will discuss.

From NPR: ‘How to Think Like an Anthropologist’ – And Why You Should Want To

From NPR’s Barbara J. King:

Civilization originated in the Fertile Crescent region, including parts of modern-day Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, and Egypt: that’s the lesson most of us learned in school.

In it, civilization is used in a highly positive way to refer to the rise of city-states and the development of writing around the 4th millennium BC.

But today, civilization is an idea too often used against people living in that area of the world, sociocultural anthropologist Matthew Engelke explains in his new book, How To Think Like An Anthropologist. Engelke quotes, as an example, a U.S. Army colonel who, in conjunction with the war on terror, said this: “In Western Iraq, it’s like it was six centuries ago with the Bedouins in their goat hair tents.”

We need to see this statement and others like it for what it is, Engelke says: An attempt to relegate the Bedouins to living fossils who are stuck in time and badly in need of being civilized by the West.

It’s not just military culture that buys into and furthers this “civilizing” perspective. In 2007, an aid project was launched by the African Medical and Research Foundation, Barclays Bank, and the British progressive newspaper The Guardian. Its goal was to deliver health care to the village of Katine in northern Uganda. The project itself was sensitive and nuanced, Engelke notes. The coverage in The Guardian was anything but. On Oct.20, 2007, a Guardian story was headlined this way: “Can we, together, lift one village out of the Middle Ages?” Beneath the headline is a statement about traveling “a few hours from London — and 700 years back in time.”

What do these words signal but that the villagers need to be brought forward in time, back into civilization?

That’s dangerous thinking, Engelke says — and through the lens of anthropology, we can see why.

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Lilly Library Exhibition on Dating Etiquette

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Preparing for a big date this Valentine’s Day? Look no further than Indiana University’s Lilly Library for some classic social etiquette advice.

The library’s “Dating Through the Ages” exhibition features social etiquette publications and other love and romance-related documents that highlight information and advice about dating.

Artifacts range from the old and obscure, like Ebenezer Bradford’s “The Art of Courting: Displayed in Eight Different Scenes: The Principal of Which Are Taken from Actual Life, and Published for the Amusement of American Youth” from 1795, to the famous, like Helen Gurley Brown’s famous 1962 advice book, “Sex and the Single Girl.”

Public services librarian Isabel Planton said she’d been planning the exhibit since December. A longtime fan of etiquette guides, she was originally interested in doing a more general feature on manners but realized that homing in on dating and courtship would be timely for Valentine’s Day.

A 1936 manual, “How to Get Your Man and Hold Him,” was a good starting point. A co-worker showed it to Planton years ago, and she was amused by the cover image of a man and woman getting married.

“It’s really kind of an over-the-top cheesy 1930s manual,” she said. “I’d say more than anything else, that’s what got this started. I had this at my desk for a couple of years. It’s really great. It has all these hilarious illustrations in it.”

With many items relating to the topic in the library’s collection, Planton had plenty of options to curate an exhibition.

“I started with searching in our catalog, trying out different subject headings that related to courtship or dating and seeing what that brought me to,” she said. “And then I did the old trick of taking the call number for this subject area and going up to the shelves to see what else was there.”

Many of the books focus on letter writing, which reflects the “proliferation of rules” during the Victorian era, Planton said.

Some of these rules seem antiquated by today’s standards: how to flirt with a fan or handkerchief or gloves, for example. But readers clung onto them so strongly at the time that many of these etiquette guides were printed in miniature editions for easy access, allowing people to stash them in a pocket to read on the go.

Looking at trends in this two-century span, Planton said rules relaxed over time, but they didn’t disappear by any means.

“It seemed like a lot of these books are geared toward women and how they should behave. And then things start to become a little bit more loose and a little bit more liberal as we move into the 20th century and see the roles relaxing,” she said. “Although, still, there are a lot of rules for women. They’re just changing, but they’re still there.”

The “Dating Through the Ages” exhibition will be on display at the Lilly Library through Friday, March 2. For more information, visit the Lilly Library website.