Charles Goodlett, Elizabeth Kryder-Reid Appointed Chancellor’s Professors At IUPUI

From left: Chancellor's Professors Charles Goodlett and Elizabeth Kryder-Reid. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University
From left: Chancellor’s Professors Charles Goodlett and Elizabeth Kryder-Reid. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar has appointed Charles Goodlett, a professor in the School of Science, and Elizabeth Kryder-Reid, a professor in the School of Liberal Arts, as prestigious Chancellor’s Professors.

The Chancellor’s Professorship is the most distinguished appointment a faculty member can attain at IUPUI, recognizing extensive records of accomplishment and leadership in teaching, research and service. These senior faculty members retain the title throughout their appointments at IUPUI and comprise a special group of mentors and advisors for colleagues.

“Professor Goodlett and professor Kryder-Reid have dedicated themselves to outstanding research and education at IUPUI, serving as mentors, teachers and scholars for more than 20 years,” Paydar said. “Their appointments as Chancellor’s Professors honor all that they have done to enhance students’ educational experiences, to contribute to the vibrant intellectual community on our campus, and to support the advancements of their disciplines more broadly.”

Chancellor’s Professors are faculty who have demonstrated excellence in their support of IUPUI as an academic community of exceptional quality and integrity and have distinguished themselves in their disciplines through the creation and application of knowledge. Through their leadership and service in their departments, in their schools and across campus, they have reinforced and advanced IUPUI’s mission and vision.

Charles Goodlett
Goodlett, who arrived at IUPUI in 1993, is a professor in the Addiction Neuroscience program in the Department of Psychology in the School of Science.

Much of his research over the last quarter-century has focused on the effects of alcohol on the developing brain using quantitative neuroanatomy and behavioral methods in animal models of human fetal exposure. His work has shown that prenatal alcohol-induced brain damage and subsequent impairments in learning are directly related to blood alcohol content, with binge-like patterns of consumption proving especially damaging to the developing brain. His work showed that during early development of one important region of the brain, the cerebellum, there are relatively well-defined periods of enhanced vulnerability to damage from binge alcohol exposure.

Goodlett is continuing to research neurodevelopment disorders in a collaborative project with Randall Roper studying a mouse model of Down syndrome, while also fueling his passions for mentoring and teaching.

“Service to the campus is what I really value right now; I have dedicated a lot of time in the last five years working on faculty issues through faculty governance,” said Goodlett, who has also served for many years on the IUPUI Research Affairs Committee, including being chairperson in 2008-10. “Mentoring junior faculty is a concern of mine — making sure they’re given the right support and that they are able to navigate the academic landscape to achieve the full potential of their career trajectory.

“We have a very strong neuroscience undergraduate program, and one of the things that we are working on — that I’m taking a bit of a lead on — is developing a capstone research laboratory course that will allow students to gain experience in independent, hypothesis-driven behavioral neuroscience research.

“Being appointed as a Chancellor’s Professor motivates me even more to be a good academic citizen. It encourages me to continue and expand my efforts.”

Elizabeth Kryder-Reid
When Kryder-Reid, a professor of anthropology and museum studies in the School of Liberal Arts, arrived on campus in 1998, museum studies was only an undergraduate certificate program, and when a computer with a student roster was inadvertently sent to university surplus, she had to track down the 11 certificate students individually.

Today, thanks in large part to Kryder-Reid’s leadership as director from 1998-2013, the IUPUI museum studies program is one of the largest in the country, with undergraduate and graduate offerings and a number of dedicated museum studies faculty that few other schools can match.

Kryder-Reid is currently director of the Cultural Heritage Research Center. Her research explores how people appropriate the tangible and intangible remnants of the past and mobilize them in social relationships.

“I’ve always been drawn to questions about the connections of past and present — how we remember the past and represent it in the material forms of public history sites and landscapes as well as museum collections and exhibits,” she said. “The compelling part is trying to understand not just the stories we tell, but why we tell them and how they relate to our contemporary relationships.”

Last month, her book “California Mission Landscapes: Race, Memory, and the Politics of Heritage” won the 2019 Elisabeth Blair MacDougall Book Award from the Society of Architectural Historians, which recognizes the most distinguished work of scholarship in the history of landscape architecture or garden design. The book, published in 2016 by University of Minnesota Press, has enjoyed widespread acclaim with awards from groups in landscape studies, history and landscape architecture history.

“I thanked my students in the foreword to that book. Conversations in class about the missions, about these broader questions of narratives, memory, race and politics, as well as about museums and anthropology sites, shaped my thinking about the mission landscapes,” Kryder-Reid said. “Teaching and scholarship are integrally related; each one informs the other.”

Kryder-Reid’s current work includes an environmental justice project, part of a broader international collaboration with the Humanities Action Lab that will include an exhibit coming to Indianapolis’ Central Library next January and public programs developed by IUPUI students.

“I know some of the people from the School of Liberal Arts who have served as Chancellor’s Professors and have admired the way they have crafted their careers to produce important scholarship and be amazing teachers while serving the campus,” Kryder-Reid said. “I’m honored to work in their company.”

Read the original story from IUPUI News’ John Schwarb 

Herron’s Top 100 Honorees of 2019

Devin Johannis (middle) with Leslie Kidwell (left), president of the IUPUI Alumni Association, and Nasser H. Paydar (right), IUPUI chancellor and executive vice president of Indiana University. Courtesy of Shannon McCullough.
Devin Johannis (middle) with Leslie Kidwell (left), president of the IUPUI Alumni Association, and Nasser H. Paydar (right), IUPUI chancellor and executive vice president of Indiana University. Courtesy of Shannon McCullough.

Every year, IUPUI honors the achievements of their student body by recognizing exceptional students through the IUPUI Top 100 list. Changemakers, innovators, achievers, and leaders are included.

Several students at Herron are being honored this year: newcomers Devin Johannis and Jazmine Hooper, in addition to returning honorees Haley Francis-Halstead and Sydney Patberg.

Devin Johannis
Succeeding on his own terms is something Devin Johannis specializes in. He had an untraditional start at Herron: he was admitted through the newly founded artistic support program. When he received a notification that a portfolio of his work would be due in a week, he had to make do with what he could. “I remember grabbing some colored pencils and pens that were lying around and just looking things up online, trying to make art,” he said. This hard work paid off, and Johannis was soon directly admitted. After an experience while studying abroad in Italy where he saw the same pattern his father uses as trim moulding on architectural columns and church designs, he began to think more about tradition in his work. This eventually led him to furniture design as his major.

“Tradition is such an important part of being a designer now. So many people have made so many things before you, it can only benefit you to know more about it…I would’ve felt blind without it,” he said.

The experience of being a artistic support student serves as a source of inspiration for Johannis, and drives him to help students in similar situations. He is a mentor through IUPUI’s O-Team program. He’s also contributed to the National Mentoring Symposium, IUPUI’s Sophomore Experience program, and IUPUI’s Bridge first year seminar, among others. “My mentor played a huge role in getting me admitted, and through her, I realized how beneficial it can be to have a mentorship. I wanted to know what it means to be a mentor, so that’s why I pursued it,” Johannis said.

Herron School of Art and Design's Top 100 honorees of 2019, pictured with members of the Student Services team during the recognition dinner on April 12th, 2019.   Courtesy of Shannon McCullough
Herron School of Art and Design’s Top 100 honorees of 2019, pictured with members of the Student Services team during the recognition dinner on April 12th, 2019. Courtesy of Shannon McCullough

Having been listed as one of IUPUI’s top 100, Johannis has proven he is well on his way to becoming a successful creator. With that being said, he stresses the importance of maintaining momentum. “I still try to ground myself, and pretend in my head that at any moment I could get kicked out. The more success, the more things I’m able to achieve — the more praise that comes with it. That’s great, but it’s really easy to get lost in that, to be like ‘cool, I’m in the Top 100! I made it!’ and stop trying,” Johannis said. “I don’t want to ever be like that. I’ve always got another goal, and I’ve always got to keep going.

Johannis is graduating this year with a B.F.A. in furniture design, a minor in art history, and an architectural and interior design graphics certificate. True to his word, he plans on applying for jobs that could push him towards his goal after graduation: getting in-field experience and then pursuing a master’s degree to become a fine arts professor. “There’s something about being out in the actual career field that allows professors to specialize their classes and make it feel like it really is their coursework. That’s something I don’t want to miss out on,” he said. “When people take a class with me, I want them to be able to say ‘oh, that’s his work. There’s a lot that he can provide that’s unique to the course and I couldn’t get elsewhere.'”

Jazmine Hooper
Jazmine Hooper is a leader, first and foremost. She is a member of the Herron Ambassador program, the president of Herron’s Student Council, and the student representative for the Herron Alumni Association, among other leadership appointments. All of these enable Hooper to maximize outreach and help incoming students. “Being able to have these interactions with students and being able to give them advice and clarity is extremely valuable,” she said.

Hooper believes in the importance of the student connection due to the significance of her own time at Herron. She originally intended to major in visual communication design, but ended up in drawing and illustration. Now, she’s currently experimenting with printmaking. She attributes this to Herron’s “beautiful way of making you take classes outside your comfort zone.” “You’re going to be taking electives out of your major,” she said. “I discovered book arts, printmaking — things that I’ve absolutely fallen in love with.” She cites Herron’s inherent experimentation as the reason why she didn’t have to “settle” for a medium that might’ve not worked for her.

Malala, Magician 2 1/2″ x 3″. Courtesy of Jazmine Hooper.

When giving advice to incoming freshmen, Hooper believes one of the most important things to remember is that “everything has a purpose,” especially foundation studies. “I throw back to things I learned freshman year all the time,” she said. “I might be setting up a composition for a print and use gestalt theory without even recognizing it. You have to have patience.”

Being a part of the IUPUI Top 100 is extremely important to Hooper. It was a goal for her since her sophomore year, and she can graduate knowing she’s achieved it. “To get that recognition is a really big deal to me,” she said. After graduating with her B.F.A. in drawing and illustration (along with her minors in book arts and art history), she plans to further her body of work by contributing to the Indianapolis artistic sphere. “Whether I end up as a gallery attendant or creative director or anything else, I just want to be able to express myself creatively and maintain my personal practice,” Hooper says. She plans on eventually going to graduate school to become a professor of the arts.

Haley Francis-Halstead
Haley Francis-Halstead is receiving a B.F.A. in visual communication design(VCD). She has a wide spectrum of experience, ranging from restaurant industry social media marketing to being the executive director of Herron’s VCD capstone exhibition in 2019. She has worked tirelessly to support IUPUI over the course of her education, having been an employee in the Office of Community Engagement, Housing and Residence Life, and IUPUI’s chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha. In her spare time, she creates YouTube vlogs about her experiences as an art student. Francis-Halstead has made the Top 100 two consecutive years.

Sydney Patberg
Sydney Patberg is receiving a B.A.E. in art education. She has already worked in-field, having been employed as an art teacher for both U Craft Me Up and Columbus Canvas. She contributes to IUPUI’s Greek life scene as the chapter president for Phi Mu Fraternity since November 2017, helping to raise over $25,000 annually on behalf of the organization. She also participates in Jagathon yearly, helping to raise money for Riley Hospital for Children. Patberg has also made the Top 100 two consecutive years.

Read the original story from Herron School of Art + Design 

Herron’s Ninth Annual ‘Look/See’ Event Celebrates Indianapolis’s Emerging Artists, Art Therapists And Design Strategists

Kibo, Chatbot Tech That Enhances Interest In Books, Wins 2019 JagStart Competition

Radhika Ravindran pitches Kibo during the 2019 JagStart competition. Photo courtesy of the IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research
Radhika Ravindran pitches Kibo during the 2019 JagStart competition. Photo courtesy of the IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research

An idea that originated more than five years ago was developed and refined into a project that won IUPUI’s 2019 JagStart Student Idea Pitch Competition on April 12.

Radhika Ravindran, a master’s degree candidate in the School of Informatics and Computing, has a younger brother who doesn’t enjoy reading but likes using his smartphone, including sending text messages to friends. She wondered why the same activity couldn’t be used for reading books.

“While there are services to help consume books differently, nothing addresses the lack of attention span and engagement aspects of it,” Ravindran said. “My solution, Kibo, uses chatbot technology to make book-reading like a conversation and more engaging than ever.”

Ravindran delivered a three-minute elevator pitch and participated in a two-minute Q&A session with a panel of judges during the IUPUI student competition. Kibo was named the best of the 11 projects in the competition, and Ravindran was awarded $2,500 to further develop it.

“Originally I thought of making Kibo an application for home use,” Ravindran said. “But with the JagStart competition award and insights from two contacts I have made, I’m planning to turn it into an education application that could benefit students up to the university level.”

Samuel Kropp, a bachelor’s degree candidate in the Kelley School of Business, won second place and $1,500 for The Aquaponics Company. The company is based around the sustainable science of aquaponics — the combination of fish farming and hydroponics. The goal is to scale down commercial aquaponics to an in-house system to be sold directly to household consumers.

Eli Hoopengarner, a double bachelor’s degree candidate in the School of Engineering and Technology and the School of Liberal Arts, won third place and $750 for The FlexWheel. The product improves motorsport driver comfort, allocates stronger muscle groups to decrease a driver’s fatigue and provides energy dissipation upon impact.

Kristina Tinsley, a bachelor’s degree candidate in the Kelley School of Business and a member of the Honors College, and Madhura Mhatre, a master’s degree candidate in the School of Informatics and Computing, won the audience choice prizes and $500 apiece. Tinsley pitched Archived, a smartphone app that increases visitor engagement at museums and helps maintain museum inventory. Mhatre pitched Swelter Produce, which addresses the challenge of desert farming by using renewable resources to generate clean energy from heat and to extract water from humid air in arid environments for irrigation.

JagStart is organized through IUPUI’s Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research. It has undergone different iterations, including a business pitch competition, since it started in 2012. Simon Atkinson, vice chancellor for research, said it is important that resources like JagStart are available for innovative IUPUI students.

Simon Atkinson
Simon Atkinson

“These students are future entrepreneurs and leaders for Indiana,” Atkinson said. “Competitions like JagStart and other resources offered by IUPUI help them hone the soft skills that will carry them far in whatever career they choose.”

Other competitors in the 2019 JagStart Student Idea Pitch Competition and their projects were:

  • Michael Daniells: Breeze Microloans, a mobile application platform that provides access to short-term, low-principal, low-interest-rate loans.
  • Sneh Khatri: Kidzie, an application that promotes the development and well-being of young children through features that enhance parent-child communication.
  • Dakota Merkel: Rest in Peace, a social media platform that allows people to actively remember their loved ones years after they pass away.
  • Yi-shan Tabitha Tsai: epiQ, a mobile application that helps students achieve basic furniture needs.
  • Natalie Woods: Green Roofs, a product designed to allow residents in an urban environment to have their own green spaces.
  • Szu-Yu Yang and Swaroop John: Pickcart, an online-shopping-style mobile application for university students to access free food items from their on-campus food pantries.

Read the original story from IUPUI NewsSteve Martin 

Ann Hamilton + Opening Reception

Ann Hamilton, habitus, 2016. Installation at Municipal Pier 9, made in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop & Museum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Thibault Jeanson

Herron School of Art and Design will present the 2019 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture with Ann Hamilton, a recipient of the National Medal of Arts and MacArthur Foundation “genius grant.”

Hamilton has created large-scale multimedia installations, public projects, and performances in numerous spaces around the world for more than 30 years. During the lecture, Hamilton will discuss her wide-ranging processes and use of materials along with the themes she has drawn upon throughout her artistic career. Following the lecture is an opening reception for three exhibitions, presenting new and recent works by Christine Sciulli, Gillian Wearing and Chris Sickels aka Red Nose Studios.

The Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture brings internationally acclaimed female artists to Indianapolis. The lecture series is made possible by a gift from Indiana philanthropist Jane Fortune – author, art historian, and founder of Advancing Women Artists.

THE JANE FORTUNE OUTSTANDING WOMEN VISITING ARTIST LECTURE BASILE AUDITORIUM, ESKENAZI HALL
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6 | 5:30 – 8 P.M.

Funding Available through Indiana Campus Compact

Guest Contributor: Lauren French, Master’s Student Non-Profit Mgmt., Graduate Assistant, CSL

Effective service learning and community engagement [SLCE] demands additional support to move from vision to impact and sustainability. Indiana Campus Compact [ICC ] is one important source of funding for administrators, faculty, staff, and students, who wish to partner with the community to deepen and expand programs. ICC is a partnership among 44 Indiana colleges and universities, representing 70 campuses, dedicated to preparing college students to advance the public good in their communities. IUPUI is proud to be a member campus and has found previous success in seeking funding through ICC.

Indiana Campus Compact has thousands of dollars in the form of grants and fellowships for faculty, staff, students, and the community organizations they work with. These include:

  • Service Engagement Grants: Support students, professional staff, faculty, or department level projects that integrate one or more forms of educationally meaningful service learning and community engagement.
    • Funding categories include:
    • Scholarship of Engagement [includes SL course development, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning on SL, Community Engaged Research and Professional Service Projects]
    • Student Community Service
    • Listening to Communities [support for campus community dialogues]
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $2,250 are available; upcoming proposal deadlines are February 11th, 2019 & May 13th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • Conference Scholarships: These scholarships support faculty, staff, or students at ICC campuses to present on their engaged work at regional and national conferences.
    • The presentation must relate to ICC’s mission.
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $500 are available and proposals are accepted on a rolling basis. The deadline for proposals is at least 6 weeks prior to the conference; conferences must take place before April 30th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • The Faculty Fellows Program: This is a year-long learning community experience for full-time faculty that supports the integration of service learning and community engagement into all aspects of faculty work: teaching, research, and service. Participants will work together to develop a research or creative project to enhance and advance the field of service learning and community engagement.
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $3,750 are available; deadline for letter of intent to apply is Tuesday, March 19th, 2019 and deadline for full proposal is Tuesday, May 14th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • Social Innovation Microlending Program: This program is available to students and alum of ICC campuses who are social entrepreneurs and would like to obtain a loan to start a social venture.
    • Loans are provided through a partnership with Bankable on behalf of the Indiana Small Business Administration.
    • ICC provides consultation and professional development for funded social entrepreneurs through events and partnerships with other organizations.
    • Funding Levels: Loan amounts vary from $500 to $50,000  [a typical loan amount will range from $5,000 to $10,000]. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

Greening IUPUI Grant

Taking Your Good Idea to the Next Level

Are you an IUPUI student, faculty, or staff member that has come up with a way to advance campus sustainability? Submit your idea, and you could win a Greening IUPUI Grant to make it happen.

Greening IUPUI Grants are awarded one time per year to projects that advance our campus sustainability principles and improve IUPUI’s STARS score. IUPUI dedicates a total of $50,000 annually to fund these projects.  You can review the Greening IUPUI Grant Guidelines here

Application Information

Deadlines

  • Application period opens: December 1, 2018
  • Application period closes: February 1, 2019 (11:59pm)
  • Applicants notified: April 1, 2019

Eligibility

IUPUI students, faculty, and staff may apply.  Students must have a faculty or staff member’s support and designate them as the project contact person on the application

Guidelines

Review the full Greening IUPUI Grant Fund Guidelines before applying.
Proposals should focus on one or more of the following areas:

  • Planning & Administration (Strategic initiatives, diversity, affordability, innovation)
  • Academic (Courses, research, other educational pursuits)
  • Campus Engagement (student engagement programs, events)
  • Public Engagement (volunteer opportunities, campus-community partnerships)
  • Operations (Grounds, energy, waste, water, purchasing, transportation, buildings)
  • Health & Wellness (Food, health, equity, and human sustainability

Proposals will be received by the Greening IUPUI Grant Review Committee who will evaluate the applications based on the following criteria:

  • Improving IUPUI’s STARS score
  • Long-term impact for IUPUI
  • High-impact learning experience(s)
  • Visibility
  • Student involvement
  • Reasonable timeline and feasibility
  • Financial considerations

To Apply

Complete the Greening IUPUI Grant application. You can preview the application before starting the application process.

Past Grant Awards

Need ideas?! Check out our sustainability principles, latest STARS report, and a few recent grant awards! Submit your Final Assessment Report here!

IUPUI’s musical man: Dennis Jones shines onstage and in the Campus Center

 

Dennis Jones helps open the Campus Center every day. He and his team keep the IUPUI building functioning like a song. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

In show business, a triple threat is a singer, dancer and actor all rolled into one performer.

That must make Dennis Jones an octuple threat: One, Jones is a beloved presence in the Campus Center, where he has worked for the past seven years for Campus Facility Services. Two, Jones is a proud veteran of the U.S. Navy, based in San Diego from 1982 to 1992. Three, Jones has sung the national anthem before Indiana Pacers and Indiana Fever games. Four, five, six and seven, Jones is an actor, director, producer and backstage guru for Indianapolis’ Footlite Musicals theater group.

And eight, Jones will be honored with the 2019 Advocate of the Dream Award at the annual — and sold-out — IUPUI Black Student Union’s Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Dinner. The award goes to a staff or faculty member at IUPUI who promotes the ideals of freedom and equality presented in King’s historic “I Have a Dream” speech.

“When I found out about the award, I was sitting here during rehearsals for ‘Legally Blonde,'” Jones said while standing in Footlite Musicals’ 255-seat theater. “I got all emotional.”

Jones is producing Footlite’s current show, “Murder Ballad,” which will be presented in a cabaret format with a live band Jan. 18 to 20. Tickets are available for 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday. As producer, Jones must monitor show budgets, ticket sales and marketing while being a conduit between theater bosses and show director Bradley Lowe.

Dennis Jones will be honored at the IUPUI MLK Celebration Dinner for his work in the Campus Center and in local theater.

While Jones made his debut for Footlite in 2011, acting and singing in such classics as “Sunset Boulevard,” “Follies” and “Big River,” he co-directs the theater’s summer camp for teens and has been added to Footlite’s board of directors.

“He means quite a bit to us,” said Keith Matters, Footlite’s president. “He’s very good with people, working with our youth and he’s great all-round. You have to know how to do all of these things to make an organization like ours work.”

Balancing his passion for his job with theater has been a dance of long hours and maintaining a hectic schedule during show runs, but it’s been well worth it for Jones, an Indianapolis native who holds a theater degree from Indiana State University.

That versatility has helped Jones’ work at IUPUI. He’s a fixture in the Campus Center as much as the bookstore, the Cultural Arts Gallery and Starbucks.

Campus Center star

Jones collects an average of 12,000 steps a day at the Campus Center. He helps lead a crew that keeps the IUPUI campus crown jewel clean, organized and functioning.

While certainly not shy, Jones is less animated at work than he is onstage. After all, his shift starts at 6 a.m. But he is always happy to see students, faculty and staff members who have come to love him over the years. You can’t walk with him for more than 20 seconds without someone saying “hello” to him as he scales up and down the Campus Center’s five bustling levels.

“I guess they appreciate me. I don’t know. I try to do the best I can,” Jones said.

Jones said he wakes up every morning at 4 a.m. Coffee, watching the news and relaxing before opening the 250,000-square-foot Campus Center are part of his predawn routine.

“It’s quiet,” Jones said. “I don’t do anything but come to work. During the summer, I meet some of the parents of the students. We talk, and I assure them that I’m like the students’ second or third father here. I make sure they’re doing what they’re supposed to do. If they linger too much, I send them off to class.

“I see them as freshmen, and then I see them when they leave and go spread their wings.”

During a recent visit, Jones said hello to Cindy Harkness and Jennifer Zotz, senior coordinators for recruitment and outreach in the Enrollment Services office. Jones directed Zotz’s son, Tommy, during last summer’s young artists camp at Footlite, which culminated in a production of “Pirates of Penzance.”

“I loved that he shares his gifts and talents with young people,” said Zotz, who saw all seven “Pirates” performances. “He has amazing patience, and he’s so great to work with. On the stage and off the stage, he’s just a shining star.”

Harkness has known Jones since his first year working in the Campus Center. She’s among the many staff members who are aware of Jones’ theater talents.

“We tell him, ‘When you go to Hollywood, remember us,'” Harkness said with a laugh. “We love Dennis. I think we need a star in the Campus Center with Dennis’ name on it.”

The Show Must Go On

Dennis Jones has acted, directed, produced and worked backstage at Footlite Musicals in Indianapolis. His talents earned him a spot on the theater’s board of directors as well. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Jones remembers the moment he fell in love with theater. Sure, he played the giant in his elementary school’s smash musical version of “Jack and the Beanstalk,” but he really developed a passion for theater while attending Northwest High School.

Toward the end of his first year, Jones happened upon his school’s production of “Bye Bye Birdie.” The rest of his life has been dedicated to the stage, even if it meant serving his country and later keeping IUPUI’s student hub functioning first.

Footlite Musicals gets the majority of Jones’ theatrical work, but he has expanded to television, online promo work and even film. During his time in Southern California, Jones got some TV work in Los Angeles. When he returned to Indianapolis, he got a local spot for WISH-TV as well as being a face of IN Biz advertising.

Jones is pumped for March. He was cast in a new project from Indianapolis author Joyce Licorish — a film version of her novel “The Forgotten Timepiece,” which was published in 2017. The shoot will take place in Covington, Georgia.

“She directed me in ‘The Color Purple’ here,” Jones said. “When she was writing the novel, I told her I wanted to be a part of it, and she stayed true. I did have to go through the audition process, but I got in.”

Jones’ love of the theater — and IUPUI — has increased each season. When he’s not at home, he’s usually at his work home or his stage home.

“Most shows, everyone gets along like family,” Jones said. “No matter what I’m doing, as long as it’s around theater, it’s just what I do.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tim Brouk

 

IUPUI to party like it’s 1969

IUPUI will officially turn the big 5-0 on Jan. 24. It’s the campus’s birthday, but the presents are for you. Photo by Getty Images

On Jan. 24, 1969, the average cost of gas was 32 cents a gallon, “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” by Marvin Gaye was the No. 1 song on the radio, and “Sweet Caroline” crooner Neil Diamond turned 28 years old.

Also, and most importantly, IUPUI was officially established on that memorable day.

IUPUI’s golden anniversary will be celebrated in style throughout the day and well into the evening Jan. 24 in the Campus Center.

The day will feature a wide variety of activities designed to honor IUPUI’s past, celebrate our present and envision our future. Accomplishments by faculty, staff, students, alumni and community partners throughout the past 50 years will be recognized even as guests throughout the day will be looking ahead to the university’s next half-century.

Here’s a breakdown of what you can expect next week while celebrating IUPUI’s golden anniversary:

50th Anniversary Report to the Community

When and where: 10 to 11 30 a.m. on the fourth floor of the Campus Center.

Registrations are full for this invitation-only event that will feature remarks by IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar, IU President Michael A. McRobbie, Purdue Board of Trustees President Michael Berghoff and a panel of Indianapolis mayors — past and present — who will help celebrate the occasion of IUPUI’s official birthday in historic fashion. But the event will be live-streamed on broadcast.iu.edu.

Special sessions and party activities

When and where: Noon to 5 p.m. on various floors of the Campus Center.

Presentations from IUPUI faculty and staff, all 45 minutes or less, will enlighten throughout the afternoon. The talks are open to all. They include:

  • Professor of anthropology Paul Mullins will offer a featured session, “The Price of Progress: Race and Displacement in Indianapolis’ Near-Westside,” from noon to 12:45 p.m. and 2 to 2:45 p.m. in Room 309
  • Colleagues in the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research have organized an IUPUI Research Rock Stars session, highlighting 50 years of outstanding research at IUPUI.
  • University Library colleagues will share information about digital collections, including an opportunity to have a 3D scan made of your face — or your favorite IUPUI artifact — for the digital repository that will commemorate the day.

The party continues

When and where: Noon to 10 p.m. on various floors of the Campus Center.

Employees, students and visitors are invited to check out the activities on the Campus Center’s main floor and the theater level, which will include a 360-degree photo booth, an all-day dance party, a virtual-reality 3D tour of campus, a new interactive map of community engagement and 50th-birthday cakes made by local bakeries.

Get your golden jaguar

IUPUI is giving out 700 3D-printed “Golden Jaguars” to faculty, staff and students who print out a passport and collect stamps at various birthday locations around campus. The jaguars have been produced on campus by University Library’s digital scholarship group in the 3D Printing Studio.

Residence halls and organizations are competing for the most stamps to win golden jaguar figurines and a chance for pizza with Chancellor Paydar. Get started here.

Be sure to wear your JagSwag and post on social media about IUPUI’s birthday. The hashtag #MyIUPUI was created to celebrate this exciting day, so take advantage of this special occasion and show off your school spirit by spreading the word.

Read the original article from IUPUI News