From Herron School of Art + Design | Kinetic Artwork by Zilvinas Kempinas

For more information or to see the original press release, visit the Herron School of Art + Design website.

Zilvinas Kempinas, “Parallels” (partial installation view), Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius, Lithuania

The spring exhibitions in the Galleries at Herron School of Art and Design open March 7, 2018, headlined by a survey of works by kinetic artist Zilvinas Kempinas, including the international debut of a new, 112-foot-long site-responsive work.

Using VHS magnetic tape and other unconventional materials, Kempinas crafts dynamic sculptures and installations that are activated by natural phenomena such as light and the circulation of air.

Among eleven works in the exhibition are eight new sculptures on view for the first time, including “V Formation,” a large-scale installation conceived for Herron’s main gallery space. “V Formation” (2018) incorporates lines of unspooled VHS tape stretched across the length of the gallery. The installation creates a low ‘ceiling’ of shimmering reflective tape just above visitors’ heads. As the bands traverse the 112-foot-long gallery, the tape torques from a horizontal plane to a vertical one. The result is a monumental yet ethereal installation that transforms the experience of Herron’s space in unexpected ways.

Zilvinas Kempinas” runs through April 21, 2018, in the Berkshire, Reese, and Paul Galleries.

Also on view in the Galleries at Herron:

In the Marsh Gallery: Celebrating Herron’s Painting program, an undergraduate painting exhibition showcases a variety of works that explore traditional and contemporary methods and practices.

In the Basile Gallery: “Drawing Now: Recent Student Artwork” features a selection of work from students in Herron’s Drawing and Illustration program. Shannon M. Linker, vice president of the Arts Council of Indianapolis and director of Gallery 924, will serve as guest juror for the exhibition.
All three exhibitions open with a public reception on Wednesday, March 7 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St. The student exhibitions run through April 18, 2018. The Galleries at Herron are free and open to the public Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesdays until 8 p.m. For more information, visit

Parking is available courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or on the upper floors of the Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6 p.m. Park on any floor after 6 p.m. Bring your parking ticket to the Herron galleries for validation.

About Zilvinas Kempinas

Kempinas was born in Plungė, Lithuania in 1969. In 2009, Kempinas represented Lithuania at the 53rd International Art Exhibition of the Venice Biennale in Italy. He has had solo exhibitions at Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, U.K.; Reykjavik Art Museum, Iceland; Museum Tinguely, Basel, Switzerland; Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow; Kuntshalle Wien, Vienna, Austria; and the Palais de Tokyo, Paris, among others. Group exhibitions include the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco. Kempinas lives and works in New York City.

About Herron School of Art and Design

Founded in 1902, Herron School of Art and Design is the premier accredited, professional school of art and design in the state of Indiana and is part of the thriving urban campus of IUPUI. With more than 50 full-time faculty serving 11 undergraduate and three graduate programs, Herron’s curriculum prepares graduates to be leaders in a world that requires a unique combination of creativity, conceptual skills, and technical abilities. Herron is an engaged community and regional partner including five public galleries; community learning programs; and the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life.

Reiberg Reading Series | James Still

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the IUPUI English Department are delighted to present the Rufus and Louise Reiberg Reading Series featuring playwright James Still, who will read from his collected works at the Lilly Auditorium on February 23, 2018, at 7:00pm.

Free tickets are available here.

James Still’s plays have been produced throughout the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, South Africa, China, and Japan. This year he is celebrating his 20th season as Playwright-in-Residence at Indiana Repertory Theatre (IRT), where audiences have seen 15 of his plays on all three of its stages. His recent work includes a trilogy of linked-plays: The House that Jack Built (IRT), Appoggiatura (Denver Center Theatre), and Miranda (Illusion Theater, Minneapolis). Other recent work includes April 4, 1968: Before We Forgot How to Dream (IRT); two plays about the Lincolns, The Window Lincoln and The Heavens are Hung in Black (both premiering at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C.); a play for one actor about culinary icon James Beard called I Love to Eat (Portland Center Stage); a play for 57 actors called A Long Bridge over Deep Waters (Cornerstone Theater Company in Los Angeles); Looking Over the President’s Shoulder about Indiana native Alonzo Fields (premiered at IRT, produced at theaters across the country); Amber Waves (The Kennedy Center and IRT); and And Then They Came for Me, which has been produced at theaters around the world.

Playwright James Still

Still’s short play When Miss Lydia Hinkley Gives a Bird the Bird was a winner of Red Bull Theater’s Short New Play Festival and performed at many festivals. His new plays include (A) New World and Black Beauty (Seattle Children’s Theatre). James is an elected member of both the Nation Theatre Conference in New York and the College of Fellows of the American Theatre at the Kennedy Center. He received the Otis Guernsey New Voices Award from the William Inge Festival and the Todd McNerney New Play Prize from Spoleto. He grew up in a tiny town in Kansas and is a longtime resident of Los Angeles.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series is provided by the Reiberg family, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and the IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

IUPUI Arts & Humanities Grant Deadline is February 15!

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Grant deadline will be here sooner than you think. Be sure to give yourself plenty of time to get your application together. Here’s what you need to know to get started . . .

The IAHI Grant Program supports campus-wide attainment of excellence in research and creative activity in arts and humanities. It is designed to enhance the research and creative activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty. The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.


All full-time tenured and tenure-eligible faculty from all schools and units at IUPUI are eligible to apply. Under certain circumstances, non-tenure-track faculty members whose evaluation criteria include research or creative activity may also be eligible with an explanation in the letter of support from their chair or dean.

Visiting and associate faculty members and post-doctoral fellows are not eligible.

An associate member (or non-eligible member) of the IUPUI faculty can be a participant in a grant in collaboration with a PI who is an eligible member of the IUPUI faculty.


All grants are intended for support of research and scholarly activity, and not for support of teaching and/or service activities. Scholarship of teaching may be supported under this grant program, if it has strong and clearly articulated research outcomes.

Projects will be limited to one (1) year in duration.

Funds will not be granted for a project currently supported by another internal funding mechanism, unless a case is made in justifying the complementary funding.

An investigator may not serve as PI on more than one IAHI grant proposal in a given round.

Applications will be judged on the merit of the proposed research or creative activity, qualifications of the applicant, significance of the research to the field, the potential for additional external funding, and the project’s importance to the individual’s future research plans. Applications for new projects are encouraged.


A. Small Travel Grants for Conferences and Exhibitions: up to $500 to support travel to a conference or exhibition related to a research or creative project.

B. Event Support Grants: up to $1,000 to support a public event at IUPUI related to a research or creative project.

C. Research/Creative Activity Grant: up to $5,000 for travel, equipment, materials, space, hourly assistance, etc. This grant does not require a match. A grant recipient may apply and receive this grant on a yearly basis.

D. Matching Grant for Research/Creative Activity: up to $15,000 which might be used for such things as release time, summer salary, research assistant support, or a research workshop or conference, as well as incidental expenses. This grant requires a 1 to 2 match from the school, department, and/or center sponsoring the faculty (i.e. two thirds or 66.67% of funds come from IAHI, and one third or 33.33% from the faculty’s unit). Salary requests are allowed and cannot exceed one month of salary per person. A Matching Grant recipient is eligible to apply for a new Matching Grant no sooner than two years from the previous grant proposal submission.

E. Collaborative Grant for Research/Creative Activity: up to $30,000 to support research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by a team of two or more arts and humanities faculty from different units on campus. Funds might be used for such things as release time, summer salary, research assistant support, or a research workshop or conference, as well as incidental expenses. This grant does not require a match from the school, department, and/or center of applying faculty. Funding preference in this category will be given to projects that correspond to one of the following themes: a) Social Justice and the Urban Environment, b) Communication and Exchange in the Digital Age

Click here to learn more or apply for a grant.


IU Kelly School of Business’s National Diversity Case Competition

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For the seventh straight year, the Indiana University Kelley School of Business is hosting 140 undergraduate students from 35 business schools who are competing in the National Diversity Case Competition on January 12 and 13. The competition, held annually the weekend before Martin Luther King Jr. Day, brings together some of the best and most diverse talent in undergraduate education from across the nation.

Students are challenged to solve diversity-related business issues and share ideas while benefiting from workshops and networking with companies that value inclusion. They include teams from eight Big Ten schools and more than two dozen other top schools from Vermont to Arizona. Participants from historically black colleges and universities include Southern University and A&M College, Florida A&M University, and Xavier University of Louisiana.

Each four-student team must include two members from an underrepresented population. Many students find that participating in the event leads to leadership opportunities, internships and jobs after graduation. They will compete for $20,000 in prize money.

“Diversity in business benefits everyone,” said Idalene “Idie” Kesner, dean of the Kelley School and the Frank P. Popoff Chair of Strategic Management. “Educators know it, and companies know it. Kelley has long been a leader in establishing programs to increase diversity in the classroom and to contribute to a diverse workforce. We’re very proud to bring together these talented students from all over the country with companies who value diversity.”

Events begin Friday, January 12, with a networking session and dinner. Workshops on the following day are designed to support career opportunities for diverse students in Fortune 500 companies. Competition begins early on Saturday, with the schools divided into seven brackets. The winners in each bracket continue on to the finals. Prizes are awarded to the winner, the finalists, and the runners-up in each bracket.

IU alumna Laysha Ward, executive vice president and chief external engagement officer for Target Corp. and a member of the company’s executive leadership team, will be this year’s keynote speaker. She earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from IU and a master’s degree in social services administration from the University of Chicago. Target Corp., a platinum supporter, is providing the case that students will use. It addresses a real-world issue for many companies: building on a culture where authentic differences in backgrounds, experiences, cultures, and thoughts are appreciated. Judges will be looking for creative solutions that leverage the students’ diverse backgrounds.

Corporate partners provide substantial financial support for the event, which includes travel reimbursement and lodging and meals for students to eliminate barriers to their participation.

“I’ve had the opportunity to attend and judge the National Diversity Case Competition, and I can tell you with absolute certainty that this event shows why diversity and inclusion are so critical,” said Ken Bouyer, inclusiveness recruiting leader for EY Americas. “Seeing the diversity of thought, perspective, and background of the students driving very different and innovative solutions is exactly why study after study shows that diverse teams that work inclusively perform better in solving complex problems.”


For a full list of corporate support and competing schools, see the full article here.

IU’s 2018 MLK Day Celebration

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In honor of the late civil rights leader’s legacy, Indiana University’s 2018 Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebrations will be marked by an extensive array of programming on IU campuses across the state. This annual tradition will also include IU students leading the MLK Day of Service, an effort to give back to the communities surrounding IU’s campuses.

“It is a great privilege for the IU community to be able to demonstrate its commitment to the values that Dr. King stood for, particularly as we approach the 50th anniversary of his tragic assassination,” said James Wimbush, IU vice president for diversity, equity, and multicultural affairs, dean of the University Graduate School, and Johnson Professor for Diversity and Leadership. “Dr. King’s message is reflected in the way IU’s students, faculty and staff come together to inspire others and affect positive change, not only for this celebration but throughout the year.”

IUPUI will host the 49th Annual IUPUI Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Dinner — the longest-running Martin Luther King Jr. Day-related event in the Indianapolis community. It will take place on January 14 at 6:00pm at the Indiana Roof Ballroom. Presented by IUPUI’s Black Student Union in conjunction with the IUPUI Multicultural Center, the theme of this year’s event is “A Call to Conscience.” The keynote speaker is Opal Tometi, a co-founder of the Black Lives Matter activist movement and the executive director of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration.

IUPUI’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service will take place from 8:00am to 1:30pm on January 15. Participating IUPUI students, faculty, staff, and members of the community will check in at the IUPUI Campus Center in the morning, then volunteer together at locations across Indianapolis.

Visit IU’s 2018 Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration website for a full list of activities.

From the NEA: Economic Impact of the Arts on Rural Communities

Rural arts organizations draw more non-local audiences to their venues and report greater civic leadership and customer connectedness than their urban peers, according to a new research report, Rural Arts, Design, and Innovation in America: Research Findings from the Rural Establishment Innovation Survey. Published by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), the report is based primarily on 2014 data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service (ERS). The ERS’s Rural Establishment Innovation Survey examines the type and breadth of innovation within rural businesses.

Rural Arts, Design, and Innovation in America is important because until now, arts and economic impact theories have been built and tested only in urban environments. As noted in the report’s preface, “Frequently, the data infrastructure for rural arts research projects has proved inadequate for elementary fact-finding, not to mention for generalizing about rural creative economies as a whole. Into this climate, the Rural Establishment Innovation Survey bursts as an unprecedented resource.”

NEA Director of Research & Analysis Sunil Iyengar said, “We’ve long understood that the arts and design can beautify a place and attract new residents and businesses. This report is unique in showing these attributes as closely linked to innovative business practices in rural communities nationwide.” [Read More]

Herron announces spring 2018 speaker series featuring Carrie Mae Weems, Lori Waxman, and Tom Loeser

From the Herron School of Art + Design:

The Galleries at Herron School of Art + Design is pleased to announce three exceptional public talks during the spring 2018 semester with art critic Lori Waxman, furniture maker Tom Loeser, and internationally renowned artist Carrie Mae Weems.

Each year, artists, designers, and other cultural producers are invited to speak at Herron School of Art and Design on timely issues related to contemporary art and culture. This spring, the talks will explore the role of the contemporary art critic, one furniture designer’s irreverent challenge to tradition and expectations, and an artist’s life-long investigation of cultural identity and systems of power.

Spring 2018 endowed talks

Lori Waxman will speak on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at 5:30 p.m. as part of the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Visiting Artist Lecture. Waxman has written about contemporary art for the Chicago Tribune, Artforum, and other periodicals for the past 18 years. Her books include “Girls! Girls! Girls! in Contemporary Art” and “60 wrd/min art critic,” which was also the name of Waxman’s live performance of art criticism at dOCUMENTA (13). Waxman teaches art history at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Tom Loeser will speak on Monday, March 5, 2018, at 5:30 p.m. as part of the Phillip Tennant Furniture Artisan Lecture. Loeser has been head of the wood/furniture area at University of Wisconsin–Madison since 1991. Loeser designs and builds one-of-a-kind functional and dysfunctional objects that are often carved and painted. His work is always based on the history of design and object-making as a starting point for developing new form and meaning.

Carrie Mae Weems will speak on Wednesday, April 4, 2018, at 5:30 p.m. as part of the Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Artist Lecture. One of the most important and celebrated contemporary American artists, Carrie Mae Weems has investigated issues of race, gender, and class for over thirty years. Her artwork continues to raise important questions about cultural identity and the politics of representation. Weems is the recipient of the MacArthur “Genius” grant, the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Prix de Rome.

Support for Herron’s endowed talks is made possible by Jane Fortune, Phillip Tennant, and the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Great Frame Up Indianapolis.

All talks are free, open to the public, and held in the Basile Auditorium at Eskenazi Hall located at 735 West New York St., on the IUPUI campus. For more information, visit


From NUVO: Adrian Matejka named Indiana Poet Laureate

Adrian Matejka just might be the first Indiana poet laureate who can give you in-depth instruction in rap poetics — it’s a subject he teaches at IU Bloomington —and the sonnet structures of Charles Baudelaire. The Indiana Art Commission announced Matejka’s selection as poet laureate on Monday, Dec. 11.

Matejka was born in Nuremberg, Germany, but he’s spent half his life in the Hoosier state. A graduate of Indiana University Bloomington, he’s now the Lilly Professor / Poet-in-Residence at his alma mater. Matejka is currently working on a new collection of poems, Hearing Damage, and a graphic novel.

His most recent book of poetry is entitled Map to the Stars, which relates to his growing up in Indianapolis in the ‘80s. But when NUVO writer Dan Grossman talked to him in Oct, 2015, he had just published The Big Smoke, a book of poems on Jack Johnson, who became the first African-American heavyweight boxing world champion (from 1908 – 1915.) In that interview, Grossman asked him what drew him to Johnson, who was also the subject of a 2004 Ken Burns documentary entitled Unforgivable Blackness… [read more]

2017 Heartland Film Festival accepts films from two School of Informatics and Computing students

Sam Mirpoorian (left) and Hannah West (right)

From News at IUPUI.

Two Media Arts and Science students in the School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI had their entries accepted into the 2017 Heartland Film Festival held recently in Indianapolis.

Sam Mirpoorian, who received his bachelor’s degree in May and is now enrolled in the master’s program, and Hannah West, a current senior, produced their films under the guidance of Media Arts and Science faculty member C. Thomas Lewis.

Sam Mirpoorian’s short, “Little Warriors,” received this year’s Indiana Spotlight Film Award, winning $5,000 and adding to accolades already earned at the Indy Film Festival, the Napa Valley Film Festival and the Global Impact Film Festival.

“Little Warriors” captures a group of Indianapolis youth and their impassioned attempt to introduce legislation that would address climate recovery. (You can even watch the trailer on Vimeo!)

Mirpoorian created the film for his senior capstone project. He attributes much of his success to the support he received from the program and his advisors.

“The program is very hands-on and truly allows for filmmakers like me to explore and unleash their abilities and interests,” he said. “I mostly want to thank professor Lewis, as he provided excellent guidance and made sure I stayed on course.”

As an undergraduate, Mirpoorian also produced “Under the Bridge: The Criminalization of Homelessness,” which received critical acclaim last year and has been released for commercial distribution.

West’s film, “Not in Vain,” was a class project created for the Video for Social Change course. She, too, credits Lewis for her success. “I’m very thankful for his help, support and guidance on this project, as well as throughout my undergrad degree work,” she said.

“Not in Vain” explores Indiana’s opioid crisis, a topic close to West’s heart. “Moving forward, it would be great to find a way to have this film shown in Indiana public schools,” West said. She pointed out that opioid abuse is a problem that is affecting many Hoosiers as early as high school, and she hopes that the film could create a dialogue with students.

The Media Arts and Science undergraduate degree with specialization in video production and sound design introduces students to the latest technical skills required in the video and sound industry and prepares them to develop, produce and ultimately deliver a professional-quality product.

“In the Media Arts and Science video courses, we educate students to create professional-level films that engage in important social issues. It is truly rewarding when we see our students get the recognition they deserve for their hard work,” Lewis said.

From the AHA: Benevolent Diplomacy

German boys line up to receive food from pots marked USA while a military official snaps a photo.

Read the original article from Kaete O’Connell

Last winter while leafing through the Official File at the Truman Library for material on Herbert Hoover’s 1947 economic mission to Germany, I was struck by a vibrant burst of color. The monochrome of telegrams and correspondence was replaced by colorful sketches of chickens, Lifesaver candies, and a family of beans marching to a can for preservation. The drawings were bound together with thank-you notes penned by young recipients of US food relief. German children clearly appreciated the “gift” of food, pleasing occupation officials keen to capitalize on American charity. German stomachs, particularly young ones, offered an alternate route to hearts and minds in the early Cold War.

At a time when the future of foreign assistance programs remains uncertain and military rhetoric is ascendant, we might look back to the experience in postwar Germany, when the United States practiced altruism as a form of diplomacy. For a brief moment, before Cuba, before Korea, and even before Berlin, the United States cultivated an image that relied as much on beneficence as military might… [read more]