IUPUI Arts and Humanities Internal (IAHI) Grant

Award cycle:
FY 2018-19

Funding available:
varies by category

The IAHI Grant Program is designed to enhance the research and creative activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty. The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.

The program has five categories of funding. They are:

  1. Small Travel Grants for Conferences and Exhibitions: up to $500 to support travel to a conference or exhibition related to a research or creative project. Applicants may receive only one award per year.
  2. Event Support Grants: up to $1,000 to support a public event at IUPUI related to a research or creative project. Applicants may receive only one award per year.
  3. Research/Creative Activity Grant: up to $5,000 for travel, equipment, materials, space, hourly assistance, etc. Applicants may apply and receive this grant on a yearly basis.
  4. Matching Grant for Research/Creative Activity: up to $15,000 total project that may be used for things such as release time, summer salary, research assistant support, or a research workshop or conference, as well as incidental expenses. This grant requires a 1 to 2 match from the school, department, and/or center sponsoring the faculty (i.e. $10,000 grant, $5,000 school). Salary requests are allowed and cannot exceed one month of salary per person. A matching grant recipient is eligible to apply for a new matching grant no sooner than two years from the previous grant proposal submission.
  5. Collaborative Grant for Research/Creative Activity: up to $30,000 to support research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by a team of two or more arts and humanities faculty from different units on campus. Funds might be used for things such as release time, summer salary, research assistant support, or a research workshop or conference, as well as incidental expenses. A Collaborative Grant recipient is eligible to apply for a new Collaborative Grant no sooner than two years from the previous grant award. Funding preference in this category will be given to projects that correspond to one of the following themes: Social Justice and the Urban Environment or Global Exchange and a Changing Planet.

Eligibility

Eligible PIs

  • All full-time tenured and tenure-eligible faculty from all schools and units at IUPUI.
  • Under certain circumstances, non-tenure-track faculty members whose evaluation criteria include research or creative activity may also be eligible with an explanation in the letter of support from their chair or dean.
  • An associate member (or non-eligible member) of the IUPUI faculty can be a participant in a grant in collaboration with a PI who is an eligible member of the IUPUI faculty.

Ineligible PIs

  • Visiting faculty members
  • Associate faculty members
  • Postdoctoral fellows

Funding

Allowed

  • See Categories.

Not Allowed

  • Funds will not be granted for a project currently supported by another internal funding mechanism unless a case is made in justifying the complementary funding.

Application requirements

  • All grants are intended for support of research and scholarly activity, not for support of teaching and/or service activities. Scholarship of teaching may be supported under this grant program, if it has strong and clearly articulated research outcomes.
  • Projects will be limited to one (1) year in duration.
  • An investigator may not serve as PI or Co-PI on more than one IAHI grant proposal in a given round.
  • Applications will be judged on the merit of the proposed research or creative activity, qualifications of the applicant, significance of the research to the field, the potential for additional external funding, and the project’s importance to the individual’s future research plans. Applications for new projects are encouraged.

Application sections include:

  • Cover page
  • Abstract
  • Project Plan not to exceed five pages
  • References cited
  • Budget and Justification
  • Biographical Sketch or CV not to exceed five pages, include funding history
  • Letters of support from collaborators and department chair
  • IRB, IACUC, and/or IBC forms if applicable

    Categories 1 and 2

    Submission deadlines: Open

    Categories 3, 4, and 5

    Submission deadlines: October 1 and February 1

Ready to apply?! Click here! 

Information from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research (OVCR)

Themester 2018 explores the relationship between humans and nonhuman animals

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — The Indiana University Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences’ 10th annual Themester explores the interconnectedness of animals and humans with a fall lineup of public talks, workshops, films, exhibits and visiting speakers.

Peter Singer. Photo by Alletta Vaandering

“Darwin provoked human beings to reconsider the human place among living beings,” said Steven Wagshal, professor of Spanish and co-chair of the 2018 Themester Committee. “Perhaps we are nothing more or less than one species of animals who evolved on this planet. Yet human beings are also an extremely peculiar sort of animal; we have complex social and political systems, and we have radically changed the environment.

“The purpose of this Themester is to challenge us all to think about our connections to and differences from other animals. It is to explore how authors and artists have depicted animals, to work through our strange sort of animality and to inquire about what sorts of obligations flow from it for how we ought to treat each other, other animals and our environment.”

Philosopher Peter Singer, author of the groundbreaking book “Animal Liberation” and most recently known for his effective altruism model, will speak about ethics and animals on Sept. 12 at Presidents Hall inside Franklin Hall. A groundbreaking work first published in 1975, “Animal Liberation” popularized the term “speciesism” and changed the conversation about treatment of animals. The talk is co-sponsored by Union Board, IU’s largest student programming board.

Russ Mittermeier

Other scholars giving free public talks include Russ Mittermeier, the world’s pre-eminent primate conservationist and the 2018 winner of the prestigious Indianapolis Prize. On Oct. 2, Mittermeier will discuss the importance of conservation with a particular focus on nonhuman primates.

Jill Pruetz, professor of anthropology at Texas State University, will also focus on primates for her Oct. 26 public keynote talk, “Life on the Savanna,” for the Midwest Primate Conference. Pruetz will discuss her work with chimpanzees in the hostile savanna environment of Senegal.

The Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior will present a speaker series called “Man’s Best Friend: The Science of Dog Cognition.” The first lecture, scheduled for Sept. 20, will feature anthropologist Pat Shipman of Pennsylvania State University speaking on the domestication of dogs in Ice Age Europe. Themester will partner with IU Cinema and the IU Moving Image Archive Screening Room at Herman B Wells Library to present a series of free films, beginning Sept. 12 with Charles Burnett’s critically acclaimed but rarely shown “Killer of Sheep” at Wells Library. A counter to the “blaxpoitation” films of the early 1970s, the film focuses on everyday life in a black community. It was added to the National Film Registry and named one of the 100 Essential Films by the National Society of Film Critics.

Jill Pruetz

Other films include the documentary “Jane,” which draws on hours of previously lost National Geographic footage of primatologist Jane Goodall; and “Au Hasard Balthazar,” Robert Bresson’s classic look at cruelty and compassion. “Angry Inuk” presents Arctic seal hunting from an indigenous perspective.

Exhibitions include “Shapes of the Ancestors: Bodies, Animals, Art and Ghanaian Fantasy Coffins” at the Mathers Museum of World Cultures. The exhibit will explore the historical development and contemporary use of figurative coffins, which are often in the shape of animals and communicate familial and personal attributes, values or identity. Mathers will hold a number of supporting events, including a curator’s talk, artist visit and family craft day at the museum. The exhibit runs through the fall semester.

In October, the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology will present a curated exhibit that explores the animal/human connection from historic, archaeological and Native perspectives.

Daniel Anum Jasper hand-paints details on the face of a lion palanquin used by a Ghanaian chief. Jasper is also well-known in Ghana for painting movie posters. Photo by Kristin Otto, Indiana University

IU Theatre presents Edward Albee’s “The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia? (Notes toward a definition of tragedy).” A provocative play about loss, love and the limits of tolerance, “The Goat” is for mature audiences only. The show runs Nov. 29 to Dec. 8 and is a ticketed event.

For a complete list of Themester 2018: Animal/Human events and details, visit the Themester News and Events page. Most events are free and open to the public, though some require registration or tickets. Consult the Themester online calendar for more information.

Select events are limited to IU undergraduates, but most Themester events are open to the public and free.

College of Arts and Sciences Themester courses complement Themester 2018. Course include animal folklore and the behavior and evolution of animals.

Themester is an initiative of the Indiana University Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences.

Guest filmmakers and directors including Michael Schultz are highlights of IU Cinema’s fall season

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Thirty years after his last visit to Indiana University Bloomington, filmmaker Michael Schultz returns to celebrate 50 years in stage and screen. Schultz will be present for screenings of several of his films as part of Indiana University Cinema’s Jorgensen Guest Filmmaker Series.

Michael Schultz Photo courtesy of IU Cinema

 

The filmmaker series is supported through the Ove W Jorgensen Foundation and brings internationally known filmmakers to IU Bloomington during the fall and spring semesters.

Writer and curator Sergio Mims will lead an extended onstage interview with Schultz about his films and career at 7 p.m. Nov. 9. In addition, Schultz and his wife, creative partner and co-producer Lauren Jones will be present for screenings of “Cooley High,” “Krush Groove,” “Car Wash” and “To Be Young, Gifted and Black.”

The screening of “To Be Young, Gifted and Black” will take place at the IU Moving Image Archive Screening Room in the Herman B Wells Library on Nov. 7. All other films will be screened at IU Cinema. Schultz’s visit is made possible through a partnership with the Black Film Center/Archive.

The fall 2018 Jorgensen Guest Filmmaker Series also features:

  • Tamer El Said, filmmaker and director, who will visit Bloomington on Sept. 21 to present a lecture at 4 p.m. followed by a 7 p.m. screening of “In the Last Days of the City,” his first feature film as director. El Said founded Zero Production, is an advocate for the power of cinema and established Cimatheque-Alternative Film Centre in Egypt, a multipurpose teaching and programming space for independent filmmaking.

    “78/52: Hitchcock’s Shower Scene” is a documentary about “78 shots and 52 cuts that changed cinema forever.” Image courtesy of IU Cinema
  • Director Sara Driver, whose work is a combination of fantasy, surrealism, science fiction, comics, horror, sword-and-sorcery and the supernatural. Driver will be in Bloomington for screenings of her films “Boom for Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michael Basquiat” at 7 p.m. Nov. 29 and “Sleepwalk” at 10 p.m. Nov. 30. She’ll present her lecture at 7 p.m. Nov. 30 before the screening of “Sleepwalk.”
  • Alexandre O. Philippe, a Swiss-American filmmaker who has directed a number of award-winning films and documentaries. His most recent work, “78/52: Hitchcock’s Shower Scene,” documents the iconic scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho,” which used 78 camera set-ups and 52 edits over the course of three minutes. Philippe will attend the screening of this film at 7 p.m. Dec. 6, as well as screenings of “The Exorcist” at 7 p.m. Dec. 4 and “Doc of the Dead” at 10 p.m. Dec. 7. He will present a Hitchcock Master Class at 7 p.m. Dec. 7.

“The range of talented guests visiting IU Cinema across all programs this fall should engage and entertain a broad and diverse audience for us,” said Jon Vickers, IU Cinema founding director. “There are over a dozen guests presenting their work, and the majority of them will work with students and faculty in the classroom or special master classes.”

Tickets are not necessary for the lectures in the Jorgensen series, but they are needed for the film screenings. Ticket information and additional details on all of the guest filmmakers can be found on IU Cinema’s website.

IU Cinema also hosts a full season of movies, screenings and events, often collaborating with other units on the Bloomington campus.

Rising Tide: The Crossroads Project Photo courtesy of IU CInema

“We are thrilled to partner each semester with a wealth of IU units and community organizations through our Creative Collaborations program,” said Brittany Friesner, associate director of IU Cinema. “Our fall schedule includes another strong line-up of engaging and collaborative programming, including series curated by the Mathers Museum for World Cultures, the Irish-American Community at IU, the Russian and East European Institute, and the Black Film Center/Archive.

“Our collaborative programming model allows us to reach deeply into campus and community, calling upon scholars and other subject-matter experts to present unique cinematic experiences accessible for all IU students, staff, faculty and the community at large.”

Highlights of the fall 2018 season include:

  • The 5X Ida Lupino: Fearless, Extraordinary Trailblazer film series, which commemorates the 100th anniversary of the birth of early Hollywood filmmaker Ida Lupino. Her films often addressed social issues and taboo topics. Five films directed by Lupino will be shown throughout the fall semester, kicking off Sept. 7. Dates and ticket information are available on the 5X Series page.
  • “On Your Marc,” a documentary following television icon Marc Summers as he develops a live theater show about his life. A sneak preview of this new film will be shown at 7 p.m. Sept. 14; Summers is scheduled to be present. The screening is presented in partnership with Bloomington Playwrights Project.
  • Rising Tide: The Crossroads Project, part of IU’s Integrated Program in the Environment and Environmental Resilience Institute’s celebration of how the arts and humanities catalyze science in support of environmental sustainability. The performance combines film, chamber music and spoken word to motivate sustainable action in the face of climate change. A Q&A with the performers and IU experts will follow the film. The screening begins at 7 p.m. Oct. 4. There will also be a daylong symposium with lectures, a workshop and a panel discussion hosted by the Integrated Program in the Environment.
  • The Creatures of Yes Interactive Workshop, which is part of the CINEkids International Children’s Film Series. Director and puppeteer Jacob Graham will lead a workshop filled with screenings of many of his short films at 4 p.m. Nov. 17. The workshop is suggested for kids 5 and older.

Read the original article from IU News

Herron Welcomes master printmaker Kenneth Tyler, showcasing his collaborations with iconic artists

INDIANAPOLIS — This fall, the Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI presents a survey of collaborations between Herron alumnus Kenneth Tyler and 11 of the 20th century’s most iconic artists in the Galleries at Herron Sept. 19-Nov. 10 in conjunction with IUPUI’s 50th-anniversary celebrations.

Kenneth Tyler, left, and Terence La Noue examining proofs from the “Ritual Series,” Tyler Graphics Ltd. artist studio, Mount Kisco, New York, 1987. Photo by Marabeth Cohen-Tyler

With a “no rules” mantra, master printer Kenneth Tyler worked with dozens of artists from 1966 through 2001 to create prints that redefined the medium of fine art printmaking. “Kenneth Tyler: The Art of Collaboration” offers an intimate view into Tyler’s visionary partnerships with Joseph Albers, Helen Frankenthaler, David Hockney, Terence La Noue, Roy Lichtenstein, Joan Mitchell, Robert Motherwell, John Newman, Steven Sorman, Frank Stella and John Walker.

In addition, the exhibition brings together artwork on loan from the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, including the printing matrix for Frank Stella’s “Juam”; archival photographs taken in the Tyler Graphics Ltd. workshops during the time of the partnerships; and eight documentary films by Frank Cantor.

“Tyler is a distinguished alumnus of Herron School of Art and Design who graduated with a Master of Art Education in 1963 and was awarded an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts from Indiana University in 2005,” said professor and former Dean Valerie Eickmeier, who was integral to bringing the Tyler exhibition to Herron. “I am honored to welcome Ken back to the school and highlight works of art from his extraordinary personal collection in the Galleries at Herron.”

“Kenneth Tyler: The Art of Collaboration” is made possible by the generous support of the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation and the Sam Francis Foundation. In-kind support for the opening reception is provided by Sun King Brewery. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated 44-page booklet containing Tyler’s personal reflections and an essay by Jane Kinsman, head of international art at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

Also on view in the Galleries at Herron Sept. 19-Dec. 12:

  • In the Marsh Gallery: MacArthur Award “Genius Grant” recipient Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley’s “The Minotaur Trilogy,” a trio of videos that bring a feminist perspective to the Greek myth of the minotaur, using punning wordplay, handmade costumes and sets, and bawdy humor to riff on classical mythology and pop culture.
  • In the Basile Gallery: “Stuff(ed),” an exhibition featuring the work of five contemporary artists who explore the playful, subversive power of sculpted fabric to transform and reimagine mass-market commodities and bric-a-brac from everyday life. Participating artists are Jessica Dance, Gil Yefman, Andrea Pritschow, David Gabbard and Natalie Baxter.

A public talk with Tyler will occur during the opening reception for all three exhibitions from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19, at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St. The Galleries at Herron, located in Eskenazi Hall on the IUPUI campus, are free and open to the public 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesdays.

Parking is free, courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis with validation from the Herron galleries. Visitors may park in the Sports Complex Garage adjacent to Eskenazi Hall or on levels 5-6 of the Riverwalk Garage. Visit HerronGalleries.org for more information.

Read More

Read the original article from IU News

Fantasy coffin designer Paa Joe bringing his brand of underground art to IUPUI, IU Bloomington

Revised: All events with Paa Joe have been cancelled as of 9-13-18

Many artists put their heart, soul and passion into their work for the world to see. For Ghanaian artist Joseph “Paa Joe” Ashong, however, his art is dedicated to the individual passion of his client and is typically seen by the world for only a short time.

Paa Joe stands with a fantasy coffin shaped like a lion. Photo courtesy of Benjamin Wigley, director of “Paa Joe and the Lion”

Paa Joe is a master craftsman who creates fantasy coffins, part of Ghana’s tradition of abebuu adekai, which started in the 1950s with artists creating custom coffins for priests and chiefs. These functional coffins are most often in the shape of animals but can be nearly anything the client dreams. Paa Joe and his team have made coffins as varied as lions, shoes and a baby grand piano. As one of the most well-known fantasy coffin makers, Paa Joe has had his work displayed in and commissioned from locations around the world.

Next week, Paa Joe, his son and a former apprentice will bring their expertise and the intricacies of this Ghanaian tradition to the campuses of IUPUI and Indiana University Bloomington. Paa Joe will work with students and faculty at the Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI during a nine-day workshop that will highlight Ghana’s traditions and the artistry involved in the making of fantasy coffins. In Bloomington, Paa Joe will be honored at the Mathers Museum of World Cultures, which currently has an exhibit of fantasy coffins, and participate in a discussion and screening of a film documenting his work at IU Cinema.

“Paa Joe is an internationally respected artist and recognized leader in his field within Ghana,” said Greg Hull, professor and interim chair of fine arts at the Herron School of Art and Design. “It’s an honor to be able to host him on our campus thanks to a grant from the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute. It is our hope that through his visit and workshops, everyone will gain insight into a uniquely different creative process and world culture.”

In addition to this work with students at Herron, Paa Joe will host several fantasy coffin work sessions that are open to the public at the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center as well as a public talk at 5 p.m. Sept. 12 in Eskenazi Hall’s Basile Auditorium. Before leaving IUPUI, Paa Joe will lead and orchestrate a live performance demonstrating the Ghanaian funeral ceremony and celebration of life from 5 to 6 p.m. Sept. 14. The performance is open to the public, and attendees are invited to participate in the event.

Following his time at IUPUI, Paa Joe and his team will travel to IU Bloomington to view and discuss an exhibit on the Ghanaian tradition of fantasy coffins at IU’s Mathers Museum of World Cultures.

The exhibit, “Shapes of the Ancestors: Bodies, Animals, Art and Ghanaian Fantasy Coffins,” is part of the Bloomington campus’s Themester and was curated by Kristin Otto, a Ph.D. candidate in anthropology.

Otto, who studies African art, was a research associate at the Mathers Museum in August 2017 when the museum received a one-of-a-kind donation of an airplane-shaped fantasy coffin. Given her background and research interests, Otto was asked to research and curate an exhibit on this unique Ghanaian tradition. She spent two weeks in Ghana visiting Paa Joe’s workshop, learning about the process and interviewing the people who work there.

“I was really, really lucky to be able to do this research,” Otto said. “I was able to get a sense of the artists, their technical skills and artistry. I got to see them work on a series of ocean-themed coffins as well as an ear-of-corn-shaped coffin that was to be used for a funeral.”

The exhibit features four full-size coffins: the airplane, a pink fish on loan from IU’s Eskenazi Museum of Art, a hen on loan from the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis and a Nike shoe also on loan from the Children’s Museum. In addition, visitors can view five mini/collectible coffins: a rooster, lion, eagle, beer bottle and Coca-Cola bottle.

The exhibit also focuses on Otto’s research in Ghana, including how the fantasy coffins are made, the process and the people behind the work. Visitors to the exhibit will also find information on the cultural uses of these coffins both within Ghana and around the world.

“These craftsmen just have an intuitive sense of the material and shape; they don’t draw or sketch anything,” Otto said. “They’re really skilled at this, and it’s an incredible honor for Paa Joe to come here.”

Otto’s exhibit is on display at the Mathers Museum through Dec. 16, and a reception honoring Paa Joe will take place from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Sept. 16 at the museum. Otto will also moderate a discussion with Paa Joe following the screening of the film “Paa Joe and the Lion” at IU Cinema. The documentary follows Paa Joe and his son, Jacob, on their journey to re-establish their workshop. Tickets to the 4 p.m. screening Sept. 16 are free and available through IU Cinema.

“This project is an intentional effort to broaden international programming on our campuses and continue strengthening Herron’s connection with the larger university,” Hull said. “For our students, having access to engage and work with professional artists provides insight that can’t be simulated in the classroom and shows them that there are many diverse paths that can be taken in pursuit of their own professional practice.”

Read the original article from IU News

 

Meet first-year student Carly Butz

Carly Butz will continue her family’s teaching tradition during her IUPUI career.

Carly Butz, a first-year Herron School of Art and Design student in the Honors College, looks to be a third-generation teacher while enhancing her art skills. Photo by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

As an art education major within the Herron School of Art and Design, she will follow in the footsteps of grandfather Bruce Butz and mother, Heather Butz, as educators. But first-year student Carly Butz will combine her passion for working with kids with her art prowess.

An impressive portfolio of paintings, drawings and ceramic pieces has her locked into studio classes, starting with two- and three-dimensional design this semester. The talent will help in the classroom, which will be greatly enhanced thanks to Herron’s many resources.

“They have an awesome woodworking area,” said Butz, a Fishers native. “The Think It Make It Lab: I’ve never been able to work with 3D printers at all, so it will be really cool to learn how to use those.”

Butz is a new member of the Honors College after receiving the Bepko Scholarship along with a Herron scholarship and a Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship, which goes to students who will their teaching careers in Indiana.

“I love working with kids,” said Butz, who worked as a camp counselor at Conner Prairie this summer. “I’ve had teachers inspire me, and I’ve seen how much teachers can make a difference in students’ lives.”

Butz sees high school or junior high school as her destination to teach art. After absorbing the love of education from her family and the expertise from Herron faculty, she will be ready to mold the next generation of young artists.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tim Brouk

The Entanglements Series: Sound, Art, and Ecology (free lunch included)

What do we mean when we say that we’re listening? What is it that we hear? How do sounds help us articulate our emotions and shape our understanding?
In a world of rapid environmental transformation, how have our soundscapes changed? What is it that we’re not hearing? What does this mean for our futures?
Join us for lunch (it’s free!), a performance by Mary Lattimore, and a discussion with a panel of experts who focus on the intersections ofsound, art, ecology, and culture.

Thu, September 20, 2018
12:00 PM – 2:00 PM EDT

 

The Cabaret
924 North Pennsylvania Street
#Suite B
Indianapolis, IN 46204

 

For more information on panelists, performances and to get you FREE ticket, click here! 

Reading at the Table with Robert Rebein

Robert Rebein is a professor of English and interim dean of the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. His books include Headlights on the Prairie: Essays on Home; Dragging Wyatt Earp: A Personal History of Dodge City and Hicks; Tribes; and Dirty Realists: American Fiction after Postmodernism.

Headlights on the Prairie: Essays on Home:

At the long-term care facility where Robert Rebein’s father lands after a horrific car crash, a shadow box hangs next to each room. its contents suggesting somethings of the occupants life. In Headlights on the Prairie, Rebein has created a literary shadow box of sorts, a book in which moments of singular grace and grit encapsulate a life and a world.

Thursday September 11, 2018                                                                                11:30a.m.-1:00p.m.                                                                                                           University Club                                                                                                                               875 W. North St., Room 200                                                                                   Indianapolis IN, 46202

Buffet Lunch: $13                                                                                                                          (dessert and soft drinks not included)

Please register here

For more information on the Reading at the Table Series, click here

IU’s Hilltop Garden and Nature Center Celebrates Shakespeare

When Indiana University Hilltop Garden and Nature Center volunteer LindHeath first learned about the Shakespeare gardens being grown across America a few years ago, she sprang into action.

The Shakespeare Garden at Hilltop. Photo by James Brother, IU Communications

With the help of Hilltop Garden coordinator Lea Woodard, IU landscape architect Mia Williams and Monroe County master gardeners Charlotte Griffin and Bob Baird, Heath began a journey to create IU’s own garden full of plants mentioned in Shakespeare’s literature and grown during the era in which he lived and wrote.

The team created a master list of plants from the Shakespeare Gardens at Brooklyn Botanic Garden and Northwestern University. Then they chose which of the plants would adapt and flourish in Bloomington’s climate. When deciding the garden’s layout, they referred to the book “Plant-Lore and Garden-Craft of Shakespeare”by Henry Ellacombe.

They broke ground on the garden in 2014. Since then, Heath has worked constantly to maintain the space with new plants every season.

As she walked around the garden recently, she explained each plant’s significance and its suitability to Indiana’s climate.

Hilltop Garden volunteer Linda Heath. Photo by Eric Rudd, IU Communications

Each plant bears a label indicating the scientific name, size and blooming period, its sun, shade, soil and water requirements, and quotes about the plants from Shakespeare’s literature. Some examples of the wide range of plants being grown are sweet peas and carnations, which were popular in Shakespeare’s time and are mentioned in his work, “The Winter’s Tale.”

“Creating this garden became a wonderful learning experience,” Heath said. “We wanted to make it extremely educational, so we created these labels so that when people come, they have the ability and knowledge to grow these plants in their own garden.”

Heath said her dream of creating the garden wasn’t necessarily from an interest in Shakespeare himself or his literature but stems from a love of the plants that grew during the time period. She gained a deeper knowledge of his literature through growing the garden and believes that others can as well.

Heath enjoys hearing what her visitors, including preschool classes, have to say about the garden.

A radiant pasque flower that’s featured in the garden. Photo by James Brosher, IU Communications

“I once had visitor who was so excited to find out that Hilltop had a Shakespeare Garden,” she said. “He had just visited New York and told me his father went to the Central Park Shakespeare Garden every single day.”

The garden at Hilltop is still expanding today. The Bloomington Garden Club recently awarded a grant to purchase a wooden archway that will be placed at the entrance of the garden. It is surrounded by numerous other visitor-friendly gardens, such as the Shade Garden and the Edible Campus Garden.

“It’s like an oasis in the middle of a busy campus,” Heath said.

Read the original article from IU News written by Grace Stryker

The Veterans’ Storyteller

Thirty-three years after he returned from service in Vietnam, Media School professor emeritus Ron Osgood felt proud to be a veteran for the first time.

Professor emeritus Ron Osgood has directed two documentaries on Vietnam veterans and is producing an oral history website that tells their stories. (Courtesy photo)

It was 2005, and he had returned to his hometown of Chicago for the dedication of a Vietnam veterans memorial.

“There were hundreds of people, many of which were Vietnam veterans wearing a cap that said, ‘Vietnam veteran’ or a shirt that said ‘First Cavalry,’ or something to represent themselves as a veteran,” Osgood said. “There were so many veterans, and I saw how proud they were.”

Simultaneously, decades-old anti-war group Vietnam Veterans Against the War was supporting an Iraq War protest. The juxtaposition of the two events piqued Osgood’s interest.

At the protest, he heard impassioned speeches by two young men, both still on active duty. Afterward, he approached one of them and acknowledged his “courageous” speech. The man told him his father, a Vietnam-era veteran who supported the Iraq War, had all but disowned him for his opposition.

“I left and drove back to Bloomington with this emotion of feeling proud to be a veteran and sad that this young man who would soon be a veteran spoke out with his beliefs, and his father would not accept him,” Osgood said.

That, to Osgood, emphasized the generational aspect of the Vietnam and Iraq wars and inspired his first war documentary, My Vietnam, Your Iraq.

“That became the catalyst for my next 13 years of work with veterans’ projects,” he said.

Osgood is a veteran and a veterans’ storyteller, though the stories he tells are rarely his own. Rather, they’re the experiences and memories of countless other veterans he’s spoken with throughout the production of two documentaries: My Vietnam, Your Iraq and Just Like Me: The Vietnam War — Stories from All Sides, and a sprawling online multimedia project he’s developing called Vietnam War Stories.

Read More

Read the original article from IU News, written by Chris Forrester