IAHI Conference yields “An Anthropocene Primer”

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the Rivers of the Anthropocene project is proud to announce the official launch of An Anthropocene Primer, Version 1.0 on October 23, 2017. An Anthropocene Primer is an innovative open access, open peer review publication that guides learners through the complex concepts and debates related to the Anthropocene, including climate change, pollution, and environmental justice.

This born-digital publication (www.anthropoceneprimer.org) is a critical and timely resource for learners across multiple fields from academia, to industry, to philanthropy to learn about issues and topics relating to the Anthropocene, a framework for understanding environmental change that highlights human impact on earth systems.

An Anthropocene Primer was created to provide learners in museums, schools, non-profits, and formal research institutions with an entry point into some of the big concepts and debates that dominate discussions about the Anthropocene. The primer is not intended to be comprehensive (this is, after all, An Anthropocene Primer, not The Anthropocene Primer), nor is it intended to be didactic. The primer is a framework to guide individual and collaborative learning from the beginner to advanced levels.

Version 1.0 of An Anthropocene Primer is available for open peer review from October 23, 2017 through February 1, 2018. Open peer review allows users to contribute to and engage with fellow readers and the authors as the editors develop it for a final print and open access ebook version. A video tutorial on how to participate in open peer review is available at www.anthropoceneprimer.org/index.php/videotutorials/.

Edited by Jason M. Kelly and Fiona P. McDonald, An Anthropocene Primer emerged from the “Anthropology of the Anthropocene” workshop (http://www.anthropologyoftheanthropocene.org) hosted by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute in May 2017. The participants from this workshop make up list of authors: Jason M. Kelly (IUPUI, USA), Fiona P. McDonald (IUPUI, USA), Alejandro Camargo (University of Montreal, Canada), Amelia Moore (University of Rhode Island, USA), Mark Kesling (The daVinci Pursuit, USA), Ananya Ghoshal (Forum on Contemporary Theory, India), George Marcus (University of California, Irvine, USA), Paul Stoller (West Chester University, USA), Dominic Boyer (Rice University, USA), Serenella Iovino (University of Turin, Italy), Rebecca Ballestra (Artist, Monaco/Italy), Eduardo S. Brondizio (IU, Bloomington), Jim Enote (A:shiwiw A:wan Museum and Heritage Center, Zuni, USA), Ignatius Gutsa (University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe), Cymene Howe (Rice University, USA), Sue Jackson (Griffith University, Australia), Phil Scarpino (IUPUI, USA). This workshop was funded by the Wenner-Gren Foundation and the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities grant program.

Applications open for Young Scholars in American Religion program

Young Scholars in American Religion will include a series of seminars devoted to the enhancement of teaching and research. The aims of all sessions of the program are to develop ideas and methods of instruction in a supportive workshop environment, to stimulate scholarly research and writing, and to create a community of scholars that will continue into the future.

Please click here to apply.

Scholars eligible to apply are those working in a subfield of the area of religion in North America, broadly understood, who have a terminal degree in hand, a full-time academic position, and have launched their careers within the last seven years. Scholars are selected with the understanding that they will commit to the program for all seminar dates. Participants are expected to produce two course syllabi, with justification of teaching approach, and a publishable research article over the course of their seminars.

IUPUI’s Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture also has a new website at raac.iupui.edu.

Calling All Students and Young Professionals

“Arts and Humanities: Don’t Leave School Without Them” is a new book-in-progress that will advocate for the arts and humanities through the voices and perspectives of students and young professionals. The book will lend advice to high school and college students about how the arts and humanities can play a foundational and transformative role in their educations and careers across a wide range of fields and disciplines.

The book’s author/editor, Christine Henseler, is currently calling for submissions from students and young professionals. Submissions can be short essay (~1500 words), poem, comic strip, zine, infographic, interview, poster, design, photograph, visualization, or any other publishable material – so if you have experiences or advice you’d like to share, go to the book’s website to learn more.

Poet, essayist, and critic Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib will speak at IUPUI

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the IUPUI English Department are pleased to present the Rufus and Louise Reiberg Reading Series featuring poet and essayist Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib. Willis-Abdurraqib will read from his collected works at the Basile Auditorium on November 16th at 7:30pm. Free tickets are available at willis-abdurraqib.eventbrite.com.

Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib is a poet, essayist, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His poetry has been published in Muzzle, Vinyl, PEN American, and various other journals. His essays and music criticism have been published in The FADER, Pitchfork, The New Yorker, and The New York Times. His first full length collection, The Crown Ain’t Worth Much, released in June 2016 from Button Poetry, was named a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book prize. His limited edition chapbook, Vintage Sadness, was released in summer 2017. His first collection of essays, They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us, will be released this winter. He is a Callaloo Creative Writing Fellow, an interviewer at Union Station Magazine, and a poetry editor at Muzzle Magazine. He is also a member of the poetry collective Echo Hotel with poet/essayist Eve Ewing.

Additionally, he is a columnist at MTV News, where he writes about music and fights to get Room Raiders back on the air. He thinks poems can change the world, but really wants to talk to you about music, sports, and sneakers.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series is provided by the Reiberg family, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and the IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

Professor Barbara Mills will speak at the IAHI next month

As part of the 2017 Midwest Archaeological Conference, Barbara Mills invites you to her lecture, “Current Debates in the Archaeology of the Chaco World.” The talk will be held at the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute on October 19th at 7pm. Mills is the Professor of Anthropology and American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona and Curator of Archaeology at the Arizona State Museum.

Chaco Canyon’s dense concentration of monumental architecture, along with the millions of objects that have been excavated, pose challenges to traditional models of Southwestern societies. The ways in which archaeologists interpret regional systems of interaction like Chaco’s has led to a number of debates. Some of these are about Chaco’s origins, while others focus on its most extensive “Classic” period, and still others consider Chaco’s reorganization and fragmentation. The questions asked are as hotly debated as their answers. This presentation will outline several important debates about inequality, historical memory, economy, migration, and religious ritual that are guiding exciting new research on Chaco.

This event is sponsored by the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and The Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in collaboration with the 2017 Midwest Archaeological Conference.

Free tickets are available at barbara-mills.eventbrite.com.

About the Speaker
Professor Mills is an anthropological archaeologist with broad interests in archaeological method and theory, especially (but not exclusively) as applied to the North American Southwest. Her work has focused on ceramic analysis and, more broadly, material culture as a tool to understand social relations in the past. She is interested in the way depositional practice can be used to understand memory, materiality, and relational logics. Her research on ceramic technology, craft specialization, and accumulations research has led to a series of papers and edited volumes on social inequality, identity, feasting, and migration.

Mills’s interests were fostered by more than a decade of work in the Silver Creek area of east-central Arizona, including a multi-year collaborative project with the White Mountain Apache Tribe. She also has field and research experience in a number of other areas of the Southwest, including Zuni, Chaco, Mimbres, Grasshopper, and most recently the Greater Hohokam area. Outside the U.S. she has research experience in Guatemala (Postclassic Maya), Kazakhstan (Bronze Age), and Turkey (Neolithic). She is currently a lead researcher on the Southwest Social Networks Project, which brings together data and a talented group of scholars to apply social network analysis (SNA) to archaeological data from the Southwest.

The Reiberg Reading Series will feature poet Maggie Smith this October

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the IUPUI English Department are pleased to present the Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series featuring poet Maggie Smith. Smith will read from her selected works in the IUPUI Lilly Auditorium on October 11th at 7:30pm, with a Q&A session and book signing to follow.

Smith is the author of three books of poetry: Good Bones, which is making its debut on shelves on October first; The Well Speaks of Its Own Poison, winner of the Dorset Prize and the 2016 Independent Publisher Book Awards Gold Medal in Poetry; and Lamp of the Body, winner of the Benjamin Saltman Award. The poem “Good Bones,” after which her new book is titled, went viral internationally. It was called the “Official Poem of 2016” by the BBC/Public Radio International and has been translated into nearly a dozen languages. Advance praise for Good Bones (the book) says it is written “with such a clean, aching clarity of lyricism that I discover now frequently exhausted human touchstones freshly, with real surprise.”

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series is provided by the Reiberg family, the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and the IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

Tickets are available through Eventbrite.

IUPUI Professor Andrea Jain named editor of Journal of the American Academy of Religion

The original press release is available here.

Professor Andrea Jain

Andrea Jain, an associate professor of religious studies in the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, has been appointed editor of the prestigious Journal of the American Academy of Religion. With around 9,000 members, the American Academy of Religion is the largest organization of religious studies scholars in the world, and its quarterly journal is the most prestigious in the field.

Jain is a leading scholar of South Asian religions and yoga studies. Her 2014 book, “Selling Yoga: From Counterculture to Pop Culture,” was published by Oxford University Press and is a top seller in the field of comparative religions. She has co-chaired the Yoga in Theory and Practice unit of the American Academy of Religion, and her work is featured regularly in newspapers, magazines, and the scholarly blog Religion Dispatches. Her areas of interest include contemporary spirituality and the history of modern yoga; the yoga industry’s relationship to capitalism and consumer culture; the intersections of gender, sexuality, and yoga; religion and politics in contemporary society; and methods and theories in the study of religion.

“I am honored to serve as editor of such an important journal and look forward to helping share the work of colleagues around the world while fostering important conversations,” Jain said. “I am also grateful to work with so many talented scholars at IUPUI, all of whom have made our department a valuable asset to the campus and to the field of religious studies.”

The IUPUI religious studies department will serve as the journal’s editorial office, which is also noteworthy for IUPUI, the School of Liberal Arts, and the department. The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research at IUPUI has allowed release time for Jain’s work as editor, while the Office of the Vice President for Research at Indiana University is contributing funding for two IU Bloomington graduate students to serve as editorial assistants.

“These collaborative investments are foundational to the first-rate humanities scholarship recognized by professor Jain’s selection as editor of the Journal of the American Academy of Religion,” said Thomas J. Davis, dean of the School of Liberal Arts. “The journal will continue to be a key publication in religious studies, and we’re delighted that IUPUI will have such a significant role.”

A celebration of Jain’s appointment, in conjunction with Indiana Humanities, will take place from 4 to 5pm on October 10th in Room 409 of the IUPUI Campus Center. IUPUI Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer Kathy Johnson will speak along with Davis, while Jain will speak about her vision for the journal and for humanities research at IUPUI.

New Residency Program Helps Create a More Welcoming Campus at IUPUI

Indianapolis SkylineThe IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute (IAHI) is pleased to announce the IAHI Welcoming Campus Artist Residency. Artists and designers are invited to apply for two residencies that will take place during 2018.

In consultation with the IAHI director and advisory team, residents will develop a public artwork for the IUPUI campus. They will also participate in studio visits and public programs.

The IAHI Welcoming Campus Artist Residency is part of the IUPUI Welcoming Campus Initiative, a program designed to transform IUPUI into a more inspiring destination for faculty, staff, students, and visitors.

The IAHI Welcoming Campus Residencies are funded by the IUPUI Welcoming Campus Fund, the School of Engineering and Technology, and the Office of the Vice President for Research. They are offered in collaboration with the City State residency program. City State is a collaboration of Central State Mansion, the IAHI, Ignition Arts, iMOCA, People for Urban Progress, and PRINTtEXT.

For more details about the IAHI Welcoming Campus Artist Residency and the application form, click here.

IU seeking institutional nominees for the Japan Foundation’s “Performing Arts Japan for North America” award

Blue Square

The Japan Foundation’s “Performing Arts Japan for North America” program is designed to provide financial assistance for non-profit organizations in the US and Canada that aim to introduce Japanese performing arts to local audiences. PAJ Touring Grants help present Japanese performing arts at multiple locations in the United States and Canada, with an emphasis on locations outside major metropolitan areas. PAJ Collaboration Grants help Japanese and American/Canadian artists develop new work, which will further an appreciation of Japanese culture when presented to American/Canadian audiences. The PAJ program offers two types of support:

  • The Touring Grant assists with the presentation of Japanese performing arts at multiple locations in the United States and/or Canada, with emphasis on locations outside major metropolitan areas where there is little exposure to Japanese performing arts.
  • The Collaboration Grant facilitates the collaboration of Japanese and American/Canadian artists so that they may create new work with the potential to develop into a touring project and further an appreciation of Japanese culture when presented to audiences in the United States and Canada.

Grants are determined on a cost-sharing basis and are awarded only to U.S.-based or Canada-based non-profit organizations and are subject to the relevant laws and regulations of the Japan Foundation. Applicants are eligible to apply for one project only through one of the two categories. Only one applicant from each Indiana University campus, so applications must go through the limited submissions process for each institution to determine its nominee.

To apply for IU Internal competition, please find the application at the IU Research Gateway website. The internal deadline for IUPUI is August 30, 2017.

The Berlin Prize is accepting 2018/2019 fellowship applications

The American Academy in Berlin invites applications for its residential fellowships for the academic year 2018/2019.

The Academy seeks to enrich transatlantic dialogues in the arts, humanities, and public policy through the development and communication of projects of the highest scholarly merit. For 2018/2019, the Academy is also interested in considering projects that address the themes of migration and social integration, as well as questions of race in comparative perspective.

For all projects, the Academy asks that candidates explain the relevance of a stay in Berlin to the development of their work.

Approximately 20 Berlin Prizes are conferred annually. Past recipients have included art historians, anthropologists, historians, musicologists, journalists, poets and writers, filmmakers, sociologists, legal scholars, economists, and public policy experts, among others. Fellowships are typically awarded for an academic semester. Bosch Fellowships in Public Policy may be awarded for shorter stays of six to eight weeks. Benefits include round-trip airfare, partial board, a $5,000 monthly stipend, and accommodations at the Academy’s lakeside Hans Arnhold Center in the Berlin-Wannsee district.

Fellowships are restricted to US citizens and permanent residents. Candidates in academic disciplines must have completed a PhD at the time of application. Candidates working in other fields—such as journalism, film, law, or public policy—must have equivalent professional degrees. Writers should have published at least one book at the time of application.

Please note that artists, composers, and poets are invitation-only competitions.

Following a peer-reviewed evaluation process, an independent Selection Committee reviews finalist applications. The 2018/2019 Berlin Prizes will be announced in late February 2018.

For further information and to apply online, please visit the website. The application deadline is Friday, September 29, 2017 (12 noon EST or 6 pm CET).