Making the City | The Ethics, Values, and Practices of Public Art in Urban Contexts

This semester’s third installment of The Ethics, values, and Practices of Public Art in Urban Contexts Seminar Series, “Making the City,” will be held on Monday, April 16, from 4-6pm at the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, University Library 4115P.

Cities across the US are grappling with major transformations that expose the many tensions inherent to historical disparities in economics, education, safety, and political access brought on by inequalities based in race and class. Midwest cities have responded to these challenges with a variety of approaches. This seminar series is concerned with addressing one of them: the role of culture in reshaping cities – specifically through public art.

In the discourse and practice of urban design, public art has increasingly been seen as a key tool in redeveloping our cities – from making cities more livable and safe to encouraging economic development and educational achievement.

Using art as a tool to address urban design challenges goes by a variety of different names: creative placemaking, civic art, and tactical urbanism, to name a few. These approaches are fundamentally tied to ethical frameworks and notions of value. Seminar meetings will discuss the intersections of ethics, public art, and urban design through shared readings, guest speakers, and conversation.

Click here to reserve your ticket on Eventbrite.

The Ethics, Values, and Practices of Public Art in Urban Contexts Seminar Series is supported by The Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society at Indiana University, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and the Herron School of Art and Design.

IUPUI Wins Engaged Campus of the Year Award from Indiana Campus Compact

View the original article from News at IUPUI.

With its demonstrated ability to contribute to improving the community and educate students for civic and social responsibility, IUPUI won the 2018 Engaged Campus of the Year award from the Indiana Campus Compact.

The Indiana Campus Compact is a partnership of Indiana’s public, private, and community college higher education institutions and is focused on advocating, implementing, and improving service engagement. The Engaged Campus Award recognizes exemplary commitment to advancing the civic purposes of higher education.

“IUPUI’s commitment to community engagement began when the campus was founded in 1969 and is a guiding principle for all of our students, faculty, and staff,” IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar said. “We’re honored to receive this award as a symbol of our strong historic commitment to the public good, which continues to be a major force in our strategic priorities.”

The IUPUI Strategic Plan articulates the campus priorities of student success; advances in health and life sciences; and contributions to the well-being of the citizens of Indianapolis, the state of Indiana, and beyond. Engagement is pervasive throughout the strategic plan — in the curricular and co-curricular experiences, research, service, economic and community development, and more.

In 2014, as part of that strategic plan, IUPUI developed an Office of Community Engagement to support, promote, and recognize campus engagement with the community and to develop a strategic approach to community engagement at IUPUI.

Community engagement is integrated into the curriculum on an institution-wide level. From the newly launched Community Corps program, which gives students an introduction to community development, to residential and commercial developments designed for social justice impact, to an American Studies cultural ecologies internship exploring how art and culture impact a community’s well-being, IUPUI weaves community into courses, majors, and departments across the campus.

As home to the nationally recognized Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, the Center for Service and Learning, and The Polis Center for place-based solutions, IUPUI has been lauded for years for being a shining example of how an urban university can be the conduit for collaboration and reciprocal partnerships with surrounding communities while at the same time offering a robust, rigorous, and socially just education to its students.

“Indiana Campus Compact’s mission to prepare college students to advance the public good in their communities is only possible when our partner institutions dedicate themselves to the same mission. Fully engaged colleges and universities work hand-in-hand with community partners to improve community life and to educate students for civic and social responsibility,” said J.R. Jamison, executive director of Indiana Campus Compact. “Community engagement is embedded in IUPUI’s culture, and its faculty, staff, and students are connected to the community in meaningful, lasting ways that advance the public good.”

IUPUI received a $1,000 prize with the award. The money is being donated to one of its community partners, Christamore House, which provides youth education services, senior programming, and life skills training to residents of Haughville and the near-west side of Indianapolis.

Robert G. Bringle Civic Engagement Showcase

Plater Medallion Recipients from 2015 Bringle Showcase

Service, partnership, and research. The Robert G. Bringle Civic Engagement Showcase recognizes the impact of each of these things on the IUPUI campus and in the community.

Held in the IUPUI Campus Center (420 University Boulevard) on Tuesday, April 10, the showcase will honor faculty, staff, and community partners who exemplify IUPUI’s commitment to deepening community engagement. The showcase will highlight the contributions of four IUPUI honorees. Poster presentations will show the various and diverse contributions IUPUI students, faculty, staff, and organizations are making to this commitment. Finally, the event will conclude with a formal recognition of the graduating students who have been awarded the William M. Plater Civic Engagement Medallion for exemplary commitment to serving their community.

To register or to learn more, visit the IUPUI Center for Service & Learning website.

Core Fulbright Program Competition

From the Vice President for International Affairs:

The competition for the 2019-20 Core Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program is now open. The Core Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program sends more than 500 American scholars and professionals annually to more than 125 countries, where they lecture and/or conduct research in a wide variety of academic and professional fields. Visit the CIES website for application details.

Keep in mind that grant lengths vary and are specified in the award description; grant benefits vary but generally include travel and living expenses for the awardee and accompanying dependents; the competition is open to all U.S. citizens; the application deadline is August 1, 2018; and the Catalog of Awards is available here.

For more information, visit the CIES website and contact IUPUI’s Fulbright representative, Leslie Bozeman.

Ryan White Letters at the Children’s Museum

Ryan White (1971-1990) was a hemophiliac who contracted AIDS from a blood transfusion. He was diagnosed at the age of 13. In the early 1980s, not much was known about the disease, and Ryan was not allowed to continue attending school in his hometown because parents thought he would spread the disease to others. After a fierce legal battle that brought national attention to Ryan and his family, he was allowed to return to school. However, discrimination continued, and Ryan and his family decided to move further south to Cicero, Indiana. There, Hamilton Heights schools educated their students about AIDS and its effects, and they welcomed him with open arms.

Meanwhile, Ryan became a spokesperson for AIDS communities, speaking locally and internationally about his experiences. He was friends with many celebrities and was able to speak at the President’s Commission on the AIDS Epidemic. A TV movie, “The Ryan White Story,” was made about his life, and it aired in 1989, gaining him further popularity. Ryan’s major goal in life was to have a normal childhood and normal experiences in high school. He enjoyed school and was able to skateboard, drive, and hold a job at a surf shop.

However, Ryan was still sick, and his illness caused his death on April 8th, 1990. Thousands attended his funeral in Indianapolis, including first Lady Barbara Bush. He was buried in Cicero, in part because of the warm welcome the community had given him. Ryan’s legacy lives on through the National CARE Act, IU’s Dance Marathon for Riley (as well as similar marathons at other universities), an AIDS walk at Hamilton Heights commemorating Ryan with a scholarship, and more.

In 2001, Ryan’s mother donated the contents of his room, in addition to other materials, to the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. The museum opened their ground-breaking permanent exhibit The Power of Children in 2004. The exhibit portrays Ryan’s life, as well as the lives of Ruby Bridges and Anne Frank.

In 2016, The Children’s Museum received a grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services to digitize letters sent to Ryan White in the 1980s in collaboration with IUPUI Library’s Program of Digital Scholarship. The archive of nearly 6,000 letters offers significant cultural information related to the AIDS epidemic, the perspective of children, and related issues of tolerance, education, and inspiration as well as a window to popular culture in the 1980s.

As part of this project, the Museum has created an online learning platform for youth in grades 3-12 to learn how to transcribe letters and research questions of interest about Ryan’s life and time period. In addition, the letters and transcriptions are available to scholars through the IUPUI Library online digital collections, allowing the letters to be used for research regarding the misunderstood disease and to share the legacy of Ryan White.

Visit The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis website to learn more.

Food Waste and Hunger Summit

Original article at News at IUPUI.

IUPUI Campus Kitchen student volunteers

Leading experts in the fight against food waste and hunger will come together at IUPUI March 24-25 for the fifth annual Food Waste and Hunger Summit, co-hosted by IUPUI and The Campus Kitchens Project, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization empowering young people to fight food waste and hunger.

The summit brings together students and advocacy groups from across the country who are working to solve food insecurity problems and wasted food in their communities.

It is an opportunity for them to share best practices and encourage others to join the movement. This two-day event will support attendees in unpacking the “triple bottom line” of successful food justice ventures: expanding access to healthy food, creating meaningful careers and testing innovative solutions to the nation’s most systemic failures.

Registration for the event is now open. Indiana University students may attend for free. There is a $35 registration fee for other students and a $75 fee for members of the general public.

The IU Office of the Bicentennial is a sponsor of the summit.

Confirmed keynote speakers include Robert Egger, founder of DC Central Kitchen, founder and CEO of LA Kitchen; Michael F. Curtin Jr., CEO of DC Central Kitchen; Pashon Murray, founder and CEO of Detroit Dirt, waste reduction expert, and circular economy advocate; Anna Lappé, founder of Real Food Media, national bestselling author and sustainable food advocate; and Marcia Chatelain, associate professor of history and African-American studies at Georgetown University, scholar of race and ethnicity, and food studies specialist.

IUPUI launched its own chapter of the student-led Campus Kitchen in 2014, after participating in The Campus Kitchens Project’s annual launch grant competition in partnership with the Sodexo Stop Hunger Foundation.

“While progress continues in the fight against hunger, food insecurity remains a top concern across the nation. At IUPUI, we are working with local advocates and taking steps to help students, staff, faculty and the greater Indianapolis community gain access to regular meals through the Campus Kitchen at IUPUI and Paw’s Pantry, a student-run food pantry,” said Camy Broeker, vice chancellor for finance and administration.

“We are honored to host the 2018 Food Waste and Hunger Summit, which is bringing together national and local leaders, partner organizations, students, faculty and staff to share innovations, best practices and sustainable solutions to food waste, hunger and poverty.”

Local and national partner organizations including Feeding America, DC Central Kitchen, No Kid Hungry and Second Helpings will join the discussion along with as many as 250 student leaders from around the nation who are leading the fight to reduce food waste, hunger and poverty on their campuses and in their communities.

On more than 60 university and high school campuses across the country, student volunteers with The Campus Kitchens Project transform unused food from dining halls, grocery stores, restaurants and farmers markets into meals for people experiencing hunger. In the last academic year, Campus Kitchens across the country recovered more than 1.3 million pounds of wasted food and served 350,000 meals.

 

Lotus Blossoms Performances Coming to Eskenazi Hospital

Kardemimmit

A series of performances will be held in the Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Concourse at the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Hospital.

In the first of these, the women of Kardemimmit will sing and play the Finnish national instrument – the kantele, which is similar to a zither or dulcimer. The quartet has mastered both the 15-stringed and 38-stringed kantele, producing the distinctive sounds made by the plucked acoustic instrument that blends with delicate, tight vocal harmonies in a style of singing known as “reki.” The standout contemporary Nordic ensemble – composed of Maija Pokela, Jutta Rahmel, Anna Wegelius, and Leeni Wegelius – writes music for their voices and instruments, a new folk music rooted in Finnish tradition. Lotus fan tip: Listening to Kardemimmit on disk or in video is one thing; their powerful live performance is simply remarkable.

In the second, Dance of Hope will captivate you with its rhythms, sounds, and exhilaratingly colorful choreography. Created to restore dignity and self-confidence to Ugandan children by teaching life skills, music, and the arts, the group of children, aged 7 to 16 years old, delivers a rich cultural experience. Performances explore the transformational power of music and dance to raise awareness and improve the way of life for the many children who have been orphaned, displaced, or live in poverty. This vibrant music and dance spectacular features a cast of young performers, whose triumphant and inspiring stories showcase their resilience, creativity, and persistence. Dance of Hope’s artistic director and producer, Kinobe, performed at the 2009 & 2010 Lotus World Music & Arts Festivals, as well as Lotus Blossoms in 2015.

The third performance features a brother-and-sister duo from Nashville, Tennessee, Giri & Uma Peters, who are award-winning multi-instrumentalists who astonish audiences with their refreshing, soulful blend of old-time, roots, and bluegrass music. Giri and Uma may be young (13 and 10 years old, respectively), but their musicianship and vocal harmonies showcase a creativity and originality beyond their years. Their musicianship has attracted the attention of roots music star Rhiannon Giddens and banjo greats Abigail Washburn and Bela Fleck, among others. Lotus audiences know great Americana roots music when they hear it – and the Peters won’t disappoint.

These events are free and open to the public. Parking is available on the Eskenazi Health campus in the Eskenazi Health Parking Garage, which is accessible from Eskenazi Avenue.

Giri and Uma Peters are brought to Lotus Blossoms in collaboration with the IU Arts and Humanities Council/India Remixed Festival.

This series is made possible in part from the generous support of the Eskenazi Health Foundation and the Lotus Education & Arts Foundation.

New Exhibit from IAHI Scholar-in-Residence Samuel E. Vázquez

IMMERSED is a group exhibition featuring works by contemporary visual artists whose creative processes reveal deeply rooted meanings through symbolism and narrative. The exhibition is organized and curated by Samuel E. Vázquez in collaboration with InCultur. Participating artists include Samuel E. Vázquez, Danicia Monét, Atsu Kpotufe, Elizabeth Bilbrey, Gary Gee, Shamira Wilson, Hector Del Campo, Maria Zepeda, Stephen Heathcock, and Heather Ward Miles.

According to Vázquez, “The main idea of IMMERSED is to share diverse expressions by featuring the works of artists whose focused studio practices are unique to each artist.” The title of the exhibition, which includes paintings, photographs, illustrations, and sculptures, “alludes to the immersive and continuous process of developing one’s voice.”

“This exhibition can speak to anyone interested in exploring, engaging, and interacting with the art and artists. It can also speak via the diverse global backgrounds of the featured artists. Through direct dialogue with the artists or the works, we can meaningfully engage in conversation while learning from one another. That’s the beauty of art – it speaks of and about life, making our collective human experience richer,” Vázquez said.

The exhibition, held at Butler University’s Clowes Memorial Hall, will open with a reception from 6:00-9:00 pm on Tuesday, March 20, and will close on April 23. This exhibition is presented by Butler’s Jordan College of the Arts Signature Series, which features internationally acclaimed guest artists brought to Butler University’s campus. For more details, including gallery hours and parking information, click here.

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1970, Samuel E Vázquez is a visual artist working primarily in mixed media. His inspiration is rooted in the New York City subway style writings of the 1970s and 80s, along with the works of Ed Clark, Jackson Pollock, and Jean-Michel Basquiat. Vázquez’s work has been exhibited in numerous galleries and cultural institutions. He has lectured on the history of style writing in venues such as the Arts Council of Indianapolis, New York City College of Technology-CUNY, Indianapolis Public Library Central Branch, Clowes Memorial Hall at Butler Arts Center, and Indianapolis Museum of Art. Vázquez is a 2017 Scholar In Residence at the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and a 2017-18 Creative Renewal Arts Fellow of the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

MPH Data Day

Indiana’s Management Performance Hub (MPH) provides analytics solutions tailored to address complex management and policy questions enabling improved outcomes for Hoosiers. They empower partners to leverage data in innovative ways, facilitating data-driven decision making and data-informed policy making.

On March 6, MPH is hosting Data Day 2018 at the Indiana Statehouse. The MPH Data Day is an open event for people who want to share ideas and learn how Indiana is leading the nation with data and innovation. MPH partners who use Indiana data to positively impact the lives of Hoosiers will present their projects.

Presentations will run from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm in the North Atrium of the Statehouse. Food, refreshments, and data success stories will be shared.

Gendered Innovations: Lunch with Londa Schiebinger, MA, PhD

Dr. Londa Schiebinger will be on campus next week on Tuesday, March 6, to discuss The Secret Cures of Slaves as part of the History Talks! and IUPUI Diversity Speakers Series. In addition, she will present her work on Gendered Innovations over lunch.

This event is sponsored by the IUSM Office of Diversity Affairs. Lunch will be provided, so please be sure to register if you plan to attend! For more information or to register, click here.

Doing research wrong costs lives and money. For example, between 1997 and 2000, 10 drugs were withdrawn from the U.S. market because of life-threatening health effects. Eight of these posed ‘greater health risks for women than for men’ (U.S. GAO, 2001). Not only does developing a drug in the current market cost billions—but when drugs failed, they caused human suffering and death.

Gender bias also leads to missed market opportunities. In engineering, for example, considering short people (many women, but also many men) “out-of-position” drivers leads to greater injury in automobile accidents (see Pregnant Crash Test Dummies). In basic research, failing to use appropriate samples of male and female cells, tissues, and animals yields faulty results (see Stem Cells). In medicine, not recognizing osteoporosis as a male disease delays diagnosis and treatment in men (see Osteoporosis Research in Men). In city planning, not collecting data on caregiving work leads to inefficient transportation systems (see Housing and Neighborhood Design). We can’t afford to get the research wrong.

Doing research right can save lives and money. An analysis of the U.S. Women’s Health Initiative Hormone Therapy Trial, for example, found that for every $1 spent, $140 were returned to taxpayers in health care savings. The study also saved lives, adding 145,000 more quality-adjusted life years (Roth et al., 2014).

It is crucially important to identify gender bias. But analysis cannot stop there: Gendered Innovations offer state-of-the-art methods of sex and gender analysis. Integrating these methods into basic and applied research produces excellence in science, health & medicine, and engineering research, policy, and practice. The methods of sex and gender analysis are one set of methods among many that a researcher will bring to a project.

Londa Schiebinger, MA, PhD is the John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science at Stanford University. She currently directs the EU/US Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment project. She is a leading international expert on gender in science and technology and has addressed the United Nations on the topic of “Gender, Science, and Technology.” She is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize and Guggenheim Fellowship. Her work on Gendered Innovations harnesses the creative power of sex and gender analysis to enhance excellence and reproducibility in science and technology.  More info can be found here.