Square Peg Round Hole Coming to IUPUI

We are excited to welcome guest artists Square Peg Round Hole to Indianapolis and the IUPUI campus next week. The IU Bloomington-trained instrumental rock trio will present a performance lecture on campus Friday, March 2. They will be discussing the integration of multimedia technology into their percussion-driven music as well as tips for young musicians hoping to build a career. Click here for more details.

In addition, the group will cap off their stay in Indy with a performance at Pioneer on March 3 supported by IUPUI’s own Big Robot. Click here for more information.

These events are made possible with generous support by the IUPUI Department of Music and Arts Technology, Pioneer Indy, and the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Square Peg Round Hole formed in 2011 while studying music at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, in Bloomington, Indiana. The band has shared bills with Built To Spill, The Album Leaf, Mae, This Will Destroy You, and The Joy Formidable, and has been featured at major venues across the country including the Electric Factory, (Le) Poisson Rouge, Old National Centre, and the World Café Live. Find them on YouTube or their website for more information.

#SavetheNEH with IU Bloomington

The Institute for Digital Arts and Humanities at IU has announced the visit of Dr. William “Bro” Adams, Former Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, which will include two public events, “Digital Horizons for the Dissertation” on February 19 and “Virtual Realities: Making the Humanities in a Digital World” on February 20. In light of recent federal budgetary happenings, IU’s scholarly community is invited to attend and engage in a timely discussion regarding the past, present, and future of the arts and humanities, both digital and traditional.

To read more about the #SavetheNEH campaign, President Trump’s budget proposals, and what this means for the arts and humanities, you can visit the National Humanities Alliance site.

 

Three Decades Later: Art and Race in Indianapolis

A public conversation with local artists about art and race in Indianapolis takes its start from the 1989 essay “Ethos and Creativity: The Impulse as Malleable” by Indianapolis writer Mari Evans. This essay combines autobiography, history, and conceptual analysis to relate local conditions to a broader understanding of the significance of artistic creation. Join a panel of Indianapolis artist to consider the essay’s continuing relevance to art, justice, and community.

The conversation will take place on Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 6:30 pm in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall, 735 West New York Street. Visitor parking is available in the Sports Complex Parking Garage, 875 West New York Street.

Panelists will include Phyllis Boyd, an urban designer and former gallery director who trained as a landscape architect and now serves as executive director of Groundwork Indy; David Hoppe, writer, editor, and playwright who edited the book in which Evans’ essay originally appeared; Adrian Matekja, Poet Laureate of Indiana and Ruth Lilly Professor at Indiana University; Carl Pope, a critically acclaimed, Indianapolis-based conceptualist whose museum installations and public art interventions explore the intersections between conceptual art, American Literature, hidden histories, and social justice; and LaShawnda Crowe Storm, a visual artist, activist, and community builder who uses the making of art to create space and place for difficult conversations promoting healing and change.

This event is sponsored by the Indiana University Bicentennial Celebration, the Institute for American Thought, the IUPUI Africana Studies Program, the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, the IUPUI School of Liberal Arts, the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, and Indiana Humanities.

Critical Conversations on Black Homicide

The Critical Conversations series is hosted by a partnership of IUPUI, the Concerned Clergy of Indianapolis, and the Baptist Minister’s Alliance. The partnership seeks to bring together the IUPUI campus and the faith-based community organizations around public health issues, providing a safe space to educate, inform, and strategize around these issues, leading to positive social change in the community.

The conversation will be held on February 15, 2018, at 6:30 pm in the IUPUI Hine Hall Auditorium, 875 W. North Street. Doors will open at 6 pm, and free parking will be available in the garage located under the building.

IUPUI Chancellor Nasser Paydar and Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett will give opening remarks, followed by an introduction by Dr. Molly Rosenberg, author of Black Homicide Report. Dr. Leah Gunning Francis, author of Ferguson and Faith: Sparking Leadership and Awakening Community will give a presentation.

The culminating panel discussion will include moderator Rev. David Greene, President of the Concerned Clergy of Indianapolis and Pastor of Purpose of Life Ministries Indianapolis; criminal justice and best practices expert Dr. Tom Stucky, Executive Associate Dean of the IUPUI School of Public and Environmental Affairs; clergy member Rev. Dr. Wayne L. Moore, President of the Baptist Minister’s Alliance and Pastor of Olivet Missionary Baptist Church; community member Gregory L. Wilson, Executive Director of the Indiana Civil Rights Commission; youth representative Anthony Beverly, Director of Stop the Violence Indianapolis; policymakers Rep. Greg Porter of the State of Indiana and Rep. Stephen Clay, President of the City-County Council of the City of Indianapolis; law enforcement representative Chief Bryan Roach, IMPD; and media member Steve Jefferson, Crimebeat Report from WTHR-Channel 13.

Four-Year Funded PhD Position: The Anthropocene Household

Mississippi River SystemThe Anthropocene Household Project is currently accepting applications for a four-year funded PhD position. The application deadline is March 15, 2018.

The Anthropocene Household Project explores the Anthropocene at the local level by focusing on the household as an essential element to understanding the day-to-day lived experiences, knowledges, and practices associated with environmental change. The purpose of this project is threefold: 1) to work with communities to produce local narratives and understanding about water specifically, and the environment more generally; 2) to develop new approaches to interdisciplinary, community-based research grounded; and 3) to develop, synthesize, and analyze quantitative and qualitative data sets that generate actionable knowledge relevant for policy makers, community organizations, residents, and scholars.

This interdisciplinary project uses a Participation Action Research framework, working with residents, community organizations, neighborhood groups, schools etc. as co-producers of knowledge. PhD students working on this project will be trained in mixed methods approaches, including surveys, participant observation, focus groups, interviews, and oral histories. Moreover, they will be trained in community-based research collaboration practices and ethics.

As an applied PhD program, students will pursue both a course of traditional coursework and a four-year, community engaged research assistantship based at the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute (IAHI).

In the first two years of the program, the PhD student will take the required core courses in the PhD program, which will be supplemented with relevant courses in disciplines including environmental studies, geography, history, and anthropology. While taking coursework, the PhD student will be employed as a research assistant at the IAHI. This research assistantship is the centerpiece of the program and replaces the role that teaching assistantships often play in graduate programs. Through their internship, the student will develop relevant technical skills in participant observation, interviews, oral histories, exhibition and program design, and community engagement. They will also have the opportunity to co-author publications and grants with the project team as well as present at conferences. In years three and four, the student will pursue research that culminates in the doctoral research project.

For more information or to apply, visit the Rivers of the Anthropocene website.

From Herron School of Art + Design | Kinetic Artwork by Zilvinas Kempinas

For more information or to see the original press release, visit the Herron School of Art + Design website.

Zilvinas Kempinas, “Parallels” (partial installation view), Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius, Lithuania

The spring exhibitions in the Galleries at Herron School of Art and Design open March 7, 2018, headlined by a survey of works by kinetic artist Zilvinas Kempinas, including the international debut of a new, 112-foot-long site-responsive work.

Using VHS magnetic tape and other unconventional materials, Kempinas crafts dynamic sculptures and installations that are activated by natural phenomena such as light and the circulation of air.

Among eleven works in the exhibition are eight new sculptures on view for the first time, including “V Formation,” a large-scale installation conceived for Herron’s main gallery space. “V Formation” (2018) incorporates lines of unspooled VHS tape stretched across the length of the gallery. The installation creates a low ‘ceiling’ of shimmering reflective tape just above visitors’ heads. As the bands traverse the 112-foot-long gallery, the tape torques from a horizontal plane to a vertical one. The result is a monumental yet ethereal installation that transforms the experience of Herron’s space in unexpected ways.

Zilvinas Kempinas” runs through April 21, 2018, in the Berkshire, Reese, and Paul Galleries.

Also on view in the Galleries at Herron:

In the Marsh Gallery: Celebrating Herron’s Painting program, an undergraduate painting exhibition showcases a variety of works that explore traditional and contemporary methods and practices.

In the Basile Gallery: “Drawing Now: Recent Student Artwork” features a selection of work from students in Herron’s Drawing and Illustration program. Shannon M. Linker, vice president of the Arts Council of Indianapolis and director of Gallery 924, will serve as guest juror for the exhibition.
All three exhibitions open with a public reception on Wednesday, March 7 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St. The student exhibitions run through April 18, 2018. The Galleries at Herron are free and open to the public Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesdays until 8 p.m. For more information, visit HerronGalleries.org.

Parking is available courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or on the upper floors of the Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6 p.m. Park on any floor after 6 p.m. Bring your parking ticket to the Herron galleries for validation.

About Zilvinas Kempinas

Kempinas was born in Plungė, Lithuania in 1969. In 2009, Kempinas represented Lithuania at the 53rd International Art Exhibition of the Venice Biennale in Italy. He has had solo exhibitions at Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, U.K.; Reykjavik Art Museum, Iceland; Museum Tinguely, Basel, Switzerland; Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow; Kuntshalle Wien, Vienna, Austria; and the Palais de Tokyo, Paris, among others. Group exhibitions include the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco. Kempinas lives and works in New York City.

About Herron School of Art and Design

Founded in 1902, Herron School of Art and Design is the premier accredited, professional school of art and design in the state of Indiana and is part of the thriving urban campus of IUPUI. With more than 50 full-time faculty serving 11 undergraduate and three graduate programs, Herron’s curriculum prepares graduates to be leaders in a world that requires a unique combination of creativity, conceptual skills, and technical abilities. Herron is an engaged community and regional partner including five public galleries; community learning programs; and the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life.

Reiberg Reading Series | James Still

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the IUPUI English Department are delighted to present the Rufus and Louise Reiberg Reading Series featuring playwright James Still, who will read from his collected works at the Lilly Auditorium on February 23, 2018, at 7:00pm.

Free tickets are available here.

James Still’s plays have been produced throughout the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, South Africa, China, and Japan. This year he is celebrating his 20th season as Playwright-in-Residence at Indiana Repertory Theatre (IRT), where audiences have seen 15 of his plays on all three of its stages. His recent work includes a trilogy of linked-plays: The House that Jack Built (IRT), Appoggiatura (Denver Center Theatre), and Miranda (Illusion Theater, Minneapolis). Other recent work includes April 4, 1968: Before We Forgot How to Dream (IRT); two plays about the Lincolns, The Window Lincoln and The Heavens are Hung in Black (both premiering at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C.); a play for one actor about culinary icon James Beard called I Love to Eat (Portland Center Stage); a play for 57 actors called A Long Bridge over Deep Waters (Cornerstone Theater Company in Los Angeles); Looking Over the President’s Shoulder about Indiana native Alonzo Fields (premiered at IRT, produced at theaters across the country); Amber Waves (The Kennedy Center and IRT); and And Then They Came for Me, which has been produced at theaters around the world.

Playwright James Still

Still’s short play When Miss Lydia Hinkley Gives a Bird the Bird was a winner of Red Bull Theater’s Short New Play Festival and performed at many festivals. His new plays include (A) New World and Black Beauty (Seattle Children’s Theatre). James is an elected member of both the Nation Theatre Conference in New York and the College of Fellows of the American Theatre at the Kennedy Center. He received the Otis Guernsey New Voices Award from the William Inge Festival and the Todd McNerney New Play Prize from Spoleto. He grew up in a tiny town in Kansas and is a longtime resident of Los Angeles.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series is provided by the Reiberg family, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and the IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

IUPUI Arts & Humanities Grant Deadline is February 15!

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Grant deadline will be here sooner than you think. Be sure to give yourself plenty of time to get your application together. Here’s what you need to know to get started . . .

The IAHI Grant Program supports campus-wide attainment of excellence in research and creative activity in arts and humanities. It is designed to enhance the research and creative activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty. The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.

ELIGIBILITY

All full-time tenured and tenure-eligible faculty from all schools and units at IUPUI are eligible to apply. Under certain circumstances, non-tenure-track faculty members whose evaluation criteria include research or creative activity may also be eligible with an explanation in the letter of support from their chair or dean.

Visiting and associate faculty members and post-doctoral fellows are not eligible.

An associate member (or non-eligible member) of the IUPUI faculty can be a participant in a grant in collaboration with a PI who is an eligible member of the IUPUI faculty.

FUNDING AND PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS

All grants are intended for support of research and scholarly activity, and not for support of teaching and/or service activities. Scholarship of teaching may be supported under this grant program, if it has strong and clearly articulated research outcomes.

Projects will be limited to one (1) year in duration.

Funds will not be granted for a project currently supported by another internal funding mechanism, unless a case is made in justifying the complementary funding.

An investigator may not serve as PI on more than one IAHI grant proposal in a given round.

Applications will be judged on the merit of the proposed research or creative activity, qualifications of the applicant, significance of the research to the field, the potential for additional external funding, and the project’s importance to the individual’s future research plans. Applications for new projects are encouraged.

CATEGORIES

A. Small Travel Grants for Conferences and Exhibitions: up to $500 to support travel to a conference or exhibition related to a research or creative project.

B. Event Support Grants: up to $1,000 to support a public event at IUPUI related to a research or creative project.

C. Research/Creative Activity Grant: up to $5,000 for travel, equipment, materials, space, hourly assistance, etc. This grant does not require a match. A grant recipient may apply and receive this grant on a yearly basis.

D. Matching Grant for Research/Creative Activity: up to $15,000 which might be used for such things as release time, summer salary, research assistant support, or a research workshop or conference, as well as incidental expenses. This grant requires a 1 to 2 match from the school, department, and/or center sponsoring the faculty (i.e. two thirds or 66.67% of funds come from IAHI, and one third or 33.33% from the faculty’s unit). Salary requests are allowed and cannot exceed one month of salary per person. A Matching Grant recipient is eligible to apply for a new Matching Grant no sooner than two years from the previous grant proposal submission.

E. Collaborative Grant for Research/Creative Activity: up to $30,000 to support research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by a team of two or more arts and humanities faculty from different units on campus. Funds might be used for such things as release time, summer salary, research assistant support, or a research workshop or conference, as well as incidental expenses. This grant does not require a match from the school, department, and/or center of applying faculty. Funding preference in this category will be given to projects that correspond to one of the following themes: a) Social Justice and the Urban Environment, b) Communication and Exchange in the Digital Age

Click here to learn more or apply for a grant.

 

IU Kelly School of Business’s National Diversity Case Competition

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For the seventh straight year, the Indiana University Kelley School of Business is hosting 140 undergraduate students from 35 business schools who are competing in the National Diversity Case Competition on January 12 and 13. The competition, held annually the weekend before Martin Luther King Jr. Day, brings together some of the best and most diverse talent in undergraduate education from across the nation.

Students are challenged to solve diversity-related business issues and share ideas while benefiting from workshops and networking with companies that value inclusion. They include teams from eight Big Ten schools and more than two dozen other top schools from Vermont to Arizona. Participants from historically black colleges and universities include Southern University and A&M College, Florida A&M University, and Xavier University of Louisiana.

Each four-student team must include two members from an underrepresented population. Many students find that participating in the event leads to leadership opportunities, internships and jobs after graduation. They will compete for $20,000 in prize money.

“Diversity in business benefits everyone,” said Idalene “Idie” Kesner, dean of the Kelley School and the Frank P. Popoff Chair of Strategic Management. “Educators know it, and companies know it. Kelley has long been a leader in establishing programs to increase diversity in the classroom and to contribute to a diverse workforce. We’re very proud to bring together these talented students from all over the country with companies who value diversity.”

Events begin Friday, January 12, with a networking session and dinner. Workshops on the following day are designed to support career opportunities for diverse students in Fortune 500 companies. Competition begins early on Saturday, with the schools divided into seven brackets. The winners in each bracket continue on to the finals. Prizes are awarded to the winner, the finalists, and the runners-up in each bracket.

IU alumna Laysha Ward, executive vice president and chief external engagement officer for Target Corp. and a member of the company’s executive leadership team, will be this year’s keynote speaker. She earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from IU and a master’s degree in social services administration from the University of Chicago. Target Corp., a platinum supporter, is providing the case that students will use. It addresses a real-world issue for many companies: building on a culture where authentic differences in backgrounds, experiences, cultures, and thoughts are appreciated. Judges will be looking for creative solutions that leverage the students’ diverse backgrounds.

Corporate partners provide substantial financial support for the event, which includes travel reimbursement and lodging and meals for students to eliminate barriers to their participation.

“I’ve had the opportunity to attend and judge the National Diversity Case Competition, and I can tell you with absolute certainty that this event shows why diversity and inclusion are so critical,” said Ken Bouyer, inclusiveness recruiting leader for EY Americas. “Seeing the diversity of thought, perspective, and background of the students driving very different and innovative solutions is exactly why study after study shows that diverse teams that work inclusively perform better in solving complex problems.”

 

For a full list of corporate support and competing schools, see the full article here.

IU’s 2018 MLK Day Celebration

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In honor of the late civil rights leader’s legacy, Indiana University’s 2018 Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebrations will be marked by an extensive array of programming on IU campuses across the state. This annual tradition will also include IU students leading the MLK Day of Service, an effort to give back to the communities surrounding IU’s campuses.

“It is a great privilege for the IU community to be able to demonstrate its commitment to the values that Dr. King stood for, particularly as we approach the 50th anniversary of his tragic assassination,” said James Wimbush, IU vice president for diversity, equity, and multicultural affairs, dean of the University Graduate School, and Johnson Professor for Diversity and Leadership. “Dr. King’s message is reflected in the way IU’s students, faculty and staff come together to inspire others and affect positive change, not only for this celebration but throughout the year.”

IUPUI will host the 49th Annual IUPUI Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Dinner — the longest-running Martin Luther King Jr. Day-related event in the Indianapolis community. It will take place on January 14 at 6:00pm at the Indiana Roof Ballroom. Presented by IUPUI’s Black Student Union in conjunction with the IUPUI Multicultural Center, the theme of this year’s event is “A Call to Conscience.” The keynote speaker is Opal Tometi, a co-founder of the Black Lives Matter activist movement and the executive director of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration.

IUPUI’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service will take place from 8:00am to 1:30pm on January 15. Participating IUPUI students, faculty, staff, and members of the community will check in at the IUPUI Campus Center in the morning, then volunteer together at locations across Indianapolis.

Visit IU’s 2018 Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration website for a full list of activities.