Pinpointing Activities: Office of Community Engagement Launches Engagement Map

The community engagement map features more than 350 activities, heavily concentrated in metro Indianapolis but also spreading across the country and internationally.
The community engagement map features more than 350 activities, heavily concentrated in metro Indianapolis but also spreading across the country and internationally.

IUPUI faculty and students participate every year in activities that enhance lives in the Indianapolis community and beyond.

That’s not just a tagline or a talking point; it’s documentable work that anyone can explore, thanks to a new map launched by the IUPUI Office of Community Engagement.

On the map — dive in yourself here — are points representing more than 360 activities, heavily concentrated in Indianapolis and within the I-465 loop but stretching across the country and as far away as Africa. Each one represents an activity or where an activity’s community partners are located, with details about faculty, schools/centers involved and the scope of the work. Among all the activities, more than 5,000 IUPUI students have participated.

“The map further demonstrates IUPUI’s commitment to Central Indiana,” said Amy Conrad Warner, vice chancellor for the Office of Community Engagement. “It provides essential information about initiatives underway, assets in the community and partners who contribute to a common goal.”

The map, funded by an IUPUI Welcoming Campus Initiative grant, was developed in partnership with The Polis Center and includes social and demographic data from SAVI, one of the nation’s first and largest community information systems.

For example, selecting a point just southwest of downtown brings up a window about SEAL Indiana, a statewide dental program that provides preventive oral health services for children who do not have adequate access to dental care. The Indiana State Department of Health and IUPUI provided startup funding for the program, which began in 2003. The School of Dentistry, naturally, is the school listed as the participant, with areas of focus including education, government and public safety, health and wellness, and social issues.

School of Dentistry assistant professor Armando Soto is one of two faculty members listed, and clicking on Soto’s name brings up lines on the map connecting to other sites where he is involved in community activities — a web of engagement, if you will.

A toolbar on the map allows further pinpointing; activities can be filtered by information such as start date, number of students involved or community organizations involved. Adding layers allows for demographic, education, income and health data by neighborhood in Marion County that provides further context to the community’s opportunities and challenges.

The map will be updated periodically as more information is added to the Collaboratory, a platform that captures IUPUI’s community engagement efforts.

Film Screening of Faat-Kiné

Come join us to watch the film, FAAT KINÉ (Senegal 2001)! Ousmane Sembene, the father of African cinema, calls his fellow Africans to a reckoning of the post-independence era at the beginning of a new century. FAAT KINÉ tells the story of the title character (Venus Seye), a gas-station manager in present-day Senegal, who has climbed the ladder of success in a male-dominated society after enduring numerous betrayals by men she trusted. A masterful portrait of the changing roles of women in Senegalese society, Sembene’s film is a poignant reminder that Africa will not be liberated from its colonial past without a concomitant liberation of African women.
This event is presented by the IUPUI Committee on African Studies (CAS)
Thursday April 25th, 6-8pm
Lilly Auditorium University Library 
We’ll see you there!

For the record: IUPUI Talks Favorite Albums In Time for Record Store Day

From connecting with family members to influencing their research at IUPUI, music has played an important part in the lives of IUPUI staff and faculty members.

With Record Store Day sweeping into Indianapolis record shops on Saturday, April 13, we wanted to know what some of your favorite records are and why.

Jordan Munson, Department of Music and Arts Technology
“OK Computer,” Radiohead

A senior lecturer in music and arts technology, Jordan Munson teaches synthesis and sound design classes while leading the student performing group Electronic Music Ensemble. He also oversees the performance studios’ use within his department.

Radiohead’s epic 1997 release, “OK Computer,” directly influenced his professional aspirations. The record was groundbreaking in terms of the possibilities of electronic music and recording studio experimentation. Munson has pursued electronic music since then, creating for IUPUI and his solo performance work.

“It was influential in recording and production and all of these things I think about all the time now here at IUPUI,” Munson explained. “It was an interesting turning point. This was a milestone in terms of albums, production and concept.”

Check out Munson’s new, original music live at 12:30 p.m. Saturday at Indy CD and Vinyl‘s Record Store Day celebration.

Carolyn Springer, Herron School of Art and Design
“Kind of Blue,” Miles Davis

For most of the 21st century, Carolyn Springer‘s academic work has focused on color and design. She has worked as an adjunct instructor since 2005, primarily teaching color theory in the elective arts program.

Color is her thing, so it’s fitting that Miles Davis’ legendary “Kind of Blue” would resonate so much with Springer, an Indiana University alumna. After all, the record’s compositions include “Blue in Green” and “All Blues.”

“It has this warmth, even though it’s ‘Kind of Blue,'” Springer said. “The rich tones … it just felt like it was inside my soul.”

Jasdeep Bagga, School of Science
“Chunga’s Revenge,” Frank Zappa

Jasdeep Bagga is the webmaster for the School of Science, developing and upkeeping sites for the program’s nine departments. Before he became adept at coding, he was putting the needle to the groove on an impressive record collection.

Bagga goes by the nickname “Jazz,” which is also an ingredient in the eclectic sounds of the late Frank Zappa. Bagga was a freshman at IU Bloomington when he first dove into the discography of the man who composed such works as “My Guitar Wants to Kill Your Mama,” “Dirty Love” and, of course, “Don’t Eat the Yellow Snow.” He took a music history class that focused on Zappa’s music, career and life.

“The music blew me away,” Bagga remembered. “I did this crazy deep dive of Zappa, fell in love — and there was no going back from there.”

John King, Department of Media Arts and Science
“Copper Blue,” Sugar

A lecturer in media arts and science, John King has collected music since his teens, but the 1992 album by noted alt rockers Sugar has stuck with him through the decades and format changes. It’s the only record he has several copies of; he first bought it on cassette, then CD, then LP — and then all of the reissues, international pressings and promotional copies. When he was a high school student, King said, “Copper Blue” was one of the first albums recommended to him that went beyond pop or classic rock radio.

“My buddy Ryan said I would like it because it was so loud and distorted,” King recalled. “After I bought it, I kept going back to it so many times. There were certain songs that spoke to me lyrically. To me, there isn’t a bad song on the album or one I skip every time.

“Today, when I see it in clearance bins at Half Price Books or something, I’ll get it and then give it to people: ‘I got this for $1. Here, take this.’ I feel like I am rescuing it from oblivion.”

King, who teaches video production, scriptwriting and digital storytelling classes, believes vinyl records still hold a place in modern music consumption. You can listen to Spotify, but holding an LP still strikes a chord.

“The tactile, the idea of holding it your hand — there are marks of character on it,” King said. “I like that there is a loud pop on this record between tracks. You get another copy, and it’s not going to play like that. There’s a significance to ‘This one is mine.'”

Mandy Porter, Division of Student Affairs
“Tapestry,” Carole King

The soothing sounds of “Natural Woman,” “I Feel the Earth Move” and “It’s Too Late” echoed through the Porter household near Portage, Michigan. Mandy Porter, the IUPUI coordinator for student success and outreach, said she grew up in the “CD era” and consumed music accordingly. But her parents’ massive collection of LPs always fascinated her. The old records have become an anchor to childhood memories of her home. She also had to listen to her dad explain — at length — the superior sound of vinyl over CD and digital.

Porter started buying current acts like Adele and Sam Smith on vinyl, but she always went back to those old tunes from “Tapestry,” which has sold 25 million copies and become an iconic title in 1970s soft rock.

“Just listening to an album my mom listened to when she was my age,” Porter explained, “brings me back to multiple times in my life and my mom’s life. Hearing music the way she heard music is relating to my family.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tim Brouk

Negotiating the Diaspora: African Immigrant Women’s Memoirs Dialogue with Human Rights

Dr. Tobe Levin von Gleichen, a multi-lingual scholar, translator, editor and activist, is an Associate of the HutchinsCenter for African and African American Research at Harvard University; a Visiting Research Fellow at the International Gender Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford; an activist against female genital mutilation (FGM) and professor of English Emerita at the University of Maryland, University College. Her most notable works to date are Empathy and Rage, Female Genital Mutilation in African Literature, and Waging Empathy.

Please join IUPUI Committee on African Studies, CAS, as Dr. Levin von Gleichen lectures on the topic of human rights for immigrant women in the African diaspora. Come with questions and leave with knowledge.

Wednesday April 17th 12-1pm
Business Building BS 3018

We’ll see you there!

Spring Break Around the World 2019

During spring break, more than 160 IUPUI students experienced the world through study abroad, with “classrooms” ranging from museums to the beach to the rainforest. The following four program locations highlight how students explored different dimensions of their fields of study, conducted service projects and more.

Guanacaste, Costa Rica

Twelve Honors College students from a variety of majors journeyed to beautiful Guanacaste, Costa Rica, for the annual Honors College Service Learning program. The service portion of the trip was divided into two groups working at Cartagena and Tempate elementary schools, allowing the students to go beyond the textbook and get an in-depth understanding of the current education system in Costa Rica.

The first group taught a variety of English lessons — greetings, body parts, food and nutrition. The second group assisted with teaching the importance of hygiene and best dental practices.

“Words cannot describe the feeling of getting to see how excited the students were to learn English from us,” student Amber Greaney shared. “One day we walked in, and all the students started chanting ‘English, English, English’ all together. Although we were the ones doing service, I felt like I gained more from the experience than I could ever give to them. This trip was truly the best week of my life.”

The group also participated in two language exchanges with local universities, practicing their Spanish skills and making friends with local Santa Cruz students. The group saw why Costa Rica is famous for ecotourism, receiving a tour of the Diria coffee plantation, hiking the rainforest surrounding the Miravalles volcano, and taking a natural mud bath followed by a dip in natural hot and cold springs.

“Before visiting Costa Rica, I had always seen myself as belonging to the United States solely,” student Lilly Pollard said. “Every individual I met in Costa Rica was so incredibly inviting and kind. I was able to make an impact on individuals in another country by volunteering at schools. My experience made me expand my thoughts of what makes a community, helping me grow and become a better global citizen.”

Buenos Aires, Argentina

The Kelley School of Business‘ Argentina: Corporate Social Responsibility program exposed students to the economic and political history of Argentina, the social issues that its population faces today, and how businesses are helping to address those issues. The class completed a service-learning component and met with a variety of Argentine businesses.

“In discussion with these companies, I gained an understanding of how these businesses contribute toward the three pillars of sustainability,” shared program participant Vidula Gongade. “I also had an incredible volunteer experience with Proyecto Agua Segura, a company that creates solutions for the water crisis in the rural areas. My group and I visited a local school to build a rainwater-harvesting system with water filters and a vertical garden irrigation system.”

London

Two IUPUI programs based their courses in the United Kingdom’s capital city, a multicultural bastion with approximately 9 million inhabitants. With a timely topic, the Kelley School’s U.K.: Brexit, Business and Brits program explored how business is conducted in the U.K., examining the purpose and structure of the European Union and the potential impacts of Brexit.

“Studying abroad was one of the best decisions I made at IUPUI,” said Kelley student Gauri Nagaraj, who participated in the Brexit program. “I met so many new people, learned a lot of new things and explored the city of London — without Google Maps! It was an amazing experience to be in a city so full of history and culture.”

The second London program, offered by the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, took a look at the U.K.’s National Health Service for this year’s Health Systems Around the World course. Students visited London-area health facilities, met with local faculty, completed a public health scavenger hunt and toured historical sites directly related to health systems, including the Broad Street pump, site of the famous cholera outbreak of 1854.

Copenhagen, Denmark

Herron School of Art and Design‘s Exploring Art and Design in Denmark program allowed students to experience the public and private spaces that embody a people-centered approach to daily life in the Scandinavian city of Copenhagen. Students attended lectures from leading design groups with an emphasis on service design and had the opportunity to experience hygge firsthand by cooking a Danish and American meal in the home of some Danish hosts.

“Being exposed to well-designed solutions that address a particular problem has had the biggest influence on me,” student Caila Lutz reflected. “I am now confident that I can provide techniques and ideas similar to the ones used in Denmark for problem-solving in the United States. For example, at the airport, instead of scanning your ticket when you start boarding, you scan your ticket to get into a seating area when you first arrive at the gate, making the boarding process quicker and less stressful.

“I’ve learned so much from studying abroad, but with the growing city, there will always be more to learn.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Mandy Bray

A Few Minutes With: Shariq Siddiqui, Muslim Philanthropy Initiative Director

Shariq Siddiqui is leading the Muslim Philanthropy Initiative, which will explore the “uncharted territory” of Muslim Americans in the philanthropic sector. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Shariq Siddiqui has been named as the inaugural director of the Muslim Philanthropy Initiative at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at IUPUI, which will focus on understanding and helping to enhance Muslim philanthropy.

In addition to directing the initiative, Siddiqui will be an assistant professor in the school. He talked to IU Communications about the Muslim American community, how they give and how the Muslim Philanthropy Initiative will help Indianapolis.

Q: How quickly is the Muslim American community growing, both in numbers and as an active member of the nonprofit sector?

A: It’s growing really fast. As a community, we have gone from nearly 1,200 mosques to over 2,100 mosques nationally. We are also seeing growth in nonprofits — we estimate that we have nearly 7,000 Muslim nonprofits nationwide.

Q: Generally speaking, do Muslim Americans give in a certain way or to certain areas?

A: The Lake Institute on Faith & Giving just funded a poll with the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding called the American Muslim Poll, and what we are finding are some really interesting things. American Muslims are very similar to most religious Americans in terms of commitment to social justice and poverty, but because they are a diasporic community, you’ll see engagement outside of the U.S. as well.

The thing that I think is most remarkable is the timing of when they give. Muslim Americans probably give much more during the months of Ramadan. Most of us think of giving in December, because of tax reasons, but American Muslims tend to give more during these holy days.

Q: What work around this new initiative excites you the most?

A: We know very little, so it’s uncharted territory. If you think about the American Muslim community, we’re less than 1 percent of the population, but if you think about the scrutiny on American Muslims, it’s much larger than 1 percent. So there’s a great intensity of curiosity, an intensity of interest — who these people are, what they do, and how they engage in philanthropy and the nonprofit sector — from very little data. Answering those questions is what excites me the most.

Also, these organizations need a lot of help. Over the last year, we’ve trained 200 Muslim nonprofits, but as we put more intensity behind hiring a full-time person and so on, we should be able to have a greater impact. If you think about a sector with 7,000 nonprofits, it seems large, but if you think about the fact that in the last year, on a part-time level, we trained 200, imagine what we can do over the next five years.

The other interesting and exciting part is how there are people out there who want to raise money from American Muslims — the Red Cross, all these different organizations. We can provide training to them about how to raise money from an American Muslim population, how to engage with that community, how to involve them. So we’re excited about the two-way relationship — one is to help strengthen the sector itself, and then the other is to think about the broader 1.4 million nonprofits that want to get engaged with the Muslim Americans but just don’t know enough. We hope to provide them that education.

Q: How is that engagement different?

A: Ultimately, we’re all Americans, but our histories inform our perspectives and how we act. The school broadly focuses on this range of diversity, equity and inclusion — how do we look at different populations, how can we figure out what is that other aspect of their lives and how do we bring that unique perspective to the table.

Q: How do you see your work benefiting Indianapolis?

A: There’s a pretty significant Muslim population here — 15 mosques, four full-time Islamic schools and a great number of nonprofits. So right there, you have a community that’s interested. We have an opportunity to do research, to do training and to recruit. We have already increased the number of Muslim students in our master’s programs from that community.

There’s also really strong interest from the Indianapolis nonprofit and philanthropic community to engage with Muslims. One example is the YMCA of Greater Indianapolis. A few years ago, its board decided they wanted to have greater diversity, equity and inclusion on their board, so they went out and recruited a Sikh member. Then they decided they needed to have a Muslim, and a few years ago they had me join the board. But they had to figure out who I was and how to find me.

We hope we can create those kinds of connections between the broader community here that wants to engage with Muslims.

Read the original article form IUPUI NewsJohn Shwarb

Run Toward Fear: Education & Art as Cultural Sites of Resistance

A Diversity Speaker Event Featuring Haki R. Madhubuti; a poet, professor, and publisher. A Leading poet and one of the architects in the Black Arts Movement, Haki R. Madhubuti has been a pivotal figure in the development of independent Black Institutions and a strong black literary and intellectual tradition. He is one of the world’s best-selling authors of poetry and nonfiction. In this public lecture, Prof. Madhubuti will address challenges and opportunities confronting us in our current historical moment, He will speak on the importance of developing critical stances in matters of culture, agency, social justice, equity and community.

Friday April 19th
2-3:30pm
Lilly Auditorium
UniversityLibrary
755W.MichiganAve

This event is free and open to the public! We’ll see you there!

16th Annual Thomas H. Lake Lecture

We hope you can join us for our 16th Annual Thomas H. Lake Lecture. This year we will hear from best-selling author and world-wide speaker, Lynne Twist at Indiana Landmarks in Indianapolis on Thursday, April 11, 2019. The topic is “The Soul of Money: Shifting from Scarcity to Abundance.” The lecture begins at 6:00 pm with a reception to follow. This talk will address the mindset of scarcity and how it grips us, having us live in a constant state of worry and fear, rather than allowing us to see the bounty, flow, generosity and sufficiency that is available to each of us in life.

Ms. Twist is the author of the best-selling, award-winning book “The Soul of Money: Transforming Your Relationship with Life and Money.” Founder of the Soul of Money Institute, Lynne has worked with over 100,000 people in 50 countries in board retreats, workshops, keynote presentations and one-on-one coaching in the arenas of fundraising with integrity, conscious philanthropy, strategic visioning and creating a healthy relationship with money.

You can register for the lecture here.

Design, Culture, and Everyday Life in Denmark

Aaron Ganci and Haley Francis-Halstead in Copenhagen. @hollabackhaley

This spring break, twenty-two students from Herron’sfurniture designvisual art, and visual communication design programs traveled to Copenhagen, Denmark, with associate professors Aaron Ganci and Helen Sanematsu to experience one of Europe’s modernist design epicenters. They traveled via bicycle to design studios, museums, and cultural attractions and sampled a plethora of Danish cuisines.

“It was inspiring to see my students experience Denmark. We visited several design agencies to learn about their people-centered approach to design, went to a few museums, had a bike tour of the city with a local designer, and made a dinner together to experience hygge. Our trip to the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art was especially inspiring because we had a personal tour from their director of education who taught us about the history of land, the collection, and the architecture. I can’t wait to get back with more students!”

Aaron Ganci, associate professor of visual communication design

“The museums we visited during our study abroad were amazing and made me fall in love with the arts all over again. But above all, the talks with the designers were what stood out to me.

We went to EGGS Design and spoke to Katja [Egmose] and Nikolaj [Bebe], who are the creative directors for EGGS in Copenhagen. Katja had us do an exercise where a few groups had arthritis and the other groups were mute. The groups with arthritis (I was in that group) had to tape their knuckles and wrists, which would mimic the lack of movement with arthritis.

This was an important exercise because we had to go to the grocery store and pick up ingredients to make lunch while our hands and wrists were taped. This seemed weird at first, and we got some interesting looks from the people in the store, but as we were shopping – trying to hold on to the basket, use our phones to look up translations, and take out our credit cards – it all made sense.

Design isn’t about making something pretty; design is about creating a solution to a problem. Our problem was the fact that everyday tasks were made more difficult because of our mobility issues. Katja said we should always try and put ourselves in the shoes of the people for whom we are creating a solution.”

Romarie Quinones-Perez, visual communication design student

“Being exposed to well-designed solutions that address a particular problem has had the biggest influence on me. I am now confident that I can provide techniques and ideas similar to the ones used in Denmark for problem solving in the United States. For example, at the airport, instead of scanning your ticket when they start boarding, you scan your ticket to get into a seating area when you first arrive at the gate, therefore, making the boarding process quicker and less stressful.”

Caila Lutz, visual communication design student

“Denmark always ranks in the top 3 of the world’s happiest countries, and it was awesome to get some idea of why by being there and hanging out with Danish folks. We used our previous experience in design to share our own networks with our students, and we all learned a lot about how design can make life better.”

Helen Sanematsu, associate professor of visual communication design

“Everyone there was so kind! Me and the other grad student took a day trip to Møns Klint, a beach with giant white sand cliffs. We had a four-mile hike to get to there, after a train and two bus rides. During our hike back, it started to rain and the wind was really strong. We stopped to use the restroom in what turned out to be a nursing home and the manager offered us a ride to the train station. It was a 40-minute drive and she told us a lot about Denmark and even stopped at a couple churches to show us the architecture and art inside.

I think part of why everything felt so intentionally placed and beautiful in Denmark is because the people there really value what they have – not just as possessions but also in terms of quality and design as well as togetherness. So many things there are designed to maximum potential and to be aesthetically pleasing, which compliments their emphasis on togetherness and coziness. It is definitely something I have taken home with me and makes me look at things differently.”

Tiffany Pierce, visual art student

“The people there were amazing, and the architecture was breathtaking. It was an incredible experience I would want to have again and again!”

Deven Grose, visual communication design student

Read the original article from Herron School of Art + Design

Reading at the Table with Dr. Wendy Vogt

Dr. Wendy Vogt

Reading at the table will be presented by Wendy Vogt. Wendy Vogt, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of anthropology at IUPUI. In 2012, she received her doctorate from the School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Her research interests include politically engaged anthropology., migration, transit journeys, violence, political economy, human rights and transnational feminism. She teaches courses on Cultural Anthropology, Race & Ethnicity, Gender & Sexuality, Migration, Ethnographic Methods, Anthropological Theory, Applied Anthropology and International Studies.

Lives in Transit chronicles the dangerous journeys of Central American migrants in transit through Mexico. Drawing on fieldwork in humanitarian aid shelters and other key sites, the book examines the multiple forms of violence that migrants experience as their bodies, labor, and lives become implicated in global and local economies that profit from their mobility as racialized and gendered others. At the same time, it reveals new forms of intimacy, solidarity and activism that have emerged along transit routes over the past decade. Through the stories of migrants, shelter workers and local residents, Vogt encourages us to reimagine transit as both a site of violence and precarity as well as social struggle and resistance.

Please register in advance

Call in reservations are welcome at 317-274-7014

Buffet Lunch: $13
(Desert and soft drinks not included)

Tuesday April 9th, 2019
11:30am-1pm
UniversityClub Rm200
875W.NorthSt.
Indianapolis, IN 46202