Alison Bechdel, Graphic Artist and Novelist, to Speak in Indianapolis

Alison Bechdel

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute Lecture Series and The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series present:

Alison Bechdel

Date: February 28, 2013

Location: Dean and Barbara White Auditorium, Indiana State Museum

Time: 7:00 pm

Tickets: free to the public (available here)

 

Alison Bechdel is the creator of the long running comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For.  Judith Levine in Ms. Magazine called Bechdel’s work, “one of the preeminent oeuvres in the comics genre, period.”  In 2008, Dwight Garner of the New York Times reported that the weekly comic strip, published for over 20 years, “has been as important to new generations of lesbians as landmark novels like Rita Mae Brown’s “Rubyfruit Jungle” (1973) and Lisa Alther’s “Kinflicks” (1976) were to an earlier one.”

In 2006, Bechdel published the graphic memoir Fun Home, hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by numerous sources, including The New York Times, amazon.com, The Times of LondonPublishers Weekly, salon.com, New York magazine, and Entertainment WeeklyTime named it the best book of 2006, calling it “a stunning memoir about a girl growing up in a small town with her cryptic, perfectionist dad and slowly realizing that a) she is gay and b) he is too. … Bechdel’s breathtakingly smart commentary duets with eloquent line drawings. Forget genre and sexual orientation: this is a masterpiece about two people who live in the same house but different worlds, and their mysterious debts to each other.” Fun Home was a finalist for the 2006 National Book Critics Circle Award in the memoir/autobiography category.

Bechdel released her second graphic memoir, Are You My Mother?, in May 2012.  Jonathan Safran Foer, author of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close and Everything is Illuminated called the book “a work of the most humane kind of genius, bravely going right to the heart of things: why we are who we are. It’s also incredibly funny. And visually stunning. And page-turningly addictive. And heartbreaking.”

In her work, Bechdel is preoccupied with the overlap of the political and the personal spheres. Dykes to Watch Out For was an explicitly community-based and politically engaged project. But in her deeply intimate memoirs about her father’s life before the gay rights movement and her mother’s life before the women’s movement, she turns a microscopic lens on the internal mechanisms of oppression and liberation.

Bechdel edited Best American Comics 2011. She has drawn comics for Slate, McSweeney’s, Entertainment Weekly, The New York Times Book Review, and Granta. Her work is widely anthologized and translated.

In the spring of 2012, Bechdel was a Mellon Residential Fellow for Arts and Practice at the Richard and Mary L. Gray Center at the University of Chicago. She is also the recipient of a 2012-13 Guggenheim Fellowship.

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute was founded in 2012. Its mission is two-fold. First, it serves as a liaison between IUPUI and the greater Indianapolis community, supporting collaborations and running public programs such as lectures and performances. Secondly, it fosters interdisciplinary faculty research and creative activity in the arts and humanities at IUPUI.

The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series is presented by the Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. It was founded in 1997 in honor of former English Department chair Rufus Reiberg and his wife, Louise. The Series annually brings national and regional writers to the IUPUI campus to present their work.

Sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series, Office for Women, Office of Housing and Residence Life, Office of Student Involvement, IUPUI Women’s Studies Program, IUPUI Department of English, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

History Train – Artist in Residence Proposal (Indiana Historical Society)

Indiana Historical Society

General Information
The Indiana Historical Society is issuing a call for proposals for a fall 2013 four-week community art project in conjunction with the Indiana Bicentennial History Train. The project will be created, added to and executed on-site at the train stops in an unheated, outdoor 30×30 tent and should encourage community involvement.

The Indiana History Train is comprised of an exhibit on three renovated boxcars, hands-on activities tent, a first-person interpreter tent and a community art space tent. The Train will run for four weeks each fall for four years and will celebrate Indiana’s bicentennial through the theme “Next Indiana.” In 2013, the Train will travel to four sites in northern Indiana: Kokomo, Delphi, Wabash and Fort Wayne. The Train is free to the public and will be open Thursdays–Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at each location. This proposal is only applicable to the 2013 History Train sites.

Graduate and undergraduate students and emerging professionals in the fields of art, design, architecture and performing arts are encouraged to apply to create community-centered art.

A chosen applicant/s will be awarded a stipend to cover materials for the project and travel expenses to each site. The artist will have the opportunity to document their project through the use of a blog and other social media. Please see the attached Educator’s Guide from the 2008 History Train to see how the event has worked in the past. The Educator’s Guide will be updated for 2013 once more information on the exhibit and activities is available.

Expectations
• Graduate and undergraduate students and emerging professionals in the fields of art, design, architecture and performing arts are encouraged to apply to create community-centered art while involving members of those communities.
• The artist(s) should submit a resume and letter of recommendation, along with images of the type of work he or she does. Applications should include contact information, including e-mail and a phone number.
• A budget outline will need to be submitted to IHS by June 30, 2013, along with a maximum of 15 sketches or photographs of the work in progress.
• The artist(s) will be responsible for the design, customization and fabrication of the project inside the tent. The project should be portable, durable, and able to be set up in 90 minutes. Tables and chairs can be provided if so desired. The project (or a version of it) should be able to accommodate up to 60 students at a time during school visit hours.
• The project proposal should be one that train visitors can collectively add to during the Train’s visit in their community. Takeaway components, especially for school groups with limited time, are desirable but not necessary.
• The project proposal should connect to the “Next Indiana” theme by encouraging participants to use the past in order to envision their community’s future. Projects should encourage 1)local pride, 2)an appreciation of history and 3)civic engagement.
• The artist(s) is expected to communicate their experiences to a larger audience through social networking platforms.
• The History Train usually sees 12–15,000 visitors. There is an expectation that there will be some level of interaction with general public visitors and more structured interaction with school groups.

Compensation
• Artists are provided with a budget of $2,000 to purchase materials for fabrication and creation. All materials purchased with this budget are property of the Indiana Historical Society. A personal stipend of $1,500 is also awarded.
• The IHS will reimburse mileage costs to each site for one artist.
• Artists will be loaned a Macbook laptop to use for blogging/social media for the duration of the residency.
• This commission is a large time commitment. It would be ideal for students participating to earn credits at their university for their work, but this must be negotiated by the student/resident with his or her school.

Project Considerations
• Proposed project must be able to be implemented in outdoor conditions. The tent protects from rain, but not cold, humidity, and outside noise (the Train is often near working rail lines.)
• Electrical capacity is limited to one generator.

Hours & Accommodations
• The History Train is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays for four weeks. Wednesdays, from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. is set up time. School groups will visit the Train on Thursdays and Fridays, usually between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. with general public visitation making up the majority of Saturday’s attendance.
• Hotel accommodations will be provided for the artist at each site.

Important Dates
• Application Due Date: Friday, February 1, 2013
• Notification of Finalists Date: Friday, March 1, 2013
• Finalists interviews: March 4-15, 2013
• Final selection: March 22, 2013
• Budget Outline Due Date: June 30, 2013
• Sketches and/or photographs of the work in progress Due Date: June 30, 2013

Questions
• Please submit all questions to Becca Beck at: bbeck@indianahistory.org

Five by Five Starts with Big Car’s Event Feb. 8 at Service Center

With its arts-idea-pitching event on Feb. 8 at Service Center for Culture and Community, the Indianapolis-based community arts organization Big Car kicks off a new initiative that will award $10,000 to one winner at each of four themed events in 2013.

Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF), the Efroymson Family Fund and the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation are funding the series, called Five by Five, as a platform for sharing innovative arts ideas in Indianapolis. The goals are to help projects get off the ground while launching a fun series of idea-generating events, hosted and shaped by some of the city’s most important creative leaders.

The other three events — hosted by local not-for-profits People for Urban Progress, IndyHub and Harrison Center for the Arts — take place in April, June and September. Host organizations design each unique event, selecting the finalists and handling the judging. The only rules: projects must involve the arts; and each event features five finalists, presenting five slides in a maximum of five minutes. The winner at each receives $10,000.

Big Car’s theme for the Feb. 8 event is Revolutionize Your City: Art + Technology = Innovation. The call is simple: People with Indianapolis-related project or program ideas that bring art and technology together — could be low-fi or cutting-edge technology — email a 300-to-500-word description with three jpeg images (sketches, concepts, past work) to Big Car executive director Jim Walker at jim@bigcar.org by January 23. The five selected presenters will be notified by Jan. 25. Their slides will then be due on Feb. 6. Presentations will take place at a free public event at Service Center on Feb. 8 at 7 p.m.

A team of collaborators will help Big Car on the event and with selection and judging of ideas. Teaming up on the Revolutionize Your City Five by Five are Central-Indiana-based tech, design and startup innovators Dreamapolis, Idea Architects, IndySpectator, KA+A, The Levinson Center, SmallBox, and Verge.

The broad themes for the three other Five by Five events are Make Your City (People for Urban Progress), Face Your City (IndyHub) and Connect Your City (Harrison Center for the Arts).

Call for AY 2013-2014 Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Institute (MURI) Proposals

The Center for Research and Learning welcomes proposals for the AY 2013-2014 Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Institute (MURI) at IUPUI. Proposals should represent two or more disciplines and should offer undergraduate students the opportunity to engage in a substantive research experience focused on a significant research problem.

This is a unique opportunity provided to IUPUI faculty and researchers for mentoring students while conducting pilot projects or testing new techniques and designs.

Some key points regarding this year’s program are as follows:

  • Faculty writing proposals are encouraged to review the document entitled MURI FAQs for Faculty Submitting Proposals.
  • Proposals must be submitted by using the current version of the MURI Project Proposal Form.
  • The MURI Review Committee will review the submitted proposals using the MURI Proposal Evaluation Form (log in with IUPUI username and password).
  • Graduate students and post-doctoral trainees may also serve as co-mentors on a team.
  • Proposals are due by midnight on March 22, 2013, to the following address: CRLGrant@iupui.edu
  • The Proposal Review Committee Meeting is currently scheduled for April 12, 2013
  • The announcement regarding funded proposals is currently scheduled for April 16, 2013.
  • Once the selected projects are posted to the CRL website, students may apply to MURI and rank their project choices beginning April 30, 2013 with a deadline of September 10, 2013.
  • The Academic Year program begins on October 4, 2013, and continues through April 30, 2014.

MURI is jointly funded by the Center for Research and Learning, a division of the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, and the School of Engineering and Technology.

Project proposals from all disciplines on the IUPUI campus are encouraged.

For more information contact Elizabeth Rubens erubens@iupui.edu

Signature Centers Initiative Proposal Workshop

The Signature Centers Initiative (SCI) was begun in 2006 in an effort to create strong research units, which are uniquely identifiable with IUPUI and will lead the way in world-class research and creative activities that will substantiallyenhance the reputation of our campus. I am happy to announce the 6th round of submission for SCI proposals. Application guidelines are attached to this message. Deadline for application is April 1, 2013. Please share this announcement with faculty in your school.

Moreover, our office will offer a workshop on January 11, 2013, for those interested in applying for SCI funding. Registration for the workshop is strongly encouraged. A description of the workshop and the link to the registration site are provided below.

Center Proposals for Signature Centers Initiative

When: Friday, January 11, 2013 | 1:00 PM-3:00 PM
Where: University Library, Room 1126

This workshop is intended for those interested in submitting high quality center proposals to the Signature Centers Initiative program.  The intent is to provide the participants with a better understanding of what constitutes a research center and its desired attributes. In addition, the review process and review criteria for Signature Centers Initiative applications will be discussed. Ample time will be given for questions.

To register: http://crl.iupui.edu/Events/eventsRegistration.asp?id=3080

Art, Race, Space Symposium on 25 January 2013 at IUPUI

Art, Space, and Race Conference

Art, Race, Space Symposium

 

Date: January 25, 2013

Location: Campus Center, IUPUI Campus, 420 University Blvd.

Time: 8:00 am–5:30 pm

 

Artists and scholars from across the country will join leaders from Indianapolis’s arts and culture sector in an interdisciplinary daylong symposium dedicated to exploring the complicated relationships between art, race, and civic space.  Participants will begin by reflecting on artist Fred Wilson’s E Pluribus Unum, a public art commission for the Indianapolis Culture Trail that was cancelled in 2011 due to controversy surrounding Wilson’s appropriation of a freed slave figure from the Soldiers and Sailors Monument.  Building on the ideas about race, class, visual culture, and democratic debate that emerge from the Indianapolis project, presenters will also address related historical and contemporary examples from other parts of the United States.  In order to encourage public dialogue about art, race, and space, the symposium will provide an opportunity for audience members and presenters to engage in conversations about these matters throughout the day.

The symposium is free and open to the public.

Hosted by the IUPUI Museum Studies Program and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Campus maps and parking information.

Reading at the Table: The Sacred Wisdom of the American Indians by Larry Zimmerman

Zimmerman Flier

“The Sacred Wisdom of the American Indians”

Larry Zimmerman, Anthropology/Museum Studies, School of Liberal Arts

DATE: Thu Nov 08 2012
TIME: 11:30 AM – 01:00 PM
LOCATION: University Faculty Club

Professor Larry J. Zimmerman combines panoramic scope with a wealth of detail in this landmark testimony to the Native American peoples and their way of life. He shows how, despite their differences, all American Indians share a profound appreciation of the cycles of nature and a belief in the cosmic interconnectedness of all things. He tells the tragic tale of their conquest and dispossession, followed by their survival against the odds and the renewal of pride in a distinctive cultural heritage. He describes and celebrates their myths, their ceremonies, their tribes, their crafts, and their reverence for the land –inspiring us to turn our thoughts to nature and our own place in it. The five chapters are: Tribes & Territories; The Life of the Spirit; Symbol, Myth & Cosmos; Ritual & Sacrament; and The Survival of the Sacred.

A buffet lunch is available for $13.00 inclusive of tax and gratuity. Dessert and lemonade/ice tea/soft drinks are extra.

CONTACT INFORMATION

EVENT SITE: academicaffairs.iupui.edu/

REGISTRATION: academicaffairs.iupui.edu/events/eventDetails.asp?id=2911

Ray Bradbury biographer to present lecture in the humanities

Bradbury and Eller

Legendary American science-fiction and fantasy writer Ray Bradbury will be the subject of the 2012 John D. Barlow Lecture in the Humanities at IUPUI on Nov. 8.

“Becoming Ray Bradbury” author Jonathan R. Eller, professor of English and director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies in the Institute for American Thought, a research component of the IU School of Liberal Arts, will present the illustrated lecture, “Cry the Cosmos: Ray Bradbury and the American Imagination.”

The lecture will begin at 6:15 p.m. in the IUPUI Campus Center Theater, 420 University Blvd. A reception precedes the lecture in the Campus Center atrium at 5 p.m.

“For more than 60 years, Ray Bradbury has been one of the most recognized figures in American literature and popular culture,” Eller says. “Between 1950 and 1962, he captured the American imagination with such enduring titles as ‘The Martian Chronicles,’ ‘The Illustrated Man,’ ‘Fahrenheit 451,’ ‘The October Country,’ ‘Dandelion Wine’ and ‘Something Wicked This Way Comes.’ His increasing commitments to film, television and stage adaptations of his work led inevitably to his decline as a storywriter, but his early tales and media work soon combined to make him the nation’s most prominent public advocate of the Space Age — a role he fulfilled for the rest of his long life.”

Eller co-founded the Bradbury Center within the Institute for American Thought in 2007, and he became the center’s director in August 2011. He first met Ray Bradbury in 1989, eventually developing a working relationship that lasted until Bradbury’s death in June 2012. Since 2000, Eller has edited or co-edited several limited-press editions of Bradbury’s works, including “The Halloween Tree” (2005), “Dandelion Wine” (2007) and two collections of stories and precursors related to Bradbury’s publication of “Fahrenheit 451: Match to Flame” (2006) and “A Pleasure to Burn” (2010).

The IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI hosts the Barlow Lecture in the Humanities in honor of Liberal Arts Dean and Professor Emeritus John D. Barlow. The lecture is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. To RSVP, email LibaRSVP@iupui.edu with “Bradbury” in the subject line.

Barlow Flyer