Confucius Institute in Indianapolis celebrates fifth anniversary

Joe Xu

The Confucius Institute in Indianapolis will celebrate its fifth anniversary by doing what it has done since 2007: offering programs for Hoosiers that provide a window into China.

Beginning April 22, the weeklong celebration includes three Chinese films, a reception, followed by student performances and a symposium, “China in Africa: A New Model of International Development?” co-sponsored by the institute and the Sagamore Institute.

The films will be shown at 5:45 p.m. in IUPUI’s Taylor Hall, 815 W. Michigan St. The films, which are free and open to the public, are “Painted Skin: The Resurrection,” April 22; “Red Sorghum,” April 23; and “The Treatment,” April 25.

A nonpolitical and nonprofit organization, the institute was established at IUPUI through an agreement between the Office of Chinese Language Council International and IUPUI, in partnership with Sun Yat-Sen University in China. The Confucius Institute at IUPUI is one of about 90 institutes in the U.S. and 400 around the world.

The Confucius Institute at IUPUI facilitates mutual understanding between the people of China and the people of central Indiana by promoting Chinese language and culture, and it creates educational, business and community relationships, said Dr. Joe Xu, a professor of anatomy and cell biology at the IU School of Medicine and the founding director of the Confucius Institute at IUPUI.

“It’s important for people in Indiana to see and understand China, if only through the window provided by the Confucius Institute,” Xu said. “Helping people know each other reduces misunderstanding.”

Since it opened its doors, the Confucius Institute has engaged Indianapolis and central Indiana residents through numerous activities, including promoting business exchanges; facilitating government exchanges; teaching Chinese using a variety of methods, including multimedia and the Internet; training teachers to teach Chinese in primary schools, high schools and colleges; teaching Chinese courses of various types in a variety of arenas; sponsoring academic activities, cultural exchange programs and Chinese language competitions; and showcasing Chinese movies and television programming.

“Whoever wants to understand Chinese culture and language, we are there for them,” Xu said.

The institute has established three Confucius classrooms for students in grades K-8 or K-12: two in Indianapolis and one in Brownsburg. It offers summer study abroad programs in China for high school students, college students and the general public as well as a K-8 Chinese language and culture summer camp at IUPUI. One-on-one Chinese language and cultural tutoring are  also available at the institute, as are translation and interpretation services.

The Confucius Institute has helped establish or participated in a range of cultural activities in Indianapolis, including a Chinese Language and Cultural Fair, the Indy 500 Parade, Indianapolis Chinese Festival and Chinese New Year celebration.

The partnership with Sun Yat-Sen University, a top-ten university in China with strong programs in the humanities, social sciences, business, law and life sciences, has produced a number of exchange programs at IUPUI, including programs at the Kelley School of Business and the Schools of Education, Informatics, Liberal Arts, Medicine and Public and Environmental Affairs.

David Craig- Beyond Public vs. Private: Health Care as a Social Good

David Craig

Workshop in Multidisciplinary Philanthropic Studies (WIMPS)

PRESENTS
David Craig
Religious Studies Department
IUPUI
Beyond Public vs. Private:
Health Care as a Social Good
 
Abstract:

 

As an ethicist trespassing on the realms of health economics and health policy, I propose that health care in the United States is neither a private good nor a public good.  The economic distinction between private goods and public goods, as I understand it, fits closely with the theory that sees the provision of public goods through state programs as a response to market failures and the provision of additional public goods through nonprofit organizations as a further response to government failures.  This theory gets the historical story backward in the case of health care in the United States.  I look to core values in the mission statements of nonprofit health care providers and to public values in federal health policies to argue that U.S. health care is a social good, the product of extensive social investments of philanthropic service and public funding.  These investments establish, in turn, new social norms and cultural expectations that help determine how the good of health care is produced and distributed.  In other words, social commitments to moral values predetermine the empirical workings of U.S. health care.  These lessons may apply to other nonprofit sectors, too.

 

Tuesday, April 16, 2013
12:00 – 1:15 p.m.
ES (Education/Social Work Building) 2101, IUPUI

For more information, please see the attached flier, or email Marty Sulek at msulek@umail.iu.edu.

Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History Fellowships

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History Fellowships

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History awards short-term research fellowships to doctoral candidates, postdoctoral scholars, college and university faculty at every rank, and independent scholars working in American history. In 2013, up to ten fellowships of $3,000 each will be awarded to scholars to conduct research within the archival holdings of any institution in the five boroughs of New York City.

To apply, candidates should submit:
• A project proposal including information about the archives to be consulted, an anticipated budget, and applicant’s full contact information

• A curriculum vitae

• Two letters of recommendation from established scholars

Applications must be postmarked or submitted online by May 1, 2013. All applicants will be notified by June 7, 2013. Fellows are expected to complete their research within a year of notification of the award. For more information or to submit an application, please visit: http://www.gilderlehrman.org/programs-exhibitions/fellowships.

 

Fellowship Coordinator
The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
19 W. 44 Street
Suite 500
New York, NY 10036
Phone: 646-366-9666, x28
Fax: 646-366-9669
Email: fellowships@gilderlehrman.org
Visit the website at http://www.gilderlehrman.org/programs-exhibitions/fellowships

April Faculty and Staff Course Grant and Scholarship Opportunities

center for service and learning logo

GRANTS

2013 – 2014 Service Learning Course Development Grants
The Center for Service and Learning is sponsoring a service-learning course development grant program for 2013-2014.
The program is open to interested faculty and academic staff to develop new or to significantly transform existing courses
using service-learning pedagogy.  Grant funds are available to support undergraduate, graduate, or professional course
development.
In particular, the Center is keen to support course development guided by one or more of the following:
·         engages departments and/or levels of the curriculum traditionally underrepresented in service-learning at IUPUI;
·         promotes deep learning within a single or across multiple disciplinary frameworks;
·         fosters critical and integrative reasoning and associated skill building – particularly when geared to enhance a learner’s capacity to collaborate across cultural and social boundaries, to hone ethical/moral reasoning in real world settings, and/or supports enhanced public problem-solving and knowledge generation;
·         incorporates innovative uses of instructional technology that not only support collaborative student learning but also enhances the role of community voice within the course/program;
·         targets under-represented, first generation, transfer and/or at-risk student populations;
·         connects with and builds on preexisting courses within a program of study to improve scaffolding for high impact, community-engaged learning experiences at key thresholds (e.g. gateway courses, intro to the major, capstone courses, etc.);
·         enhances IUPUI’s relationship with the neighborhoods and organizations located in Indianapolis’NearWest.

 

The grant stipend is $3000 to support summer work on course development. Please note that these grant funds are
distinct from the RISE course development grants administered by Academic Affairs.
Application deadline:             Monday, April 29th
 
 
Dissemination Grants
The Center for Service and Learning has small dissemination grants ($500 – $750) available to support faculty and
instructional staff to disseminate work associated with civic and community engagement in higher education including:
·         Instructional models and assessment associated with service-learning or service-learning combined with other
high impact practices (ePortfolios, learning communities, study abroad, capstones, etc.),
  • Co-curricular community-engaged learning and assessment (e.g. scholarship programs, alternative spring break

programs, etc.),

  • Research on student learning outcomes, student motivations, and more associated with community-engaged

learning environments,

  • Theoretical papers or critiques devoted to issues in civic and community engagement in higher education,
  • Research, assessment, and practice innovations associated with community-campus partnerships (local and global),
  • Public scholarship and engaged learning models for faculty/staff,
  • Program or department-based institutionalization of community engagement.

 

Eligibility: To be considered, the proposals must have been accepted for external presentation for conferences
during the period of April 2013 – April 2014.  All full time faculty, including lecturers and clinical faculty, as well as
instructional staff, are eligible to apply.
Funds will be distributed on a rolling basis until the pool is exhausted.  In addition to the external presentation,
grantees will be expected to share their presentation at a later time with a campus audience. For more information,
contact Mary Price at price6@iupui.edu.
 
 
 
SCHOLARSHIPS
Service Learning Assistant Scholarship Program
Fall 2013 and 2013-2014 Academic Year Applications are now being accepted.
General application deadline: July 1, 2013

Learn more or apply.

IU Libraries digitization project creates rich repository of Hoosier authors

Wells IQ Wall

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — An Indiana University Libraries project that will allow anyone to research Hoosier authors and their bibliographies online — as well as access hundreds of digitized books — is nearly complete.

Conceived years ago and funded in 2006 by a Library Services and Technology Act grant through the Indiana State Library, the “Indiana Authors and Their Books” project oversaw digitization of a three-volume reference set published by Wabash College that covers nearly 200 years of Indiana’s literary history.

The books include authors who were born, raised or educated in Indiana, or who lived in the state for a major portion of their lives.

The website hosted by IU Libraries includes more than 7,000 author entries and nearly 21,000 book citations. It links directly to about 400 digitized copies of selected titles and allows users to search for remaining titles via external services like Google Books, WorldCat, Hathi Trust Digital Library and the Libraries’ online catalog, IUCAT.

Entries range from well-known authors such as James Whitcomb Riley, Booth Tarkington and Gene Stratton Porter to the lesser known, such as an entry for Ethel Mathilda Green Adams, a public schoolteacher who wrote a book about musical understanding in the 1960s. In addition to works of literature, there are a number of nonfiction works including histories of local towns, counties and churches. These sources, and a handful of regimental histories dating to the Civil War, are a genealogical gold mine.

“Our hard work on this project has created a really rich resource that is already receiving more than 28,000 unique visits per month from users,” digital projects and usability librarian Michelle Dalmau said. “I see it as an important K-12 tool, while it can also assist scholars who are researching more obscure authors. Users are able to browse by author, book title or publication date, creating possibilities for deep textual analysis.”

Dalmau plans to share encoded texts and descriptive metadata with the state library to include in the Indiana Digital Library portal, Indiana Memory.

The original project had called for digitization of about 150 curated titles from 1880 to 1920, an era known as Indiana’s Golden Age of Literature. But the explosion of Google Books and other resources such as the HathiTrust Digital Library onto the digitization scene opened up new possibilities, allowing for access to hundreds more titles than originally expected, Dalmau said.

In addition to the original 150 books digitized for the grant, IU Libraries staff digitized an additional 250 books available through the project themselves, focusing on important books from Indiana’s literary and historical heritage. These books become available as staff complete them — on average, four new books every month.

That crucial behind-the-scenes effort is also benefitting Indiana University in another way: The Digital Library Program partnered with the Library Technical Services Department to generate new workflows for digitization for the project, opening new doors for future collaboration.

Once the texts are encoded and available online, Technical Services staff catalog those digital texts, a full-service treatment that makes metadata/cataloging librarian Jennifer Liss proud.

“In a time in when public libraries are pushing back against outdated publishing and distribution models for e-books, it’s gratifying to know that our work makes these digital texts — and their respective high-quality cataloging records — freely available to anyone with an Internet connection and a browser,” she said.

The partnership brought other changes, including the development of cataloger expertise in new tools. Digital library staff did a fine job lowering technical barriers for catalogers to participate in digital projects, Liss said, noting that 70 percent of all Technical Services catalogers now provide metadata for digital projects.

“Now that we’ve ‘productionized’ this process, so to speak, it opens the door to partner in other ways,” Dalmau said. “We’ve set up workflows where contributions from catalogers are facilitated with minimal intervention by digital library technologists.”

IUPUI Honors College hosting annual showcase April 19

The IUPUI Honors College will host its third annual open house next week, featuring the research, creative activities, scholarship and community service projects of IUPUI’s Honors Scholars.

The IUPUI Honors College Showcase takes place from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday, April 19, on the lower level of University Library, 755 W. Michigan St.

The showcase provides the opportunity for some of the campus’s most talented students to share their activities and accomplishments with the campus and the wider community, said Jane Luzar, founding dean of the Honors College.

“The IUPUI Honors College Showcase is a signature event for the college,” Luzar said. “The annual showcase is an opportunity for the campus and community to interact with some of the high-ability and highest-achieving students on the campus.”

Incoming IUPUI freshman who meet the required academic qualifications are offered scholarships and direct admission to the IUPUI Honors College. Honors Scholars have uniquely designed educational experiences that include independent research; prepartions for post-baccalaureate study; and the opportunity to gain a greater understanding of the world at large through service learning, civic engagement, culture studies and study abroad.

Zach Graham, an IUPUI junior pre-med biology major, is among the Honors Scholars presenting at this year’s showcase. Spending the fall 2012 semester at the University of Cape Town in South Africa had a major and lasting impact on both his personal and professional life, the honors student said.

“That experience could not have been possible without the unwavering support of the IUPUI Honors College,” Graham said. “I am thrilled to present at the upcoming Honors College Showcase to share my experience with the public and other students and hopefully encourage those students to consider where and how a study abroad experience could enhance their own college career.”

The semester abroad brought him face to face with problems present in developing countries such as social inequality, economic inequality, racial tensions, corruption and government restructuring, Graham said.

“Wanting to specialize in global health after medical school, this exposure gave me a better sense of the difficulties that developing countries are facing beyond health care and how those other challenges can both directly and indirectly influence an effective and equitable delivery of health care to those most in need,” he said.

Another student, Eric J. Keller, will present his research on “Ethical Considerations Surrounding Survival Benefit-Based Liver Allocation.”

“There is an ever-growing disparity between the demand for and supply of donor livers,” said Keller, a senior biology and chemistry major. His projects investigated ethical issues affecting liver allocation in order to critically evaluate the survival benefit-based liver allocation model.

“We believe this model possesses a number of positive attributes as well as shortcomings which would limit its effectiveness. Thus we suggested that a similar model be developed, with suggested amendments, to take the next steps toward better liver allocation,” Keller said.

Both Keller and Graham say the experiences, opportunities and responsibilities offered them as Honors Scholars have had a significant positive impact on their education.

“The Honors College has surrounded me with other talented students who have inspired me to stay motivated and keep reaching for higher goals,” Keller said. “I am continually fascinated by the immense amount of information one can gain by being open to the experiences and opinions of others. My colleagues at IUPUI and in the Honors College have taught me valuable lessons which will significantly benefit me in my future career.”

Additional information about the showcase is available online.

The event is free of charge and open to the public.

 

Upcoming Lectures at IU Bloomington

April 5 to 19, 2013

Indiana Journal of Law & Social Equality symposium
WHEN: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, April 5
WHERE: Law School Room 335 Faculty Conference Room, Bloomington
WHAT: Indiana Journal of Law & Social Equality Annual Symposium: “Social Equality: Looking Forward and Looking Back”
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: smithco@indiana.edu

From Philosophy to Paleography, or The Annoying Duty to Share History With the Past
WHEN: Noon to 1:15 p.m. Friday, April 5
WHERE: 1020 E. Kirkwood Ave., Ballantine Hall, Room 004, Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Bob Eno, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at IU Bloomington
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-3765 or easc@indiana.edu

The Chairs of Chester Cornett
WHEN: 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, April 6
WHERE: Mathers Museum of World Cultures, 416 N. Indiana Ave., Bloomington
WHAT: As part of its 50th anniversary celebrations, the Mathers Museum of World Cultures will present a series of conversations with curators, researchers, students and scholars from a variety of disciplines who study and explore the museum’s rich collections.
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-6873 or mathers@indiana.edu

A Life in the Law: From Military Commissions to the Indiana Supreme Court
WHEN: Noon Monday, April 8
WHERE: IU Maurer School of Law Room 123, Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Indiana Supreme Court Justice Steven David
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-856-4044 or kturch@indiana.edu

I manoscritti provenzali in Italia
WHEN: 4 p.m. Monday, April 8
WHERE: Slocum Room, Lilly Library, 1200 E. Seventh St., Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker Carlo Pulsoni, professor of romance philology at the University of Perugia, will discuss the Italian manuscripts containing works in Old Occitan.
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-7035 or hstorey@indiana.edu

Innovations in Law School Pedagogy
WHEN: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 9
WHERE: Wynne Courtroom (Room 100), Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St., Indianapolis
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Provost Lauren Robel
COST: Free and open to the public; Reception will be held at 5:30 p.m., in the Law School Atrium
INFORMATION: cleavera@iupui.edu

LL.M. 10th Anniversary Celebration: International Legal Education in the 21st Century: Preparing Lawyers to Meet Global Challenges
WHEN: 2 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 9
WHERE: Wynne Courtroom (Room 100), Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St., Indianapolis
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Honorable Judge Patricia Riley, Indiana Court of Appeals
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: pcaparas@iu.edu

Louise Melling, ACLU: “The New Age of Abortion Restrictions: Listen Up! It’s About You”
WHEN: Noon Wednesday, April 10
WHERE: IU Maurer School of Law Room 123, Bloomington
WHAT: Louise Melling, American Civil Liberties Union deputy legal director and director of the ACLU Center for Liberty, will discuss the status of abortion restrictions and how they compromise our rights and well-being today, 40 years after the U.S. Supreme Court decided Roe v. Wade — as well as what is to come.
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-856-4044 or kturchi@indiana.edu

Principles in Drug Discovery
WHEN: 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 10
WHERE: Indiana University MSBII Building 702 N. Walnut Grove Ave., Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Dr. Betty Bei Yao, associate director at Abbvie (formerly Abbott Laboratories), where she has more than 15 years of experience in developing neuroscience-related therapeutic targets.
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-856-1930 or mtheodor@indiana.edu

Three Remarkable Women
WHEN: 5:15 p.m. Thursday, April 11
WHERE: Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, Room 102, Indiana University 1201 E. Seventh St. Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Mary D. Sheriff
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-2597 or nritsma@indiana.edu

Human Rights and Authorship Norms: Comparative Traditions
WHEN: 5 p.m. Thursday, April 11
WHERE: Wynne Courtroom 100, Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St., Indianapolis
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Roberta Rosenthal Kwall, Raymond P. Niro Professor of Intellectual Property Law and the co-director of DePaul University College of Law Center for Jewish Law and Judiac Studies
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: kgalster@iupui.edu

The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series
WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 11
WHERE: University Library Lilly Auditorium, 755 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Donald Ray Pollockauhor of the story collection Knockemstiff
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 317-274-8929 or tkirts@iupui.edu

Law & Society Center Workshop
WHEN: 4 p.m. Thursday, April 11
WHERE: IU Maurer School of Law Room 335, Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Kathie Hendley, University of Wisconsin
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-856-0434 or jkrishna@indiana.edu

Business and Human Rights: What’s the Board Got to Do With It?
WHEN: 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Friday, April 12
WHERE: Wynne Courtroom (Room 100), Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St., Indianapolis
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Professor Jena martin, West Virginia University college of Law
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: pcaparas@iu.edu

Memories & Reminiscences
WHEN: 4 to 5 p.m. Friday, April 12
WHERE: Fine Arts 015, Indiana University, Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Judy Dater, recipient of numerous photography awards, has exhibited her work throughout the United States and internationally, and her photographs are widely published.
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-7686 or catjohns@indiana.edu

Bizarre Foods Fair
WHEN: 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Saturday, April 13
WHERE: Mathers Museum of World Cultures, Bloomington
WHAT: Presentations and demonstrations highlighting the students’ research will be complemented by a variety of food.
COST: Free and open to the public, but tickets are required and must be picked up at the museum by April 12.
INFORMATION: 812-855-1696 or mathers@indiana.edu

Fuchs Lecture Series Speaker: Former Indiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard
WHEN: Noon Monday, April 15
WHERE: IU Maurer School of Law Room 335, Bloomington
WHAT: Former Indiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard will deliver the Ralph F. Fuchs Lecture, “Does the Country Have Too Many Lawyers, or Not Enough?” Shepard was recently named chair of the American Bar Association’s new Task Force on the Future of Legal Education, so his remarks will be especially timely and useful.
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-2075 or ivanderc@indiana.edu
Engaging North Korea and Iran: A public forum exploring what a strategy of engagement looks like
WHEN: 5 to 6:45 p.m. Thursday, April 18
WHERE: Wynne Courtroom 100, Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St., Indianapolis
WHAT: The IU McKinney School of Law, IUPUI Office of International Affairs, Indiana University Pan-Asia Institute and Portland State University welcome a panel of experts from the US, Europe, Asia & Australia to explore what a strategy of engagement looks like.
COST: Free and open to the public; pending approval CLE: 1.75 hours
INFORMATION: pcaparas@iu.edu

Toxic Symbiosis: Achieving Structural Justice in the Healthcare System
WHEN: 4 to 5:30 p.m., Thursday, April 18
WHERE: The Poynter Center, 618 E. Third St., Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Milton Fisk, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-0261 or eayoung@indiana.edu

Sherlock Holmes and Victorian Forensic Science

“Sherlock Holmes and Victorian Forensic Science” will be presented by practicing forensic scientist David Zauner at the Indiana Medical History Museum on Saturday, April 20th, at 4PM.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s immensely popular Victorian character, Sherlock Holmes, was the first fictional detective to explicitly base his solutions of cases on observation, science, and deductive reasoning. Many of the stories include accounts of Holmes’ detailed examinations of crime scenes and pieces of evidence.

David Zauner, a member of the Indianapolis Sherlock Holmes society, The Illustrious Clients, and a practicing forensic scientist, will explore how the Holmes stories reflect applications of scientific principles to criminal investigations in the late Victorian era and how forensic science has developed since that time to its present state.

 

Email HoosierVSA@gmail.com to RSVP or with any questions.

Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program

New exhibit at IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery highlights long and contested history of Guantánamo

Nicknamed GTMO, the United States naval station at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, has a history that is infamous and yet unknown to most Americans. A new traveling exhibit running April 10 through May 12 at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Cultural Arts Gallery reveals that history.

Developed by more than 100 students from IUPUI and 11 other universities, the exhibition, Why Guantánamo?,  explores GTMO’s history from the US occupation of Guantánamo Bay in 1898 to today’s debates about its future.

This traveling exhibition is a program of the Guantánamo Public Memory Project which seeks to build public awareness of the century-long history of the naval station.

An opening day reception takes place from 6 to 7 p.m. at the gallery, located on the second floor of the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

In 2012, 21 IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI graduate students in the museum studies and public history programs created two panels for Why Guantánamo?  Students were responsible for researching, writing, and selecting the photographs for the panels.  Those in the Introduction to Museum Studies class produced the panel “Arts of Detention,” and students in the Guantánamo Project class produced the panel “Guantánamo Hits Home.” Students who helped develop these panels in the traveling exhibit will be on hand to talk to guests at the reception on April 10.

Following the reception, a lecture featuring Indiana Supreme Court Justice Steven H. David and Indianapolis attorney Richard Kammen as speakers takes places place from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in Room 450A of the Campus Center. David and Kammen will discuss their experiences with post-9/11 Guantanamo detainees.

David was the chief defense counsel to the Office of Military Commissions from 2007-2010.  He oversaw the defense team for post-9/11 detainees in Guantánamo. Kammen is the civilian learned counsel responsible for defending Abd al-Rahim Hussein Mohammed Al-Nashiri. Al-Nashiri is accused of masterminding the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole.

IU McKinney School of Law professor George Edwards will moderate the lecture.

Edwards, director of the law school’s program in international human rights law, was an expert witness in the Guantánamo Bay U.S. Military Commission case against Australian David Hicks. Edwards and his students also provided research assistance for the defense of Hicks and for Omar Khadr, a Canadian who was 15 years old when taken to Guantanamo Bay.

Sponsors of the exhibit’s appearance at IUPUI include: the museum studies program, the public history program, the history department, and the international studies program, all units of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

The IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery is free and open to the public Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 7 p.m.

Paid parking is available in the Vermont Street parking garage, which is connected to the IUPUI Campus Center.

 

For additional information, contact:

Liz Kryder-Reid, Director, Museum Studies Program, Associate Professor, Anthropology and Museum Studies, IUPUI

ekryderr@iupui.edu

317- 274-1406

Modupe Labode, Assistant Professor History and Museum Studies, IUPUI,

mlabode@iupui.edu

317-274-2839

 

Opening reception for the exhibition Why Guantánamo? and lecture “Speaking of Guantánamo”

Wednesday, April 10, 2013
IUPUI Campus Center: Cultural Arts Gallery and Room 450A
Indiana Supreme Court Justice Stephen H. David and Indianapolis attorney Richard Kammen discuss their experiences defending post-9/11 Guantánamo detainees  and discuss the issues raised in these cases.
Opening Reception: 6:00-7:00 p.m., Wednesday, April 10, 2013, Cultural Arts Gallery, 2ndfloor of the IUPUI Campus Center. View the exhibition and meet the IUPUI students who created it.
“Speaking of Guantanamo”: 7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m., Wednesday, April 10, 2013, IUPUI Campus Center, Room 450A
Graduate students from the museum studies and public history programs at the  IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI were among the 100 students at 11 universities across the country that  developed the exhibition, Why Guantánamo?    The exhibition explores the century-long history of the US naval station at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and is a project of the Guantánamo Public Memory Project, which seeks to build public awareness of, and foster dialogue on the future of this place and the policies it shapes.
The lecture “Speaking of Guantánamo” will mark the exhibition’s opening and feature two Indiana jurists who have extensive experience defending detainees held in Guantánamo Bay. Indiana Supreme Court Justice Steven H. David was the Chief Defense Counsel to the Office of Military Commissions from 2007-2010.  He oversaw the defense team for post-9/11 detainees in Guantánamo. Indianapolis attorney Richard Kammen is the civilian learned counsel responsible for defending Abd al-Rahim Hussein Mohammed Al-Nashiri. Al-Nashiri is accused of masterminding the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole. IU McKinney School of Law professor George Edwards will moderate the discussion.
     In 2012, 21 IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI graduate students in the Museum Studies and Public History programs created two panels for Why Guantánamo?  Students were responsible for researching, writing, and selecting the photographs for the panels.  Those in the “Introduction to Museum Studies” class produced the panel “Arts of Detention,” and students in the “Guantánamo Project” class produced the panel “Guantánamo Hits Home.” Students who helped develop these panels in the traveling exhibit will be on hand to talk to guests.
Paid parking is available in the Vermont Street parking garage, which is connected to the IUPUI Campus Center:http://parking.iupui.edu/visitors.do
The IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery is free and open to the public Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., and Sunday 1-7 p.m.
Why Guantánamo? will be on exhibition from April 10 – May 12, 2013
Sponsors of the exhibit’s appearance at IUPUI include: the museum studies program, the public history program, the history department, and the international studies program, all units of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, and the Museum Studies Club.
The Guantánamo Public Memory Project seeks to build public awareness of the century-long history of the US naval station at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and foster dialogue on the future of this place and the policies it shapes. Coordinated from Columbia University’s Institute for the Study of Human Rights, the Project has developed a traveling exhibit, online story collection, curricula,  public dialogues, and more through  collaboration and debates with diverse stakeholders. First launched in 2009 by the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience, the Project is now developed by a growing number of universities, organizations, and individuals according to common principles while engaged in ongoing debate on the possibilities and pitfalls of “remembering” Guantánamo. The project was supported by the participating universities and by the Open Society Foundations, Libra Foundation, and the New York Council on the Humanities.