CALL FOR POSTER PROPOSALS: The 24th Annual Joseph Taylor Symposium presented by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI in conjunction with the Department of Philosophy

It Takes a City: Toward a Diverse and Humane Community
February 27, 2013 – IUPUI Campus Center

Students, faculty and staff, and members of the Indianapolis community are invited to submit abstracts for poster presentations at the 24th Annual Joseph Taylor Symposium, February 27, 2013. The symposium honors Dr. Joseph T. Taylor, Professor of Sociology from 1965 to 1983 and the first Dean of the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, for his many contributions to the university and the community.

Increasingly, we are witnessing a shift from our sense of community responsibility to a form of “hyper-individualism,” where individuals place self-interest first, above those of the community as a whole. The alternative, working together for a common good, facing problems as a community, and through mutual support and respect forging more lasting solutions, ensures that none of us must bear societal burdens alone. The first panel will explore the challenge of fostering tolerance and respect among young people, focusing on the problem of bullying. The second panel will examine ways in which we might reinforce a sense of community in our cities; our luncheon speaker will reflect on these themes from her standpoint as an activist in both the civil rights and gay liberation movements.

To complement those discussions, we invite posters and electronic and other visual presentations that showcase community-engaged research, teaching, and learning.  In addition to presenting their own work, faculty members are encouraged to integrate relevant poster projects into their classes to promote student submissions or to invite their students to participate on an individual basis. Participants from educational institutions other than IUPUI are most welcome. The following is a list of some possible approaches to the symposium’s theme that poster submissions might take:
 Demonstrations of research, teaching, scholarship, or other projects on Indianapolis; its neighborhoods, people, politics, culture, or history·         Presentations about service learning projects or approaches·         Examples of civic engagement initiatives

·         Projects or tools developed for Indianapolis partners, clients, or organizations

·         Questions about addressing bullying and intolerance among our youth

·         Suggestions for fostering a sense of community in our city – or in others
To submit a poster presentation proposal, please fill out the attached form and return it by February 1, 2013. Additional details about expectations for accepted proposals are also included in the form. Return forms by email to Victoria Rogers (rogersv@iupui.edu) in the Department of Philosophy. More information about the symposium is available from theTaylor Symposium website.

Book Prize: Laura Shannon Prize in Contemporary European Studies

Laura Shannon Prize

The $10,000 Laura Shannon Prize in Contemporary European Studies seeks the best book in European studies that transcends a focus on any one country, state, or people to stimulate new ways of thinking about contemporary Europe as a whole.  We welcome nominations for books published in 2011 and 2012 for the humanities cycle (philosophy, theology, cultural studies, modern languages and literatures, and the arts) by Friday, January 25, 2013.  Nominations, which can be submitted electronically, may be made by authors or publishers and require only two copies of each nominated work.  There is no entry fee.  Publishers may submit up to three titles per imprint.  Additional details about the prize and the entry form are available at the website: http://nanovic.nd.edu/shannon-prize/. Please know that contemporary is construed broadly, and books about particular countries or regions have done well in the process so long as there are implications for the remainder of Europe.  If you have any questions, please contact Monica Caro atmcaro@nd.edu or 574-631-3547.

SNAAP at IU presenting unique conference on arts training and the creative workforce

SNAAP logo

Who are the 3 million arts graduates in America? What do we know about them? What is the state of arts training in higher education today?

The Strategic National Arts Alumni Project — a project of the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research in collaboration with the Curb Center for Art, Enterprise and Public Policy at Vanderbilt University — is organizing a one-of-a-kind three-day national conference on arts training and the creative workforce.

The event, “3 Million Stories: Understanding the Lives and Careers of America’s Arts Graduates,” will take place March 7 to 9 at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.

The diverse group of speakers will include:

  • Lewis Black (MFA 1977, Yale School of Drama), Grammy Award-winning comedian, author, playwright, social critic and actor who will be interviewed by Academy Award-winning playwright and lyricist Willie Reale.
  • Elizabeth Currid-Halkett, author of “The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art and Music Drive New York City” (Princeton University Press, 2007), which has received attention in publications such as the Economist, Time, Forbes, The New Yorker, the Village Voice, National Public Radio and The New York Times.
  • Douglas Dempster, dean of the College of Fine Arts at the University of Texas at Austin and advocate of accountability in higher education.
  • James Heartfield, British journalist and author of numerous acclaimed publications, including The Creativity Gap.
  • Samuel Hoi, president of Otis College of Art and Design and chair of the board of United States Artists.
  • Sunil Iyengar, director of the Office of Research and Analysis at the National Endowment for the Arts.
  • Ann Markusen, author of numerous publications on the arts and director of the Arts Economy Initiative and the Project on Regional and Industrial Economics at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs.
  • Robert and Michele Root-Bernstein, authors of the path-breaking book “Sparks of Genius: The Thirteen Thinking Tools of the World’s Most Creative People.”
  • R. Keith Sawyer, author of 12 books, including “Group Genius” and “Explaining Creativity,” and over 80 scientific articles.

According to Steven J. Tepper, associate director of the Curb Center for Art, Public Policy and Enterprise at Vanderbilt and the conference organizer, “The conference should be required attendance for anyone who is involved in arts training and supporting artistic careers; it will also have much to offer artists, researchers and others who share a broad interest in the 21st-century creative workforce.”

Registration is now open at www.3millionstories.com. The deadline for discounted hotel accommodation is Feb. 1.

Support for this event comes from the Surdna Foundation through its leadership grant for SNAAP.

The Strategic National Arts Alumni Project investigates the educational experiences and career paths of arts graduates nationally via an annual survey, and provides findings to educators, policymakers and the general public.

U.S. Institute of Peace grant will fund international forgiveness workshop, lecture at IUPUI

Published: December 18, 2012

The director of international partnerships at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will use a $2,000 grant from the Public Education for Peacebuilding Support initiative of the United States Institute of Peace to explore a novel approach to achieving peace and reconciliation on the global stage.

Ian McIntosh said a daylong workshop on “forgiveness in international perspective” will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 2 at the Center for Interfaith Cooperation, 1100 W. 42nd St. in Indianapolis. Two survivors of mass genocide who are also advocates of “unilateral forgiveness” will lead sessions about this approach.

The advocates are Kizito Kalima, a Rwandan genocide survivor, and Eva Kor, a Holocaust survivor best known for her documentary film, “Forgiving Dr. Mengele.” Both live in Indiana and participated in a 2011 event supported by the Office of International Affairs in Indianapolis commemorating the 1994 genocide of Tutsis in Rwanda.

A public lecture also will take place at 4 p.m. Feb. 5. at the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law. Kalima and McIntosh, who is also an adjunct professor of anthropology and associate director of the Confucius Institute, will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of using unilateral forgiveness to achieve long-term peace in a case study from Rwanda.

“The workshop and lecture will be inspirational for our campus and community, especially for international students and the African Diaspora,” McIntosh said. The IUPUI African Student Association will co-sponsor the event.

“USIP is pleased to support organizations like IUPUI and their contribution to the national conversation around international conflict — and methods for resolving those conflicts nonviolently,” said Jim Marshall, president of the U.S. Institute of Peace.

The U. S. Institute of Peace is the independent, nonpartisan conflict management center created by Congress to prevent and mitigate international conflict without resorting to violence. The institute works to save lives, increase the government’s ability to deal with conflicts before they escalate, reduce government costs and enhance national security. It is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with offices in Baghdad, Iraq, and Kabul, Afghanistan.

As part of its congressional mandate, the U.S. Institute of Peace devotes a portion of its budget to support organizations that will advance the field of conflict management by developing new techniques, establishing best practices and professionalizing the field through education and training. The Public Education for Peacebuilding Support is a program of the U.S. Institute of Peace administered by the Institute of International Education.

For more information on the workshop and lecture, contact McIntosh at imcintos@iupui.edu or 317 274-3776.

IU to offer free Information Visualization MOOC designed to illustrate data

research related visualizations

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan. 10, 2013

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University’s Katy Börner, the Victor H. Yngve Professor of Information Science at the School of Library and Information Science and an international leader in information visualization, will offer a free massive open online course on the topic beginning Jan. 22.

Börner is curator of the internationally traveled Places & Space: Mapping Science exhibit and author of the Atlas of Science: Visualizing What We Know, published in 2010 by The MIT Press. She specializes in the study of the structure and evolution of scientific disciplines, the analysis and visualization of online activity, and the development of cyberinfrastructures for large-scale scientific collaboration and computation.

The course will run seven weeks from the start date, with a target audience of graduate students able to work three to six hours per week. Anyone interested in generating temporal, geospatial, topical or network analyses and visualizations from either personal or professional data would benefit from the course.

Personal data like bank statements, email activity and friendship networks, or business data like Twitter activity, funding statistics and return-on-investment data, can each provide the information needed to then identify trends, geospatial distributions, topical coverage and previously unrecognized informational links, Börner said.

“The visualization framework I teach and the tools that students will use in the course help answering ‘when,’ ‘where,’ ‘what’ and ‘with whom’ questions,” she said. “The resulting visualizations aim to improve daily decision-making; they are not just eye candy. One goal of the course is to empower a large audience to design insightful visualizations.”

The homepage for the Information Visualization MOOC offers an introductory video, a course schedule, biographies of Börner and the other instructors, and a registration link. Everybody who registers gains free access to the Scholarly Database (26 million paper, patent and grant records) and the Sci2 Tool (100-plus algorithms and tools).

It is one of the first MOOCs offered by IU and the first to offer an opportunity for students to work in teams with actual clients like researchers interested in understanding data patterns and trends, government agencies developing visual interfaces for data holdings, industry representatives looking to maximize return on investment, medical doctors seeking cures, and not-for-profit organizations hoping to communicate impacts and achievements.

“Data mining and visualization skills are best acquired by working on projects that make a difference,” Börner argues. “To be successful, students must care about and understand a client’s needs, become intimately familiar with the data available to address this need, and apply the best algorithms and tools to design effective workflows that render data into insight.”

Information visualization continues to broaden its reach from computer science and human-computer interaction into fields like drug discovery, financial analysis and scientific research. Later this month, Börner will attend the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland, to give a talk titled “Visualizing What We Know” using a 26-foot-wide display wall. She will also speak on the topic “Dangerous Visualizations: Big Data Is Watching You” as part of a panel session on “Reinforcing Critical Infrastructure With Cyber Experts.”

For more information or to speak with Börner, please contact Steve Chaplin, IU Communications, at 812-856-1896 or stjchap@iu.edu.

$1,000 IU Alumni Association Scholarships Available for 33 Students

IU Limestone Crest

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — The Indiana University Alumni Association will award 33 $1,000 scholarships this year through the IUAA Scholars program. Children of IUAA members are eligible for the awards.

The IU Alumni Association is proud to be able to offer support to the children of IUAA members,” said Debbie Lemon, deputy executive director of the IU Alumni Association.

Eligible students can obtain a 2013 scholarship application online. Applications will be accepted through March 29, and scholarship recipients will be notified by May 10.

To be eligible for one of the 33 scholarships, an applicant must be a son or daughter of an IU Alumni Association member and be a full-time, undergraduate student attending any IU campus.

In its 19 years, the IUAA Scholars program has provided $344,000 of support to IU students. “Through the loyalty of our alumni, this program will continue to grow,” Lemon said.

The scholarships will be awarded on the basis of financial need and academic achievement as determined by the Office of Student Enrollment Services. Preference will be given to students who have not received a scholarship in prior years.

Two scholarships are designated for qualifying students from each of IU’s eight campuses. The remaining scholarships will be awarded to students on an at-large basis. If there are no applicants from a particular campus, or the applicants do not meet the criteria, that campus’ scholarship will be added to the at-large scholarship pool.

Revenue from the IU Collegiate License Plate Program funds this scholarship program. In 2012, more than 48,000 plates were issued, making the IU plate the most popular specialty plate in Indiana.

To check on the status of your membership or to join the IU Alumni Association, contact Joan Hall, director of membership, at 800-824-3044.

The IU Alumni Association is dedicated to serving the university and its diverse alumni, students and friends. As one of the nation’s largest alumni organizations, serving more than 570,000 graduates worldwide, the IUAA provides many programs and services to its members, nonmember alumni and the university. For more information, call 800-824-3044.

Funding: NEA Art Works School-Based Projects

NEA Logo

L0468b

NEA Art Works – School-Based Projects

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=1953
URL for complete guidelines: http://www.arts.gov/grants/apply/GAP13/ArtsEdAW.html

IU Internal Deadline: 1/28/2013
NEA Application Deadline: 8/8/2013

Brief Description:

This program, as well as Art Works (L0468a &L0468b), fall under the Grants for Arts Project (GAP). Both programs share a limitation of only 1 for the entire University (IU as the lead applicant). Because of this, the internal deadline for all deadlines falling under these two programs is NOON, January 28th. Only those granted an exception as an independent component can submit separately.

Art Works encourages and supports the following four outcomes:

  • Creation: The creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence,
  • Engagement: Public engagement with diverse and excellent art,
  • Learning: Lifelong learning in the arts, and
  • Livability: The strengthening of communities through the arts.

School-based projects must be directly connected to the school curriculum and instructional program. Activities may take place in or outside of the school building at any time of the day, including after-school and summer enrichment programs formally connected to school curricula. Projects must be based on a curriculum that aligns with either national or state arts education standards and include assessment of participant learning.

Award Amount:

  • Grants generally will range from $10,000 to $100,000. Grants of $100,000 or more will be made only in rare instances, and only for projects that the Arts Endowment determines demonstrate exceptional national or regional significance and impact. In the past few years, well over half of the agency’s grants have been for amounts less than $25,000.
  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $10,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $20,000 and the organization must provide at least $10,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.
  • Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of support of up to two years. The two-year period is intended to allow an applicant sufficient time to plan, execute, and close out its project, not to repeat a one-year project for a second year.

Limitation: One per Indiana University

An organization may submit only one application under these FY 2014 Grants for Arts Projects guidelines, with few exceptions:

  • One from the University with IU as the lead
  • One each for separately identifiable and independent components such as the IU Art Museum, Traditional Arts Indiana and WTIU

These shared limitations apply to L0404 Challenge America Fast-Track (5/23/2013 deadline) AND L0468a&b Art Works (both 3/7/2013 and 8/8/2013 deadlines).

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by NOON, January 28, 2013 for internal coordination. Although not required, it is recommended that you contact Donna Carter at limsub.iu.edu indicating your interest in this program to help expedite the review process.

  • 1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references)
  • A letter of support from Chair or Dean
  • Abbreviated CV for the PI (not to exceed 3 pages)

Applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

Funding: Kress Interpretive Fellowships at Art Museums

Kress Icon

L0075

Kress Interpretive Fellowships at Art Museums

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=1957
URL for complete guidelines: http://www.kressfoundation.org/fellowships/interpretive/

IU Internal Deadline: 2/1/2013
Agency Deadline: 4/1/2013

Brief Description:

The purpose of the Kress Interpretive Fellowship at Art Museums program is to provide a new kind of mentored professional development opportunity within American art museums.  The program is intended to encourage students to explore interpretive careers in art museums, whether as future museum educators or curators; to strengthen the profession of museum educator within the art museum community; to strengthen ties between museum educators and curators in the shared task of interpretive programming in art museums; and to expand the range of promising career options available to students of art history and related fields.

Reflecting the goals of the Fellowship program, the evaluation of applications is based on relative as well as independent criteria. Overall, the program seeks to support a set of professional development opportunities that offer:

  • Opportunities to work collaboratively and in a team environment along side both art museum educators and curators
  • Opportunities for students or graduates from a variety of North American academic programs in art history and related fields
  • Opportunities to work in a variety of institutions, including large municipal art museums, smaller regional art museums and academic art museums
  • A combination of proven Fellowship sites as well as opportunities at institutions that have not previously hosted Kress Interpretive Fellows

Award Amount:

A minimum of four Kress Interpretive Fellowships are awarded each year to American art museums for 9-12 month professional development opportunities. Typically, Interpretive Fellowships begin in late summer or early fall. The Fellowship award is $30,000, with a minimum of $25,000 reserved for the Fellow&39;s stipend and up to $5,000 available to support health, travel and other benefits for the Fellow and/or to defray the direct costs of hosting the Fellow. A final report will be due from the host institution approximately one month after the completion of the fellowship.

Eligibility:

Application must be made by the art museum proposing to host a Kress Interpretive Fellow. These Interpretive Fellowships are intended as an opportunity for individuals who have completed a degree (B.A., M.A., or Ph.D.) in art history, art education, studio art or museum studies and who are pursuing or contemplating graduate study or professional placement in these or related fields. The appropriate level of educational achievement will be determined by the host museum and dependent upon the needs of the proposed fellowship project. The Fellowship candidate may be identified in advance of application by the host institution or recruited subsequently. Priority is given to first-year requests, but worthy projects that clearly outline benefits to the Fellow for a second year of Fellowship will also be considered.

Limitation: One per museum

To apply for IU Internal competition:

February 1, 2013 is only a suggested internal deadline. Application must be made by the museum or conservation research facility at which the internship will be based. Contact the director of the museum if you are interested in this program.

 

Funding: Kress Conservation Fellowships

Kress Icon

L0074

Kress Conservation Fellowships

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=1956
URL for complete guidelines: http://www.kressfoundation.org/fellowships/default.aspx?id=38

IU Internal Deadline: 2/1/2013
Foundation Deadline: 3/8/2013

Brief Description:

The Kress Conservation Fellowships provide competitive grants to museums and other conservation facilities which sponsor supervised internships in the conservation of specific objects and onsite training. The purpose is to provide a wide range of post-graduate fellowship opportunities that will help develop the skills of emerging conservators. Overall, the program seeks to support a set of internships that offer:

  • A variety of specialty areas (paintings, paper, objects, etc.)
  • Opportunities for graduates of a variety of North American graduate programs
  • Opportunities to work in a variety of institutions, from large municipal museums to university museums and other conservation facilities, as well as sites outside the U.S.
  • A combination of proven Fellowship sites as well as opportunities at institutions that have not previously hosted Kress Fellows

Award Amount:

Nine $32,000 Fellowships are expected to be awarded each year for one-year post-graduate internships in advanced conservation at a museum or conservation facility. Typically, $27,000 is allocated as a fellowship stipend, and $5,000 toward host institution administrative costs, benefits for the Fellow, and other direct costs of hosting the Fellowship. Most Fellowships begin in late summer or early fall, and run for a term of 9 to 12 months.

Eligibility:

Application must be made by the museum or conservation facility at which the internship will be based. Fellows should have completed (or will complete prior to the Fellowship) a masters-level degree in conservation prior to beginning the Fellowship. The Fellowship candidate may be identified in advance of application by the host institution or recruited subsequently.

Priority is given to first-year requests, but worthy projects that clearly outline benefits to the Fellow for a second year of Fellowship can be and have been funded.

Limitation: One per museum

To apply for IU Internal competition:

February 1, 2013 is only a suggested internal deadline. Application must be made by the museum or conservation research facility at which the internship will be based. Contact the director of the museum if you are interested in this program.

Grant: NEA Art Works Community-Based Projects

NEA Logo

L0468a

NEA Art Works – Community-Based Projects

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=1952
URL for complete guidelines: http://www.arts.gov/grants/apply/GAP14/ArtsEdAW.html

IU Internal Deadline: 1/28/2013
NEA Application Deadline: 3/7/2013

Brief Description:

This program, as well as Art Works (L0468a &L0468b), fall under the Grants for Arts Project (GAP). Both programs share a limitation of only 1 for the entire University (IU as the lead applicant). Because of this, the internal deadline for all deadlines falling under these two programs is NOON, January 28th. Only those granted an exception as an independent component can submit separately.

Art Works encourages and supports the following four outcomes:

  • Creation: The creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence,
  • Engagement: Public engagement with diverse and excellent art,
  • Learning: Lifelong learning in the arts, and
  • Livability: The strengthening of communities through the arts.

Community-based projects include activities and training in the arts that occur outside of the school system. Activities must occur outside of the regular school day, and may take place in a variety of settings. These activities may be offered by arts organizations or by other community-based, non-arts organizations or agencies in partnership with artists and/or arts groups. Projects could take place in locations such as arts organizations, community centers, faith-based organizations, public housing, tribal community centers, juvenile facilities, or school buildings.

While not formally linked to schools or their instructional programs, projects must be based on a curriculum that aligns with either national or state arts education standards and include assessment of participant learning.

Award Amount:

  • Grants generally will range from $10,000 to $100,000. Grants of $100,000 or more will be made only in rare instances, and only for projects that the Arts Endowment determines demonstrate exceptional national or regional significance and impact. In the past few years, well over half of the agency’s grants have been for amounts less than $25,000.
  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $10,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $20,000 and the organization must provide at least $10,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.
  • Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of support of up to two years. The two-year period is intended to allow an applicant sufficient time to plan, execute, and close out its project, not to repeat a one-year project for a second year.

Limitation: One per Indiana University

An organization may submit only one application under these FY 2014 Grants for Arts Projects guidelines, with few exceptions:

  • One from the University with IU as the lead
  • One each for separately identifiable and independent components such as the IU Art Museum, Traditional Arts Indiana and WTIU

These shared limitations apply to L0404 Challenge America Fast-Track (5/23/2013 deadline) AND L0468a&b Art Works (both 3/7/2013 and 8/8/2013 deadlines).

 

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by NOON, January 28, 2013 for internal coordination. Although not required, it is recommended that you contact Donna Carter at limsub.iu.edu indicating your interest in this program to help expedite the review process.

  • 1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references)
  • A letter of support from Chair or Dean
  • Abbreviated CV for the PI (not to exceed 3 pages)

Applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.