Papermaking workshop with Drew Cameron

Drew Cameron stolen youth surge
September 24, 2013
10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1401 Indianapolis Avenue, Indianapolis, IN

The papermaker, artist, and veteran Drew Cameron will lead a papermaking workshop free and open to members of the community. Lunch provided from noon to 1:30 p.m.

“Coming home from war is a difficult thing,” writes Cameron, founder of the Combat Paper Project. “There is often much to account for as a survivor.” In his own search for meaning, Cameron discovered that papermaking can be a transformative process that broadens “the traditional narrative surrounding the military experience and warfare.”

Since 2007, the Combat Paper Project, which Cameron co-founded, has grown from its San Francisco base and travelled to Canada, England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Kosovo providing workshops, exhibitions, performances and artists’ talks.

An exhibition of works from Combat Paper will open in Herron School of Art and Design’s Berkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries in Eskenazi Hall on September 25, running through November 16.

Persons interested in attending the workshops can RSVP to Paula Katz at katzp@iupui.edu to reserve a seat and lunch. Participants may bring a piece of clothing that they would like to incorporate into the batch of paper that will be made during the workshop.

Herron Regatta Art Contest

regatta contest painter
September 21, 2013
10:30 – 2:30 pm
Downtown Canal, near Buggs Temple
Regatta En Plein Air Quick Draw

On Saturday, September 21, 2013, the Herron Alumni Association will help transform the downtown canal into an artist’s playground as we host our annual Art Contest at the Fifth Annual IUPUI Regatta. This contest is open to artists 18 years or older, whether amateur or professional. Using their own supplies, participants create original artwork in any medium. The $10 entry fee includes an official Regatta “Artist” t-shirt.

QUICK DRAW CONTEST GUIDELINES

Register by September 4th

PRE-REGISTER by 9-4-13 IF YOU WANT A T-SHIRT All artists must pre-register online to be entered in the Plein Aire contest and receive a Regatta “Artist” t-shirt. You can sign up the day of the event but T-shirts may be unavailable.

REGISTRATION FEES ARE NOT REFUNDABLE. The contest will be held, rain or shine. The $10 fee applies even if you register too late to receive a t-shirt.

UNSTAMPED WORK WILL NOT BE JUDGED. Registration and stamping begins at 10:30 a.m. Look for the check-in tent near Buggs Temple (11th Street). Upon arrival, artists must check-in and those with canvasses must have their pad/canvasses stamped before beginning work. Canvasses may be prepped but otherwise must be blank.

YOU MAY SIGN, MATT OR FRAME WORK TO BE JUDGED. Artists provide their own easels for displaying their work for judging. Work can be signed, framed or matted for judging. Artists are responsible for ensuring that your easel is appropriate for outdoor display. Keep in mind that it could be a very windy, hot, rainy or cold day.

BOUNDARIES – Artists will set up along the race course on the downtown canal and may create art based on any subject within their vision – on the course or beyond.

ALL SUBMITTED ‘PLEIN AIR’ ARTWORK MUST BE CREATED THE DAY OF THE CONTEST BETWEEN 11:00 A.M. AND 12:45 P.M. All artwork submitted must be original. No pre-painted or pre-drawn work will be allowed. Anyone who starts before the 11:00 a.m. signal will be disqualified.

DISPLAY & EXHIBITION – At 12:45 pm, all artists will prepare for the exhibit and judging. Artwork must be on display by 1:00 for judging. This allows time for framing. Each artist will have an Information Form to display with their work. This form will include the title and price of the work. Framing & Matting is recommended, but not required.

JUDGING – There will be two categories for judging: “Student” and “Non-Student/Professional” . The People’s Choice Awards will be selected by the Regatta audience between 1:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. Artwork may be for sale. Winners in each category receive $200. Artwork may remain in the tent after judging is completed for those hoping to sell their artwork.

AWARDS – Awards will be announced at 2:20 p.m.

About the Regatta

IUPUI and the Student Organization for Alumni Relations (SOAR) plans IUPUI Regatta on the Downtown Indianapolis canal each year in late September. Established in 2009, the IUPUI Regatta has quickly become a signature event for the IUPUI campus. The purpose of the event is to create a high-energy campus tradition that involves both the campus and Indianapolis community while benefiting an IUPUI student scholarship. The IUPUI Regatta consists of a half mile canoe relay competition involving teams of up to six IUPUI students, faculty/staff, and alumni beginning at Fairbanks Hall at the north end of the canal, traveling down to the USS Indianapolis basin, and then back to complete the half mile leg. The Regatta also has events designed to entertain children of all ages – clowns, face painters, IUPUI student organizations host activities for kids and college students, and live entertainment from Indianapolis area bands make this festive event a can’t miss experience. Questions? Contact the Herron Alumni Association at HerronAA@iupui.edu or 317-274-8905.

Papermaking workshop with Drew Cameron

breaking rank by drew cameron
September 26, 2013
10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1401 Indianapolis Avenue, Indianapolis, IN

The papermaker, artist, and veteran Drew Cameron will lead a papermaking workshop free and open to members of the community. Lunch provided from noon to 1:30 p.m.

“Coming home from war is a difficult thing,” writes Cameron, founder of the Combat Paper Project. “There is often much to account for as a survivor.” In his own search for meaning, Cameron discovered that papermaking can be a transformative process that broadens “the traditional narrative surrounding the military experience and warfare.”

Since 2007, the Combat Paper Project, which Cameron co-founded, has grown from its San Francisco base and travelled to Canada, England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Kosovo providing workshops, exhibitions, performances and artists’ talks.

An exhibition of works from Combat Paper will open in Herron School of Art and Design’s Berkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries in Eskenazi Hall on September 25, running through November 16.

Persons interested in attending the workshops can RSVP to Paula Katz at katzp@iupui.edu to reserve a seat and lunch. Participants may bring a piece of clothing that they would like to incorporate into the batch of paper that will be made during the workshop.

Exhibition: 10,800 Minutes: Not Enough

August 30 – September 19, 2013
Marsh Gallery, Herron School of Art and Design, Eskenazi Hall

10,800 Minutes: Not Enough will feature works by seniors and graduate students in Herron’s printmaking program. These new works will have been created either individually or by teams of students.

Student participants include: Senior printmakers: Talia Ariens, Anna Clinch, Nick Goldy, Brittanie Mathis, Rachel Moore, Colton Pedro, Ashley Tesmer, and Ben Walter. Graduate student printmakers: Stephanie Beisel, Ellie Ingram, Eric Johnson, Katherine Johnson, and Liz Wierzbicki.

Artists Reception on Wednesday, September 11, 2013, 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Marsh Gallery

Artists’ Lecture: Paul DeMuro and Betsy Odom

paul demuro_betsy odom exh image
September 11, 2013
6:00 p.m.
Basile Auditorium, Herron School of Art and Design, Eskenazi Hall

Paul DeMuro and Betsy Odom, participating artists in the Shape Shifters exhibition, will discuss their work and process in this public lecture.

Shape Shifters is a unique “sculpture” and “painting” show that looks at contemporary works pushing the boundaries of these two most traditional media. Artists include: Mike Andrews, Kevin Baker, Paul Demuro, Tracy Featherstone, Dil Hildebrand, Betsy Odom, Melissa Pokorny and Leslie Wayne.

The exhibition is curated by Paula Katz and Robert Horvath.

Flowered Over, paintings and installations by Anna Kell

anna kell mattress
August 30 – September 19, 2013
Frank & Katrina Basile Gallery, Herron School of Art and Design, Eskenazi Hall

Anna Kell is a former student of Assistant Professor Robert Horvath. Originally from Columbus, Indiana, she has shown throughout the country and now teaches painting and drawing at Bucknell University in central Pennsylvania. This exhibition features some of Kell’s paintings made on full and queen sized mattresses in which she incorporates floral patterning, stains, and other features found on discarded mattresses into her compositions.

Anna Kell’s work is an investigation into the way nature is represented in our cultural commodities. She builds paintings and installations out of images of idealized nature: Victorian wallpapers, found paintings and prints, needlework, puzzles, posters, labels, patterned textiles from clothing, upholstered furniture, carpets, floral mattresses and even lampshades. These domestic ephemera become a visual vocabulary revealing the discrepancy between our cultural reality and an illusion of “the natural”.

Beyond the depiction of nature, Kell is interested in the way cultural possessions reveal the desires and values of their owners as they relate to sex, class, and aesthetics. Though the objects are collected in specific locales, they extend beyond the local to demonstrate the influence that mass-production has with the unique culture of any particular place.

Lecture: Nicholas Rattray, “Altered Bodies and Relocated Dreams: Understanding reintegration and care for student veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan”

photo of nicholas rattray
Wednesday, September 18th, 2013
12:00-1:00 pm
Campus Center 309
Nicholas Rattray, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, IUPUI Department of Anthropology
Presented by Medical Humanities and Health Studies Seminar Series
“Altered Bodies and Relocated Dreams: Understanding reintegration and care for student veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan”

This talk will explore issues of community reintegration for student veterans whose bodies have been altered by psychological and physical injuries. Drawing on long-term ethnographic research, I discuss the tensions that lie behind labels such as “reintegrated,” “disaffected,” and “disabled” and how they are negotiated in veterans’ everyday lives. In seeking to manage new embodiments and the tensions between care and the cultural dislocations of military service, many veterans have been forced to create new pathways that diverge from their prior plans — dreams both deferred and transformed.

Free and open to the campus and public, but space is limited. Please RSVP to: medhum@iupui.edu to save a spot.

Warriors-turned-artists facilitate healing with paper handmade from their own uniforms

Drew Cameron stolen youth surge
Combat Paper
September 25 – November 16
Artist’s Talk: Wednesday, September 25, 6:00 p.m.
Combat Paper Project co-founder Drew Cameron
Opening Reception: immediately following Artist’s Talk, 7:00-9:00 p.m.
Herron School of Art and Design, Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall

Veterans achieve a form of catharsis through the transformative art of papermaking, pressing their own uniforms into service as the raw material in works of art. Papermaker, book artist and veteran Drew Cameron, who co-founded the Combat Paper workshops where the art is made, will speak on opening night and will be on hand for several additional public events between September 23-27.

“Coming home from war is a difficult thing,” writes artist and veteran Drew Cameron, founder of the Combat Paper Project. “There is often much to account for as a survivor.” In his own search for meaning, Cameron discovered that papermaking can be a transformative process that broadens “the traditional narrative surrounding the military experience and warfare.”

Since 2007, the Combat Paper Project, which Cameron co-founded, has grown from its San Francisco base and travelled to Canada, England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Kosovo providing workshops, exhibitions, performances and artists’ talks.

breaking rank by drew cameron
Drew Cameron, Breaking Rank

An exhibition of works from Combat Paper will open in Herron School of Art and Design’s Berkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries in Eskenazi Hall on September 25, running through November 16. Cameron will give an artist’s talk on opening night at 6:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Surrounding Cameron’s visit, there is a full slate of activities at Herron and in the broader community. At Herron, he will work with students and the public in a variety of ways, dovetailing with the school’s Book Arts and Art Therapy programs. In addition to the exhibition opening activities, Cameron’s visit is scheduled to include:

Tuesday September 24: A papermaking workshop open to the public from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1401 Indiana Avenue. Lunch provided from Noon to 1:30 p.m.

Wednesday September 25: Classroom visit at Eskenazi Hall with Art Therapy graduate students from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and Book Arts students in the afternoon.

Thursday September 26: A papermaking workshop open to the public from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1401 Indiana Avenue. Lunch provided from Noon to 1:30 p.m.

Friday September 27: Classroom visit with Book Arts students from 9:00 a.m. to noon.

Persons interested in attending the workshops can RSVP to Paula Katz at katzp@iupui.edu to reserve a seat and lunch. Participants may bring a piece of clothing that they would like to incorporate into the batch of paper that will be made during the workshop.

November 1-16, in the Marsh Gallery: Combat Paper companion show of veteran-made art.

November 9, 2:00 p.m. in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall: “Veterans Reclaim Armistice Day”. National Book Award for Fiction winner Tim O’Brien leads a panel discussing literary expression as a means of coping with PTSD. A project of the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library.

November 13, 7:00 p.m., in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall: Screening of The Ghost Army

IUPUI’s 2013-15 Common Theme Project focuses on civil discourse

photo of Khadija Khaja

The topic of IUPUI’s 2013-15 Common Theme Project is “Find Your Voice: Hear My Voice,” commencing a two-year effort to promote campus unity, conversation and collaboration around the topic of civil discourse.

Common Theme invites IUPUI students, staff, faculty and the community to engage in a discussion and deeper exploration of civil discourse in the classroom, work place and public sphere. Among the books recommended for the new Common Theme Project is “Saving Civility: 52 Ways to Tame Rude, Crude & Attitued for a Polite Planet” by Sarah Hacala.

The 2013-15 Common Theme Project will be led by Khadija Khaja, associate professor at the School of Social Work under the direction of Jane Luzar, dean of the IUPUI Honors College.

Every two years, a new common theme is selected along with a faculty fellow to lead this process who works in partnership with an active steering committee. The 2009-2011 theme was “Change Your World: The Power of New Ideas.”

The “Find Your Voice: Hear My Voice” theme will provide opportunities for rich discourse across the campus and community on communicating about diverse viewpoints in ways that validate shared humanity and connection.

Cross-campus discussions and events will highlight positive ways of communication to deal with complex situations and conflicts students face in their daily lives to better equip them to succeed in the workforce, make them better community citizens and ensure that they reach their full potential in our globally connected digital world.

The theme of civil discourse will be advanced through joint panels at interdisciplinary campus wide forums; collaboration with community organizations on workshops that are open to the public; showing of films; suggestions of different books that instructors can use in their classrooms to support the common theme; on site events in campus dorms; invitation of a national speaker; and research across the campus.

IUPUI receives NEH grant for study of origins of HIV/AIDS

An international team of historians and anthropologists, including two Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis professors, will spend the next three years hunting down the origins of HIV/AIDS.

The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded a $290,000, three-year grant to IUPUI for the project titled “An International Collaboration on the Political, Social, and Cultural History of the Emergence of HIV/AIDS.”

Under the leadership of IUPUI professor William H. Schneider, six humanities scholars assisted by three medical research consultants will study evidence supporting the most frequently offered explanations for the emergence of the global AIDS pandemic.

“It is a clear and a worthwhile goal: figuring out the origin of AIDS,” said Schneider, a historian of medicine who teaches in the history department and directs the medical humanities and health studies program, both part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. “The emergence of new diseases, such as avian flu and swine flu, is one of the most important health concerns in recent decades.”

The new study could prove invaluable to those working in global health by providing information about how other new diseases emerge, the principal investigator said.

“It can offer a model for medical science and public health researchers who recognize that their studies need to account for the larger historical, political, economic, social and cultural relations and processes that shape disease emergence.”

Three prominent HIV/AIDS researchers — virologists Preston Marx and François Simon and epidemiologist Ernest Drucker — will serve as medical research consultants. The collaboration began 10 years ago and was recently assisted by the IUPUI Office of Vice Chancellor for Research, which provided $15,000 in seed money for the project.

Scientists widely agree that immune viruses have existed in the African simian population — chimps and monkeys — for tens of thousands of years. Some of these evolved and adapted into viruses that were devastating to the human population less than 100 years ago.

HIV/AIDS study collaborators and scientists during a planning workshop.
HIV/AIDS study collaborators and scientists during a planning workshop.

Through DNA sequencing, scientists have identified a dozen human immunodeficiency virus strains, two of which, HIV-1 and HIV-2, are responsible for the current AIDS pandemic among humans.

Because there were several adaptations, most scientists agree that the transfer was not a random incident, and they point to colonial rule of Africa as the circumstance permitting the adaptations.

The question is how and why?

Until now, explanations have focused on finding a “smoking gun,” i.e., the first case of human immunodeficiency virus. But that scholarship has lacked a critical humanities approach to the wide array of available field and archival resources.

Schneider’s team will address those shortcomings.

“This project is meant to place the medical, public health and biological dimensions of the origin of (HIV/AIDS) in its historical context in sub-Saharan Africa — bringing attention for the first time to the details of the specific social and cultural consequences of the introduction of (Western) medicine which was followed in short order by the appearance of the HIV epidemic,” Drucker said.

The research team will focus on the three most feasible explanations: changes in great ape and monkey hunting; social transformations during colonial rule including urbanization, prostitution and human mobility; and new medical interventions, specifically injection campaigns and blood transfusions, that facilitated transfer of viruses.

Schneider, an expert in the history of blood transfusions in Africa, along with Guillaume Lachenal of the University of Paris, will study the role of blood transfusions and vaccination campaigns, health interventions unheard of in Africa before colonial rule.

Ch.-Didier-Gondola_B
IUPUI professor Ch. Didier Gondola, chairman of the history department, is also a member of the research team.

IUPUI professor Ch. Didier Gondola, chairman of the history department, is also a member of the research team. He is an authority on the history of Brazzaville and Kinshasa, the two neighboring African cities considered to be the place where the HIV-1 epidemic began, which is responsible for 85 percent of today’s AIDS cases. Gondola will investigate the impact of equatorial African urbanization, migration and gender on the emergence of AIDS.

The team will conduct field research and consult several archives and colonial and medical service records in Africa and Europe. Beginning with an IUPUI meeting in February 2014, the scholars will meet periodically to review the research, which will conclude with the publication of a book in 2016.

The HIV/AIDS project was one of four Indiana awards among the 173 NEH grants announced in July for a total of $33 million.