Indianapolis hosts another world-premiere Shakespeare event this month

Measure for Measure

Hoosier Bard Productions, the theatrical arm of the New Oxford Shakespeare project at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, takes to the stage next month for a two-weekend premiere of two back-to-back versions of Measure for Measure at the IndyFringe Basile Theatre, 719 E. St. Clair St. Shakespeare’s original and uncensored Measure for Measure will kick off the first weekend (February 21, 22, and 23) while Thomas Middleton’s more familiar 1621 adaptation of Shakespeare’s play will be featured in the second weekend of the show (February 28 and March 1, 2). Tickets ($8 students with ID, $15 general admission) are available at indyfringe.org/measure-measure or 317-869-6660.

Measure for Measure features an international cast of stage veterans, local actors, and IUPUI students under the direction of Equity actor, IUPUI professor of drama, and Hoosier Bard founding director Terri Bourus.

Bourus returns to directing after last year’s local and international success of The History of Cardenio, Shakespeare’s “lost” play, “a winning blend of the twin geniuses of Cervantes and Shakespeare” (Indianapolis Star). Bourus’s “fast-paced emotional rollercoaster of a production” received rave reviews, and was hailed as “a lively gripping piece of theatre” (Shakespeare Bulletin) and “a rollicking experience” (Nuvo). Shakespeare scholars from around the world converged on Indianapolis, and the BBC praised Cardenio as “bold and brash and funny and moving”. The play and production were also the subject of the WFYI television documentary, “CSI: Shakespeare”.

Measure for Measure asks: when is sex legal? What is the relationship between politics and morality? It tells the tale of a liberal Duke who leaves his city under the control of the conservative fundamentalist Angelo. Angelo immediately starts enforcing laws that make illicit sex a capital offence and a young man, Claudio, is sentenced to death for getting his teenage girlfriend pregnant. When Isabella, Claudio’s devout sister, pleads with Angelo to save Claudio’s life, the results are explosive.

Audiences will want to come both weekends to experience the two very different worlds of Measure. During the first weekend, audiences will be treated to the warmth and optimism of Shakespeare’s Italian summer setting, which invigorates the more lighthearted and comedic version of the original play. The second weekend presents a darker interpretation of the story, set in the winter world of wartime Vienna.

“It’s a fabulous learning experience for IUPUI students to work alongside dedicated professional actors,” Bourus says. “It’s a unique challenge and opportunity for actors, to stretch their boundaries and perform two different interpretations of their characters back to back in successive weekends. “

Audiences will have the chance to hear more about the two texts and two interpretations at the talkbacks with Bourus and members of the cast, after each performance.

The second weekend will also feature a special ASL translated performance, under the direction of IUPUI English Professor Janet Acevedo.

The New Oxford Shakespeare project is also hosting a Master Workshop titled “Editing and Performing Measure for Measure” on Saturday, February 23 from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. In addition to Bourus, and NOS editors Anna Pruitt and Rory Loughnane, the workshop will feature two special guests, Professor Gary Taylor, one of the world’s leading Shakespeare scholars (Florida State University) and actor-director Christopher Marino (Chicago). In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to discuss some of the various issues that arise in editing and performing Shakespeare’s plays with the on-site editors of The New Oxford Shakespeare. Topics include: early modern adaptation; editing drama as a multimedia art form; theatre as a form of research.

Indy Fringe Ticket site: http://indyfringe.org/measure-measure

 

NOS site: http://liberalarts.iupui.edu/shakespeare

 

IUPUI Event calendar entry: http://events.iupui.edu/event/?event_id=7986

 

Hoosier Bard FB: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hoosier-Bard-Productions/156137937762740?fref=ts

SLA Summer 2013 Research, Creative Activity, and Scholarship Grants

SLA Summer 2013 Research, Creative Activity,
and Scholarship Grants

Call for Proposals

Purpose: The SLA Summer Research, Creative Activity, and Scholarship grant program is intended to support research, creative activity, and scholarship, not teaching and/or service activities.

Amounts and use of funds: The committee expects to make 6-7 grants; the typical award amount is approximately $5,000, but exceptional proposals requesting more will be considered.  Proposals for smaller amounts are welcome. A budget with justification is required. Grants will be made for projects requiring at least one month of full-time research. Funds may be used for salary and benefits, research assistance, travel, and collection of materials. They may also be used as matches or in combination with other research grants.

Please note: If you request salary, you must also include fringe benefits in your budget. You may request no more than $4,000 in salary. If you take your salary in June, the fringe rate is 27.41%, for total salary and fringe of $5,096. If you take your salary in July, the fringe rate is 28.59%, for total salary and fringe of $5,144.

Eligibility: Tenured and tenure-track faculty in the School of Liberal Arts who did not receive a SLA internal research grant last year. Applications from non-tenured assistant professors are encouraged.

Submission of Application

  • Deadline: Friday, March 8, 2013, 4:30 pm.
  • Please use standard 8 ½ by 11 page size with at least ½ inch margins. Use an Arial, Helvetica, Palatino Linotype, or Georgia typeface, a black font color, and a font size of 11 points or larger. Charts, graphs, figures, or custom cover sheets may be in color.
  • The Project Plan is limited to 5 pages.
  • Proposals should be submitted in PDF form via email to Edith Millikan (emillika@iupui.edu, CA 441, 278-6970).

Criteria: Applications will be judged on 1) the significance and quality of the research project; 2) the clarity of stated objectives and details of methodology; 3) the feasibility of the project relative to funding requested and time frame; and 4) potential for future funding and/or for completion of the project. Applications for new projects are encouraged.

Peer Review Meeting: Although not required, it is strongly suggested that applicants meet with Edith Millikan and/or Associate Dean Jeffrey Wilson (jeswilso@iupui.edu) for an informal peer review of the proposal. We will provide feedback on how well your proposal meets the criteria discussed above, and provide assistance with drafting your budget.

The Application

The application consists of a cover sheet (appended as the last page of this document, a five-page project plan with budget, and a 4-page CV. These may be submitted as a single PDF document, or separate PDFs.

Cover sheet with title, amount requested, signatures of the applicant and the applicant’s departmental chair, and an indication of other applications for funding (this will not penalize this application). This is not included in the 5-page limit. Your email submission serves as your signature on the application form. Your department chair’s electronic signature occurs by copying her or him on your email submission.

Project Plan (Limited to 5 pages) Please use the following outline. Give sufficient detail for each outline item to indicate a well-thought out plan, including tasks, to accomplish the project.

  • Purpose and Significance of the research, creative activity or scholarship, including brief review of the relevant scholarly literature and what your research will add to the body of literature (Criterion #1)
  • The Specific Objectives of the project (Criterion #2)
  • Work Plan, Methods and Materials (Criteria #2 and #3)

o   Describe the work that will be conducted during the summer for which you seek funding. Include, as applicable, tasks you will perform to accomplish your objectives; data sources and/or archival collections you will use; data collection methods if relevant; other participants who will be involved (if any) and their roles on the project; location where work will take place if off campus; and manuscript preparation activities.

  • Timeline for the Activities (Criteria #2 and #3)
  • Evaluation Process and Plans for Dissemination (Criteria #1, #2, #3, and #4)

o   Describe how you will evaluate the success of your objectives and the analysis performed.

o   Describe your plans for disseminating the results of your research: Conference paper, scholarly article, presentation, etc.

  • Connection of this Project to Future Research, including prospects or plans for external funding (Criterion #4)
  • Budget and Rationale explaining the proposed use of funds (Criterion #3)

o   Describe the type of expense you wish covered, i.e., salary and fringe benefits, hourly student assistance, travel, data purchase, publications to assist your research, photocopying, rights and permissions, etc.

CV, limited to 4 pages. Please tailor the CV to the proposed project. Please limit your publication list to those most relevant to your proposed project. Limit the sections on teaching and service activity as room permits.

Notification: A sub-committee of the Research Advisory Committee will evaluate proposals and notify applicants by Friday, April 5, 2013.

Final Report: Recipients will be expected to file a report on their research or creative activities by Friday, December 6, 2013. Please mark this on your calendars!

 

Click here for forms: SLA 2013 Research and Creative Activity Grant

IUPUI Reseach Day 2013

When: Friday, April 5, 2013 – 9:00 am – 3:00 pm
Where: IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

Showcase your scholarly and creative research accomplishments to IUPUI and IUPUC faculty, staff, and students as well as business, nonprofit, and government organizations by submitting an abstract for the IUPUI 2013 Research Day poster session on April 5, 2013.

You are eligible to submit abstract for the Research Day poster session if you are an undergraduate or graduate/professional student engaged in a research project under the direct mentorship of an IUPUI or IUPUC faculty or staff mentor.

Please note that abstracts are due by midnight on March 1, 2013.

STEP 1) Submit your abstract.

To Submit Your Abstract:

  1. Click on the abstract formatting guidelines to make sure your abstract matches the guidelines.  http://www.crl.iupui.edu/assets/documents/AbstractFormattingGuidelines.pdf
  2. Your mentor or advisor has approved your abstract. Students working in groups must select the primary presenter who uploads the abstract.
  3. You will be required to submit in PDF format. Click on the link below and follow the instructions: http://surveycentral.uc.iupui.edu/Research_Day_2013_Student_Abstract_Submissions.aspx
  4. CRL Students: Please check with your program leader to determine if an additional submission is required.

IUPUI faculty and Center for Research and Learning staff will inform students who have been selected to present their posters on Research Day no later than March 15, 2013.
Be aware that you will receive emails with detailed information regarding your status. If you do not respond to these emails, you may forfeit your presentation slot.

STEP 2) Have your poster printed.

Please make sure to read the information regarding poster guidelines and printing before you present. Posters that do not meet the guidelines may be rejected.

Creating your poster:

    1. Click here for your poster guidelines.
    2. CRL students make sure to follow guidelines for your specific programs.
    3. The CRL will print posters for CRL Students.Submit your poster to the CRL by March 21, 2013
      1. If you are not a CRL student and would like the CRL to print your poster for you, the cost is $100.00 per poster and may include an additional consultation fee.
      2. List of alternative places to print

Indiana Association of Historians Annual Meeting

March 2, 2013
Hosted by the University of Indianapolis
Indianapolis, Indiana

The Indiana Association of Historians is holding its 33rd Annual Meeting on March 2, 2013 at the University of Indianapolis.  This year’s conference theme is “Dreams of Freedom”.

Caroline E. Janney, Associate Professor of History at Purdue University, will deliver this year’s keynote address immediately following the conference luncheon.  Her address is titled “Emancipation and Freedom:  How Civil War Veterans Remembered Slavery”

Information about the Indiana Association of Historians annual meeting, including links to the Program and conference Registration Form, can be found at:  http://iahwebsite.org/cms/

You can also contact the 2013 program chair for more information:

A. James Fuller, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
University of Indianapolis
email:  afuller@uindy.edu

Spring Events at the Indiana Medical History Museum

Lincoln Hospital Flyer

The Indiana Medical History Museum is hosting 2 talks this spring.

The first lecture will be Wednesday, February 27.  Norma Erickson will present “Lincoln Hospital, 1909-1915: A Study of Leadership in African-American Healthcare in Progressive Era Indianapolis.

“That’s Disgusting!  Estimating Time since Death from Human Decomposition” will be presented on Wednesday, April 17 by Stephen P.
Nawrocki.

RSVP to to Sarah Halter at education@imhm.org.

Center for Service and Learning Lecture: Elee Wood, “Public Scholar: Crossing the Streams of Community and University”

The Engaged Scholars Roundtable is a new program sponsored by the IUPUI Center for Service and Learning that showcases scholarly practice and innovations that honor tenets of Ernest Boyer’s concept of the Scholarship of Engagement.   To this end, the Engaged Scholars Roundtable is intended to:

  1. Build awareness of and engagement with the tenets of engaged scholarship by bringing publically disseminated work and developing research and scholarship conducted by IUPUI’s engaged scholars to the awareness of local campus and community audiences.

  2. Nurture interdisciplinary and community-campus collaboration and learning.

  3. Build capacity for the growth and development of engaged scholarship as a dimension of faculty work.

  4. Promote a sense of community among IUPUI’s engaged faculty and staff.

Format:  Roundtable sessions last for 1 hour over the lunch hour. In most cases, sessions will consist of a short 30 minute presentation followed by 20 -25 minutes of open discussion/dialogue.  The CSL plans to host 6-8 roundtables per academic year.

February’s Roundtable:

  • Presenter:    Dr. Elee Wood, Public Scholar of Museums, Families, and Learning, Associate Professor of Museum Studies and Teacher Education
  • Title: Public Scholar–Crossing the Streams of Community and University
  • When: Friday, February 15, 2013 from 12:00 pm – 1:00 p
  • Where: Hine Hall (the old University Place Conference Center), IP 226

Register for this event.

Abstract:      The Public Scholar role at IUPUI represents a commitment to civic engagement through joint appointments between the university and a community partner. Following Boyer (1990), this embedded, dual position represents a reconsideration of the work of a civically engaged university professor. Developing civic engagement and public scholarship research practices involves re-positioning and re-imagining the social interactions between “community” and “university” (Bridger & Alter, 2006; Ellison & Eatman, 2008; Ostrander, 2004). The relationships built between public scholar and community organizations are founded on both the intellectual and emotional characteristics of the faculty member as well as the overarching goals, mission and purpose of the institution (Colbert & Wharton-Michael, 2006). This synergy paves the way for more meaningful action, but it requires constant negotiation of interests, facilitation of dialogue, asking difficult questions, and fostering continued participation on the behalf of all the players (Bridger & Alter). Fundamentally the work is about being in the group, and apart from the group, focusing on the cultural norms and realities that comprise the interactions of people, place, and purpose. As Boyte and Kari (1996) acknowledge, civic engagement and public action fall along a spectrum of activities ranging from the deliberative, to problem solving, to the insurgent. In this paper, I trace the prospects and realities of these approaches to public scholarship through my research and collaboration with The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis to extend and expand family learning experiences, as well as build meaningful learning opportunities for students.

 

 

IUPUI Center for Service and Learning: Summer 2013 Service Learning Assistant Scholarships

The Center for Service and Learning is accepting applications for Summer 2013 Service Learning Assistant Scholarships. The summer application window will remain open from now through March 1st, 2013.

Service Learning Assistant (SLA) Scholarships are available to recognize IUPUI students who have been selected by faculty or professional staff to support community engaged faculty/staff work in teaching, research and service. SLAs may assist their faculty/staff mentor:

  • to design/implement/conduct SoTL research on a service learning class,
  • to conduct a community engaged research project,
  • to build capacity within a campus department or unit that expands the number and quality of service learning courses at the undergraduate, graduate and professional levels of the curriculum,
  • to implement a professional service project in and with the community.

IUPUI faculty and staff are invited to apply for an SLA scholarship.

  • Upon approval, instructors identify a student to serve as their SLA.  The scholarship award is then transferred from the faculty/staff mentor to the student.
  • Please note that awards are granted to support faculty work. Applications to support independent student research projects will not be supported.

To learn more about program requirements, funding levels, or to complete an online application, please visit: http://csl.iupui.edu/OSL/slaapps.asp.

 

NEH Preservation and Access research and Development Grants

NEH Logo

NEH Division of Preservation and Access

Receipt Deadline May 1, 2013 for Projects Beginning January 2014

Preservation and Access Research and Development grants support projects that address major challenges in preserving or providing access to humanities collections and resources. These challenges include the need to find better ways to preserve materials of critical importance to the nation’s cultural heritage—from fragile artifacts and manuscripts to analog recordings and digital assets subject to technological obsolescence—and to develop advanced modes of searching, discovering, and using such materials.

Applicants should define a specific problem, devise procedures and potential solutions, and explain how they would evaluate their projects and disseminate their findings. Project results must serve the needs of a significant number of humanists.

For details: http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/preservation-and-access-research-and-development

 

IUPUI Arts & Humanities Workshop: Research Commercialization, Intellectual Property, and Entrepreneurship

When: Thursday, February 28, 2013 | 12:00 PM-1:30 PM
Where: University Library, Room 1126

IUPUI faculty and students from across the disciplines are involved in innovative and exciting research projects — some of which might lead to inventions, technologies, software programs, or businesses.  This workshop introduces faculty and students to the basics of research commercialization, intellectual property, and entrepreneurship in the IU system.

Representatives from the IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and the IU Research and Technology Corporation will outline the steps from research idea to commercial implementation in this informative session.  They will answer such questions as: What are IU’s intellectual property policies? Should my software be open source or proprietary? Are there other researchers or community partners that can help me develop my idea? How do I translate my university research into a commercial product?

Click here to register

Gilder Lehrman Center Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery Fellowship

A residential fellowship with The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition

http://www.yale.edu/glc/info/trafficking.htm

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition (GLC), part of the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale University, invites applications for a residential fellowship from scholars and public intellectuals to study the fundamental origins and circumstances surrounding debt bondage, forced labor, human trafficking, and other forms of modern day slavery. Traditional academics as well as writers/researchers without academic institutional affiliation are encouraged to apply. The Center is offering one fellowship in 2013-14.

This is an interdisciplinary fellowship program, based in history and the social sciences, which aims to promote innovative research on the origins and conditions that lead to contemporary slavery. In recent years many NGOs and other activists have worked very hard to provide data, to engage in intervention, and to raise public and governmental awareness on this international problem. At the GLC and at Yale, and at other cooperating institutions such as the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati we believe the issues of modern slavery would benefit from a more robust research base rooted in, but not necessarily limited to, historical analysis and interpretation.

The Fellow will be expected to be in full-time residence during the academic year beginning September 1, 2013. An earned doctorate in a relevant field or alternatively equivalent qualifications for research and teaching are expected for the successful candidate. In addition to working on his/her own research project, the Fellow is expected to teach one course related to his/her research and hold related office hours for students, participate in the fall conference and offer one public lecture or conduct a workshop either at Yale or at the Freedom Center in Cincinnati. The Fellow is also expected to interact with students and faculty, contribute to the intellectual life of the Center, and participate in its collective activities and development. Ideally, the fellow will also complete a significant publication during his/her residency.

Under the direction of Professor David W. Blight, the Center fosters an intellectual community at Yale through the interaction of students, faculty, and visiting scholars interested in the understanding of all aspects of the institution of slavery from the earliest times to the present. The Center organizes various activities, including lectures, speaker series, workshops, and conferences. For more information, visit www.yale.edu/glc.

Stipend and Resource Information
The successful fellow will receive an academic year stipend of $55,000 plus individual health insurance coverage. All Gilder Lehrman Center Fellows will have full access to the Yale University libraries and email. Normally, Fellows can expect shared office space, computer access and basic office supplies. Interested candidates, who have other sources of funding, may apply with a clear indication of their funding situation. All applicants should indicate clearly whether they are seeking full or partial funding. AA/EOE; applications from women and minorities are encouraged.

Application Process
Applicants should apply through Academic Jobs On-Line athttps://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/2477 and must include the following:

  1. Cover letter, including current e-mail address
  2. Current curriculum vitae, including publications
  3. A 1500-word description of the proposed research project. The description should include the background, nature, importance, specific objectives, and methodology of the proposed research project.
  4. Two letters of recommendation. Referees should discuss the candidate’s teaching ability as well as other points. Letters of reference can be uploaded directly by the referees through the online application site.
  5. An official university transcript (graduate level, if applicable).
  6. A summary of the proposed course (300-word max)

Deadline for submission: March 1, 2013

For additional information email gilder.lehrman.center@yale.edu.
Late or incomplete applications will NOT be accepted.