Fellowship: Getty Scholars Program — Connecting Seas: Cultural and Artistic Exchange Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, 2013-14


Getty Scholars Program — Connecting Seas: Cultural and Artistic Exchange
Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, 2013-14

Applications due by 1 November 2012

Water has long been a significant means for the movement of goods and people. Sophisticated networks, at a variety of scales, were established in antiquity around the Mediterranean and the Black Seas, and later in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. Together with sporadic and accidental encounters, these networks fostered commerce in raw materials and finished objects, along with the exchange of ideas and cultural concepts. Far from being barriers, seas and oceans were vital links connecting cultures. The 2013–2014 academic year at the Getty Research Institute and Getty Villa will be devoted to exploring the art-historical impact of maritime transport.

How has the desire for specific commodities from overseas shaped social, political, and religious institutions? How has the introduction of foreign materials and ideas transformed local artistic traditions, and what novel forms and practices have developed from trade and other exchanges, both systematic and informal? What role do the objects born of these interactions have in enhancing cultural understandings or perpetuating misunderstandings? How has the rapidly accelerating pace of exchange in recent years influenced cross-cultural developments? The goal of this research theme is to explore how bodies of water have served, and continue to facilitate, a rich and complex interchange in the visual arts.

The Getty Research Institute and the Getty Villa invite proposals focusing on artistic exchange and the transmission of knowledge across bodies of water from ancient times to the present day. Scholars actively engaged in studying the role of artists, patrons, priests, merchants, and explorers in oceanic exchange are encouraged to apply, and projects focusing on the Pacific are particularly welcome.

More details: http://www.getty.edu/research/scholars/years/future.html

NEH “Shared Horizons: Data, Biomedicine, and the Digital Humanities” Symposium Scheduled for April 10-12

August 10, 2012 – The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) recently announced the first initiative of its partnership with the National Library of Medicine (NLM).  NEH’s Office of Digital Humanities, working in cooperation with NLM, the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities of the University of Maryland, and Research Councils UK, will be a part of “Shared Horizons: Data, Biomedicine, and the Digital Humanities,” an interdisciplinary symposium exploring the intersection of digital humanities and biomedicine.

Scheduled to take place April 10-12, 2013, Shared Horizons will provide a unique forum for  participants and their institutions to address questions about collaboration, research methodologies, and the interpretation of evidence arising from the interdisciplinary opportunities in this area of biomedical-driven humanities scholarship.

Shared Horizons aims to create opportunities for disciplinary cross-fertilization through a mix of formal and informal presentations combined with breakout sessions, all designed to promote a rich exchange of ideas about how large-scale quantitative methods can lead to new understandings of human culture. Bringing together researchers from the digital humanities and bioinformatics communities, the symposium will explore ways in which these two communities might collaborate on projects that bridge the humanities and medicine around the topics of sequence alignment and network analysis, two modes of analysis that intersect with “big data.”

Additional information is available on the Shared Horizons website.

Artist-in-Residence Lecture: Tim Hardy, “From Shakespeare to Shaw to Sondheim: Theatre for the 21st Century”

Tim Hardy

DATE: Thursday, September 6, 2012

TIME: 7:30PM – 9:30PM

LOCATION: Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall, IUPUI; 735 W. New York St.; Indianapolis, IN 46202 


Tim Hardy looks at our seemingly constant need for drama of one kind or another — stories, theater, film, opera, literature. Concentrating principally on theater, he identifies how drama has changed through the centuries, reflecting the society it serves.  By staying relevant to its audiences, theater still succeeds in “holding a mirror up to nature” in such a way that we can both recognize ourselves and be wonderfully surprised and informed.

As a professional actor since the mid-sixties, Tim Hardy argues that if we don’t keep an ever-vigilant eye out for lazy, repetitive theatre — and he offers examples — if we don’t truthfully and completely re-invent the means whereby we would excite, inform, and delight our audiences, then we are on the short route to what the great director Peter Brook calls “dead theatre.”  From this there can be no recovery.

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute is pleased to welcome internationally-acclaimed actor/director Tim Hardy as a 2012 artist-in-residence.  Based in London, Mr. Hardy is on the faculty of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) and has performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company (in Peter Brook’s Marat/Sade and Peter Hall’s Henry V) and at prestigious theatres across the United Kingdom and Europe.  A company member of Opera Music Theatre London, Mr. Hardy has also performed in numerous operas and musical theatre productions including La Traviata, The Magic Flute, and Guys and Dolls. He has narrated over 300 television documentaries, including series for The Discovery Channel and The History Channel, and his on-camera television work includes roles opposite Ian McKellen and Michael Gambon. Mr. Hardy’s extensive directing credits include Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Twelfth Night, Julius Caesar, Twelve Angry Men, The Crucible, Gaslight, Lady Windermere’s Fan, The Seagull, The Arcadians, and The Doll’s House.

This event is co-sponsored by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and the The New Oxford Shakespeare at IUPUI.

For tickets, click here.

IUPUI professor receives Association of Midwest Museums Distinguished Service Award

The Association of Midwest Museums has honored an Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis professor for long-term distinguished service to the museum profession.

Elizabeth Kryder-Reid, who teaches museum studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, is the recipient of the 2012 Association of Midwest Museums Distinguished Service Award. The association’s awards committee unanimously voted to present the annual award to Kryder-Reid in recognition of her outstanding commitment to the association and her exemplary service to the museum profession.

The IUPUI professor accepted the award today during a ceremony at the association’s general conference, which takes place through July 26 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in downtown Indianapolis.

The Association of Midwest Museums, established in 1927, provides programs and services to museums throughout an eight-state region in the Midwest. More than 400 museum professionals are attending this year’s association conference in Indianapolis. The three-day event features outstanding sessions, guest speakers, and tours and receptions at museums in the host city.

IUPUI lecturer to share insights gained on trip to China with students

David Strong, with colleagues, on trip to China

When the subject turned to China and globalization in his introductory sociology classes at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, David Strong realized two things: His students wanted to learn more about China, and so did he.

When an opportunity to see China first-hand came along, Strong seized it. The sociology lecturer in the IU School of Liberal Arts applied for and was selected, along with other educators from Indiana colleges and universities, to visit China in May 2012. The trip was designed for faculty members who don’t specialize in issues surrounding China but want to incorporate material about China into their teaching.

The trip was sponsored and financed by the Indiana Consortium for International Programs, the Confucius Institute and IUPUI’s Office of International Affairs.

Strong said the experience, which also included a visit to India, underscored the reasons everyone should keep an eye on China and its future, including intellectual reasons and simple curiosity.

But even if none of those reasons apply, he said there is another consideration for Hoosiers: their jobs.
Strong said he was surprised by the speed of new construction in China and how quickly the country is modernizing itself. “You really can, in some respects, very palpably feel this ancient society sprinting into the 21st century.”

Going to China left him with a more nuanced view that he will share with his students.
Among the impressions he took away:

  • “Intellectually, you know China is a big country, but when you are there you realize how damn big it is. The capital city of Yunnan Province, Kunming, where we visited, is in southwest China. Kunming is considered a smaller, provincial capital in China. Yet the population of Kunming is greater than Los Angeles.”
  • “China is a land of contrasts — where farmers in rural areas still use no more technology than they did 500 years ago to grow rice in a country that has a space program.”
  • “In Beijing, we drove past sophisticated, modern skyscrapers on our way to the Great Wall of China.”
  • “Globalization has had its winners and losers in China. In rural areas, so much of the country seems unaffected.”
  • “As long as central power isn’t challenged, you don’t see or feel the power of the state as nearly as much as I thought you would.”

China has lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty, Strong said. “But what will be the future for the poorest Chinese?” Whether the well-to-do in China are able to live a peaceful, secure life depends upon the answer to that question, he said.

“I remember coming back after this three-week experience and Indiana seemed so small,” Strong said. “We know only a small percentage of the world’s population is American. But it is one thing to know that and another to see it in such a profound way.”

Source: http://newscenter.iupui.edu/5706/IUPUI-lecturer-to-share-insights-gained-on-trip-to-China-with-students

Westfield to introduce Herron student Katey Bonar’s new sculpture with a meet the artist event on July 27

Katey Bonar

A new sculpture titled Passaggio graces the entrance to Asa Bales Park in downtown Westfield. The City’s Grand Junction Task Group commissioned the work through Herron School of Art and Design’s Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life.  Senior sculpture major Katey Bonar is the artist.
The public is invited to a Meet the Artist Event on Friday, July 27 from 6pm to 8pm at the sculpture in the park, which is located at 205 W. Hoover Street.

Three, 13-foot columns comprise the main sculpture. The columns are fabricated from steel tubing covered by polyurethane foam with a fiberglass skin and joined by concentric rings of steel tubing suspended inside the columns at the top. Near the columns are two ring groupings made of thermoplastic, flanking a sidewalk.

Katey Bonar Passaggio 2012
Katey Bonar. Passaggio. 2012

The name Passaggio references a passageway or turning point in a journey, which brings together the emphasis of history, present, and future.   Passaggio, functions as an entry way, but also a space for visitors to explore and experience as part of the park itself.
“I feel like opening an art piece like this in Westfield gives an opportunity for residents to reflect on the past, as well as to examine where they are now and where they want to be in the future, both collectively and personally,” said Bonar.
All of the visual cues in Passaggio relate to natural visual patterns that reflect time passing. The concentric ring patterns mirror the growth rings in trees. The columns’ ridges and grooves echo eroded landmasses or stratified geologic forms.  According to Bonar, the pavilion rings overhead are a way to examine the potential of looking up to the sky as an intangible place and as a possible map of the yet to come.  In the two thermoplastic ring groupings, viewers have the opportunity to trace history.

Bonar will be available to discuss the sculpture and the details behind the meaning during the Meet the Artist Event. The City is encouraging residents to make an evening of it by stopping at the weekly Farmers Market on their way to the park across the street.

About the Basile Center
The Frank and Katrina Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life is Herron’s laboratory for applying the talents and skills of Herron students and faculty to the needs of businesses, nonprofit organizations and government agencies. It connects artists in all media with community partners who are interested in providing real-world and professional practice experiences through public art commissions, art and design competitions and civic engagement opportunities. The skill and knowledge students gain from
conceptualizing and competing for community-based commissions better prepares them for the world outside college. Students often work with architects, engineers, electricians, fabrication design houses, printer companies and landscape architects to get the job done, resulting in an extraordinarily well-rounded practical experience. For more information, visit http://www.herron.iupui.edu/basile-center.

A Visit to the Herron School of Art and Design Sculpture Studios

Herron School of Art and Design faculty and students were busy this afternoon when we took a visit to the sculpture studios on Indiana Avenue. For those of you who are familiar only with the Eskanazi Hall building, Herron has a 30,000 square foot facility on Indiana Avenue. In fact, it’s currently undergoing an expansion and will be rededicated as the Sydney and Lois Eskenazi Fine Art Center.

Robert Horvath-Braincandy
Robert Horvath. Braincandy. 2010

One of the faculty we met with is Robert Horvath, Assistant Professor at the Herron School of Art and Design. Horvath explores the world behind the glamour-obsessed contemporary world. What initially appears beautiful has a menace and decay to it. In his words, his imagery “forces a visual duality: the escapist pop culture youth can no longer hide from the horrors of reality.”

Today, Robert was busy working on his IAHI funded project, a new series of ceramics which pursue some of the themes that he has developed in his paintings.


Benjamin Horvath
Robert Horvath

For more about Robert Horvath and his work, see http://www.herron.iupui.edu/faculty/robert-horvath.



Benjamin Sunderlin
Benjamin Sunderlin


We also bumped in to Benjamin Sunderlin, a student of the Herron School of Art and Design. Sunderlin showed us the casts that he was making for the IAHI and Herron. The casts show reduced size sections of the Parthenon frieze, which were molded from casts purchased for the Herron School in the 1920s and 1930s. We’ll have more to say about his project in upcoming posts.


Herron School of Art and Design to debut Design and Thinking on September 12

Herron School of Art and Design will present Design and Thinking: a documentary on design thinking on Wednesday, September 12 at 7:00 p.m. in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall.

The film (running time 74:11) entertainingly reveals the design thinking movement’s growing relevance to problem solving across business, culture and society.

The director, Mu-Ming Tsai, has won a Cannes Young Lion award for the film Wateraid for Dennis. In his first feature-length film, rather than create a paean to the beauty of design, he aims to bring forward the ambiguity, conflicts and messy process of how designers and other creative people think and do things.

Change-making organizations from a local bike shop to Coca-Cola provide real-world inspiration through design thinking in action. Thought leaders including David Kelley, Bill Moggridge, Roger Martin and Tim Brown share their belief that asking the right questions is more important than providing firm answers.

Pamela Napier and Terri Wada, faculty members in Visual Communication Design at Herron, agree that the time for such a movie is now. “With increasingly complex issues arising on multiple fronts in our current global economy,” said Napier, “design thinking has been gaining recognition as a powerful approach to creating effective and innovative solutions to many of the ‘wicked’ challenges that businesses, organizations, institutions and communities face today.”

“In places as close to Indianapolis as Chicago and as far as California,” said Wada, “creative design firms like IDEO and the design school at Stanford University have provided ample evidence of the power of design thinking applied to the creation of revolutionary objects and services.”

Herron became an early adopter of design thinking to provide real-world experiences and professional practice for its students. In its graduate degree program in visual communication design, which has had only four graduating classes, students have produced dozens of case studies where they and their faculty mentors have developed actionable solutions for real community challenges in collaboration with stakeholders. A Herron case study is featured in the new book by Andrew Shea, Designing for Social Change, published by Princeton Architectural Press.

“The inclusion of the Herron in Designing for Social Change is an acknowledgement of our contribution to this relatively young field. The fact that we’re listed among so many respected designers and design schools demonstrates Herron’s position within the leading edge of social design,” said Marshall Jones, Herron’s communication design specialist.

The September 12 event provides a unique opportunity for designers and non-designers alike to be inspired by what design thinking can do. Herron’s Visual Communication Design Graduate Studio will be open so that visitors can learn about some of the design thinking projects that are currently underway in Indianapolis.

This screening is being made possible by a generous donation from Wil Marquez, Creative Director and Owner of With Purpose  http://www.wpurpose.com/

2012 Herron Faculty Show

Herron Faculty Show 2012

Reese, Berkshire and Paul Galleries
August 10–September 12, 2012
Free Public Reception: August 24, 5:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

The biennial Faculty Show will kick off the fall gallery season at Herron School of Art and Design. This year’s exhibition promises to be eclectic, with 35 faculty members exhibiting from departments including art history, ceramics, furniture design, painting and drawing, photography and intermedia, printmaking, sculpture and visual communication design.

“All tenured and tenure-track faculty, lecturers and program technicians were invited to participate,” said Herron’s Gallery Director Paula Katz. “It’s always interesting to see who has work available to show and what the artists, designers and scholars in the show have been creating recently.”

Participants include: Anila Agha; Lesley Baker; Karen Baldner; Andrew Davis; Stephanie Doty; Ray Duffey; Valerie Eickmeier; Vance Farrow; Reagan Furqueron; Anita Giddings; Linda Adele Goodine; Stacey Holloway; Robert Horvath; Marc Jacobson; Lauren Kussro; Flounder Lee; Craig McDaniel; David Morrison; Eric Nordgulen; Kathleen O’Connell; Stefan Petranek; William Potter; Mark Richardson; Danielle Riede; Jacob Ristau; Eva Roberts; Jean Robertson; Cory Robinson; Helen Sanematsu; Lukas Schooler; Meredith Setser; Sherry Stone; Phil Tennant; Christopher Vice; and Andrew Winship.

Also opening in the Marsh Gallery August 3 and continuing through August 24 is Russian Posters, a sampling from a collection produced by 20 contemporary Russian poster artists and shown during Moscow Design Week to mark the 120th birthday of the Russian graphic designer Aleksandr Rodchenko.

Rounding out the season opener August 3 through August 24 in the Basile Gallery is a thesis exhibition by Amina Khazie, M.F.A. candidate in Furniture Design.


Clockwise from top left: Lauren Kussro, We held so tightly to each other, we became as one, detail, 2012, monotype and silkscreen on paper, thread, beads; Stephanie Doty, Alteration 1: Lift, Cut, detail, 2011, charcoal and graphite; Stacey Holloway, Take Heed, detail, 2012, mixed media; Karen Baldner, The Presence of Your Absence XXIV, detail, 2011, mixed media drawing on handmade paper with embedded horse hair.

Course Announcement: Public Art Painting, Fall 2012.

Super Bowl artist Pamela Bliss will teach this comprehensive class on Public Art Painting for fall, 2012.

Topics include:

  • Site selection
  • Interior and Exterior applications
  • Wall preparation and Material selection
  • Insurance
  • Design Scaffolding, boom lift and rappelling options

Course number: Her E220 33026
Title: Exploring Art/Mural Painting
Day Time: TR 9-11:30
Location: Herron 205 and off site locations