Owen Mundy fragments public space in Packet Switcher

the consequence of scale

Herron School of Art and Design will host Packet Switcher, an exhibition of recent projects by artist, designer and programmer Owen Mundy. The exhibition opens in the Robert B. Berskhire, Eleanor Prest Reese and Dorit and Gerald Paul Galleries on February 27 with a lecture by Mundy at 6:00 p.m. There will be a reception immediately following from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Packet Switcher runs through April 13.

Mundy is an assistant professor of art at Florida State University. He earned an M.F.A. degree in Visual Art from the University of California, San Diego and a B.F.A. degree from Indiana University, Bloomington. He’s a founder of Your Art Here http://yourarthere.org, an art organization that creates venues where art and ideas can be expressed freely through the use of billboards and other public spaces. In 2009 he created Give Me My Data http://givememydata.com, an online application that helps people get their data out of Facebook in reusable formats.

Packet Switcher contains a survey of recent and never before exhibited works. The individual pieces are varied; from dystopian visualizations of anonymous network data, to custom software which generates print resolution tests from news images. Owing to the increasingly decentralized models of artistic and cultural practice, as well as new forms of authorship like crowdsourcing, this exhibition features numerous collaborative projects with Mundy and other artists including Joelle Dietrick, Ryan Boatright, The Periscope Project, and Commodify, Inc.

The exhibition title references the process used to move digital communication by breaking files into smaller, faster blocks, or packets, of data. The packets travel through networks via the quickest available route and are reassembled at their destination. A digital photograph, for example, might be broken into several packets, each of which may travel through a different city before delivery.

Through a similar process, the artists underscore how incidental fragmentation and automation can streamline markets, but also make them vulnerable to systems failure. The use of architectural images points to recent real estate market volatility and considers how the technology-enabled pursuit of profit alters basic needs.

As a U.S. Navy photographer, Mundy observed militarism’s effect on cultures, sites and bodies. These experiences became an important influence on his work.

Also opening on February 27 and continuing through March 19 in the Marsh Gallery will be an exhibition of new works by Herron faculty members Ray Duffey and Marc Jacobson, and in the Basile Gallery, an exhibition of new works by Herron faculty member Stephanie Doty.
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Gallery Hours
MON. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
TUE. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
WED. 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.
THU. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
FRI. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
SAT. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
SUN. Closed
Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation. Complimentary parking courtesy of The Great Frame Up. Parking in the surface lot next to Herron School of Art and Design requires a valid IUPUI parking permit at all times.
Rob Bullock
Assistant to the Dean
External Affairs &  Development Specialist
Herron School of Art and Design
IUPUI – HR 224
735 West New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202
Phone:  317-278-9470
Fax:        317-278-9471

The 24th Annual Joseph Taylor Symposium It Takes a City: Toward a Diverse and Humane Community

Jospeh Taylor Symposium Flyer

Wednesday, February 27, 2013
IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

Presented by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI in conjunction with the Department of Philosophy and Center for Service and Learning

 

Dr. Joseph T. Taylor served as a Professor of Sociology from 1965 to 1983 and as the first Dean of the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI from 1967–1978. Dr. Taylor is remembered for his commitment to dialogue and diversity.

The Joseph T. Taylor Symposium honors Dr. Taylor for his many contributions to the university and the community by hosting informed discussion on issues of concern in urban America. The Twenty-Fourth Annual Joseph T. Taylor Symposium is offered in celebration of all Dr. Taylor stood for during his lifetime and stands as a lasting legacy to his vision and life work.

It Takes a City: Toward a Diverse and Humane Community

Increasingly, we are witnessing a shift from our sense of community responsibility to a form of “hyper-individualism,” where individuals place self- interest first, above those of the community as a whole. The alternative, working together for a common good, facing problems as a community, and through mutual support and respect forging more lasting solutions, ensures that none of us must bear societal burdens alone.

TEDxIUPUI Auditions on February 9: Raising the Next Generation

TEDxIUPUI

Have you ever watched a TED talk and been inspired to get up on stage and do the same thing yourself? Now’s your chance. The TEDxIUPUI team is canvassing Indianapolis to find some of the most remarkable voices to speak at the TEDxIUPUI conference devoted to “ideas worth spreading” – in the context of the theme Raising the Next Generation.

Auditions for TEDxIUPUI are on February 9, 2013 from 9-5

Location: Informatics and Communications Technology Complex Auditorium, 535 W. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (Map It)

The independently produced event, operated under a license from TED, is aimed at creating dialogue and action as well as giving Indianapolis’ best and brightest a platform for sharing their thoughts, ideas and calls to action.

The best speakers at the auditions may be invited to give a talk at TEDxIUPUI on March 22, 2013.

Fill out this form to reserve your chance to be a part of this exciting event! Tell us, what do we need to do to “Raise the next Generation”?

More details and contact information at http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/6565

New Frontiers/New Currents Grant, Deadline Feb. 1, 2013

New Frontiers/New Currents Grant:

2013 Deadlines: February 1 and August 1 (and within 6-12 months of the date of the anticipated conference or seminar)

Funding of up to $20,000 is available for New Currents programs, specifically workshops, symposia, small conferences, roundtables that offer new perspectives on, and new insights into, areas of scholarship and research in the arts and humanities.  The goal of this initiative is to host major distinguished thinkers on timely topics of significant and broad interest to the arts and humanities community and beyond, with funding preference provided to those topics more likely to have interdisciplinary interest across the arts and humanities. While presentations or participation by Indiana University faculty as part of the funded project are welcome, the majority of speakers/participants should be drawn from the outside academic community, and all speakers/participants should be nationally recognized. Written commitments by all participants in the event must be provided with the proposal.

Key to this funding initiative is dissemination, certainly including but also beyond the Indiana University community. Thus, contractual evidence for publication/dissemination of proceedings (with contributions by conference participants) as appropriate for the discipline and event is required for funding through this mechanism (see bullets below).

Application Format:

Proposals for New Currents Grants must be submitted no later than six months before the anticipated date of the event and no earlier than a year before the event, at http://research.iu.edu/funding_newfrontiers.shtml. All proposals must include:

  • a project description (3 page maximum)
  • list of confirmed speakers and rationale for their selection (2 page maximum)
  • project budget submitted using the Work on your budget function on the online application form
  • budget justification for funds requested • up-to-date c.v.(s) of proposer(s) (3 page maximum)
  • two letters of support: one from department or unit head and an additional letter from an expert in the field, not necessarily from Indiana University, assessing the significance and innovation of the project and the likelihood of its impact and success
  • a letter confirming participation from all internal and external participants
  • contractual evidence of significant dissemination, reflecting the importance placed upon dissemination for this initiative. Such evidence might include:
  • agreement with an outside publisher for publication of the conference proceedings,
  • agreement/contract with a gallery or concert facility for a presentation of a concert or gallery show outside of Indiana University with accompanying program notes,
  • agreement/contract for webinars or other new media forms of dissemination,
  • agreement/contract for publication of a themed issue of a scholarly journal
  • similar evidence as that listed above appropriate to the discipline and event.
  • Costs associated with dissemination (including publication costs) cannot be included in the budget proposal.

Recipients of funding are required to submit a brief interim report within one month after the completion of the meeting portion of the project, and a brief final report following the dissemination portion of the project. Failure to do so will preclude eligibility for future internal funding from the programs.

Indiana University Women’s Philanthropy Council Grants

The Women’s Philanthropy Council seeks to fund critical needs, new ventures, and innovative solutions to social problems. In particular, the council hopes to award grants that will advance its belief that all members of the Indiana University community should have access to quality educational opportunities, excellent health care, a clean and safe environment, cultural enrichment through the arts, and educational programs and services that allow them to pursue their academic careers. Applications that propose to give back and provide unique opportunities to the university community are especially welcome.

The WPC expects to award up to $100,000 in grants during this academic year’s granting cycle. Awards may range from $2,500 to $25,000.

All Indiana University community members on all campuses—students, faculty, and staff—with the vision and capacity to manage and effectively utilize a grant are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for applications is March 8, 2013.

2013 Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellowship Guidelines Released for Contemporary Visual Artists in Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota and Wisconsin

Efroymson Family Fund

About the Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellowship

Now in its 8th year, the Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellowships were established to increase public awareness of contemporary visual art in the Midwest. The intent of the fellowship is to reward creativity and encourage emerging and established individual artists by supporting their artistic development.

2013 Fellowship Overview
In 2013, five $25,000 fellowships will be awarded.

Eligibility Criteria
Applicants must meet the below eligibility criteria by the submission due date.

  • AGE 25 or older by February 28, 2013
  • RESIDENT of either Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota or Wisconsin as of February 2012
  • COMMITMENT to reside in Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota or Wisconsin the duration of the fellowship (May 2013-May 2014).

Past Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellows are not eligible to apply.

Fellowship Categories
Applicants must work in one of the following mediums. (Wearable or functional decorative art including quilts, jewelry, vessels or pottery will not be considered.)

  • Installation
  • Sculpture
  • New media (video, computer generated or 3-D)
  • Selection Criteria
  • All applicants will be reviewed in an anonymous process by a nationally selected jury.  The Juror will review digital images and/video and the accompanying narrative based on the following criteria.
  • Quality and skill
  • Creativity and uniqueness
  • Commitment to developing work
  • Impact the award will have on the artist’s career

Application Due Date: February 28, 2013 by 5:00pm EST

The Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellowships are made possible by the Efroymson Family Fund, a donor-advised fund of Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF).

Download the complete 2013 guidelines and submission instructions here:  http://bit.ly/VqSKeD

Save the Date: 2013 IUPUI Research Day: APRIL 5, 2013

Save the Date: 2013 IUPUI Research Day: APRIL 5, 2013

On April 5, 2013 the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research will host the 2013 IUPUI Research Day. This open house celebrates the cutting-edge and multifaceted research and scholarly activities of IUPUI. This full day event will be held at the IUPUI Campus Center.

Research Day provides an opportunity for the IUPUI faculty, staff, and students, their academic, industrial, and governmental partners, and the broader community, to come together and learn more about the research enterprise at IUPUI, to explore new collaborations, and to lay the foundation for new partnerships.

Click here to register. More details will be announced in upcoming Research Enterprise issues.

IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery, IU Art Museum partner to showcase Morton Bradley’s math-inspired art

Jean Gibran Work

NDIANAPOLIS — With their brilliant colors and their display of the Harvard University graduate’s understanding of science, Morton C. Bradley’s sculptures are full of life. When viewed, the mathematically inspired creations evoke words such as “crystal,” “kaleidoscope,” “prism” and “snowflake.”

The Cultural Arts Gallery at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, in partnership with the Indiana University Art Museum in Bloomington, invites the IUPUI campus community and the public to view an upcoming exhibit of Bradley’s work.

“Color and Form: Selected Works by Morton C. Bradley Jr.” opens Monday, Jan. 7, and runs through Friday, Jan. 25, at the IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery in Suite 240 of the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. Nine of Bradley’s hanging sculptures and 11 sculptures mounted on pedestals will be on display.

Morton C. “Bob” Bradley, born in 1912, was the visionary behind the geometric sculptures that were created over decades by a workshop of talented artists and engineers. Bradley bequeathed the creations to Indiana University at his death in 2004.

“Bob Bradley’s works represent a complex combination of geometry and color theory,” said Sherry Rouse, curator of campus art at IU Bloomington. “He started simply but grew to love the more complex forms of the stellated dodecahedra and the icosahedra as he worked with his fabricators to create sculptures. Toward the end of his life, he began to experiment with minimal surface sculptures that are delightful to the eye and challenging to the viewer.”

Bradley’s first art pieces were paintings and drawings that were unrelated to the sculptures. His work evolved into an exploration of the Platonic solids and progressed to other polyhedrons, with his designs progressing over the years.

Much of Bradley’s inspiration came from traditional two-dimensional patterns from around the world, such as Italian cathedrals and Egyptian and Arabic architecture and textiles. His transformation of the two-dimensional patterns onto multiple intersecting planes resulted in the three-dimensional forms.

Bradley worked as a painting conservator at the Fogg Museum at Harvard and wrote “The Treatment of Pictures,” the 1950 book that remains a historic reference for painting conservators. He was also a researcher and theorist on subjects such as sentence structure, teaching methodology for foreign languages, anthropometry and music theory.

“Morton Bradley was a quiet genius whose accomplishments as an artist deal with great universal ideas,” said Heidi Gealt, director of the IU Art Museum. “It is a genuine pleasure to share Mr. Bradley’s beautiful legacy with Cultural Arts Galley patrons.”

Exhibit activities include a lecture and book signing featuring Lynn Gamwell, a leading author on the intersection of art, mathematics and science. Gamwell is the author of “Color and Form: The Geometric Sculptures of Morton C. Bradley, Jr.,” recently published by IU Press. Gamwell put Bradley’s unique fusion of color, form and mathematical ideas in its historical context in her earlier book, “Exploring the Invisible: Art, Science, and the Spiritual.”

Gamwell’s lecture will take place from 4 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 22, in Room 450A of the IUPUI Campus Center. The book signing precedes the lecture, from 3 to 4 p.m., in the Barnes & Noble on the first floor of the IUPUI Campus Center.

“Color and Form,” a traveling exhibit previously on view at Indiana University Northwest, is made possible through IU’s Moveable Feast of the Arts Initiative, supported by the Lilly Endowment.

The IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1 to 7 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free.

Source: http://newscenter.iupui.edu/5888/IUPUI-Cultural-Arts-Gallery-IU-Art-Museum-partner-to-showcase-Morton-Bradleys-mathinspired-art

IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute (IAHI) Grant Information Session

Sponsored by The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research

When: Thursday, February 07, 2013 | 11:30 AM-12:30 PM
Where: University Library, Room 1126

This session will provide participants with an overview of the IAHI internal funding opportunity, how to apply and more importantly how to develop a competitive proposal. Members of the IAHI grant advisory group will be present to answer questions, as well as IUPUI faculty who have received IAHI funding and who have reviewed arts and humanities proposals.

REGISTER HERE: http://crl.iupui.edu/Events/eventsRegistration.asp?id=3105

Award: Medical Humanities Student Essay Award

Medical Humanities at IUPUI

The Medical Humanities Student Essay Award, sponsored by the IUPUI Medical Humanities – Health Studies Program, is given to a student at IUPUI whose writing is judged to be the best on a topic in medical humanities and health studies. This book award recognizes the work of students in understanding health and medicine from the perspectives of the Humanities, Law, and Social Sciences.  This competition is open to both undergraduate and graduate/professional students on the IUPUI campus.

Selection Process: Papers are judged by members of the Medical Humanities Program Committee and affiliated experts.  The award is presented and winners recognized at the annual Liberal Arts Honors Convocation ceremonies.  Undergraduate papers are judged separately from graduate papers.

Criteria: The paper must be written by an undergraduate or graduate/professional student for a course taken at IUPUI, and written within the past two academic years on a subject that utilizes the perspectives of the humanities or health studies (i.e., ethical, legal, social, historical, etc.) to gain a broader understanding of medicine and healthcare. Graduate theses and dissertations are not eligible for this award.

Submissions: The typical paper should be between 10 to 25 pages in length.  Papers are to be submitted electronically as a Microsoft Word or pdf document with a separate title page document, both of which should be attached to an email and sent to jizukac@iupui.edu by the annual deadline. Confirmations of receipt of entries will be emailed to the applicants. Entries received after the deadline cannot be accepted or considered for the competition.

For questions or more information, please call (317) 274-4740 or email Judi Campbell at jizukac@iupui.edu.