Reading at the Table with Rosa Tezanos-Pinto

Rosa Tezanos-Pinto, Ph.D., is a highly respected professor, administrator, and internationally renowned researcher in the field of Latin American literature and culture. She has authored and co-authored seven books and over forty-five articles and book chapters. She is the editor of RANLE, Revista de la Academia Norteamericana de la Lengua Española and Alba de América. In 2012, Dr. Tezanos-Pinto was invited by the renowned Latin American journal Confluencia.

Dr. Tezanos-Pinto will be reading from her book La presencia hispana y el español de los Estados Unidos. In this book, a varied range of distinguished specialists travel through scenarios, documentary sources, linguistic studies, literary and film works, to rescue the substantial Hispanic contributions to culture, education, the development of the sciences and the economic life of the United States, without overlooking a prospective view of the future of Spanish, as the second major language of this country, in the coming decades.

This event will be held on Tuesday, Feruary 12, 2019., from 11:30-1pm at University Club.  875 W. North St., Room 200.

Register now!

Click here for more information on the IUPUI Reading at the Table Series!

Students Honor MLK By Giving Back To Community

Photos by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

For Martin Luther King Jr. Day, hundreds of Jaguars spent their day off from classes volunteering at 13 different sites near downtown Indianapolis in honor of the late civil rights leader’s legacy, including the Ronald McDonald HouseHoly Family Shelter and the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site.

Several student groups, including the cross-country and tennis teams, participated in the annual day of service.

Students painted birdhouses and other decor at the Centers of Wellness for Urban Women. Their creations will be used in the community food garden at Flanner House.

Photos by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Students cleaned the Son Foundation house, which provides a residence for families who are going through cancer treatment.

Students with the IUPUI cross-country team put together bags of food for those in need at the Midwest Food Bank.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Samantha Thompson

IUPUI honors refugees of the past and present in series of events commemorating the Holocaust

INDIANAPOLIS — The IUPUI Jewish Faculty and Staff Council, in collaboration with community partners Exodus Refugee Immigration and Immigrant Welcome Center, is hosting a series of events to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Week immediately following International Holocaust Remembrance Day. These events honor the stories of refugees, asylees and immigrants from the Holocaust to today.

“After the Holocaust and World War II, human rights practice and international law were put into place to protect migrants,” said Adam Strom, director of Re-Imagining Migration at UCLA and IUPUI Holocaust Remembrance Week scholar-in-residence. “These protections are being tested today with the largest number of displaced persons since the end of the Second World War. It is time we take seriously the role of migration in the Holocaust in order to better understand our choices, challenges and responsibilities today.”

The IUPUI Jewish Faculty and Staff Council is hosting a series of events to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Week. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

A Holocaust Remembrance Ceremony will take place at noon Monday, Jan. 28, in Hine Hall Auditorium, 875 W. North St. Holocaust survivor and refugee Esther Davidson Fishman will share her story of survival and immigration to the United States. The program will also include remarks from Karen Dace, IUPUI vice chancellor for diversity, equity and inclusion, and a memorial candle-lighting by community leaders and IUPUI students, faculty and staff.

At noon on Jan. 29, Strom will lead a discussion titled “The Past Is Still Present: Migration, Immigration and the Holocaust.” He will discuss the history and consequences of the rise of the Nazis and the Holocaust and describe the role of migration in the Holocaust in order to better understand the challenges and responsibilities we are faced with today. The talk will be held in the IUPUI Global Crossroads Classroom: Room 2132 in the Education/Social Work Building, 902 W. New York St.

Holocaust Remembrance Week events will conclude with a panel discussion in Hine Hall Auditorium at 7 p.m. Jan. 29, titled “Refugees of the Holocaust, Refugees of Today: Opportunities and Challenges of New Lives in America.” The panel will be facilitated by Tamra Wright, director of diversity, equity and inclusion at the IUPUI School of Public and Environmental Affairs, and Jeremy Price, professor in the IUPUI School of Education and chair of the Jewish Faculty and Staff Council. The panelists — Strom; Debora Haber, executive artistic director of DEEP Arts and daughter of Holocaust survivors and refugees; and Winnie Betili Bulaya, founder of Refugee Welcome Baskets — will discuss personal experiences as well as historical and contemporary issues relating our responses to refugees in the past to our responses in the present.

Read the original article from IUPUI News

All The Moving Parts: A Workshop on Large-Scale Project Coordination

How to launch, coordinate, and finish inter-disciplinary projects with multiple scholars and sites, an example from O Say Can You See: The Early Washington, D.C. Law and Family Project. This workshop will focus on how to integrate social science and humanities scholarship in the process of generating a large-scale project.

All the Moving Parts is part of the seminar series Those Who Know the Trouble I’ve Seen: Citizenship and Resistance in the African-American Christian Communities, directed by Joseph Tucker Edmonds and Amanda Friesen and sponsored by the IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society.

RSVP now by email nwynne@iupui.edu

Did we mention that lunch will be provided?!
Friday February 8th in CA 508
12:30 to 2pm

See you there!

Papermaking 101 with Sarah Strong

Sarah Strong, a Herron School of Art and Design graduate student, displays some of her recent paper works in her studio. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

In the digital age, making paper from scratch is becoming a nearly lost art.

For Sarah Strong, it’s a passion she is passing on to her daughters. The Herron School of Art and Design graduate student has more than a decade of experience with hand papermaking. She incorporates her handmade papers into her installations, book arts, printmaking and more. The unique qualities of different fibers and their results keep her fascinated.

“It’s a little lonely. There aren’t a lot of papermakers in 2019,” said Strong, who earned her bachelor’s degree from Herron in 2008. “I do it because I love working with natural materials and I love to share it through teaching because of the involvement of nature and the history of paper as a means of sharing stories and knowledge.”

Sarah Strong, a Herron graduate student, defies the digital age by making her own paper for print and sculpture. Video by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

Creating even one sheet is an involved process where creativity is heavily utilized: Color, consistency, texture and which fibers to use must all be considered before the first batch of paper pulp is pulverized.

In her Herron studio, Strong has shelves of her recent work, as well as the paper works of colleagues, for inspiration. The freshest pieces are tacked to walls for drying as Strong is working feverishly to create about 30 small candlelit luminary sculptures in time for “Meld,” an exhibition running Feb. 11-16 in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1410 Indiana Ave. The show will feature the work of fellow first-year grad students Denise Troyer, Hailey Potts, Adam Rathbun, Frank Mullen and Kennedy Conner. The opening reception is set for 6 p.m. Feb. 12.

This plant material will become paper in Sarah Strong’s studio. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Found fibers

Many of the fibers Strong utilizes are harvested from her own and friends’ gardens. She keeps a handful of bins full of iris, daylily and lavender stalks and leaves. Strong said she particularly enjoys culling invasive species and using the unwanted plants in her paper.

“I love working in the gardens and then upcycling the fibers to become something of use,” she continued. “When the season is dying out, I like to go to people’s gardens and clean them out for them. I take a little bit from each plant and dry them until I’m ready to use them in my own process.”

For those without a handy source, pulp can also be purchased from paper mills like Indiana’s own TwinRocker Handmade Paper.

This bucket of paper pulp was extracted from Sarah Strong’s hydro pulper machine. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Cook first

The cellulose from the plant material is what’s needed to make paper. In order to extract the cellulose, a cooking process is required. Strong’s paper is created with the water and cellulose through hydrogen bonding.

“When I’m cooking them in a caustic solution, I’m cooking out everything that’s not cellulose,” Strong explained. “It breaks down the cellulose molecule structure a little bit, too.”

Beat it

The biggest — and loudest — piece of equipment in Strong’s studio is a hydro pulper. The artist can manipulate pulp thicknesses by changing run times and the positioning of the pulper’s beating drum and plate. When working with translucency, the pulp needs to be beaten between eight and 10 hours.

“The longer it’s beaten, the smaller the fibers become,” Strong said, “thus offering themselves to different processes in papermaking. The fibers are being broken down more and more. As you beat it further and further, the fibers turn to fibrils, which give you a stronger paper.”

Several buckets of paper pulp have been dyed. The pulp is then combined to create unique paper. By Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Add some color

While most of the paper has a light tone to it, Strong experiments with color by utilizing the dozens of colorants she has at the ready. The pulp is dyed in buckets and set on a work table like a painter’s palette. In the vat where the different pulps are combined, Strong can experiment with color like a painter.

Impressive

Water comes out of a screen as a sheet of paper gets its first pressing. More water will be extracted by mallet, machine or feet. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Once the pulp mix is satisfactory, Strong gathers the material with a screen and deckle. Excess water drips out before the pulp is carefully laid onto thin fabric sheeting. It’s then pressed and dried in various ways, depending on what the paper will be used for.

Paper for printmaking would be put under a hydraulic press. While creating paper for “Meld,” Strong’s daughter Jane Sparks simply placed the paper and fabric on some towels and then underneath a plane of Plexiglas, which Sparks then stood on for several minutes. The last of the water is squeezed out; the fibers join tighter; and the wet, new paper is ready to dry.

“Relationship with paper is very much a dance: You learn the fibers, and the fibers learn you,” Strong said. “You build this relationship, getting to know each other, and then eventually you can work together to create your art.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tim Brouk 

Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Presents Eighth Annual Exhibition: Exploring the Story of Lot’s Wife

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, invited 12 Indiana artists to explore and expound upon the story of Lot’s Wife during the eighth annual Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Seminar and the accompanying art exhibition. Artists include Stan Blevins, Peggy Breidenbach, Alys Caviness-Gober, Marjie Giffin, A. Paul Johnson, Kasey May, Michael McAuley, William Peacock, Katherine
Simmons, Jennifer Strange, Teresa Vazquez, and Kevin Wilson.

In this exhibition, the artists consider questions that delve far beyond the story Lot’s Wife who, as told in Genesis 19, turns to see the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah and becomes a pillar of salt. Did she act in disobedience or out of compassion? What is our responsibility to bear witness? Is looking back redemptive or paralyzing? Might we see contemporary events (mass tragedies, refugees) in the light of this text? Exploring the story through
religion, art, poetry, and music, this exhibition will ask questions fundamental to the human experience

Directed by Rabbi Sandy Sasso, the RSA Seminar explores the varieties of religious experience and understanding. Through seminars led by an interdisciplinary faculty, artists gain the knowledge and inspiration to develop new artistic works. Artists share their creations through exhibitions and presentations to members of the Central Indiana community, including religious organizations, schools, libraries, and community groups.

On March 7, 2019, the first public exhibition of the 2018-19 RSA Seminar’s work will open featuring new works of painting, sculpture, music, and poetry developed by the cohort. A reception begins at 5:30 p.m. with performances beginning at 6:30 p.m. The exhibition will remain on display at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis through April 30.

This opening event and exhibition is free and open to the public at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260). Refreshments will also be served at the March 7 reception.

Thursday, March 7, 2019
Reception begins at 5:30 PM; performance begins at 6:30 PM
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community
Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available at
https://www.culturalecologies.org/rsa/.

REGISTER NOW!

Catch a Fire! Honoring the Black Arts: An Evening of Spoken Word Poetry and Drumming

Babalawo Awodele Ifasina and Lasana Kazembe

Come and enjoy an evening of spoken word poetry and drumming featuring Babalawo Awodele Ifasina on the drums and Lasana Kazembe doing spoken word poetry.

The IUPUI Africana Studies Program invites one and all to a special evening of creative artistic expression. JOIN US as we honor the Black Arts with an exciting presentation and performance featuring spoken word poetry and live music.

The event will be held at Lilly Auditorium in the university library on the lower level. Wednesday, February 20th at 6pm.

This event is FREE and open to the public!

Spirit & Place Festival Call for Applications

Spirit & Place is a platform that connects Central Indiana residents through events, community conversations and skill-building opportunities aimed at launching innovative experiments, revealing invisible stories, and sparking radical collaborations. Using the arts, humanities, and religion, Spirit & Place catalyzes civic engagement and builds bridges of understanding.

It’s signature public offering is the Spirit & Place Festival which will occur from November 1 – 10, 2019 and this year’s theme is R/EVOLUTION. Learn more about the festival and the theme by visiting the Spirit & Place website.

Information about the process for submitting festival events may be found in the application guidelines. All interested participants are welcome to attend an information meeting on February 6 at WFYI (1630 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis) or by contacting Erin Kelley, Spirit & Place Program Director, at ekkelley@iupui.edu or 317-274-2462. The application deadline is Friday, April 12 at midnight.

IU Liberal Arts Talks with Catherine Beck

Join Catherine Beck, as she presents, “A Language Support Needs Analysis of International Law Students.”

This project takes a fresh look at the language support needs of international students enrolled in several programs at the IU McKinney School of Law to to determine whether the current Legal English courses are meeting the stakeholders’ needs.

The project was timed to inform a reevaluation of the current Memorandum of Agreement between the law school and the School of Liberal Arts.

Thursday, January 31, 2019
4-5pm at the Campus Center CE307

RSVP Now!

 

Greening IUPUI Grant

Taking Your Good Idea to the Next Level

Are you an IUPUI student, faculty, or staff member that has come up with a way to advance campus sustainability? Submit your idea, and you could win a Greening IUPUI Grant to make it happen.

Greening IUPUI Grants are awarded one time per year to projects that advance our campus sustainability principles and improve IUPUI’s STARS score. IUPUI dedicates a total of $50,000 annually to fund these projects.  You can review the Greening IUPUI Grant Guidelines here

Application Information

Deadlines

  • Application period opens: December 1, 2018
  • Application period closes: February 1, 2019 (11:59pm)
  • Applicants notified: April 1, 2019

Eligibility

IUPUI students, faculty, and staff may apply.  Students must have a faculty or staff member’s support and designate them as the project contact person on the application

Guidelines

Review the full Greening IUPUI Grant Fund Guidelines before applying.
Proposals should focus on one or more of the following areas:

  • Planning & Administration (Strategic initiatives, diversity, affordability, innovation)
  • Academic (Courses, research, other educational pursuits)
  • Campus Engagement (student engagement programs, events)
  • Public Engagement (volunteer opportunities, campus-community partnerships)
  • Operations (Grounds, energy, waste, water, purchasing, transportation, buildings)
  • Health & Wellness (Food, health, equity, and human sustainability

Proposals will be received by the Greening IUPUI Grant Review Committee who will evaluate the applications based on the following criteria:

  • Improving IUPUI’s STARS score
  • Long-term impact for IUPUI
  • High-impact learning experience(s)
  • Visibility
  • Student involvement
  • Reasonable timeline and feasibility
  • Financial considerations

To Apply

Complete the Greening IUPUI Grant application. You can preview the application before starting the application process.

Past Grant Awards

Need ideas?! Check out our sustainability principles, latest STARS report, and a few recent grant awards! Submit your Final Assessment Report here!