Liberal Arts Talks- The Green Challenge Deepens: Environmentalism in the Age of Climate Change by John McCormick

John McCormick revisits his 1995 book The Global Environmental Movement to examine the ways in which environmentalism has evolved in the era of climate change, globalization, the internet, nationalism, and the rise of China. He asks how these five developments have altered the definition of environmental problems, how they have shaped the international response to those problems, and how the relationship between science, economics, trade and technology has exacerbated or addressed environmental change.

Please RSVP here to attend.

FAQs
How much does this event cost and can I attend?

This event is free and open to the public.

What are my parking options for the event?

Please visit the following link for hourly rates, a visitor parking map, and garages on IUPUI’s campus here
*Note: Closest visitor parking garage to the Campus Center is Vermont St Parking Garage (XB).

Don’t miss out on a stellar talk series! This even will be held at IUPUI Campus Center, CE 305 from 4-5pm on February 27. Did we mention its FREE? We’ll see you there!

Meet Detective Sgt. Kimberly Minor: She Always Knew She Wanted To Help People

IUPD-IUPUI Detective Sgt. Kimberly Minor joined the division in 1996. Photo by Tracy James, Indiana University

The Indiana University Police Department is one of the largest law enforcement agencies in the state. Its campus divisions, however, can still have a small-department atmosphere, even when the campus is located in downtown Indianapolis.

IUPD-IUPUI Detective Sgt. Kimberly Minor joined the division in 1996 and finds this atmosphere, where she has developed lifelong friends, very appealing. Not only does she get to know colleagues well, but she appreciates that officers can spend more time with victims.

“You develop a rapport with the people you deal with because you’re not going from run to run to run,” she said. “You feel like you can help more because you can spend more time with a victim or that case.”

After graduating from Ball State University with a degree in criminal justice, Minor worked at a law firm as a paralegal while she considered attending law school or beginning a career in law enforcement. The legal work did not seem as fulfilling or intriguing as she had hoped, so she set out to become a police officer — and has never regretted it.

“It sounds cliché, but I wanted to help people,” she said from the Ball Hall Annex, the current location of IUPD-IUPUI.

Some people will recognize her as their instructor for IUPUI’s Rape Aggression Defense class. Minor has worked as a bike officer, a field training officer, a hostage negotiator and an accident reconstructionist instructor. She teaches Fair and Impartial Policing, a class that all IUPD officers are taking this year.

For several years, Minor has volunteered as a court-appointed special advocate, individuals who are appointed by judges to advocate for abused or neglected children so that they don’t fall through the cracks in the typically overburdened legal and social services systems. These children often go into homes where they are not wanted.

“I have always had a passion for children — that is my heart,” Minor said. “And knowing how many children are abused, I had a desire to help. I’ve always been a helper, giving back to the community.”

Police work can be challenging, and so can court-appointed special advocate volunteer work. Minor said she quickly realized it was harder mentally than she had expected. But the work is important — being a child’s voice in court when they don’t have one.

“I’ve had some hard cases,” she said. “The fulfilling part is knowing I’ve been able to make a difference in a child’s life.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tracy James

7 Reasons Not to Miss The International Festival

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Travel around the world without leaving Indianapolis on Feb. 21, when the Office of International Affairs kicks off its 16th annual International Festival at the IUPUI Campus Center at 10:30 a.m.

Cultural performances, traditional fare and gallery exhibitions are just some of the planned events for the daylong celebration that teaches guests about different countries and their customs.

Here are just a few reasons why you shouldn’t miss the office’s biggest party of the year:

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

1. Free food

Tantalize your taste buds by visiting five food stations offering a variety of international cuisines, including:

  • China: Spicy potato salad, a light, spicy side dish flavored with hot chiles, sesame oil and a touch of sugar, tossed with scallions.
  • Turkey: Acuka, a dip made from walnuts and goat cheese, served with pita bread.
  • Middle East/South Asia: Spiced chicken shawarma, which will be served with a yogurt sauce and pita bread.
  • South Africa: Malva pudding, a sweet dessert made with eggs, sugar, butter, cream and just a touch of apricot.
  • India: Mango lassi, a smoothie-like drink.

Complimentary beverages will also be provided.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

2. Free swag

Win a free Office of International Affairs T-shirt or other IUPUI prizes by completing the GlobalJags passport. Students can pick up their passports at the Festival Info Booth, which will be located near the main entrance of the Campus Center. Participants must complete at least eight challenges to earn a prize. Prizes include swag from the Indiana Pacers and Global Gifts and gift cards from Barnes & Noble, Jockamo Upper Crust Pizza and the Indianapolis Indians.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

3. View international art

Visiting Chinese artist Dr. Lin Dihuan will be giving a reception for his Cultural Arts Gallery exhibition, “Waiting for a Flower to Bloom,” in the gallery at noon, followed by a lecture in Room 309 at 2 p.m. The Guangdong native has gained popularity thanks to his series of ink-and-brush paintings dedicated to China’s 24 solar terms. These illustrations were recently added to UNESCO’s List of Intangible Cultural Heritage. “Waiting for a Flower to Bloom” can be viewed free of charge in the Cultural Arts Gallery through Feb. 28.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

4. Selfie time

Get your picture taken at the international photo booth, which can be found in the lower level of the TV Lounge. Make sure to share all photos on social media with #GlobalJags.

5. Intercultural mixer

Mingle with international and domestic students and faculty, dine on delicious hors d’oeuvres, enjoy entertainment from other countries, share your culture, and learn about others at this special event from noon-1:30 p.m. in CE 309. This is an IUPUI Welcoming Campus Initiative hosted by the PIE Student Association and the Gateway Community of Practice on Intercultural Learning.

6. Learn something new

Nine lectures will be given between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. in CE 305. Topics range from international health care to the history of immigrants.

Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

7. View an international performance

Student, faculty and community groups will present cultural performances from around the world from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the Campus Center Atrium stage. Performances will include Indy Samba, Lawrence Township Mariachi Band, African Student Association Dance Team, tai chi with the Chinese Culture Club, and several forms of classical Indian dance including Bihu and Pushpanjali. Poetry will also be featured, with readings in seven languages from the Department of World Languages and Cultures and slam poetry from the Dreamers Alliance.

Guests can download a festival map in advance of the event, as well as recipes for the planned dishes being shared at the food stations. Festivities will take place from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Samantha Thompson 

Funding Available through Indiana Campus Compact

Guest Contributor: Lauren French, Master’s Student Non-Profit Mgmt., Graduate Assistant, CSL

Effective service learning and community engagement [SLCE] demands additional support to move from vision to impact and sustainability. Indiana Campus Compact [ICC ] is one important source of funding for administrators, faculty, staff, and students, who wish to partner with the community to deepen and expand programs. ICC is a partnership among 44 Indiana colleges and universities, representing 70 campuses, dedicated to preparing college students to advance the public good in their communities. IUPUI is proud to be a member campus and has found previous success in seeking funding through ICC.

Indiana Campus Compact has thousands of dollars in the form of grants and fellowships for faculty, staff, students, and the community organizations they work with. These include:

  • Service Engagement Grants: Support students, professional staff, faculty, or department level projects that integrate one or more forms of educationally meaningful service learning and community engagement.
    • Funding categories include:
    • Scholarship of Engagement [includes SL course development, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning on SL, Community Engaged Research and Professional Service Projects]
    • Student Community Service
    • Listening to Communities [support for campus community dialogues]
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $2,250 are available; upcoming proposal deadlines are February 11th, 2019 & May 13th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • Conference Scholarships: These scholarships support faculty, staff, or students at ICC campuses to present on their engaged work at regional and national conferences.
    • The presentation must relate to ICC’s mission.
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $500 are available and proposals are accepted on a rolling basis. The deadline for proposals is at least 6 weeks prior to the conference; conferences must take place before April 30th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • The Faculty Fellows Program: This is a year-long learning community experience for full-time faculty that supports the integration of service learning and community engagement into all aspects of faculty work: teaching, research, and service. Participants will work together to develop a research or creative project to enhance and advance the field of service learning and community engagement.
    • Funding Levels: Awards of up to $3,750 are available; deadline for letter of intent to apply is Tuesday, March 19th, 2019 and deadline for full proposal is Tuesday, May 14th, 2019.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

  • Social Innovation Microlending Program: This program is available to students and alum of ICC campuses who are social entrepreneurs and would like to obtain a loan to start a social venture.
    • Loans are provided through a partnership with Bankable on behalf of the Indiana Small Business Administration.
    • ICC provides consultation and professional development for funded social entrepreneurs through events and partnerships with other organizations.
    • Funding Levels: Loan amounts vary from $500 to $50,000  [a typical loan amount will range from $5,000 to $10,000]. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

      Learn More & Apply Here>>

AI for Conservation: AI and Humans Combatting Extinction Together

Dr. Tanya Berger-Wolf 

The School of Informatics and Computing’s Data to Action (D2A) lab cordially invites you to attend the first event in its speaker series. We especially welcome students to attend, and we can arrange attendance-taking and reporting for class credit at an instructor’s request.

Dr. Tanya Berger-Wolf of University of Illinois Chicago will be presenting in the Data to Action Lecture Series on Friday February 22nd at 11am in the Lilly auditorium in the University Library. (lower level).

About the Lecture 

Photographs, taken by field scientists, tourists, automated cameras, and incidental photographers, are the most abundant source of data on wildlife today. Dr. Berger-Wolf will show how computational methods can be used to turn massive collections of images into high resolution information database, enabling scientific inquiry, conservation, and citizen science. Dr. Berger-Wolf will demonstrate how computational data science methods are used to collect images from online social media, detect various species of animals and even identify individuals. I will present data science methods to infer and counter biases in the ad-hoc data to provide accurate estimates of population sizes from those image data.

Dr. Berger-Wolf will show how it all can come together to a deployed system, Wildbook, a project of tech for conservation non-profit Wild Me. Dr. Berger-Wolf’s research team has built Wildbooks for over 20 species of animals, including whales (flukebook.org), sharks (whaleshark.org), giraffes (giraffespotter.org), and working on elephants. In January 2016, Wildbook enabled the first ever full species (the endangered Grevy’s zebra) census using photographs taken by ordinary citizens in Kenya. The resulting numbers are now the official species census used by IUCN Red List and the research team repeated the effort in 2018, becoming the first certified census from an outside organization accepted by the Kenyan government. Wildbook is becoming the data foundation for wildlife science, conservation, and policy.

About the Speaker 

Dr. Tanya Berger-Wolf is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she heads the Computational Population Biology Lab. Berger-Wolf is also a director and co-founder of the conservation software non-profit Wild Me, home of the Wildbook project. She has received numerous awards for her research and mentoring, including the US National Science Foundation CAREER Award, Association for Women in Science Chicago Innovator Award, and the UIC Mentor of the Year Award.

About Data to Action

The Data to Action (DATA) Lab is an interdisciplinary team of SoIC faculty and student researchers who study the impact of data practices and labor in a variety of contexts. Data are empowering artifacts that, when properly collected, aggregated, managed, and analyzed, have immense value. Data can bring tangible reward to individuals, communities, organizations, and businesses. Our work characterizes data not only as a statistical input or technological byproduct, but as a socio-technical construction with inherent contradictions, problems, and ethical implications.

Informal Gathering: There is another opportunity to informally interact with Dr. Tanya Berger-Wolf, from 9:30 am to 10:30 am on Friday 22nd at IT 266. Students and faculty from other department across the campus are welcome to attend. Right refreshment and coffee will be served.

WE’LL SEE YOU THERE!

Meet the Student African American Sisterhood

The Student African American Sisterhood accepts members from all backgrounds. Student African American Sisterhood, Indiana University

“SAAS saved me from leaving IUPUI,” Racheal Randle said. “This is my home away from home.”

Randle is the corresponding secretary for the Student African American Sisterhood, a nonprofit organization dedicated to unifying African-American women through the development of a sisterhood distinction.

The first chapter of the SAAS student group launched in 2005 on the IUPUI campus to provide a safe place for women of color at a predominantly white institution. Members focus on promoting the platforms of educational excellence, social unity, leadership and support and recognize the importance of providing encouragement in developing these skills to both majority and minority groups.

Through the sisterhood, the women perform acts of community service, such as bringing flowers for hospital patients and volunteering at the Ronald McDonald House. They also host events aimed at promoting messages from the African-American community by conducting Q&As with the campus police and hosting events explaining what it’s like to be a person of color on campus.

Although the group makes it a point to provide opportunities such as professional assistance and volunteer events for its members, the emotional support and social aspect of the group is the heart and soul for Randle and for the president of the sisterhood, Jasmine Lovelace.

Lovelace said she felt hidden on campus at first, and she still feels that the school has room to grow in order for everyone to feel welcome. She said SAAS has allowed her to really get connected and feel like she’s fully a part of IUPUI.

Randle agreed, saying she didn’t really know who to confide in or where to go for support when she first started classes here. But once she met the women of SAAS, it all changed for her.

SAAS is one of the many student organizations recognizing Black History Month on campus this year. Both women said the sisterhood is planning on celebrating the month by scheduling community service days and creating awareness on social media, including the group’s Twitter feed. Individually, they plan on showing support in the African-American community by shopping at strictly black-owned businesses.

It’s free to join the SAAS student group, which is always accepting new members of any background.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Ashlynn Neumeyer

Spectacular Humanism Studies Speaker Series Presents: Religious Progress and Humanist Hope

Philip Kitcher, Ph. D.

Presented by Philip Kitcher, Ph. D., The John Dewey Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University.

Professor Kitcher is the author of numerous books—including The Advancement of Science, 1993, Oxford U. Press; Science, Truth, and Democracy, 2001, Oxford U. Press; and Life after Faith: The Case for Secular Humanism, 2014, Yale U. Press.

Rejecting the rhetoric of atheists who dismiss all religion as rubbish, Kitcher argues that secular humanism should ally itself with progressive religion in hope of fostering coevolutionary progress.

This event will be held on March 7th from 6:30-7:45pm at the IUPUI Campus Center Room 002 (Theatre). 

RSVP NOW! 

We’ll see you there!

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, is featuring Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation, a performance by critically acclaimed cellist Maya Beiser, as part of its eight annual exhibition exploring the story of Lot’s Wife. Beiser will perform excerpts from her cello-opera, Elsewhere, an imaginative and psychological retelling of the biblical story of Lot’s Wife.

Avant-garde cellist Maya Beiser defies categories. A major presence on the international stage, she has been praised by Rolling Stone as a “cello rock star” and described by the Boston Globe as “a force of nature.” Maya’s discography includes ten solo albums and numerous feature appearances on film and TV soundtracks. She is a 2015 United States Artists (USA) Distinguished Fellow and a 2017 Mellon Distinguished Visiting Artist at MIT. Her 2011 TED Talk has been watched by over one million people. Maya was a founding member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars and is a graduate of Yale University.

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation is free and open to the public. It will be held at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260), offered in partnership with the Center for Interfaith Cooperation; the Judaism, Arts, Interfaith and Civic Engagement Fund of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck; Indiana Humanities; and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis.

Wednesday, April 3, 2019
7 – 8:30 pm
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available here.

Get your tickets now!

University Library to Launch Books on Demand

Informatics and journalism librarian Willie Miller shared the perks of University Library’s program, Books on Demand, set to launch Feb. 5. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Just like you would your own Spotify playlist, you will soon be able to contribute to building the book collection at University Library for yourself and the IUPUI community.

Starting Feb. 5, the library is handing off the power of ordering books to faculty, staff and students to decide what they want by introducing Books on Demand, the instant library book ordering system. This change in process will not only save money and change the way the library purchases books, but it will also help the IUPUI community by providing a more relevant selection of books to support active research and class papers.

Once the program launches, when a member of the IUPUI community finds a book they want to read, they’ll click the “Get This for IUPUI” button online and choose either the e-book format or the print version. E-books will deliver within two hours of the request, and print books will arrive in a week for fast delivery or two weeks with regular delivery.

“This process will allow us to get the newest research in a variety of fields with a more efficient system,” said Willie Miller, informatics and journalism librarian and resource development liaison. “We’ll have the latest available books, published in nearly every subject area, on our campus and in our catalog in about a month. We’re also excited to be providing books that we know people will definitely use, and probably use more than once.”

If someone wants a book that’s not on the list, the Books on Demand webpage will have a whole section for participants to suggest options. Most of the books will be academic in nature, yet some popular books will also be found.

It’s also possible that a few textbooks could be offered through this service, but depending on what books faculty choose as the required text, not all will be available. The ones that are listed will give students the opportunity to share and reduce costs by checking out the book from the school library instead of paying for it or renting it themselves.

Another solution for when a book isn’t on University Library’s list is using the interlibrary loan system that will still be available. Any book found in libraries around the world can be sent to IUPUI to be borrowed.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Ashlynn Neumeyer

5 Tips For Getting Into Grad School

For some of us, graduation means no more grades or homework. For those who can’t get enough of the college experience, it means the cycle is about to start all over again with graduate school.

If you’re going to graduate school and you know it, clap your hands — and give these tips a try.

Students who have questions about graduate school are encouraged to reach out to others for guidance. Indiana University

Research the program
Whether or not you know what you want to study in graduate school, it’s always a good idea to research any program you’re interested in. Find out what the program offers and what’s required to get in. You should also look up the faculty and their interests and strengths. This will help you create your personal statement and cater it specifically to the program you want to enter.

Take the GRE early
Similarly to taking the SAT when you were looking past high school, it’s a good idea to take the GRE your sophomore or junior year in college. That way, if your score is lower than you want, you have time to retake the test. Also, some of your general education classes, such as math and English, help prepare you for the GRE questions, so it’s good to take it when the information is still fresh in your mind. If you missed this mark and are taking the test later, it’s not the end of the world. It only means you have a little less time than people who started earlier.

Write, revise and tailor your personal statement
Your personal statement is not something you should write overnight. You might have several drafts throughout the process, and that’s OK. The more revisiting and revising you do, the more satisfied with the final product you’ll be. This is your chance to showcase your accomplishments and goals and explain why you’re a perfect fit for the program.

Ask for strong letters of recommendation
Making sure to ask the right people for “strong” letters of recommendation is key. Ask people who will promote you and your abilities in an effective way. It’s important to choose people who know how you work, what your accomplishments are and what your future goals are. Specifically requesting a “strong” recommendation letter shows that you’re serious about this program, and it encourages the recommender to put real thought and effort into what they write for you.

Ask for help and pay attention to deadlines
Getting all your materials turned in on time is extremely important. Make sure you know when the deadline is and have everything done a little early. That way, if you have questions about the application process, you’ll have time to ask people who know. Reach out to the admissions staff in your program, and they’ll help you create a successful application. The IUPUI Graduate Office offers workshops on getting into graduate school; see the website for details.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Ashlynn Neumeyer