Meet the Student African American Sisterhood

The Student African American Sisterhood accepts members from all backgrounds. Student African American Sisterhood, Indiana University

“SAAS saved me from leaving IUPUI,” Racheal Randle said. “This is my home away from home.”

Randle is the corresponding secretary for the Student African American Sisterhood, a nonprofit organization dedicated to unifying African-American women through the development of a sisterhood distinction.

The first chapter of the SAAS student group launched in 2005 on the IUPUI campus to provide a safe place for women of color at a predominantly white institution. Members focus on promoting the platforms of educational excellence, social unity, leadership and support and recognize the importance of providing encouragement in developing these skills to both majority and minority groups.

Through the sisterhood, the women perform acts of community service, such as bringing flowers for hospital patients and volunteering at the Ronald McDonald House. They also host events aimed at promoting messages from the African-American community by conducting Q&As with the campus police and hosting events explaining what it’s like to be a person of color on campus.

Although the group makes it a point to provide opportunities such as professional assistance and volunteer events for its members, the emotional support and social aspect of the group is the heart and soul for Randle and for the president of the sisterhood, Jasmine Lovelace.

Lovelace said she felt hidden on campus at first, and she still feels that the school has room to grow in order for everyone to feel welcome. She said SAAS has allowed her to really get connected and feel like she’s fully a part of IUPUI.

Randle agreed, saying she didn’t really know who to confide in or where to go for support when she first started classes here. But once she met the women of SAAS, it all changed for her.

SAAS is one of the many student organizations recognizing Black History Month on campus this year. Both women said the sisterhood is planning on celebrating the month by scheduling community service days and creating awareness on social media, including the group’s Twitter feed. Individually, they plan on showing support in the African-American community by shopping at strictly black-owned businesses.

It’s free to join the SAAS student group, which is always accepting new members of any background.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Ashlynn Neumeyer

Spectacular Humanism Studies Speaker Series Presents: Religious Progress and Humanist Hope

Philip Kitcher, Ph. D.

Presented by Philip Kitcher, Ph. D., The John Dewey Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University.

Professor Kitcher is the author of numerous books—including The Advancement of Science, 1993, Oxford U. Press; Science, Truth, and Democracy, 2001, Oxford U. Press; and Life after Faith: The Case for Secular Humanism, 2014, Yale U. Press.

Rejecting the rhetoric of atheists who dismiss all religion as rubbish, Kitcher argues that secular humanism should ally itself with progressive religion in hope of fostering coevolutionary progress.

This event will be held on March 7th from 6:30-7:45pm at the IUPUI Campus Center Room 002 (Theatre). 

RSVP NOW! 

We’ll see you there!

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation

The Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar (RSA), a project of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, is featuring Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation, a performance by critically acclaimed cellist Maya Beiser, as part of its eight annual exhibition exploring the story of Lot’s Wife. Beiser will perform excerpts from her cello-opera, Elsewhere, an imaginative and psychological retelling of the biblical story of Lot’s Wife.

Avant-garde cellist Maya Beiser defies categories. A major presence on the international stage, she has been praised by Rolling Stone as a “cello rock star” and described by the Boston Globe as “a force of nature.” Maya’s discography includes ten solo albums and numerous feature appearances on film and TV soundtracks. She is a 2015 United States Artists (USA) Distinguished Fellow and a 2017 Mellon Distinguished Visiting Artist at MIT. Her 2011 TED Talk has been watched by over one million people. Maya was a founding member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars and is a graduate of Yale University.

Maya Beiser in Concert and Conversation is free and open to the public. It will be held at the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis (6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260), offered in partnership with the Center for Interfaith Cooperation; the Judaism, Arts, Interfaith and Civic Engagement Fund of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck; Indiana Humanities; and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis.

Wednesday, April 3, 2019
7 – 8:30 pm
We’ll see you there!

The 2018-19 Religion, Spirituality & the Arts Seminar programming is made possible by a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and is offered in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary and the Jewish Community Center of Indianapolis. Additional information about the seminar is available here.

Get your tickets now!

University Library to Launch Books on Demand

Informatics and journalism librarian Willie Miller shared the perks of University Library’s program, Books on Demand, set to launch Feb. 5. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Just like you would your own Spotify playlist, you will soon be able to contribute to building the book collection at University Library for yourself and the IUPUI community.

Starting Feb. 5, the library is handing off the power of ordering books to faculty, staff and students to decide what they want by introducing Books on Demand, the instant library book ordering system. This change in process will not only save money and change the way the library purchases books, but it will also help the IUPUI community by providing a more relevant selection of books to support active research and class papers.

Once the program launches, when a member of the IUPUI community finds a book they want to read, they’ll click the “Get This for IUPUI” button online and choose either the e-book format or the print version. E-books will deliver within two hours of the request, and print books will arrive in a week for fast delivery or two weeks with regular delivery.

“This process will allow us to get the newest research in a variety of fields with a more efficient system,” said Willie Miller, informatics and journalism librarian and resource development liaison. “We’ll have the latest available books, published in nearly every subject area, on our campus and in our catalog in about a month. We’re also excited to be providing books that we know people will definitely use, and probably use more than once.”

If someone wants a book that’s not on the list, the Books on Demand webpage will have a whole section for participants to suggest options. Most of the books will be academic in nature, yet some popular books will also be found.

It’s also possible that a few textbooks could be offered through this service, but depending on what books faculty choose as the required text, not all will be available. The ones that are listed will give students the opportunity to share and reduce costs by checking out the book from the school library instead of paying for it or renting it themselves.

Another solution for when a book isn’t on University Library’s list is using the interlibrary loan system that will still be available. Any book found in libraries around the world can be sent to IUPUI to be borrowed.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Ashlynn Neumeyer

5 Tips For Getting Into Grad School

For some of us, graduation means no more grades or homework. For those who can’t get enough of the college experience, it means the cycle is about to start all over again with graduate school.

If you’re going to graduate school and you know it, clap your hands — and give these tips a try.

Students who have questions about graduate school are encouraged to reach out to others for guidance. Indiana University

Research the program
Whether or not you know what you want to study in graduate school, it’s always a good idea to research any program you’re interested in. Find out what the program offers and what’s required to get in. You should also look up the faculty and their interests and strengths. This will help you create your personal statement and cater it specifically to the program you want to enter.

Take the GRE early
Similarly to taking the SAT when you were looking past high school, it’s a good idea to take the GRE your sophomore or junior year in college. That way, if your score is lower than you want, you have time to retake the test. Also, some of your general education classes, such as math and English, help prepare you for the GRE questions, so it’s good to take it when the information is still fresh in your mind. If you missed this mark and are taking the test later, it’s not the end of the world. It only means you have a little less time than people who started earlier.

Write, revise and tailor your personal statement
Your personal statement is not something you should write overnight. You might have several drafts throughout the process, and that’s OK. The more revisiting and revising you do, the more satisfied with the final product you’ll be. This is your chance to showcase your accomplishments and goals and explain why you’re a perfect fit for the program.

Ask for strong letters of recommendation
Making sure to ask the right people for “strong” letters of recommendation is key. Ask people who will promote you and your abilities in an effective way. It’s important to choose people who know how you work, what your accomplishments are and what your future goals are. Specifically requesting a “strong” recommendation letter shows that you’re serious about this program, and it encourages the recommender to put real thought and effort into what they write for you.

Ask for help and pay attention to deadlines
Getting all your materials turned in on time is extremely important. Make sure you know when the deadline is and have everything done a little early. That way, if you have questions about the application process, you’ll have time to ask people who know. Reach out to the admissions staff in your program, and they’ll help you create a successful application. The IUPUI Graduate Office offers workshops on getting into graduate school; see the website for details.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Ashlynn Neumeyer 

Reading at the Table with Rosa Tezanos-Pinto

Rosa Tezanos-Pinto, Ph.D., is a highly respected professor, administrator, and internationally renowned researcher in the field of Latin American literature and culture. She has authored and co-authored seven books and over forty-five articles and book chapters. She is the editor of RANLE, Revista de la Academia Norteamericana de la Lengua Española and Alba de América. In 2012, Dr. Tezanos-Pinto was invited by the renowned Latin American journal Confluencia.

Dr. Tezanos-Pinto will be reading from her book La presencia hispana y el español de los Estados Unidos. In this book, a varied range of distinguished specialists travel through scenarios, documentary sources, linguistic studies, literary and film works, to rescue the substantial Hispanic contributions to culture, education, the development of the sciences and the economic life of the United States, without overlooking a prospective view of the future of Spanish, as the second major language of this country, in the coming decades.

This event will be held on Tuesday, Feruary 12, 2019., from 11:30-1pm at University Club.  875 W. North St., Room 200.

Register now!

Click here for more information on the IUPUI Reading at the Table Series!

Students Honor MLK By Giving Back To Community

Photos by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

For Martin Luther King Jr. Day, hundreds of Jaguars spent their day off from classes volunteering at 13 different sites near downtown Indianapolis in honor of the late civil rights leader’s legacy, including the Ronald McDonald HouseHoly Family Shelter and the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site.

Several student groups, including the cross-country and tennis teams, participated in the annual day of service.

Students painted birdhouses and other decor at the Centers of Wellness for Urban Women. Their creations will be used in the community food garden at Flanner House.

Photos by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Students cleaned the Son Foundation house, which provides a residence for families who are going through cancer treatment.

Students with the IUPUI cross-country team put together bags of food for those in need at the Midwest Food Bank.

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Samantha Thompson

IUPUI honors refugees of the past and present in series of events commemorating the Holocaust

INDIANAPOLIS — The IUPUI Jewish Faculty and Staff Council, in collaboration with community partners Exodus Refugee Immigration and Immigrant Welcome Center, is hosting a series of events to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Week immediately following International Holocaust Remembrance Day. These events honor the stories of refugees, asylees and immigrants from the Holocaust to today.

“After the Holocaust and World War II, human rights practice and international law were put into place to protect migrants,” said Adam Strom, director of Re-Imagining Migration at UCLA and IUPUI Holocaust Remembrance Week scholar-in-residence. “These protections are being tested today with the largest number of displaced persons since the end of the Second World War. It is time we take seriously the role of migration in the Holocaust in order to better understand our choices, challenges and responsibilities today.”

The IUPUI Jewish Faculty and Staff Council is hosting a series of events to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Week. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

A Holocaust Remembrance Ceremony will take place at noon Monday, Jan. 28, in Hine Hall Auditorium, 875 W. North St. Holocaust survivor and refugee Esther Davidson Fishman will share her story of survival and immigration to the United States. The program will also include remarks from Karen Dace, IUPUI vice chancellor for diversity, equity and inclusion, and a memorial candle-lighting by community leaders and IUPUI students, faculty and staff.

At noon on Jan. 29, Strom will lead a discussion titled “The Past Is Still Present: Migration, Immigration and the Holocaust.” He will discuss the history and consequences of the rise of the Nazis and the Holocaust and describe the role of migration in the Holocaust in order to better understand the challenges and responsibilities we are faced with today. The talk will be held in the IUPUI Global Crossroads Classroom: Room 2132 in the Education/Social Work Building, 902 W. New York St.

Holocaust Remembrance Week events will conclude with a panel discussion in Hine Hall Auditorium at 7 p.m. Jan. 29, titled “Refugees of the Holocaust, Refugees of Today: Opportunities and Challenges of New Lives in America.” The panel will be facilitated by Tamra Wright, director of diversity, equity and inclusion at the IUPUI School of Public and Environmental Affairs, and Jeremy Price, professor in the IUPUI School of Education and chair of the Jewish Faculty and Staff Council. The panelists — Strom; Debora Haber, executive artistic director of DEEP Arts and daughter of Holocaust survivors and refugees; and Winnie Betili Bulaya, founder of Refugee Welcome Baskets — will discuss personal experiences as well as historical and contemporary issues relating our responses to refugees in the past to our responses in the present.

Read the original article from IUPUI News

All The Moving Parts: A Workshop on Large-Scale Project Coordination

How to launch, coordinate, and finish inter-disciplinary projects with multiple scholars and sites, an example from O Say Can You See: The Early Washington, D.C. Law and Family Project. This workshop will focus on how to integrate social science and humanities scholarship in the process of generating a large-scale project.

All the Moving Parts is part of the seminar series Those Who Know the Trouble I’ve Seen: Citizenship and Resistance in the African-American Christian Communities, directed by Joseph Tucker Edmonds and Amanda Friesen and sponsored by the IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society.

RSVP now by email nwynne@iupui.edu

Did we mention that lunch will be provided?!
Friday February 8th in CA 508
12:30 to 2pm

See you there!

Papermaking 101 with Sarah Strong

Sarah Strong, a Herron School of Art and Design graduate student, displays some of her recent paper works in her studio. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

In the digital age, making paper from scratch is becoming a nearly lost art.

For Sarah Strong, it’s a passion she is passing on to her daughters. The Herron School of Art and Design graduate student has more than a decade of experience with hand papermaking. She incorporates her handmade papers into her installations, book arts, printmaking and more. The unique qualities of different fibers and their results keep her fascinated.

“It’s a little lonely. There aren’t a lot of papermakers in 2019,” said Strong, who earned her bachelor’s degree from Herron in 2008. “I do it because I love working with natural materials and I love to share it through teaching because of the involvement of nature and the history of paper as a means of sharing stories and knowledge.”

Sarah Strong, a Herron graduate student, defies the digital age by making her own paper for print and sculpture. Video by Tim Brouk, Indiana University

Creating even one sheet is an involved process where creativity is heavily utilized: Color, consistency, texture and which fibers to use must all be considered before the first batch of paper pulp is pulverized.

In her Herron studio, Strong has shelves of her recent work, as well as the paper works of colleagues, for inspiration. The freshest pieces are tacked to walls for drying as Strong is working feverishly to create about 30 small candlelit luminary sculptures in time for “Meld,” an exhibition running Feb. 11-16 in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1410 Indiana Ave. The show will feature the work of fellow first-year grad students Denise Troyer, Hailey Potts, Adam Rathbun, Frank Mullen and Kennedy Conner. The opening reception is set for 6 p.m. Feb. 12.

This plant material will become paper in Sarah Strong’s studio. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Found fibers

Many of the fibers Strong utilizes are harvested from her own and friends’ gardens. She keeps a handful of bins full of iris, daylily and lavender stalks and leaves. Strong said she particularly enjoys culling invasive species and using the unwanted plants in her paper.

“I love working in the gardens and then upcycling the fibers to become something of use,” she continued. “When the season is dying out, I like to go to people’s gardens and clean them out for them. I take a little bit from each plant and dry them until I’m ready to use them in my own process.”

For those without a handy source, pulp can also be purchased from paper mills like Indiana’s own TwinRocker Handmade Paper.

This bucket of paper pulp was extracted from Sarah Strong’s hydro pulper machine. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Cook first

The cellulose from the plant material is what’s needed to make paper. In order to extract the cellulose, a cooking process is required. Strong’s paper is created with the water and cellulose through hydrogen bonding.

“When I’m cooking them in a caustic solution, I’m cooking out everything that’s not cellulose,” Strong explained. “It breaks down the cellulose molecule structure a little bit, too.”

Beat it

The biggest — and loudest — piece of equipment in Strong’s studio is a hydro pulper. The artist can manipulate pulp thicknesses by changing run times and the positioning of the pulper’s beating drum and plate. When working with translucency, the pulp needs to be beaten between eight and 10 hours.

“The longer it’s beaten, the smaller the fibers become,” Strong said, “thus offering themselves to different processes in papermaking. The fibers are being broken down more and more. As you beat it further and further, the fibers turn to fibrils, which give you a stronger paper.”

Several buckets of paper pulp have been dyed. The pulp is then combined to create unique paper. By Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Add some color

While most of the paper has a light tone to it, Strong experiments with color by utilizing the dozens of colorants she has at the ready. The pulp is dyed in buckets and set on a work table like a painter’s palette. In the vat where the different pulps are combined, Strong can experiment with color like a painter.

Impressive

Water comes out of a screen as a sheet of paper gets its first pressing. More water will be extracted by mallet, machine or feet. Photo by Liz Kaye, Indiana University

Once the pulp mix is satisfactory, Strong gathers the material with a screen and deckle. Excess water drips out before the pulp is carefully laid onto thin fabric sheeting. It’s then pressed and dried in various ways, depending on what the paper will be used for.

Paper for printmaking would be put under a hydraulic press. While creating paper for “Meld,” Strong’s daughter Jane Sparks simply placed the paper and fabric on some towels and then underneath a plane of Plexiglas, which Sparks then stood on for several minutes. The last of the water is squeezed out; the fibers join tighter; and the wet, new paper is ready to dry.

“Relationship with paper is very much a dance: You learn the fibers, and the fibers learn you,” Strong said. “You build this relationship, getting to know each other, and then eventually you can work together to create your art.”

Read the original article from IUPUI News’ Tim Brouk