Gendered Innovations: Lunch with Londa Schiebinger, MA, PhD

Dr. Londa Schiebinger will be on campus next week on Tuesday, March 6, to discuss The Secret Cures of Slaves as part of the History Talks! and IUPUI Diversity Speakers Series. In addition, she will present her work on Gendered Innovations over lunch.

This event is sponsored by the IUSM Office of Diversity Affairs. Lunch will be provided, so please be sure to register if you plan to attend! For more information or to register, click here.

Doing research wrong costs lives and money. For example, between 1997 and 2000, 10 drugs were withdrawn from the U.S. market because of life-threatening health effects. Eight of these posed ‘greater health risks for women than for men’ (U.S. GAO, 2001). Not only does developing a drug in the current market cost billions—but when drugs failed, they caused human suffering and death.

Gender bias also leads to missed market opportunities. In engineering, for example, considering short people (many women, but also many men) “out-of-position” drivers leads to greater injury in automobile accidents (see Pregnant Crash Test Dummies). In basic research, failing to use appropriate samples of male and female cells, tissues, and animals yields faulty results (see Stem Cells). In medicine, not recognizing osteoporosis as a male disease delays diagnosis and treatment in men (see Osteoporosis Research in Men). In city planning, not collecting data on caregiving work leads to inefficient transportation systems (see Housing and Neighborhood Design). We can’t afford to get the research wrong.

Doing research right can save lives and money. An analysis of the U.S. Women’s Health Initiative Hormone Therapy Trial, for example, found that for every $1 spent, $140 were returned to taxpayers in health care savings. The study also saved lives, adding 145,000 more quality-adjusted life years (Roth et al., 2014).

It is crucially important to identify gender bias. But analysis cannot stop there: Gendered Innovations offer state-of-the-art methods of sex and gender analysis. Integrating these methods into basic and applied research produces excellence in science, health & medicine, and engineering research, policy, and practice. The methods of sex and gender analysis are one set of methods among many that a researcher will bring to a project.

Londa Schiebinger, MA, PhD is the John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science at Stanford University. She currently directs the EU/US Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment project. She is a leading international expert on gender in science and technology and has addressed the United Nations on the topic of “Gender, Science, and Technology.” She is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize and Guggenheim Fellowship. Her work on Gendered Innovations harnesses the creative power of sex and gender analysis to enhance excellence and reproducibility in science and technology.  More info can be found here.

IUPUI Telematic Collective

View the original article by Tim Brouk.

Photo by Liz Kaye, IU Communications

Department of Music and Arts Technology graduate students Harry Chaubey and Arun Berty each traveled thousands of miles to continue their studies at IUPUI.

Both young men are technologically adept and avid music consumers. Creating and understanding music through the help of computer programs and electronic equipment was their next academic step, which made the School of Engineering and Technology program an easy choice.

But these students’ backgrounds and previous stops are as different as future bass and witch house. Chaubey came from Los Angeles. He was working in sound and composition studios when he decided to up his game. Berty traveled all the way from Chennai, India. He received an undergraduate degree in computer science from Sathyabama Institute of Science and Technology in southern India. He made a big change when he decided to pursue his love of music. Both students’ skills have been welcomed in the Department of Music and Arts Technology as well as in the Telematic Collective, a unique electronic music ensemble that performs original works regularly on campus.

“I wanted both of my interests to merge,” said Berty, who found IUPUI online after he finished his computer science degree. “That’s what put me here.”


Telematic Collective gets its name from the tradition of online collaboration during its live shows. Musicians from across the globe have been known to patch in and perform with the IUPUI musicians onstage within the Informatics and Communications Technology Complex. The group’s next concert is at 7:30 p.m. April 12 in ICTC Room 152.

And the collaboration isn’t limited to online talent. A typical Telematic experience will include original video work, live dancers from local organizations like the Ballet Theatre of Indiana and guest Indianapolis musicians. While most students in Telematic have laptops guiding their sounds, musicians have also been known to pick up a saxophone or guitar. The vibraphone is a staple, as it’s the instrument that faculty advisor Scott Deal specialized in during his previous academic career. Like his students, he was lured to IUPUI by the possibilities of electronic music and technological advancement.

“I was always doing crazy technology things,” said Deal, a professor of music arts and technology. “This was a natural next step.”

Like a rock song, a Telematic piece starts with a riff and a beat. A recent rehearsal saw Chaubey, Berty, fellow grad student Dustin Paugh, and undergraduates Sam Duncan and Charles Cheesman working on a piece. The tune was still being shaped as each student got his chance to work the riff or add their own notes. Deal was sitting in as well, but he confirmed to Inside IUPUI that every Telematic piece is written by the students.

“They bring their ideas; they engage the other students; and then we use all of these wonderful technological merging tools to create something that sounds new, fresh and original,” Deal said. “They get to work their creative chops in putting the music together.”

Telematic gained new members this semester, and they are using their time to master music-composition programs like Logic Pro X and equipment like the Native Instruments Maschine drum machine and Ableton Pushes. This device is a sequencer, piano, sampler and effects modulator all in one console about the size of a textbook.

And speaking of those antiquated things made of paper, textbooks don’t tell these tech-savvy musicians how to make an original instrumental work that could earn a live audience’s interest. Experimentation, improvisation and practice fuel the tunes.

“The possibilities are endless,” Chaubey said. “This technology is my instrument.”

Chaubey and Berty manned laptop keyboards and the more traditional keyboards in a musical setting. Berty said he’d been playing piano for several years and was happy to contribute to the ensemble. Each player brings a different expertise, making Telematic an always evolving and changing entity. Berty’s background will help construct technological feats yet to be explored in the group. Other Telematic members — currently 10 students — have had video experience, which helped improve the visual side of the collective.

“We look at this more as a working group,” Deal said. “It’s multidisciplinary.”

Telematic concerts are much more than students sitting in front of laptops for an hour. Video screens display imagery, the online collaborators and dancers contribute, and moody lighting adds to the atmosphere. The music itself is presented with expert live sound. After all, the Music and Arts Technology program pumps out dozens of sound engineers and studio producers every year.

Students work on pieces for months before they are debuted live. The works are usually several minutes long, allowing for live musicians and online artists to add their own flourishes.

“I came here specifically to learn these tools and to incorporate technology into my skill set,” said Paugh, who studied classical music and vocal performance at the University of Nebraska before coming to IUPUI. “This is more collaborative in nature. Everyone contributes their piece. There’s a give-and-take.”

While putting on a good show is important, making sure these students get jobs is crucial. Like his students’ varied backgrounds, Deal said, the degree in music and arts technology can start an array of different career paths. Most students go into the recording industry, including sales and performance. Some have tried their skills at electronic instrument design. Other students have gotten positions with lucrative companies, both music related and not.

“We had a student get a job at Spotify in San Francisco doing their programming,” Deal said. “One student got a job at Boeing doing audio things. He said his job is classified and he couldn’t tell me what exactly he was doing, but it does have to do with audio.”

IUPUI Human Library

View the original article.

Organizers of a Human Library at IUPUI are recruiting 75 Indianapolis-area residents who have faced discrimination to become “books” at an event that will challenge stereotypes and prejudices through dialogue.

The IUPUI Human Library, a campus-funded Welcoming Campus Initiative, will take place from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday, April 2, at the Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

People who would like to be a human book are asked to complete a form.

“The Human Library is a place where real people and their stories are ‘on loan’ to readers,” said Andrea Copeland, associate professor and chair, Department of Library and Information Science at the Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI, and lead organizer of the event. “It’s a place where difficult questions are expected, appreciated, and answered.”

The framework of a library is particularly appropriate, Copeland said: “People go to libraries in search of new knowledge. Usually, the knowledge vessel is a book. In this case, the knowledge vessel is a human.”

People who would like to volunteer to serve as books must be at least 18 years old. They are asked to answer why they would want to be a book, what types of discrimination they have faced based on status, and what the title and three possible chapters of their book would be. Human books will be expected to participate for at least two of the hours the Human Library will be open. When the human books are checked out, they will meet with a reader, or readers, for 30 minutes.

Volunteer human books will receive training on being a book, and readers will be given guidelines for respectful communication.

Students, faculty, and staff from the School of Informatics and Computing, the School of Liberal Arts, University Library, and the Indianapolis Public Library are working together to develop the event.

A large media arts screen featuring information about some of the books and an online human book catalog are being developed to help visitors select which books they would like to check out. Each book title will have a word that illustrates the form of discrimination the human book will discuss.

Open Data and Open Government: A Workshop

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The Center for International Media Law and Policy Studies at Indiana University Bloomington will hold a free daylong workshop March 17 in Indianapolis on access to information.

“Letting the Sunshine IN: An Open Data and Open Government Workshop” is open to anyone interested in open government and open data, including journalists, civic activists and neighborhood association members, said Anthony Fargo, director of the Center for International Media Law and Policy Studies and a co-organizer of the event.

The workshop will be in the ballroom of University Tower, 911 W. North St., on the IUPUI campus.

“The strength of our open government laws is that they apply to everyone, not just journalists or public officials,” said Fargo, an associate professor in The Media School at IU Bloomington. “Anyone at any time may need to gain access to records held by a government agency or attend a meeting of a public body, so all of us have a stake in learning how effective our access laws are.”

The workshop will take place during Sunshine Week, an annual national observance that highlights the importance of open government. Co-sponsors include the IndyPro Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and the Indiana Coalition for Open Government. Fargo and co-organizer Gerry Lanosga, an assistant professor in The Media School, are Indiana Coalition for Open Government board members.

Confirmed speakers at the conference include state, regional, and national journalists and open government advocates, who will participate in informational sessions about state and national access laws.

The workshop will close with a hands-on session on how to request data and metadata from public agencies. Experts will guide attendees in submitting actual requests to state agencies for information about their data sets. Participants should bring a laptop computer or other WiFi-capable device.

Lanosga said the goal is to launch an open online catalog of state data sets.

“We know that one of the key barriers to opening public data is lack of knowledge about the range of data that state agencies maintain,” he said. “This effort will go a long way to eliminating the unknowns about state data sets and make it easier for journalists and others in the public to request them.”

The workshop is made possible by a gift to the Center for International Media Law and Policy Studies from IU journalism alumna Barbara Restle. It is free to pre-registered participants and includes breakfast, lunch, and parking. Visitor parking is available in the North Street and Vermont Street parking garages and the Hine Hall Tower Garage.

Although there is no charge to attend the workshop, attendance is limited, and advance registration is required. The registration deadline is 5 p.m. March 12.

Click here for the workshop schedule and registration.

Square Peg Round Hole Coming to IUPUI

We are excited to welcome guest artists Square Peg Round Hole to Indianapolis and the IUPUI campus next week. The IU Bloomington-trained instrumental rock trio will present a performance lecture on campus Friday, March 2. They will be discussing the integration of multimedia technology into their percussion-driven music as well as tips for young musicians hoping to build a career. Click here for more details.

In addition, the group will cap off their stay in Indy with a performance at Pioneer on March 3 supported by IUPUI’s own Big Robot. Click here for more information.

These events are made possible with generous support by the IUPUI Department of Music and Arts Technology, Pioneer Indy, and the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Square Peg Round Hole formed in 2011 while studying music at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, in Bloomington, Indiana. The band has shared bills with Built To Spill, The Album Leaf, Mae, This Will Destroy You, and The Joy Formidable, and has been featured at major venues across the country including the Electric Factory, (Le) Poisson Rouge, Old National Centre, and the World Café Live. Find them on YouTube or their website for more information.

2018 Indianapolis Sustainability Summit

Join the City of Indianapolis Office of Sustainability and the IUPUI Office of Sustainability for the inaugural Indianapolis Sustainability Summit: Community and Collaboration, hosted at IUPUI’s Campus Center. The 2018 summit will highlight the impact of community and collaborative efforts in advancing sustainability in Indianapolis. The summit will consist of The Indianapolis Sustainability Awards, Student Posters, and a Keynote Speaker.

The Indianapolis Sustainability Awards are designed to inspire innovation, showcase impact, reward leadership, and promote education around the principles of sustainability. Five awards will be given, four to highlight transformative work by a business, institution, nonprofit, and individual that integrates the three pillars of sustainability into their work, and one to highlight the organization demonstrating the greatest innovation and reductions in air emissions (the Knozone Clean Air Award). In an effort to make the event accessible for all, a number of subsidized tickets are available. All ticket sales and money raised benefits the City of Indianapolis SustainIndy Community Grant Program, which supports local organizations in advancing sustainability.

Keynote speaker Mark “Puck” Mykleby is the former special strategic assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, where he developed a concept to integrate the resources of America’s public, private, and civil sectors to capture emerging opportunities and address the complex challenges facing the U.S. and the world. Mark graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1987 and served as a Marine Officer for 24 years. After retiring from the Marine Corps in 2011, Mark went on to create the Strategic Innovation Lab at Case Western Reserve. He currently serves as the co-founder and chief strategist for Long Haul Capital Group, where he works to grow the foundation of a sustainable American economy.

For more information or to register, click here.

From NPR: ‘How to Think Like an Anthropologist’ – And Why You Should Want To

From NPR’s Barbara J. King:

Civilization originated in the Fertile Crescent region, including parts of modern-day Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, and Egypt: that’s the lesson most of us learned in school.

In it, civilization is used in a highly positive way to refer to the rise of city-states and the development of writing around the 4th millennium BC.

But today, civilization is an idea too often used against people living in that area of the world, sociocultural anthropologist Matthew Engelke explains in his new book, How To Think Like An Anthropologist. Engelke quotes, as an example, a U.S. Army colonel who, in conjunction with the war on terror, said this: “In Western Iraq, it’s like it was six centuries ago with the Bedouins in their goat hair tents.”

We need to see this statement and others like it for what it is, Engelke says: An attempt to relegate the Bedouins to living fossils who are stuck in time and badly in need of being civilized by the West.

It’s not just military culture that buys into and furthers this “civilizing” perspective. In 2007, an aid project was launched by the African Medical and Research Foundation, Barclays Bank, and the British progressive newspaper The Guardian. Its goal was to deliver health care to the village of Katine in northern Uganda. The project itself was sensitive and nuanced, Engelke notes. The coverage in The Guardian was anything but. On Oct.20, 2007, a Guardian story was headlined this way: “Can we, together, lift one village out of the Middle Ages?” Beneath the headline is a statement about traveling “a few hours from London — and 700 years back in time.”

What do these words signal but that the villagers need to be brought forward in time, back into civilization?

That’s dangerous thinking, Engelke says — and through the lens of anthropology, we can see why.

[read more]

Funding Opportunity | Capital Projects Grant

The Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation, Inc., supports charitable organizations that promote or preserve the Arts and Humanities. Capital Projects Grants are one-time, specific undertakings. Amounts awarded and time periods vary widely and depend on the scope of the project.

The Foundation will only review three requests for Indiana University. To apply to the IU internal competition or for more details, click here. The internal application deadline is March 1, 2018.

#SavetheNEH with IU Bloomington

The Institute for Digital Arts and Humanities at IU has announced the visit of Dr. William “Bro” Adams, Former Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, which will include two public events, “Digital Horizons for the Dissertation” on February 19 and “Virtual Realities: Making the Humanities in a Digital World” on February 20. In light of recent federal budgetary happenings, IU’s scholarly community is invited to attend and engage in a timely discussion regarding the past, present, and future of the arts and humanities, both digital and traditional.

To read more about the #SavetheNEH campaign, President Trump’s budget proposals, and what this means for the arts and humanities, you can visit the National Humanities Alliance site.


Exit Zero: The Documentary | Screening and Q&A

Exit Zero: The Documentary, a 2015 film by Chris Boebel and Christine Walley, tells a personal story of the lasting social and environmental impacts of deindustrialization and the key role it has played in expanding class inequalities in the United States. The film weaves a portrait of a family caught in its community’s struggles with job loss and pollution.

After the documentary, writer/producer Christine Walley will be available for a Q&A session about the film and its message.

The event will occur on March 8, 2018 at 5:00pm at the Steelworkers Union, Local 1999, on 218 South Addison in Indianapolis.

This event is sponsored by the IU Department of Anthropology at IUPUI and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute.