Food Waste and Hunger Summit

Original article at News at IUPUI.

IUPUI Campus Kitchen student volunteers

Leading experts in the fight against food waste and hunger will come together at IUPUI March 24-25 for the fifth annual Food Waste and Hunger Summit, co-hosted by IUPUI and The Campus Kitchens Project, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization empowering young people to fight food waste and hunger.

The summit brings together students and advocacy groups from across the country who are working to solve food insecurity problems and wasted food in their communities.

It is an opportunity for them to share best practices and encourage others to join the movement. This two-day event will support attendees in unpacking the “triple bottom line” of successful food justice ventures: expanding access to healthy food, creating meaningful careers and testing innovative solutions to the nation’s most systemic failures.

Registration for the event is now open. Indiana University students may attend for free. There is a $35 registration fee for other students and a $75 fee for members of the general public.

The IU Office of the Bicentennial is a sponsor of the summit.

Confirmed keynote speakers include Robert Egger, founder of DC Central Kitchen, founder and CEO of LA Kitchen; Michael F. Curtin Jr., CEO of DC Central Kitchen; Pashon Murray, founder and CEO of Detroit Dirt, waste reduction expert, and circular economy advocate; Anna Lappé, founder of Real Food Media, national bestselling author and sustainable food advocate; and Marcia Chatelain, associate professor of history and African-American studies at Georgetown University, scholar of race and ethnicity, and food studies specialist.

IUPUI launched its own chapter of the student-led Campus Kitchen in 2014, after participating in The Campus Kitchens Project’s annual launch grant competition in partnership with the Sodexo Stop Hunger Foundation.

“While progress continues in the fight against hunger, food insecurity remains a top concern across the nation. At IUPUI, we are working with local advocates and taking steps to help students, staff, faculty and the greater Indianapolis community gain access to regular meals through the Campus Kitchen at IUPUI and Paw’s Pantry, a student-run food pantry,” said Camy Broeker, vice chancellor for finance and administration.

“We are honored to host the 2018 Food Waste and Hunger Summit, which is bringing together national and local leaders, partner organizations, students, faculty and staff to share innovations, best practices and sustainable solutions to food waste, hunger and poverty.”

Local and national partner organizations including Feeding America, DC Central Kitchen, No Kid Hungry and Second Helpings will join the discussion along with as many as 250 student leaders from around the nation who are leading the fight to reduce food waste, hunger and poverty on their campuses and in their communities.

On more than 60 university and high school campuses across the country, student volunteers with The Campus Kitchens Project transform unused food from dining halls, grocery stores, restaurants and farmers markets into meals for people experiencing hunger. In the last academic year, Campus Kitchens across the country recovered more than 1.3 million pounds of wasted food and served 350,000 meals.


Lotus Blossoms Performances Coming to Eskenazi Hospital


A series of performances will be held in the Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Concourse at the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Hospital.

In the first of these, the women of Kardemimmit will sing and play the Finnish national instrument – the kantele, which is similar to a zither or dulcimer. The quartet has mastered both the 15-stringed and 38-stringed kantele, producing the distinctive sounds made by the plucked acoustic instrument that blends with delicate, tight vocal harmonies in a style of singing known as “reki.” The standout contemporary Nordic ensemble – composed of Maija Pokela, Jutta Rahmel, Anna Wegelius, and Leeni Wegelius – writes music for their voices and instruments, a new folk music rooted in Finnish tradition. Lotus fan tip: Listening to Kardemimmit on disk or in video is one thing; their powerful live performance is simply remarkable.

In the second, the Dance of Hope will captivate you with it passionate rhythms, sensational sounds, and exhilaratingly colorful choreography. Created to restore dignity and self-confidence to Ugandan children by teaching life skills, music, and the arts, the group of children, aged 7 to 16 years old, delivers a rich cultural experience packed Performances explores the transformational power of music and dance to raise awareness and improve the way of life for the many children that are orphaned, displaced, or living in poverty. This vibrant music and dance spectacular features Africa’s newest cast of young performers, whose triumphant and inspiring human turnaround stories showcase a resilience born of sounds that enhance creativity, persistence, and change. Dance of Hope’s artistic director and producer, Kinobe, performed at the 2009 & 2010 Lotus World Music & Arts Festivals, as well as Lotus Blossoms in 2015.

The third performance features a brother-and-sister duo from Nashville, Tennessee, Giri & Uma Peters, who are award-winning multi-instrumentalists who astonish audiences with their refreshing, soulful blend of old-time, roots, and bluegrass music. Giri and Uma may be young (13 and 10 years old, respectively), but their musicianship and vocal harmonies showcase a creativity and originality beyond their years. Their musicianship has attracted the attention of roots music star Rhiannon Giddens and banjo greats Abigail Washburn and Bela Fleck, among others. Lotus audiences know great Americana roots music when they hear it – and the Peters won’t disappoint.

These events are free and open to the public. Parking is available on the Eskenazi Health campus in the Eskenazi Health Parking Garage, which is accessible from Eskenazi Avenue.

Giri and Uma Peters are brought to Lotus Blossoms in collaboration with the IU Arts and Humanities Council/India Remixed Festival.

This series is made possible in part from the generous support of the Eskenazi Health Foundation and the Lotus Education & Arts Foundation.

From Humanities: Texting in Ancient Mayan Heiroglyphs

The Madrid Codex, World History Archive

If King Tut were around today, could he send a text in Egyptian hieroglyphics? Yes, with the right font and keyboard. That’s because the writing system of the pharaohs has already been included in the Unicode Standard, meaning that a character like the Eye of Horus has a code point, 13080, that will render the same way on a tablet in Cairo and a smartphone in Beijing. Because Mayan hieroglyphs have yet to be encoded, the ancient Mayan emperor K’inich Janaab’ Pakal would have to stick to emoji—but that’s about to change.

Unicode is the international encoding standard that makes it possible for users to read, write, and search in a wide range of written languages on all manner of devices without technical miscommunication. Made up of a mix of academics, stakeholders, and interested volunteers, the Unicode Consortium has encoded 139 of the writing systems, technically known as scripts, ever to have existed. Given that alphabets like Cyrillic, Arabic, and Devanagari serve more than 60 languages each and that 500 languages use the Latin alphabet, Unicode makes electronic communication possible in almost a thousand languages. But there are more than a hundred writing systems to go.

In June 2017, the Unicode Consortium rolled out its tenth version in 26 years, which included four scripts as well as the Bitcoin sign and 56 new emoji. The scripts introduced this year include Nüshu, a writing system that was developed by women in the Hunan Province of nineteenth-century China as a workaround when they were denied formal education. Also newly available is Zanabazar Square, created by a Mongolian monk in the seventeenth century to write spiritual texts in Mongolian, Tibetan, and Sanskrit. Crucial as these steps toward cultural empowerment may be, it is the textable faces, socks, mermen, and the like that have brought this global standard into the limelight.

[Read More]

New Exhibit from IAHI Scholar-in-Residence Samuel E. Vázquez

IMMERSED is a group exhibition featuring works by contemporary visual artists whose creative processes reveal deeply rooted meanings through symbolism and narrative. The exhibition is organized and curated by Samuel E. Vázquez in collaboration with InCultur. Participating artists include Samuel E. Vázquez, Danicia Monét, Atsu Kpotufe, Elizabeth Bilbrey, Gary Gee, Shamira Wilson, Hector Del Campo, Maria Zepeda, Stephen Heathcock, and Heather Ward Miles.

According to Vázquez, “The main idea of IMMERSED is to share diverse expressions by featuring the works of artists whose focused studio practices are unique to each artist.” The title of the exhibition, which includes paintings, photographs, illustrations, and sculptures, “alludes to the immersive and continuous process of developing one’s voice.”

“This exhibition can speak to anyone interested in exploring, engaging, and interacting with the art and artists. It can also speak via the diverse global backgrounds of the featured artists. Through direct dialogue with the artists or the works, we can meaningfully engage in conversation while learning from one another. That’s the beauty of art – it speaks of and about life, making our collective human experience richer,” Vázquez said.

The exhibition, held at Butler University’s Clowes Memorial Hall, will open with a reception from 6:00-9:00 pm on Tuesday, March 20, and will close on April 23. This exhibition is presented by Butler’s Jordan College of the Arts Signature Series, which features internationally acclaimed guest artists brought to Butler University’s campus. For more details, including gallery hours and parking information, click here.

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1970, Samuel E Vázquez is a visual artist working primarily in mixed media. His inspiration is rooted in the New York City subway style writings of the 1970s and 80s, along with the works of Ed Clark, Jackson Pollock, and Jean-Michel Basquiat. Vázquez’s work has been exhibited in numerous galleries and cultural institutions. He has lectured on the history of style writing in venues such as the Arts Council of Indianapolis, New York City College of Technology-CUNY, Indianapolis Public Library Central Branch, Clowes Memorial Hall at Butler Arts Center, and Indianapolis Museum of Art. Vázquez is a 2017 Scholar In Residence at the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and a 2017-18 Creative Renewal Arts Fellow of the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

The IU Open Access Policy

This letter from Jamie Wittenberg, Research Data Management Librarian and Head of the IU Libraries’ Department of Scholarly Communication, was first published here.

Jamie Wittenburg. Photo by Eric Rudd, IU Communications

In 2015, almost 45 percent of articles across all disciplines were published open access as part of a growing worldwide movement to remove financial barriers to scholarly research.

As the head of the Department of Scholarly Communication for IU Libraries, which supports open publishing, I hold the conviction that anyone should be able to read, save and share research regardless of their ability to pay for it. This is perhaps unsurprising — I’m a librarian, and advancing knowledge by providing access to scholarly work is a core mission of IU Libraries. Publishing research in such a way that it is freely available on the open web for use and reuse around the world is the principle of “open access.”

In February 2017, the Bloomington Faculty Council adopted a policy in support of open access in journal publishing, stating, in part, “the faculty of Indiana University Bloomington is committed to disseminating the fruits of its research and scholarship as widely as possible.” This policy marked a milestone for IU and for the open access community. IU Bloomington’s was the 56th faculty council in the world to unanimously pass an open access policy, joining Harvard, Duke, Princeton, Stanford, MIT and others.

Traditionally, scholarly articles are published in journals that require subscriptions, usually paid for out of library budgets. These subscription costs are increasing annually — profit margins for major academic journal publishers surpass those of Apple, Google and Amazon. As early as 2012, Harvard told its faculty that sustaining the rising costs of journals was impossible, labeling the current system “absurd” and “damaging.”

When I participate in national conversations about open access publishing, I hear a mix of concern and optimism for the future. In 2014-15, the average university library spent 73 percent of its materials budget on serials. Experts agree that the price of academic journals will continue to outstrip inflation in 2018 and beyond, with no indication of change by the profitable publishers, despite outcry from academics and libraries everywhere.

However, market forecasters also predict that the growing pace of open access publishing will continue to increase, already representing about one-third of research publications. Most federal agencies and many private foundations now require the faculty they fund to publish their findings openly. In conjunction, many institutions — and some entire countries — have implemented open access policies.

These models are changing the scholarly publishing landscape. In some disciplines, open access is the standard. Publications in astronomy and astrophysics, for example, are 87 percent open. In fields like medicine and agriculture, publishing in open access journals has also become the norm. Part of the reason is that the cost of research disproportionately affects researchers, students and citizens in developing countries — sometimes the communities in greatest need of, for example, the latest medical and agricultural research.

At IU, the Open Access Policy passed by the Bloomington Faculty Council empowers individual faculty members to make a version of their scholarly journal articles open to all, or to opt out. The policy is now aligned with the IU faculty annual reporting system, where most faculty already enter information about their research and creative activity.

My team in the Department of Scholarly Communication is processing nearly 1,600 faculty-authored publications from the reporting system for inclusion in the IUScholarWorks institutional repository.

In response to the growing need for open access support on campus, we are developing core library services that support open scholarship and research transparency in an integrated way. These include our open access services, research data services, journal publishing services and emerging services around affordable and open course materials. We provide consultations with students and faculty, publishing services and instruction.

To contact the Scholarly Communication Department, schedule a consultation, or learn more about support for open scholarship on campus, visit their website.

IUPUI’s Successful Chapter of The Campus Kitchens Project

Original article by Tim Brouk from News at IUPUI.

Photo by Liz Kaye, IU Communications

With her black apron tied and a white paper chef’s hat donned, Madison Watson was ready to simultaneously battle hunger and food waste from a kitchen in the Campus Center.

The sophomore epidemiology major first joined IUPUI’s chapter of The Campus Kitchens Project to fulfill a community health class requirement. She put in her hours in the fall but has since returned to the kitchen on her own this semester. Campus Kitchens has the mission of ending hunger by utilizing and repurposing excess food into healthy, nutritious meals for those in need.

“I never cooked a day in my life before I started volunteering here, but I’ve picked up a couple of skills along the way,” Watson said.

The work Watson and dozens of other volunteers have done this academic year helped bring Campus Kitchens’ annual meeting to IUPUI. The national Food Waste and Hunger Summit is set for March 24-25 in Hine Hall. The acquisition of the event was aided by a $5,000 Indiana University Bicentennial grant, which will cover logistical costs like feeding those who help feed thousands across the nation during the summit. Indiana University students can register and attend the event for free thanks to the grant.

The meals Watson helps prepare feature extra food gathered from Chartwells’ Tower Dining and Catering, Second Helpings, and community food banks. The meals are then provided to community organizations like Brightwood Community Center, Wheeler Mission, and the Ronald McDonald House of Indiana.

Watson can identify with the Indianapolis children who are on the receiving end of much of Campus Kitchens’ efforts; growing up, she sometimes suffered from food insecurity. She found an outlet to help with the Campus Kitchen at IUPUI, which was founded in 2014.

“It’s good to give back, to help people who are in a situation I used to be in,” Watson said.

The statistics that the Campus Kitchen at IUPUI promotes are impressive: From October 2014 to November 2017, 1,128 volunteers put in 3,272 hours to prepare 7,712 meals for the campus and the community. The chapter used almost 20,000 pounds of recovered food to create these meals. That’s 10 tons of food that would have gone to the garbage.

While the dual battle against hunger and food waste is first in the minds of Campus Kitchen volunteers, creativity, ingenuity and improvisation are required at every cooking session because the students never know what they will be working with when entering the kitchen. “Chopped” contestants have nothing on Campus Kitchen volunteers. Watson was flipping pancakes one evening and baking cupcakes the next.

On the evening of Feb. 7, Watson and the team inherited some marinated steaks, trays of seasoned wild rice and lentils, and a few crates of small watermelons. Student leaders Kelly Moors and Arooj Mohammed quickly worked out a menu and put the volunteers on grilling and melon-chopping duties. They decided on classic mashed potatoes for another side.

“You have to be creative. You have to think whether you can pair this with this,” said Mohammed, a senior studying geology. “It makes it more interesting and exciting to prepare stuff impromptu.”

The food is carefully packed away for next-day delivery. Much of the Feb. 7 haul was bound for Brightwood’s after-school program; the rest would find home in the coolers of Paw’s Pantry. The plates are assembled – protein, sides and fruit – and ready to be taken home by an IUPUI student and reheated.

Mohammed watched his volunteer team carefully package the wild rice and lentil medley in dozens of smaller containers to be donated to Paw’s Pantry. The portions were clearly labeled and dated.

“Every serving of food you make, and every second you put into making the food, is taking action,” Mohammed said.

The origins of the Campus Kitchen at IUPUI started with Nancy Barton, a lecturer in the School of Physical Education and Tourism Management, noticing the problems of hunger and food waste in Indianapolis and on the IUPUI campus. The two problems should cancel each other out, she thought, if the extra food could only reach those in need. After working with Second Helpings, which also specializes in food rescue, preparation and delivery along with culinary job training, Barton was alerted to The Campus Kitchens Project, a “student-powered hunger relief” charity based out of Washington, D.C. With the help of the IUPUI Office of Sustainability, the IUPUI chapter was launched and has been making an impact campus- and communitywide for the past four years.

Recent months have seen the Campus Kitchen of IUPUI looking more at its home base. The collaboration with Paw’s Pantry was strengthened with a sit-down, dine-in IUPUI student meal on Nov. 13 during Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week. The successful event took place in the Campus Center and should help pave the way for more campus meals.

“We fed more than 80 students,” recalled Deb Ferguson, IUPUI’s assistant director of sustainability and a staff advisor for the Campus Kitchen at IUPUI. “Working with Paw’s Pantry, we’re going to try to host six to eight campus community meals throughout the year and make them a little more informal so that anyone on campus who has a need can get a hot meal and eat it there or take it to go.”

Most Campus Kitchen volunteers come in with a love of cooking already, but the feeling of helping others usually becomes the main course.

“It’s an extracurricular activity that’s cooking, and you’re doing it for a good cause,” Mohammed said. “You’re doing it for people who need food.”

MPH Data Day

Indiana’s Management Performance Hub (MPH) provides analytics solutions tailored to address complex management and policy questions enabling improved outcomes for Hoosiers. They empower partners to leverage data in innovative ways, facilitating data-driven decision making and data-informed policy making.

On March 6, MPH is hosting Data Day 2018 at the Indiana Statehouse. The MPH Data Day is an open event for people who want to share ideas and learn how Indiana is leading the nation with data and innovation. MPH partners who use Indiana data to positively impact the lives of Hoosiers will present their projects.

Presentations will run from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm in the North Atrium of the Statehouse. Food, refreshments, and data success stories will be shared.

Gendered Innovations: Lunch with Londa Schiebinger, MA, PhD

Dr. Londa Schiebinger will be on campus next week on Tuesday, March 6, to discuss The Secret Cures of Slaves as part of the History Talks! and IUPUI Diversity Speakers Series. In addition, she will present her work on Gendered Innovations over lunch.

This event is sponsored by the IUSM Office of Diversity Affairs. Lunch will be provided, so please be sure to register if you plan to attend! For more information or to register, click here.

Doing research wrong costs lives and money. For example, between 1997 and 2000, 10 drugs were withdrawn from the U.S. market because of life-threatening health effects. Eight of these posed ‘greater health risks for women than for men’ (U.S. GAO, 2001). Not only does developing a drug in the current market cost billions—but when drugs failed, they caused human suffering and death.

Gender bias also leads to missed market opportunities. In engineering, for example, considering short people (many women, but also many men) “out-of-position” drivers leads to greater injury in automobile accidents (see Pregnant Crash Test Dummies). In basic research, failing to use appropriate samples of male and female cells, tissues, and animals yields faulty results (see Stem Cells). In medicine, not recognizing osteoporosis as a male disease delays diagnosis and treatment in men (see Osteoporosis Research in Men). In city planning, not collecting data on caregiving work leads to inefficient transportation systems (see Housing and Neighborhood Design). We can’t afford to get the research wrong.

Doing research right can save lives and money. An analysis of the U.S. Women’s Health Initiative Hormone Therapy Trial, for example, found that for every $1 spent, $140 were returned to taxpayers in health care savings. The study also saved lives, adding 145,000 more quality-adjusted life years (Roth et al., 2014).

It is crucially important to identify gender bias. But analysis cannot stop there: Gendered Innovations offer state-of-the-art methods of sex and gender analysis. Integrating these methods into basic and applied research produces excellence in science, health & medicine, and engineering research, policy, and practice. The methods of sex and gender analysis are one set of methods among many that a researcher will bring to a project.

Londa Schiebinger, MA, PhD is the John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science at Stanford University. She currently directs the EU/US Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment project. She is a leading international expert on gender in science and technology and has addressed the United Nations on the topic of “Gender, Science, and Technology.” She is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize and Guggenheim Fellowship. Her work on Gendered Innovations harnesses the creative power of sex and gender analysis to enhance excellence and reproducibility in science and technology.  More info can be found here.

IUPUI Telematic Collective

View the original article by Tim Brouk.

Photo by Liz Kaye, IU Communications

Department of Music and Arts Technology graduate students Harry Chaubey and Arun Berty each traveled thousands of miles to continue their studies at IUPUI.

Both young men are technologically adept and avid music consumers. Creating and understanding music through the help of computer programs and electronic equipment was their next academic step, which made the School of Engineering and Technology program an easy choice.

But these students’ backgrounds and previous stops are as different as future bass and witch house. Chaubey came from Los Angeles. He was working in sound and composition studios when he decided to up his game. Berty traveled all the way from Chennai, India. He received an undergraduate degree in computer science from Sathyabama Institute of Science and Technology in southern India. He made a big change when he decided to pursue his love of music. Both students’ skills have been welcomed in the Department of Music and Arts Technology as well as in the Telematic Collective, a unique electronic music ensemble that performs original works regularly on campus.

“I wanted both of my interests to merge,” said Berty, who found IUPUI online after he finished his computer science degree. “That’s what put me here.”


Telematic Collective gets its name from the tradition of online collaboration during its live shows. Musicians from across the globe have been known to patch in and perform with the IUPUI musicians onstage within the Informatics and Communications Technology Complex. The group’s next concert is at 7:30 p.m. April 12 in ICTC Room 152.

And the collaboration isn’t limited to online talent. A typical Telematic experience will include original video work, live dancers from local organizations like the Ballet Theatre of Indiana and guest Indianapolis musicians. While most students in Telematic have laptops guiding their sounds, musicians have also been known to pick up a saxophone or guitar. The vibraphone is a staple, as it’s the instrument that faculty advisor Scott Deal specialized in during his previous academic career. Like his students, he was lured to IUPUI by the possibilities of electronic music and technological advancement.

“I was always doing crazy technology things,” said Deal, a professor of music arts and technology. “This was a natural next step.”

Like a rock song, a Telematic piece starts with a riff and a beat. A recent rehearsal saw Chaubey, Berty, fellow grad student Dustin Paugh, and undergraduates Sam Duncan and Charles Cheesman working on a piece. The tune was still being shaped as each student got his chance to work the riff or add their own notes. Deal was sitting in as well, but he confirmed to Inside IUPUI that every Telematic piece is written by the students.

“They bring their ideas; they engage the other students; and then we use all of these wonderful technological merging tools to create something that sounds new, fresh and original,” Deal said. “They get to work their creative chops in putting the music together.”

Telematic gained new members this semester, and they are using their time to master music-composition programs like Logic Pro X and equipment like the Native Instruments Maschine drum machine and Ableton Pushes. This device is a sequencer, piano, sampler and effects modulator all in one console about the size of a textbook.

And speaking of those antiquated things made of paper, textbooks don’t tell these tech-savvy musicians how to make an original instrumental work that could earn a live audience’s interest. Experimentation, improvisation and practice fuel the tunes.

“The possibilities are endless,” Chaubey said. “This technology is my instrument.”

Chaubey and Berty manned laptop keyboards and the more traditional keyboards in a musical setting. Berty said he’d been playing piano for several years and was happy to contribute to the ensemble. Each player brings a different expertise, making Telematic an always evolving and changing entity. Berty’s background will help construct technological feats yet to be explored in the group. Other Telematic members — currently 10 students — have had video experience, which helped improve the visual side of the collective.

“We look at this more as a working group,” Deal said. “It’s multidisciplinary.”

Telematic concerts are much more than students sitting in front of laptops for an hour. Video screens display imagery, the online collaborators and dancers contribute, and moody lighting adds to the atmosphere. The music itself is presented with expert live sound. After all, the Music and Arts Technology program pumps out dozens of sound engineers and studio producers every year.

Students work on pieces for months before they are debuted live. The works are usually several minutes long, allowing for live musicians and online artists to add their own flourishes.

“I came here specifically to learn these tools and to incorporate technology into my skill set,” said Paugh, who studied classical music and vocal performance at the University of Nebraska before coming to IUPUI. “This is more collaborative in nature. Everyone contributes their piece. There’s a give-and-take.”

While putting on a good show is important, making sure these students get jobs is crucial. Like his students’ varied backgrounds, Deal said, the degree in music and arts technology can start an array of different career paths. Most students go into the recording industry, including sales and performance. Some have tried their skills at electronic instrument design. Other students have gotten positions with lucrative companies, both music related and not.

“We had a student get a job at Spotify in San Francisco doing their programming,” Deal said. “One student got a job at Boeing doing audio things. He said his job is classified and he couldn’t tell me what exactly he was doing, but it does have to do with audio.”

IUPUI Human Library

View the original article.

Organizers of a Human Library at IUPUI are recruiting 75 Indianapolis-area residents who have faced discrimination to become “books” at an event that will challenge stereotypes and prejudices through dialogue.

The IUPUI Human Library, a campus-funded Welcoming Campus Initiative, will take place from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday, April 2, at the Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

People who would like to be a human book are asked to complete a form.

“The Human Library is a place where real people and their stories are ‘on loan’ to readers,” said Andrea Copeland, associate professor and chair, Department of Library and Information Science at the Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI, and lead organizer of the event. “It’s a place where difficult questions are expected, appreciated, and answered.”

The framework of a library is particularly appropriate, Copeland said: “People go to libraries in search of new knowledge. Usually, the knowledge vessel is a book. In this case, the knowledge vessel is a human.”

People who would like to volunteer to serve as books must be at least 18 years old. They are asked to answer why they would want to be a book, what types of discrimination they have faced based on status, and what the title and three possible chapters of their book would be. Human books will be expected to participate for at least two of the hours the Human Library will be open. When the human books are checked out, they will meet with a reader, or readers, for 30 minutes.

Volunteer human books will receive training on being a book, and readers will be given guidelines for respectful communication.

Students, faculty, and staff from the School of Informatics and Computing, the School of Liberal Arts, University Library, and the Indianapolis Public Library are working together to develop the event.

A large media arts screen featuring information about some of the books and an online human book catalog are being developed to help visitors select which books they would like to check out. Each book title will have a word that illustrates the form of discrimination the human book will discuss.