IAHI Announces the Publication of the Open Access Book Rivers of the Anthropocene

Rivers of the Anthropocene Book CoverThe IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the Rivers of the Anthropocene project is proud to announce the publication of Rivers of the Anthropocene. Published by University of California Press, Rivers of the Anthropocene is available in print and as an open access publication through Luminos at https://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520295025.

This exciting volume presents the work and research of the Rivers of the Anthropocene Network, an international collaborative group of scientists, social scientists, humanists, artists, policy makers, and community organizers working to produce innovative transdisciplinary research on global freshwater systems. In an attempt to bridge disciplinary divides, the essays in this volume address the challenge in studying the intersection of biophysical and human sociocultural systems in the age of the Anthropocene.

Featuring contributions from authors in a rich diversity of disciplines—from toxicology to archaeology to philosophy—this book is an excellent resource for students and scholars studying both freshwater systems and the Anthropocene.

Edited by Jason M. Kelly, Philip Scarpino, Helen Berry, James Syvitski, and Michel Meybeck, this volume emerged from a conference held at the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute. Contributors include Jeff Benjamin (PhD student, Columbia University); Helen Berry (Professor of History, Newcastle University); Tim Carter (President, Second Nature); Celia Deane-Drummond (Professor and Director of the Center for Theology, Science and Human Flourishing, Department of Theology, University of Notre Dame); Matt Edgeworth (Senior Project Officer for the Cambridge University Archaeology Unit; Honorary Research Fellow, University of Leicester); David Gilvear (Professor of River Science, Sustainable Earth Institute, Plymouth University); Stephanie C. Kane (Professor, Department of International Studies, Indiana University Bloomington); Jason M. Kelly (Director of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute; Associate Professor of History, IUPUI); Andy Large (Reader in River Science, School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, Newcastle University); Laurence Lestel (Researcher at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Ken Lubinski (Former Chief, River Ecology, U. S. Geological Survey, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center); Sina Marx (German Committee for Disaster Reduction, Bonn, Germany); Michel Meybeck (Emeritus Scientist at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Mary Miss (Founder, City as Living Laboratory); Dinah Smith (Honorary Visiting Fellow, Department of Geology, University of Leicester); Philip Scarpino (Director, Public History Program at IUPUI;  Professor of History, IUPUI); Eleanor R. Starkey (Researcher, School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University); Jai Syvitski (Executive Director of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System and Professor at University of Colorado, Boulder); Martin Thoms (Professor of River Science, Director of the Institute for Rural Futures, University of New England); Mark Williams (Professor of Palaeobiology, Department of Geology, University of Leicester); Jan Zalasiewicz (Professor of Palaeobiology, Department of Geology, University of Leicester).

New Residency Program Helps Create a More Welcoming Campus at IUPUI

Indianapolis SkylineThe IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute (IAHI) is pleased to announce the IAHI Welcoming Campus Artist Residency. Artists and designers are invited to apply for two residencies that will take place during 2018.

In consultation with the IAHI director and advisory team, residents will develop a public artwork for the IUPUI campus. They will also participate in studio visits and public programs.

The IAHI Welcoming Campus Artist Residency is part of the IUPUI Welcoming Campus Initiative, a program designed to transform IUPUI into a more inspiring destination for faculty, staff, students, and visitors.

The IAHI Welcoming Campus Residencies are funded by the IUPUI Welcoming Campus Fund, the School of Engineering and Technology, and the Office of the Vice President for Research. They are offered in collaboration with the City State residency program. City State is a collaboration of Central State Mansion, the IAHI, Ignition Arts, iMOCA, People for Urban Progress, and PRINTtEXT.

For more details about the IAHI Welcoming Campus Artist Residency and the application form, click here.

IAHI Grant Deadline

Blue Square

The IAHI Grant Program supports campus-wide attainment of excellence in research and creative activity in arts and humanities. It is designed to enhance the research and creative activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty. The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.

The next deadline is February 15, 2017.

To learn more about the grant program and how to apply, click here.

Award-winning Photographer Greg Constantine Visits Indianapolis on March 22

Dalit children from Nowhere PeopleJoin the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute for a presentation, discussion and book signing by award-winning photographer and Indianapolis native, Greg Constantine about his critically acclaimed photography book Nowhere People.

DATE: March 22
TIME: 7:00pm
LOCATION: IUPUI Campus Center Theater; 420 University Blvd.; Indianapolis, IN 46202
PARKING: Vermont St. Garage (1004 W. Vermont St.) or Barnhill Garage (345 Barnhill Dr.)
REGISTER FOR FREE TICKETS BELOW

Nowhere People is a ten-year project that documents individuals and ethnic communities around the world who have had their citizenship stripped or denied from them by governments (mostly because of discrimination, racism, and intolerance). These individuals—up to ten million worldwide—are denied almost all fundamental rights and do not have citizenship to any country and are stateless.

Nowhere People is the third and capstone book of the project and was published in November 2015.  The book was named a Notable Photo Book of the Year by Photo District News Magazine and was also named one of the 10 Best Photo Books of 2015 by Mother Jones Magazine.

Greg Constantine will talk about the book and present a slideshow of images from the project, which Mother Jones Magazine has described, as “among some of the best, most ambitious documentary projects of our time.”

BIO:

Greg Constantine is an independent documentary photographer originally from Carmel, IN. He has spent much of the past fifteen years living and working in Asia. In 2005, he began work on his long-term project, Nowhere PeopleConstantine has spent the past ten years documenting stateless communities in eighteen countries, including Bangladesh, Myanmar, Nepal, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Kenya, Ivory Coast, Dominican Republic, Ukraine, Serbia, Italy, Iraq, Kuwait and Lebanon. His work has been featured in various publications including the New York Times, International Herald Tribune, Newsweek, The Atlantic, The New Republic, CNN and Al-Jazeera.

Exhibitions of work from Nowhere People have been held in over twenty cities around the world. In 2011, a series of books from the Nowhere People project was released with the aim of not only chronicling and spreading more awareness of the plight of stateless people but also to help engage policy makers. Nowhere People is the third book in the series.

IAHI Grant Programs Workshop (February 8)

IAHI Grant Workshop LogoThis session will provide participants with an overview of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Grant Program. It will offer information on how to apply and, more importantly, on how to develop a competitive proposal. Faculty recipients and members of the grants’ advisory groups will be present to answer questions.

Date: February 8, 2016
Time: 5:00-6:30
Location: IAHI, IUPUI University Library, UL 4115P, 755 W. Michigan St.

This event is free, but please register here:

Reiberg Reading Series: Garth Greenwell (Feb. 18)

What Belongs to You Book CoverThe IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Department of English present the Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series featuring Garth Greenwell

Date: February 18, 2016
Time: 7:30-9:00 pm
Location: Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall, IUPUI, 735 W New York St, Indianapolis, IN 46202
Click here to get your free tickets

Garth Greenwell (born 1978) is an American poet, author, literary critic, and educator. His debut novel, What Belongs to You was published in the US by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in January 2016. What Belongs to You has been called the “first great novel of 2016” by Publishers Weekly. Of the book, the New York Times Book Review observes, “Mr. Greenwell writes long sentences, pinned at the joints by semicolons, that push forward like confidently searching vines. There’s suppleness and mastery in his voice. He seems to have an inborn ability to cast a spell.”

In 2013, Greenwell returned to the United States after living in Bulgaria to attend the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop as an Arts Fellow. He has published stories in The Paris Review and A Public Space and writes criticism for the New Yorker and The Atlantic.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series comes from the Reiberg family, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and the IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

Danicia Monet and Pamela Napier Talk about Good Design

Pamela Napier and Danicia MonetOutpost Indy and the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute invite you to join us for weekly one hour discussions on all things design and community in Indianapolis.

We will bring you experts from all over Indy to have real conversations on the state of our community as it pertains to connectivity, environmental awareness, and good design.

This week, Danicia Monet and Pamela Napier talk design.

Date: December 3, 2015
Time: 12-1 pm
Location: Outpost Indy at Circle Centre (across from H&M), 49 W. Maryland St.
Register for free

Danicia Monet: Danicia Monet is an Interaction Designer, challenging traditional urban planning and development ideas to encourage social commentary on people-centric culturally competent design.

Pamela Napier: Assistant Professor, Visual Communication Design, Herron School of Art and Design | IUPUI Co-founder & Design Strategist, Collabo Creative

So come on down to the Circle Centre Mall (yes we did say the mall), bring your lunch and join us to discuss how we can make Indy a cooler, more beautiful and greener place to live.

More Ask an Expert: Tuesdays on Monument Circle!

Ask an Expert with Gabe FilippeliIs it Tuesday? Is it lunchtime? Then come down to Monument Circle. Each week, you will get to meet university experts and ask them any question you want about their area of expertise. In exchange, our experts will ask you about your expertise. It’s always fun, and you never know what you’re going to learn.

Our upcoming Ask an Expert events are:

  • Art Therapy with Juliet King (15 September)
  • Christianity and Globalization with Joseph Tucker Edmonds (22 September)
  • Art and Anthropology with Fiona McDonald (29 September)
  • Women in Politics with Kristy Sheeler (6 October)
  • Science Fiction and Philosophy with Jason Eberl (13 October)

“Ask an Expert” was designed by the IAHI and the Kinetic Project. We are currently offering this program as a collaboration with Big Car and its SPARK: Monument Circle project.

Dr. Albert Schweitzer of Lambaréné and the United States of America: Philanthropy, Networks and Medicine in the 20th-Century

Albert SchweitzerDr. Hines Mabika, “Dr. Albert Schweitzer of Lambaréné and the United States of America: Philanthropy, Networks and Medicine in the 20th-Century”

Date: 13 August 2015
Time: 12-1pm
Location: IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute (4th floor of the IUPUI University Library, Room UL 4115P)
Free Registration (see below)

In 1949, the German-born Dr. Albert Schweitzer traveled to the United States. Famous for establishing a hospital in Lambaréné (Gabon) in the African rainforest, Life magazine had recently named him “The Greatest Man in the World.” And, in just a few years, he would receive the Nobel Prize. This trip to the United States was vital to Schweitzer’s larger project of building an international network of philanthropy that could sustain his work in Africa. Dr. Mabika’s talk will explore these transnational relationships and connections, revealing networks of individuals and institutions that included the Unitarian Church, prestigious universities, and pharmaceutical companies which provided him and his hospital with medicines.

Dr. Hines Mabika is Senior Research Associate of the Faculty of Medicine at Bern University, Switzerland. He has taught the history of medicine, colonial and postcolonial historiographies, and health network management. He holds a PhD in History from the University of Aix-en-Provence, France and an MBA in Health Network Management from Paul Cezanne University, France. He has served on the Faculties of Medicine at the University of Aix-Marseille, France and the University of Lausanne, Switzerland as well as the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Basel and University of Lausanne, Switzerland.

The Mirror of Landscape: An Interactive Discussion with Rebecca Allan and Jason M. Kelly

The Mirror of Landscape AdvertDate: June 4, 2015
Time: 7 pm
Location: DeBoest Lecture Hall, Indianapolis Museum of Art
Tickets are free and available here

Landscape painting has long provided humans with an artistic form for contemplating the relationship between nature, society, and culture. It is a profoundly engaging and intellectually powerful mode of expression that has served a host of purposes over the last 300 years — from buttressing social hierarchy to criticizing injustice to highlighting scientific discovery to expressing human hopes and anxieties.

In this interactive discussion, New York based artist Rebecca Allan and Dr. Jason M. Kelly, Associate Professor of History and Director of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, will engage the audience in a conversation about the role of landscape painting in mediating our relationship with the environment and with each other. We will explore five paintings, created between 1750 and 2015. The discussion will end in a visit to the IMA’s Pont-Aven gallery to examine Paul Gauguin’s Flageolet Player on the Cliff.

Presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project.