Scholarships Available for the 2015 Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching (HILT) Institute

We are pleased to announce that the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute will offer four full scholarships to the 2015 Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching (HILT) Institute which will take place on IUPUI’s campus from Monday, July 27th through Friday, July 31st.

To apply for the scholarship, please send a 1-2 page letter of application to by May 22. In the letter, clearly outline how attendance at the HILT Institute will assist you in your current or future research or professional development in the arts or humanities. Please attach a 2-page CV to the email.

All full-time tenured and tenure-eligible faculty from all schools and units at IUPUI are eligible to apply. Under certain circumstances, non-tenure-track faculty members whose evaluation criteria include research or creative activity may also be eligible with an explanation in a letter of support from their chair or dean.

Please see the list of courses below. For additional information and detail on the events and schedule, click here.

HILT 2015 is sponsored by the Center for Digital Scholarship at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library, the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland, and MATRIX: Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences at Michigan State University.     



led by Mia Ridge and Ben BrumfieldSuccessful crowdsourcing projects help organizations connect with audiences who enjoy engaging with their content and tasks, whether transcribing handwritten documents, correcting OCR errors, identifying animals on the Serengeti or folding proteins. Conversely, poorly-designed crowdsourcing projects find it difficult to attract or retain participants. This class will present international case studies of best practice crowdsourcing projects to illustrate the range of tasks that can be crowdsourced, the motivations of participants and the characteristics of well-designed projects. We’ll study crowdsourcing projects from the worlds of citizen science, investigative journalism, genealogy and free culture to look for lessons which might apply to humanities projects. We’ll discuss models for quality control over user-generated projects, explore the cross-overs between traditional in-house volunteer projects internet-enabled crowdsourcing, and look at the numbers behind real-world projects. Finally, the course will give students hands-on experience with several different crowdsourcing platforms for image annotation, manuscript transcription, and OCR correction. Students are encouraged to bring their project ideas and some scanned material for the lab sessions.


led by Roopika Risam and micha cárdenas

“…we must discuss, we must invent…”
—Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth

From Sandra Harding’s interventions in postcolonial science studies to Radhika Gajjala’s articulation of digital subalternity to Kavita Philip’s work on postcolonial computing, postcolonial approaches to technology have provoked lively discussion. New conversations have emerged around essential questions: can the digital be “decolonized?”; what are the limits of decolonial, postcolonial, or anti-colonial approaches to digital cultures?; and how can these theoretical approaches be marshaled to build communities, tools, and justice?Together, we will explore these questions at the intersections of theory and praxis as we consider how tools can be theorized, hacked, and used in service of decolonization. This course undertakes this task through three goals: 1) learning about, understanding, analyzing the history and present processes of colonization, decolonization, neocolonialism and the postcolonial, with attention to local, hemispheric and global contexts; 2) analyzing digital technologies, with attention to how they intersect with humanities disciplines such as art, literature and performance, and how they produce, reproduce or enact processes of colonization; and 3) inventing new and/or alternative technologies, or new uses of existing technologies, that work against colonization and post-colonial legacies that maintain social injustice.

Our days will be spent engaging with theory, hands-on experimentation, and reflection on practice. Theoretical topics may include digital labor, subalternity, embodiment, and aesthetics. Applied activities may include Scalar-based game design, mobile media/film/photography, digital exhibits, and mapping. In the spirit of our theoretical approach, we emphasize accessiblity and low-cost technology, as well as creativity and interpretation. Therefore, no prior experience with theory or practice is required, just an openness to discuss and invent the theories and practices of De/Post/Colonial Digital Humanities.


led by George Williams and Erin Templeton

In order to successfully reach a wide audience, digital projects must take into account the variety of potential users and their diverse needs.. Not everyone accesses information in the same way, though we often assume otherwise. For example, people with disabilities of many different kinds–sensory, physical, and cognitive–represent a significant percentage of users for many digital projects, but most of these projects are designed without thinking about accessibility. However, digital humanists can ensure that they are designing for all users by taking accessibility into account from the beginning of a project. And existing projects can be adapted to improve their accessibility.

This course will take a two-fold approach: students will read and discuss key works from disability studies scholarship in order to consider various applications for the digital humanities; these readings will form a critical framework for students’ hands-on work with tools that enable them to evaluate and create scholarly digital resources. Mornings will involve readings-based discussions on topics such as emerging standards for accessibility in digital environments, the social model of disability, user-centered design, and embodiment. Afternoons will be reserved for guided individual exercises and small-group work. Students are encouraged to bring their own projects or project ideas in order to evaluate them for accessibility and to make or plan changes as appropriate. Knowledge of and experience with web design is not required, but curiosity and a willingness to learn are a necessity.


led by Lee Skallerup-Bessette and Jesse Stommel

Many argue digital humanities is about building stuff and sharing stuff, reframing the work we do in the humanities as less consumptive and more curatorial—less solitary and more collaborative. In this workshop, participants will experiment with ways technology can be used to build learning communities within the classroom, while also thinking about how we can connect our students to a much larger global classroom. We’ll start at the level of the syllabus, thinking about how we organize and structure hybrid courses and digital assignments, before delving into specific tools and critical orientations to technology.

Participants should expect that the workshop will be hands-on, collaborative, and iterative; we will be using and building, experimenting with the pedagogy we are learning, making our learning environment as we go. The course has no prerequisites. We will work together across skill levels, experimenting with new tools, while adapting and remixing our pedagogies. This isn’t about digital tricks or gimmicks, but a profound re-examination of how we teach. The best digital tools inspire us, often to use them in ways the designer couldn’t anticipate. The worst digital tools attempt to dictate our pedagogies, determining what we can do with them and for whom. The digital pedagogue teaches her tools, doesn’t let them teach her.


led by Jarom McDonald

When YouTube launched to the public in 2005, the now-ubiquitous red play-button logo contained a simple yet powerful tagline, “Broadcast Yourself.” Inherent in such an imperative is a concept that’s at the core of this course — in today’s wired world, digital video is a powerful storytelling medium, one that can influence constructions of identity, community, culture, and the nature of narrative itself. In this course, we’ll explore the interactivity and narrative of digital video by positioning it as a tool for seeing, exploring, expressing and critiquing within the digital Humanities.

We will look at the various forms of dynamic storytelling, investigate the history of the video medium and what bearing it plays on the broadcast zeitgeist of today, explore formal techniques of digital storytelling including subjectivity, sequencing and transitioning, rhythm and repetition, interactivity, linearity, and meta-narration, tackle analytic tasks such as video annotation and video data analysis, and grapple with the physics of representing moving images in digital form. We will also emphasize, in addition to understanding the theories and specificities of digital video, how we might start acquiring production skills — including exposure to multimedia editing tools, working with codecs and compression, and, of course, leveraging online video dissemination channels such as YouTube. Ultimately, this class allows for students to begin to develop a critical perspective of engaging with digital video in the Humanities as a way to articulate fundamental, narrative-driven application of these rapidly changing paradigms.

Students will need to bring with them a new-ish laptop and a cell-phone (or other portable device) capable of shooting video, but no other equipment is needed nor knowledge assumed.


led by Brandon Locke, Thomas Padilla, and Dean Rehberger

Starting a digital humanities research project can be quite intimidating. This course is designed to make that process less so by exploring tools and platforms that support digital humanities research, analysis, and publication. We will begin by reframing sources as data that enable digital research. We will work throughout the week on approaches to (1) finding, evaluating, and acquiring (2) cleaning and preparing (3) exploring (4) analyzing (5) communicating and sharing data. Emphasis will be placed across all stages on how to manage a beginner digital research project in such a way that helps to ensure that your project remains accessible, that the process is well documented, and that the data are reusable.

Throughout this course, we will examine several existing projects, and move through the process of collecting, cleaning, and structuring humanities data and sources and plugging them into tools and platforms to analyze, visualize, share, and publish the data and analysis. Exploration of these stages of project-building will include a technical walk-through, as well as an examination of the tools and their underlying methodologies. Participants are strongly encouraged to bring their own research material to work with, but sample data will be provided.


led by Trevor Muñoz and Katie Rawson

This course is for people who have or are making textured, rich humanities data and want to be able to use, share, and preserve their information. We will take a multi-faceted approach to the challenges of curating data that integrates

* immediate, practical concerns of preparing, transforming, and analyzing data,
* strategic tasks of mapping data models and developing maintenance plans,
* and foundational thinking about the role of data curation in research.

We will move between hands-on work with data sets and tools to discussions about the nature of data curation. Working with the tools like IPython notebooks and OpenRefine and with open data sets in a variety of formats from institutions like the Metropolitan Museum and the Digital Public Library of America, we will explore topics such as defining data quality and identifying data problems; translating data models between different systems; developing best practices for data reuse and interchange. Participants will be able to use data from their own research or work with practice sets we will supply.

We ask that people who take this course have some experience using open source software, including reading technical documentation and help forums, and that they have a basic understanding of programming (e.g. what is a variable, some familiarity with loops, etc.). Please contact the instructors if you need guidance in attaining these prerequisites in time for HILT.


led by Brandon Walsh and Wayne Graham

This course focuses on introducing participants to humanities programming through the creation and use of the Ruby on Rails web application framework. This course will introduce programming and design concepts, project management and planning, workflow, as well as the design, implementation, and deployment of a web-based application. Technologies covered in this course will include git, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Ruby, Rails, and relational (and non-relational) data stores. Over the course of the week, we will work through the practical implementation of a developing and deploying a small-scale web application.


led by Mark Algee-Hewitt

Text mining, the practice of using computational and statistical analysis on large collections of digitized text, is becoming an increasingly important way of extracting meaning from writing. Whether working on survey data, medical records, political speeches or even digitized collections of historical writing, we are now able to use the power of computational algorithms to extract patterns from vast quantities of textual data. This technique gives us information we could never access by simply reading the texts. But determining which patterns have meaning and which answer key questions about our data is a difficult task, both conceptually and methodologically; particularly for those who work in the humanities who are able to benefit the most from these methods.

Large-Scale Text Analysis with R will provide an introduction to the methods of text mining using the open source software Environment “R”. In this course, we will explore the different methods through which text mining can be used to “read” text in new ways: including authorship attribution, sentiment analysis, genre studies and named entity extraction. At the same time, our focus will also be on the analysis and interpretation of our results. How do we formulate research questions and hypothesis about text that can be answered quantitatively? Which methods fit particular needs best? And how can we use the numerical output of a text analysis to explain features of the texts in ways that make sense to a wider audience?

While no programming experience is required, students should have basic computer skills and be familiar with their computer’s file system. Participants will be given a “sample corpora” to use in class exercises, but some class time will be available for independent work and participants are encouraged to bring their own text corpora and research questions so they may apply their newly learned skills to projects of their own.


led by Simon Appleford and Jennifer Guiliano

This course will explore the fundamentals of project planning and design including, but not limited to: formulating appropriate disciplinary questions for digital humanities research, investigating digital humanities tools and resources, structuring your first project, critical path scheduling, understanding roles and responsibilities, risk management, documenting your project work, writing your first grant proposal, budget setting and controls, building the project team, and selecting and implementing project management tools and software.

This is an advanced course and, as such, you are expected to have an understanding of the definition of digital humanities. Materials will be covered through lectures, discussions, presentations, and hands-on activities. Participants will get the most from the course if they arrive with at least some sense of a potential digital humanities project that they would like to develop throughout the week.

WONDER AND THE NATURAL WORLD: A Call for Grant Proposals

Logo for CSRES courtesy of News.iupui.eduCALL FOR GRANT PROPOSALS: Symposia, workshops, performances, and seminar series for departments, institutes, and research centers at all IU campuses
Deadline for submission: June 15, 2015
Awards announced by mid-July 2015

The IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society (CSRES) announces a grant competition on the theme of Wonder and the Natural World. Departments, research centers, and institutes across all IU campuses may apply for funds to support or supplement symposia, workshops, seminar series, performances, or small conferences during the 2015-2016 academic year that align with the Consortium’s two-year theme of Wonder and the Natural World. This call for proposals is part of a two-year thematic initiative sponsored by CSRES.

Wonder has been framed as a key moral disposition, as well as an aesthetic, emotional, or cognitive response; depending on its objects and orientation, it may display both salutary and sinister dimensions. Wonder at nature is prompted by the odd and uncanny, the strange and novel, the transcendent and sublime, as well as encounters with the monstrous and horrific. It has variously been associated with, or dissociated from, curiosity, awe, intimations of divinity, infinity, the sublime, the miraculous or supernatural, feelings of astonishment and puzzlement. We welcome projects that explore wonder or its cognate terms in relation to nature or the natural, broadly construed. Proposals should clearly relate the project to the announced theme.

Grants will be awarded in amounts up to $2500, $5000, and $7500 depending on the scope of the proposed project. Funds can be used for travel and honoraria for external speakers, as well as hospitality expenses in keeping with university regulations. IU faculty may not receive honoraria. Applications for funding should include:

• summary of the project (750 words max.)
• a list of invited presenters
• a detailed budget
• letter of support from department chair or school/unit dean (included with the application or emailed separately)
• evidence of other funding obtained or requested (for requests over $2000)

Questions about the grant competition, and complete grant proposals may be emailed to CSRES Director Lisa Sideris at

The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs, and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. Their mandate is to aid in the development of research and scholarship to better understand religion, ethics, values, and spirituality in society. An initiative of the IU Vice President for Research Office, CSRES is also supported by the Office of the President, The Office of the Executive Vice President and Chancellor, IUPUI, and the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington.

Popular Combat Paper workshops return to Herron School of Art and Design in November


Paper making at a combat paper workshop Image courtesy of Combat Paper project

This November, Drew Cameron will return to Herron School of Art and Design with his internationally successful Combat Paper workshops, where veterans or anyone touched by war may bring uniforms or other cloth to be turned into paper and then made into works of art.

Established in 2007, the Combat Paper Project has grown from its San Francisco base to an international phenomenon that has helped to heal war-torn people from Canada to Kosovo.

In his own post-combat search for meaning, Cameron, the project’s co-founder, discovered that papermaking could be a transformative process that broadens “the traditional narrative surrounding the military experience and warfare.” The workshops are returning to Indiana at the urging of Juliet King, director of Herron School of Art and Design’s Art Therapy Program.

With the support of faculty and students from bookbinding, other fine arts programs and art therapy, the workshops will take place on Thursday and Friday, November 6 and 7, at the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1410 Indiana Avenue, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Lunch will be provided from noon to 1:30 p.m.

Attendance is free, but reservations are required. Anyone interested in attending the workshops may reserve a seat by contacting Juliet King by email or by phone at 317-278-5466 by October 30.

Cameron also will be providing a lecture series to graduate art therapy students where they will engage in an interactive discussion on the similarities and differences between therapeutic art experiences such as Combat Paper and the clinical profession of art therapy.

Grant Writing Workshop: IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant Program

DATE: September 3, 2014
TIME: 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
LOCATION: IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Conference Room, University Library 4th Floor

This session will provide participants with an overview of the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant Program. It will offer information on how to apply and, more importantly, on how to develop a competitive proposal. Faculty recipients and members of the New Frontiers grants advisory groups will be present to answer questions.

Register here:

Digital Arts & Humanities Workshops for 2014-15


Digital Arts and Humanities Workshop LogoAre you interested in creating a professional blog but don’t know where to start? Have you ever wished that you had the skills to visualize your research data? Do you want to know how to use social media to share your work with the public? The Digital Arts and Humanities Workshop is a new series presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Center for Digital Scholarship. It will provide hands-on training in skills such as scholarly social media and blogging, data mining, data visualization, online exhibitions, and more. This year, our workshops are targeted to beginners, so please take this opportunity to plunge into the fascinating world of the digital arts and humanities. Workshop events are free to IUPUI faculty, research staff, graduate students, and local non-profit professionals. Space is limited, so be sure to reserve your place as soon as possible.


“Introduction to Data Visualization I: Visualization with Gephi” 9 September 2014, 12:00-2:30, UL 2120

Gephi is a popular open source program that facilitates network analysis and data visualization. It is a powerful tool used by universities and news organizations, including the New York Times. However, it can be a bit imposing for beginners. This workshop provides novices with a hands-on introduction to basic data visualization with Gephi. Attendees will become familiar with the Gephi interface and will emerge with basic of Gephi’s applications. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to basic research as well as teaching and public engagement. Register here:

“Introduction to Scholarly Blogging” 6 November 2014, 12:00-2:00, UL 2120

There is a robust and growing community of scholars who share their research through blogging platforms such as WordPress, Blogger, and Drupal. Not only is blogging a way to engage with the public, but it is becoming increasingly important in creating and sustaining scholarly networks and communication. By the end of this workshop, attendees will have a blog up and running on, and they will understand the fundamentals of sharing information, building networks, and engaging with the public. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to research, teaching, and public engagement. Register here:

“Introduction to Data Visualization II: Data Normalization for Network Analysis in Gephi” 16 September 2014, 12:00-2:30, UL 2120

Gephi is a popular open source program that facilitates network analysis and data visualization. It is a powerful tool used by universities and news organizations, including the New York Times. However, it can be a bit imposing for beginners. This workshop provides novices with a hands-on introduction to network analysis with Gephi. Network analysis allows researchers to analyze and visualize qualitative and quantitative relationships between objects, people, and groups. This workshop will focus on how to capture and organize data so that Gephi can visualize network relationships. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to basic research as well as teaching and public engagement. Register here:

“Introduction to TEI for the Digital Humanities” 11 February 2015, 12:00-2:30, UL 2120

The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) sets the standards for text-encoding, born-digital editing, and digital humanities projects.  It is the preferred format for granting agencies such as the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). TEI’s  guidelines define an XML format for textual materials represented in a digital form.

This workshop provides attendees with a hands-on introduction to basic text encoding with TEI. It assumes attendees have some basic knowledge of XML or other markup languages. Register here:

“Social Media for Scholars” 11 March 2015, 12:00-1:30, UL 2120

Twitter. Facebook. Instagram. Reddit. What do these platforms have to do with scholarly research? As it turns out, quite a bit. Scholars are turning to these platforms to expand the reach of their work — communicating with networks of specialists, students, and non-specialists alike. In this workshop, attendees will learn about the various social media platforms and how to use them in a scholarly capacity. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to research, teaching, and public engagement. Register here:



New Frontiers/New Currents Grant, Deadline Feb. 1, 2013

New Frontiers/New Currents Grant:

2013 Deadlines: February 1 and August 1 (and within 6-12 months of the date of the anticipated conference or seminar)

Funding of up to $20,000 is available for New Currents programs, specifically workshops, symposia, small conferences, roundtables that offer new perspectives on, and new insights into, areas of scholarship and research in the arts and humanities.  The goal of this initiative is to host major distinguished thinkers on timely topics of significant and broad interest to the arts and humanities community and beyond, with funding preference provided to those topics more likely to have interdisciplinary interest across the arts and humanities. While presentations or participation by Indiana University faculty as part of the funded project are welcome, the majority of speakers/participants should be drawn from the outside academic community, and all speakers/participants should be nationally recognized. Written commitments by all participants in the event must be provided with the proposal.

Key to this funding initiative is dissemination, certainly including but also beyond the Indiana University community. Thus, contractual evidence for publication/dissemination of proceedings (with contributions by conference participants) as appropriate for the discipline and event is required for funding through this mechanism (see bullets below).

Application Format:

Proposals for New Currents Grants must be submitted no later than six months before the anticipated date of the event and no earlier than a year before the event, at All proposals must include:

  • a project description (3 page maximum)
  • list of confirmed speakers and rationale for their selection (2 page maximum)
  • project budget submitted using the Work on your budget function on the online application form
  • budget justification for funds requested • up-to-date c.v.(s) of proposer(s) (3 page maximum)
  • two letters of support: one from department or unit head and an additional letter from an expert in the field, not necessarily from Indiana University, assessing the significance and innovation of the project and the likelihood of its impact and success
  • a letter confirming participation from all internal and external participants
  • contractual evidence of significant dissemination, reflecting the importance placed upon dissemination for this initiative. Such evidence might include:
  • agreement with an outside publisher for publication of the conference proceedings,
  • agreement/contract with a gallery or concert facility for a presentation of a concert or gallery show outside of Indiana University with accompanying program notes,
  • agreement/contract for webinars or other new media forms of dissemination,
  • agreement/contract for publication of a themed issue of a scholarly journal
  • similar evidence as that listed above appropriate to the discipline and event.
  • Costs associated with dissemination (including publication costs) cannot be included in the budget proposal.

Recipients of funding are required to submit a brief interim report within one month after the completion of the meeting portion of the project, and a brief final report following the dissemination portion of the project. Failure to do so will preclude eligibility for future internal funding from the programs.